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How to read comic books on your computer

Speed reading is a technique that allows the reader to save time while also grasping the underlying concept or theme in the text. Although speed reading can obviously be applied to reading books or newspapers, many comic lovers question the ability to speed read comics while also enjoying the message that the illustrations are meant to convey. In the 21st century, comics are no longer seen as simply a means of entertainment, but have been defined as an important marketing tool in this technology-driven era whereby visual impact can easily convey the mission statement of the organization or the core purpose of its product and services.

Comic lovers and readers of comic books and graphic novels have more and more publications available both in paper and online, and are usually eager to zip through the latest release to get ready for the next one. Speed reading can allow them to do so; all they need to do is employ a few simple and effective tips. Illustrations present within the comics are a powerful tool and a quick look at the illustrations allows the reader to understand the situation surrounding the characters. Comic readers should focus on reading the text silently rather than vocalizing, as saying the words out loud can slow down the reading speed.

Moreover, comic books and graphic novels tend to extend the entire scenario over several illustrations, often on the same page, and it is therefore recommended that the reader learn to skip over those illustrations that are not deemed to be important. A simple glance at each picture can allow you to gauge whether it’s worth reading or is simply an extension of the previous illustration. This technique, known as skimming, can allow you to speed read entire comic books in a matter of minutes.

Another technique to speed read comics is to avoid rereading the text. Many readers tend to go back to the last illustration and reread the entire text. This merely slows down the reading process. To keep up reading speed, you must force your mind to read forward rather than drift back to the previous illustration.

Speed reading comics is entirely possible; all you need to do is practice a bit based on the techniques described above.

How to read comic books on your computer

Comic books as a medium seem tailor-made for tablets, even if the timeline doesn’t precisely add up. But there are a surprising amount of comic reading applications meant for old-fashioned desktop machines, too. This stuff comes in handy for gadgets that blur the lines, like the Microsoft Surface, or for someone who’s amassed a large collection of DRM-free comic book files.

MComix: Windows, Linux

If you’re looking for a simple, easy-to-use comic reader with enough features to give you some extra bells and whistles, MComix should probably be your first stop. It’s free and open source, based on the older and now abandoned Comix reader project, regularly updated for Windows and Linux. If it had a macOS version, we might just be able to end this article right here.

How to read comic books on your computer

The interface has a basic library function, but it’s easier to simply open your files (CBR, CBZ, and PDF, among more pedestrian image formats) directly from your computer’s file explorer. The reading view makes it easy to find your page with thumbnails along the left side, and various fit modes along with a full screen view are handy in both button and hotkey flavors. The reader supports double-page views to best emulate comic reading, and a right-to-left mode for those who prefer manga to western-style comics.

The download comes as a standalone package, so you don’t even need to install anything, though you might want to associate some of the more common comic file types with MComix soon after trying it out.

YACReader: Windows, macOS, Linux

If you live a multi-OS lifestyle and you prefer some cross-platform consistency, YACReader is probably your best bet. It supports all of the common file types and archives, with a focus on building up an extensive and well-organized library of personal comics. The application will automatically fetch tags and issue data from the ComicVine database, and those who are keen on sharing with friends can install the UI-free server version to remotely host comics on iOS.

How to read comic books on your computer

The application is available on Windows in both installer and portable flavors, plus 64-bit macOS and various Linux distro versions. The interface itself is a bit minimal for my taste, but it quickly disappears if you’re reading in full screen anyway. Sadly, though YACReader plays nice with all three major desktop platforms and can remotely serve files to iOS, there’s no Android client as of yet.

Comicrack: Windows

Though ComicRack comes in Android and iOS flavors, it’s Windows-only on the desktop. Which is weird, because it’s one of the more technical and analytical options out there. The tabbed interface supports reading multiple books at once, and its double-pane main view focuses on the user’s library or standard file browsing more than some of the other programs on this list. But for the comic enthusiast who’s serious about managing a large collection, this could be the best option.

How to read comic books on your computer

Once you dig into ComicRack, you see it’s a little more forgiving than it appears at first glance, with a double- and triple-column option and a handy all-in-one page view. Double-tapping the F button will switch from standard fullscreen view to a minimalist windowed look—good for reading while you keep an eye on something else on your computer. It also functions as the most feature-rich viewer when used as a pure file manager.

SimpleComic: macOS

How to read comic books on your computer

SimpleComic uses the fluid, and integrated user interface that was popular with mid-aughts OS X design to create what’s probably the simplest comic reader around. Though it supports all the common archive formats and includes the usual bells and whistles like double-page display and right-to-left reading, it does so with a minimal interface that will make you nostalgic for a Steve Jobs software demo. It’s probably the simplest and best-looking item on this list (with no particular care for libraries or tagging), so it’s a pity that the developer has only released a macOS version.

MangaMeeya: Windows

How to read comic books on your computer

While you can certainly use MangaMeeya for western comics, it’s designed specifically for Japanese-style manga. This focus extends to more than just the right-to-left default page layout: the image display includes various tools that make black-and-white scans more visible and legible on computer screens, something that isn’t typically a concern for full color graphic novels. That specialization does seem to be a bit of a detriment for those looking for wider image file support or library tools, though—you’ll have to keep your files organized manually in Windows Explorer. On that note, it’s only available for Windows, more’s the pity.

Comic CBR, CBZ Viewer: Chrome

How to read comic books on your computer

The Chrome Web Store isn’t exactly littered with dedicated comic viewers, but this seems to be the best among a very short field of contenders. The minimal interface can load up CBR or CBZ archive files wither from your personal Google Drive account or on your local machine. The super-simple interface offers one- or two-page views with standard or right-to-left reading, with the fullscreen option controlled by the browser itself. Like many Chrome extensions, this one is supported by advertising, and there’s no way to pay to get rid of the web-based ads. The extension will work on Chrome OS devices and more standard desktops, but with the options laid out above, there’s really no reason to use it on anything but a Chromebook.

Reading and organizing a comic book collection on your computer is efficient and a lot of fun. Today we will look at a couple of free applications that allow you to read your favorite comic books on your computer.

Using CDisplay

One of the most well known comic book readers is CDisplay, which has a simple interface with several options to allow the best viewing… just browse to the comic you want by going to File Load file.

How to read comic books on your computer

CDisplay does a great job of displaying comics with settings such as a black background to make it easy on your eyes.

How to read comic books on your computer

Go to Options Configure or just hit “C” to go in and change viewing features. Keyboard Ninja’s will appreciate the many hotkey combinations.

How to read comic books on your computer

Using ComicRack

Another great choice is ComicRack which actually has more viewing features than CDisplay. While reading a comic you can easily change setting by right clicking on a page to pull up the menus.

How to read comic books on your computer

Switching pages is easy with a pop up menu that scrolls to different pages in the comic.

How to read comic books on your computer

You can go in and change the page order of the comic under Preferences.

How to read comic books on your computer

You can keep up with the latest builds and other ComicRack news.

How to read comic books on your computer

ComicRack also includes programmable hotkeys as well.

How to read comic books on your computer

These are just some of the features of ComicRack. Other features include creating reading lists, using ComicRack as a PDF viewer, information overlays, color adjustment, and other options to manage a comic library.

If you are just starting off with eComics here are a few places to get them free or cheap.

How to read comic books on your computer

With Infinity War, Black Panther, and Deadpool 2 dominating the box office, it’s a great time to start reading comic books. Windows 10 doesn’t have a large number of choices, but the ones that are available do their job very well.

Cover

How to read comic books on your computer

Cover is a lightweight UWP comic book reader. It supports a number of formats, including CBZ/ZIP, CBR/RAR, 7Z/CB7, CBT, PDF, and EPUB. The app doesn’t contain any comics when you download it but if the comics you purchase are DRM-free and in one of those formats, you can read it in Cover.

Cover also has an easy import feature that lets you bring your entire library of comics into the app. You can choose to store those comics directly on your PC or in the cloud, so you don’t take up valuable space on your PC.

It’s free to download cover but the unpaid version is limited to viewing 25 comic books. If you want to fully unlock the app and manage as many books as you’d like, it costs $3.99.

CDisplay Ex

How to read comic books on your computer

CDisplay Ex isn’t available through the Microsoft Store, but you can download it on your PC through their website.

It doesn’t have the modern interface of Cover, but it supports all the standard comic book formats and doesn’t take much power to run, though it’s worth pointing out that I couldn’t get PDFs to work in my testing. It opened a CBR book just fine.

You can install plugins to visualize the covers of each issue and CDisplay Ex has a tool built in that helps scans of older comics become more readable. You can also configure keyboard shortcuts to help you navigate the app.

CDisplay Ex is a throwback to an older version of Windows but has been in the comics industry for a long time, so it’s worth a look. It’s also free.

Comixology within Edge

How to read comic books on your computer

Comixology shut down its Windows app years ago, but you can still access your content on your Windows 10 device. Reading comics through Comixology’s site isn’t the same as using a native app, but it still delivers a good experience. You can only stream comics from the website, meaning you can’t download them and read them when you’re away from the web. This could be a deal breaker for some, but if you mostly read comics while relaxing at home or somewhere you have WiFi, then it isn’t as big of an issue.

The benefit of using Comixology on the web is that you have access to any content you’ve already purchased or subscribed to through Comixology. Their library of content is massive, and Comixology Unlimited gives you access to a vast catalog without breaking the bank. The best way to read these comics from Comixology would probably be on a tablet with a dedicated app, but if you already have a subscription, you can easily jump into an issue of your favorite series on your PC.

While Comixology works on any browser, Edge has a nice full-screen mode and is touch-friendly, making your comic reading experience a bit more immersive.

There are free comics available on Comixology but for more content you can either buy individual issues or get a subscription to a series or Comixology Unlimited, the latter of which costs $5.99 per month.

Summing things up

Unfortunately for Windows 10 users, there aren’t as many options for reading comics as you see for other categories of apps. That being said, the options that are available work well and cover a wide range of content. Whether you want a native UWP app, a classic Windows app, or to view your comics within your browser, there’s a solution for you.

What are your favorite comics and how do you read them? Let us know in the comments below.

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How to read comic books on your computer

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How to read comic books on your computer

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How to read comic books on your computer

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How to read comic books on your computer

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How to read comic books on your computer

Disclaimer: This site contains affiliate links from which we receive a compensation (like Amazon for example). But they do not affect the opinions and recommendations of the authors.

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Like many news outlets our publication is supported by ad revenue from companies whose products appear on our site. This revenue may affect the location and order in which products appear. But revenue considerations do not impact the objectivity of our content. While our team has dedicated thousands of hours to research, we aren’t able to cover every product in the marketplace.

For example, Wise Bread has partnerships with brands including, but not limited to, American Express, Bank of America, Capital One, Chase, Citi, Discover, and Amazon.

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I was a big X-Men fan in middle and high school, and for several years, I made my monthly trek to the comic book store to buy all of the new titles in the X-Men universe. And oh, there were a lot of them: Uncanny X-Men, X-Men, X-Force, X-Factor, Excalibur, Cable, Wolverine. plus miniseries following characters like Gambit, Domino, and Rouge.

As I grew older, I stopped reading X-Men; the story lines weren’t really grabbing me anymore, but moreover, keeping up with several comic books each month was becoming a rather pricey hobby.

Like most things, comics have only gotten more expensive over time — until recently, the two major comics publishers, Marvel and DC, were both selling individual issues for $3.99. In late 2010, both publishers wised up to the fact that the high cover prices were hurting them, and announced that they would change prices on most titles to $2.99.

Still, $2.99 is too expensive to make me resume monthly comic shop trips. I did, however, start reading comics again in the last few years. One of my friends had recommended Joss Whedon’s run writing Astonishing X-Men. I picked up the trade paperbacks on sale at a store that was going out of business, and I was impressed by the sharp, funny take on characters I had loved as a kid, written for a more mature audience. That’s when I realized that not only do I still really enjoy reading comic books, but there are plenty of ways to do so that are much cheaper than making those monthly comic-shop pilgrimages.(See also: 5 Ways to Read Free Books on Any Smartphone)

I’ve detailed a few methods for enjoying free or reduced-price comic books below. One note I will make about most of these methods, however, is that you need to be OK with not be completely up-to-date on story lines. If you can wait until issues are republished as trade paperbacks or are interested in catching up on older titles, though, these ways to read comic books for free will work well for you.

1. Visit the Library

You might be surprised by how many comic books your local library carries. Here in Philadelphia, the Free Library has several graphic novels in its catalog, from classic superhero tales like Alan Moore’s Watchmen and the X-Men Dark Phoenix Saga to true-life tales like Maus and The Complete Persepolis to relatively recent titles and collections like Runaways, Scott Pilgrim, and Batman: Year 100.

2. Use Your Computer or Mobile Device

There are so many ways to read comic books for free or cheaply in the digital realm:

  • Visit your favorite publisher’s website. Marvel has its own digital section, and several publishers including DC and Image offer digital comics through Comixology. Some are free, while others are available for slightly lower than the price of the paper comic.
  • Read independent comics. Several independent comic artists and writers publish their work online for free, ranging from newspaper-style comic strips to ever-growing sci-fi tales. The Webcomic List has listings for “over 17,500 online comics” and lets you browse by genre.
  • I haven’t used it myself, but e-book site WOWIO offers some free comic books for download, as well as a program where their “sponsors hope to earn your business by covering the cost of your books.”
  • The multi-platform comic-book reader Graphic.ly offers some free comics on its site.

3. Trade in Old Comics

Many comic book shops will accept trade paperbacks or graphic novels that you’ve already read in exchange for store credit. Note that this doesn’t really work for individual issues; unless you have remarkably old or notable comics, it’s unlikely that your local comic shop will take them — another reason for you to not buy by-the-issue in the first place.

4. Buy Trades on Sale

The same comic book shops that will buy your used trades also sell them (who would’ve thought?) for less than the cover price. If you absolutely must get your trades and graphic novels new, keep an eye out for sales at comic book shops, or search for your desired comics on a site like Amazon, which often sells new books for less than their printed price.

5. Celebrate Free Comic Book Day

This is not a long-term solution, but it can be a fun event: The first Saturday in May each year, several comic-book publishers offer specially published Free Comic Book Day comics totally gratis at comic book stores across the country. It’s an especially great event for kids.

6. Borrow

Not only is borrowing comics from friends free, but it’s also a great way to get recommendations for new titles. One of my friends lent me the first five collections of Alan Moore’s Saga of the Swamp Thing, a title that I never would have considered reading otherwise, but now love.

Are you a comic-book reader? If so, do you have any other suggestions for reading comics on the cheap?

Disclaimer: This site contains affiliate links from which we receive a compensation (like Amazon for example). But they do not affect the opinions and recommendations of the authors.

Wise Bread is an independent, award-winning consumer publication established in 2006. Our finance columns have been reprinted on MSN, Yahoo Finance, US News, Business Insider, Money Magazine, and Time Magazine.

Like many news outlets our publication is supported by ad revenue from companies whose products appear on our site. This revenue may affect the location and order in which products appear. But revenue considerations do not impact the objectivity of our content. While our team has dedicated thousands of hours to research, we aren’t able to cover every product in the marketplace.

For example, Wise Bread has partnerships with brands including, but not limited to, American Express, Bank of America, Capital One, Chase, Citi, Discover, and Amazon.

Sometimes it may be hard to find some of your favorite comic books locally and perhaps you really don’t have the space for them or the cash to spare at the moment. Luckily, finding them online is possible! Whether it’s Marvel comics you’re looking for or some manga from abroad, the internet has you covered.

However, it can be quite risky to go searching around the internet for just about anything, especially if you don’t know where to look or how to protect your computer in the process. Before you set out on your venture, ensure the security of your data by using an anti-virus program and a Virtual Private Network (VPN). A VPN service allows you to unblock websites, safely surf the net over public WiFi, and anonymize your internet experience while also protecting your device from malware.

There are several different websites where you can read your favorite comic books online, many of which may not be well-known or particularly trustworthy. But now that you’re aware of how to protect your device, here are a few places you can find some of your favorite comic books available for your enjoyment 24/7.

How to read comic books on your computer

Hello Comic!

If what you fancy is Marvel or DC Comics, Hello Comic! has just about the best selection of comic books for you. With ongoing updates and a huge list of comics available on their site, Hello Comic! offers high quality scans of a ton of great comics. The best thing is, all of their content is entirely free.

Walking Dead fans, you might want to make your way over to their page, as they have two pages worth of issues of the The Walking Dead right now and more to come.

Crunchyroll

Though a monthly fee of $6.95 applies, Crunchyroll is well worth it. Not only does Crunchyroll have a selection of manga to choose from, but shows as well. Like Hello Comic!, Crunchyroll also features regular updates, allowing you to stay current with some of your favorites.

The only downside is that the manga section is fairly limited in what titles are offered. However, Crunchyroll is still a great choice since they also feature a good amount of shows to choose from and you can even browse through it on your game consoles, such as the Wii U or Playstation 4. Forums, news, and an online store is also available.

How to read comic books on your computer

GetComics.info

If you prefer to download comics instead of viewing them on the website itself, GetComics.info is the page for you! GetComics.info offers a wide selection of comics, including several from both DC and Marvel. They also have a variety of comics by other publishers, such as Dark Horse.

GetComics.info offers all of their comic books for free and even allows you to request specific ones if you choose. Their search feature on their site also makes it simple to find what you’re looking for. Just be sure that you have your security software in use when visiting their page, as all of their comics are available for download only and you will need a specific app in order to view them.

MyManga

For the manga lovers, MyManga is an appealing choice. Featuring a huge selection of manga titles and even new releases, MyManga offers something for just about everyone. There are no downloads required and on their website you can easily flip through the pages of each manga by using the arrow keys on your keyboard.

If you don’t have much time to spare, you can quickly find your favorite manga by using the search bar on MyManga’s page. And if you’re looking for something new or want to check out some of the most popular manga, it’s simple to do so. One unique feature of this webpage is that you can create a My Manga List, which will allow you to keep track of what you’re reading.

Read Away!

Keeping up to date with your favorite comics (manga included) doesn’t always have to cost you an arm and a leg. Of course it’s always nicer to have a physical copy, but for those times when you really can’t spare the extra cash or clear up any shelf space to fit any new additions, reading them online is a nice alternative. Let’s keep in mind too, that certain comics are really hard to come by and you might get lucky and find that rare issue on one of the websites mentioned.

Whatever your reason for seeking ways to read your favorite comic books online, always remember to protect your device before you begin visiting any new websites or downloading comics. You’ll be thankful that you did!

What are some of your favorite comic books and have you been able to find them available to read online? Let us know in the comments section.

Whether you’re at New York Comic Con or home sitting on your duff, it’s always a good time to fire up Comixology. These tips will help you make the most of your time with the digital comic book app.

How to read comic books on your computer

New York City-based, Amazon-owned Comixology burst on the scene in 2007 with a novel idea: bring digital comic books to mobile devices.

Comixology isn’t the only company to make that move, but it’s become the most successful, with thousands of American comics, manga, trade paperbacks, and graphic novels available for purchase. In fact, Comixology even serves as the home for platform-exclusive digital comics from a variety of publishers.

So, what makes Comixology attractive to creators and its user base? The service offers digital versions of print comics on the same day as physical releases, many money-saving sales, excellent mobile apps that include the incredibly useful Guided View technology, and the ability for independents to self publish.

Although those are features that I deeply appreciate, Comixology’s most attractive aspect, in my opinion, is the breadth of its library.

I own Amazing Fantasy #15 (the first appearance of Spider-Man) and The Incredible Hulk #1 (the first appearance of the big, gray/green guy), which were published before I was born. Comixology also has EC Comics’ 1950s-era Tales from the Crypt series, as well as Jack Kirby and Joe Simon’s 1940s-era Young Romance titles. There are holes in the catalog, sure, but Comixology is a one-stop-shop for those who want to explore comic book history.

It should come as no surprise, then, that I’ve spent a ridiculous amount of time using Comixology. As a result, I know the platform quite thoroughly, and have accumulated valuable Comixology knowledge to pass on to those who are new to the platform. Below, you’ll find valuable tips that will show you how to execute many Comixology-enhancing actions, including managing your collection and gifting others with digital comics. But, more importantly, enjoy those comics!

Time Your Comic Book Purchases

There is never a bad time to buy digital comics, but a well-timed purchase can save you significant shekels. Comixology has sales popping off all the time, so with a little foresight and planning, you can take advantage of deep discounts to nab your favorite titles on the cheap.

For example, Comixology frequently has sales tied to the release of comic book-based movie or television programs. For example, when Captain America: Civil War hit theaters in May 2016, Comixology had an accompanying sale that I used to fill in holes in my Cap comic collection. And, like Valve’s infamous Steam sales, Comixology has across-the-board sales during Black Friday and the holiday shopping season.

These deals are listed in the homepage slider, so they’re difficult to miss. Check ’em out.

Subscribe to Your Favorite Titles

Say you discover a series that you really, really enjoy. Instead of manually purchasing issues as they’re released, you can simply subscribe to a series. You do so by visiting one of the Comixology issue pages dedicated to the series and clicking the big Subscribe icon. Now, you need not worry about missing a future issue.

Please note that subscribing to a series only promises that you’ll purchase upcoming issues. If you subscribed to a series after it began, you must manually purchase the earlier issues.

Gorge a Comic Book Buffet

Sync Your Comixology and Marvel Accounts

Comixology has a digital comic book platform. Marvel has a digital comic book platform. You can make them dance together. Connect the two accounts by visiting comixology.com/marvel-sync and logging in with your Marvel credentials. By doing so, any digital comics codes you redeem at marvel.com/redeem make their respective books appear in your Comixology account.

Archive Unwanted Comics

Comixology doesn’t let you delete comics you don’t like, but you can hide them! Selecting the Archive option associated with any of the comics in your collection will make a book disappear from your Smart Lists.

If you want to remove those books from Archives and return them to the Smart Lists, click My Books > Archive and select the Unarchive option associated with a particular book.

Download DRM-Free Backups

Did you know that Comixology lets you download titles to your computer, so you can read them without first logging into your account? From the Comixology.com home screen (yes, you can only do it via the company’s website), click My Books > Backups. Once there, you’ll see purchased books that are available for download in CBZ or PDF form.

Unfortunately, DC and Marvel want no part of this, as the comic book titans likely see it as something that promotes illegal distribution. On the upside, Archie, IDW, Image, and Valiant are just four of the publishers that support DRM-free backups.

Once you’ve downloaded your books, you can read them in your favorite digital comic book reader.

Activate Instant Checkout

By default, Comixology prompts you to add a book to the shopping cart and then select a payment method before hitting the big old Buy icon. But you can ditch those steps by enabling Instant Checkout by visiting Username > My Account > Billing.

Once you do that, a Buy Instantly icon appears under each book listing in the Comixology store. Click that, and you own the book.

Quickly Browse Pages

Sometimes you’ve just got to flip back to a page you’ve already read due to a shocking moment, story revelation, or some other plot point. Now, you can’t technically flip digital comic book pages, but you can quickly browse them.

If you’re on a mobile device, you can do so by swiping pages left or right. On the desktop, you can do so by pressing the left or right arrow keys on your keyboard, or by clicking the Browse icon and clicking a page thumbnail.

Give an eGift Card

Altruism is a good thing. If you have a comic book fan in your life who you’d like to bless with the gift of digital comic book, consider a Comixology eGift Card.

You begin by clicking the eGift link on the homepage, and then selecting an eGift Card. You can pick any of the preselected amounts that range from $10 to $100—or key in an amount of your choosing. After that, type the recipient’s email address and select a delivery day. Boom! You’ve given the gift of comics!

More Digital Comics Stories

If you dug these Comixology tips and are hungry for more digital comics goodness, check out these stories:

How to Read Comic Books and Manga on your Kindle?

The iPad has been toted as the ultimate comic book reader, but that doesn’t mean your can’t give it a run for its money with your Kindle. Here’s how to optimize and transfer your comic books and manga to your Kindle.

Sure, tablets may have big colorful screens, which are undoubtedly better for most comic books. But the Kindle’s e-ink screen has its place. You can read it at night without straining your eyes, you can read it outdoors in direct sunlight, and its battery is absolutely killer. Its screen may be small, but for manga and other black and white comics, it’s a perfect little device.

Unfortunately, the Kindle can’t read common CBR and CBZ files out of the box. However, there is a handy tool called Kindle Comic Converter on Windows, macOS, and Linux that can convert your comics to a Kindle-friendly format, and optimize them so you get the best reading experience possible. (Note: despite its name, Kindle Comic Converter can also optimize books for Kobo, Nook and other ereaders.)

Step One: Convert Your CBR and CBZ Files for the Kindle

To get started, download Kindle Comic Converter and start it up on your computer. To add a CBR/CBZ file (or group of files), click the “Add File” button.

Choose your file from the list. You can hold Ctrl or Shift to select multiple files.

You should see a list of files ready to be converted in the program’s window.

From there, choose your ereader from the dropdown on the left (I’m using a Kindle Paperwhite 3), and it should pre-select your options for you. You can adjust certain things if you need to (like “Manga Mode”, if the comic in question is read right-to-left). Just mouse over any of the other options to see what they do.

When you’re ready, click the Convert button.

The conversion may take a while depending on how many files you have selected. Once it’s finished, you should find your converted files in the same folder as the source files.

Step Two: Copy Your Comics to Your Kindle

If you’ve ever copied a book to your Kindle before, the next step should be familiar. Plug your Kindle into your computer using its USB cable. Open up your computer’s File Explorer and navigate to the newly-mounted Kindle drive.

Just drag your new comic files (which will likely be in MOBI or AZW3 format, unless you’re using another ereader) to your device—on my Kindle, I’ve put them on the “documents” folder. Eject your Kindle, and you should see that they appear in your reading list!

Here’s what you can expect comics to look like on your device. We selected Scott Pilgrim because the extremely simple and high-contrast line art used in the series is a good indicator of what Manga-style artwork, in general, will look like:

Looks fantastic, right? It’s easy to read, the line art and dialog bubbles are crisp. And the newer the Kindle you have, the better it will look.

For comparison, here’s a page from Escape from Wonderland:

How to read comic books on your computer

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I was a big X-Men fan in middle and high school, and for several years, I made my monthly trek to the comic book store to buy all of the new titles in the X-Men universe. And oh, there were a lot of them: Uncanny X-Men, X-Men, X-Force, X-Factor, Excalibur, Cable, Wolverine. plus miniseries following characters like Gambit, Domino, and Rouge.

As I grew older, I stopped reading X-Men; the story lines weren’t really grabbing me anymore, but moreover, keeping up with several comic books each month was becoming a rather pricey hobby.

Like most things, comics have only gotten more expensive over time — until recently, the two major comics publishers, Marvel and DC, were both selling individual issues for $3.99. In late 2010, both publishers wised up to the fact that the high cover prices were hurting them, and announced that they would change prices on most titles to $2.99.

Still, $2.99 is too expensive to make me resume monthly comic shop trips. I did, however, start reading comics again in the last few years. One of my friends had recommended Joss Whedon’s run writing Astonishing X-Men. I picked up the trade paperbacks on sale at a store that was going out of business, and I was impressed by the sharp, funny take on characters I had loved as a kid, written for a more mature audience. That’s when I realized that not only do I still really enjoy reading comic books, but there are plenty of ways to do so that are much cheaper than making those monthly comic-shop pilgrimages.(See also: 5 Ways to Read Free Books on Any Smartphone)

I’ve detailed a few methods for enjoying free or reduced-price comic books below. One note I will make about most of these methods, however, is that you need to be OK with not be completely up-to-date on story lines. If you can wait until issues are republished as trade paperbacks or are interested in catching up on older titles, though, these ways to read comic books for free will work well for you.

1. Visit the Library

You might be surprised by how many comic books your local library carries. Here in Philadelphia, the Free Library has several graphic novels in its catalog, from classic superhero tales like Alan Moore’s Watchmen and the X-Men Dark Phoenix Saga to true-life tales like Maus and The Complete Persepolis to relatively recent titles and collections like Runaways, Scott Pilgrim, and Batman: Year 100.

2. Use Your Computer or Mobile Device

There are so many ways to read comic books for free or cheaply in the digital realm:

  • Visit your favorite publisher’s website. Marvel has its own digital section, and several publishers including DC and Image offer digital comics through Comixology. Some are free, while others are available for slightly lower than the price of the paper comic.
  • Read independent comics. Several independent comic artists and writers publish their work online for free, ranging from newspaper-style comic strips to ever-growing sci-fi tales. The Webcomic List has listings for “over 17,500 online comics” and lets you browse by genre.
  • I haven’t used it myself, but e-book site WOWIO offers some free comic books for download, as well as a program where their “sponsors hope to earn your business by covering the cost of your books.”
  • The multi-platform comic-book reader Graphic.ly offers some free comics on its site.

3. Trade in Old Comics

Many comic book shops will accept trade paperbacks or graphic novels that you’ve already read in exchange for store credit. Note that this doesn’t really work for individual issues; unless you have remarkably old or notable comics, it’s unlikely that your local comic shop will take them — another reason for you to not buy by-the-issue in the first place.

4. Buy Trades on Sale

The same comic book shops that will buy your used trades also sell them (who would’ve thought?) for less than the cover price. If you absolutely must get your trades and graphic novels new, keep an eye out for sales at comic book shops, or search for your desired comics on a site like Amazon, which often sells new books for less than their printed price.

5. Celebrate Free Comic Book Day

This is not a long-term solution, but it can be a fun event: The first Saturday in May each year, several comic-book publishers offer specially published Free Comic Book Day comics totally gratis at comic book stores across the country. It’s an especially great event for kids.

6. Borrow

Not only is borrowing comics from friends free, but it’s also a great way to get recommendations for new titles. One of my friends lent me the first five collections of Alan Moore’s Saga of the Swamp Thing, a title that I never would have considered reading otherwise, but now love.

Are you a comic-book reader? If so, do you have any other suggestions for reading comics on the cheap?

Disclaimer: This site contains affiliate links from which we receive a compensation (like Amazon for example). But they do not affect the opinions and recommendations of the authors.

Wise Bread is an independent, award-winning consumer publication established in 2006. Our finance columns have been reprinted on MSN, Yahoo Finance, US News, Business Insider, Money Magazine, and Time Magazine.

Like many news outlets our publication is supported by ad revenue from companies whose products appear on our site. This revenue may affect the location and order in which products appear. But revenue considerations do not impact the objectivity of our content. While our team has dedicated thousands of hours to research, we aren’t able to cover every product in the marketplace.

For example, Wise Bread has partnerships with brands including, but not limited to, American Express, Bank of America, Capital One, Chase, Citi, Discover, and Amazon.