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How to read your cable modem’s diagnostic page when something goes wrong

The Modem Status section of the user interface allows you to view several options and check how your modem is running. Follow the steps below to access the modem status menu.

NOTE: Depending on your modem, your settings interface may appear slightly different from the images below.

1. Connect a device, such as a computer or tablet, to the internet through WiFi or using an Ethernet cable connected to your modem.

2. Open a web browser and type http://192.168.0.1 into the web address field.

3. Log in to the modem’s settings interface (Modem GUI) using your Admin Username and Admin Password. Note that these are different from your wireless network name (SSID) and WiFi password (security key).

Find the Admin Username & Password on the modem sticker

You can find the Admin Username and Password printed on the sticker attached to the side, back or bottom of the modem.

CAUTION! Do not remove or lose your modem sticker, which includes your default admin username and password. These preset credentials cannot be retrieved, and your modem could become unusable without them.

Admin Password and WiFi Password: What’s the difference?

The modem sticker shows you TWO important sets of login credentials. How do you use each one?

SSID and Key/Wireless Password: Used to access and connect to your WiFi network

  • SSID is the name that will show up on your devices in the list of wireless networks (may have two for dual-band modem/routers)
  • Key/Wireless Password is the password you will enter on your devices to connect securely to your network
  • These default settings can also be customized in the modem settings or through the app

Admin Username and Admin Password: Used to log in to your modem settings portal

For the last couple of weeks I’ve had “hiccups” every other day or so in my internet connection (Comcast with a Motorola SB5100 modem). I look over at the modem and the “Send” light is usually blinking. The problem goes away in anywhere from 1 – 5 minutes. I have not changed anything on my side.

Is there anything I can do to tell if the problem is with the modem? What are the symptoms of a failing modem? Using speedtest.net I get speeds of 28.93/5.85 if that says anything.

EDIT: I realized that I could access the modem status page through the router (thought I needed a direct connection for some reason):
Downstream Signal to Noise Ratio: 39 dB
Downstream Power Level: 4 dBmV
Upstream Power Level: 54 dBmV

99.9999999999999999% of issues with cable are signal related. call comcast and ask them to check your signal history. your current signals aren’t terrible but your upstream is a bit high. if you rent the modem from comcast just take it into the local office and get something newer (docsis 3.0) but i’d be willing to bet theres something wrong with your lines. could just be a loose connection somewhere.. could be a damaged cable inside or out. could be water in the lines outside etc etc etc. start by calling in and asking them to check your levels and history and get a tech out if needed. most bad cable modems ive seen have either not been able to achieve sync at all or just plain dont power on.

OK, thanks. The modem is mine so that is why I was asking.

Would I be likely to see a speed increase with a DOCSIS 3 modem? I think I’m currently getting slightly higher speeds than I’m paying for, but it seems some people get an immediate boost from upgrading.

Your signal levels look OK to me. Downstream could probably be a bit better but is probably fine (mine is usually at

5-7 dBmV, FWIW). I’d start by looking at the wiring. Try moving the modem to another room/line to isolate coax runs. Consider swapping out the splitter as well. You don’t need to connect the modem to your network for testing, of course, simply connect a laptop straight to the modem to look up the diagnostic info

I had a similar problem. Signal was low (

2 dBmV) across all downstream channels, but things only flaked out when channel 8 was one of the bonded channels. It turned out the coax leading to the room the cable modem was in was failing and had to be replaced. After replacement signal was fine across the board and performance has been solid.

A DOCSIS 3 modem may give you a speed boost. It all depends on your service level, whether that tier requires a channel bonding configuration that your current modem doesn’t support, etc.

0 is the ideal value for downstream power, with +/- 10 to 15 being acceptable.

I’d upgrade to a DOCSIS 3 modem just because the channel bonding can help you out, even if you don’t have 100Mb service. It allows the cable provider to give you a bunch of slower channels that bond together then possibly one overloaded “fast” channel.

Huh, interesting. Various sources agree, but none of those really explain the why. Others give the math for dBmV but what I found was either exceptionally brief and/or seemed to assume decent knowledge of the math behind radio (not my forte).

I’m guessing the number represents the balance of having the signal strong enough to be discernible over background noise and potential interference, and not so strong as to overwhelm the modem (e.g., the equivalent of someone shouting into your ear so loudly you can’t understand).

I figure that at some point in the past the signal level to my home was measured/tuned on the old coax line (a low-quality indoor-rated RG-59 run outside), which is why it was closer to the ideal. Replacing it skewed the numbers, of course.

Oh, and a side note: Unless you know that the person you are talking to is fairly knowledgeable, never bring up the topic of up/downstream channels to a 1st-tier Comcast rep. The word “channel”, I believe, seems to set them on using a script for diagnosing WiFi issues, and no matter what you say afterwards will get them off of it. Comcast apparently doesn’t train their reps on using the modem diagnostics features or even the basics of modem/headend communication.

Check any splitters you have in-line. I had a Comcast tech come and replace a few splitters and redo the connectors on a few lines in my house and I got a 7dB signal increase to my modem and stopped the hiccups.

Huh, interesting. Various sources agree, but none of those really explain the why. Others give the math for dBmV but what I found was either exceptionally brief and/or seemed to assume decent knowledge of the math behind radio (not my forte).

I’m guessing the number represents the balance of having the signal strong enough to be discernible over background noise and potential interference, and not so strong as to overwhelm the modem (e.g., the equivalent of someone shouting into your ear so loudly you can’t understand).

I figure that at some point in the past the signal level to my home was measured/tuned on the old coax line (a low-quality indoor-rated RG-59 run outside), which is why it was closer to the ideal. Replacing it skewed the numbers, of course.

Oh, and a side note: Unless you know that the person you are talking to is fairly knowledgeable, never bring up the topic of up/downstream channels to a 1st-tier Comcast rep. The word “channel”, I believe, seems to set them on using a script for diagnosing WiFi issues, and no matter what you say afterwards will get them off of it. Comcast apparently doesn’t train their reps on using the modem diagnostics features or even the basics of modem/headend communication.

I ran a CATV plant in an Eskimo village for a few years, 20+ years ago. The plant was entirely analog, none of the digital or encrypted stuff they do today. We were experimenting with 1st-gen modems at low data rates, too – only for basic stuff like monitoring fire panels. So bear in mind that my experience is small and outdated. But kind of interesting in scope because I did it all, from headend to house drops.

But we were taught at the time, that 0dbmv is the target value at any given frequency, and we could see the results. Too high above that (too “hot”) and the picture arrived sparkly, overdriving the receiving television. To low (“cold”) and the picture would begin to dissolve in static. Now, signals at various frequencies would propagate differently through the wire – if I remember rightly, higher freqs stronger. So we had to apply a bit of a bias at the headend, and then re-apply that bias as we moved through the cable plant. Because in practice different wires and different amps don’t always work as perfectly as theory does. And you could never get it perfect, with all freqs arriving at each television exactly at 0dbmv. But that range (15 up, 15 down) across all of the delivered freqs, was usually acceptable to most TVs.

And that’s about as deep as I remember it all. Anyway, the basic practical answer, in my mind, devolves to this:

Because that’s what TVs were designed for, so that’s what CATV plants were designed for. Carrying data on the same wires was an afterthought. So they modeled the data modems on the rules that worked for the TVs.

On a side note. I have Comcast and the CS reps working out of their Everett call center seem to be really well educated on the data side of things. If I call and ask them to dig into my modem, they do so quickly, professionally, and (as best I can tell) in a technically accurate way. I’ve even asked them if they could find other people on my node who have the same modem, see if it’s experiencing similar problems . and they did! This happens without call escalation.

Find out how to troubleshoot your Spectrum Wi-Fi, internet service, TV app, and more.

Internet and TV troubles are frustrating. And Charter Spectrum is certainly not without its fair share of . . . eh hmm . . . issues.

Lucky for you, we’ve researched some quick fixes to common issues that’ll help you stay off the phone with Spectrum customer service and stay glued to your screens.

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Enter your zip code to see internet plans in your area.

Troubleshooting your Spectrum Wi-Fi

No need to worry, most problems with your Spectrum Wi-Fi can be resolved by checking your connections and turning your equipment off and on.

Check your network connection

You might be surprised how often a loose cord or cable is the culprit.

First things first, check your Wi-Fi router’s power cord and Ethernet cable to make sure they’re both plugged in.

Reboot your Spectrum modem and Wi-Fi router

So you’re all juiced up and connected to the internet, but your Spectrum Wi-Fi is still giving you guff?

No problem, just unplug your Spectrum modem and Wi-Fi router and plug it back in after waiting 60 seconds, and your router will reboot.

Rebooting can help free up precious memory and clean up any minor bugs that might be messing with your internet connection.

Find your Spectrum Wi-Fi network name or password

When it comes to Wi-Fi woes, another common hotspot is a lost or forgotten Wi-Fi network name or password.

The good news is that nine times out of ten your Wi-Fi network name and password can be found on the label of your modem/router.

Can’t remember your Wi-Fi password? You can find it and reset it by logging in to your Spectrum account, navigating to the Service section, and clicking on Internet.

Related Spectrum Wi-Fi troubleshooting articles

  • Maximizing Your Wi-Fi Performance
  • Find or Change Your Wi-Fi Network Name & Password
  • Digital Camera Wi-Fi Connection

Troubleshooting your Spectrum Internet service

Most problems with your Spectrum Internet service probably have to do with either your download speed being too slow or your signal dropping.

Take an internet speed test

If you have doubts about your internet speed, take a couple minutes a day for the next week or so to test it out.

Once you’ve done a few tests, compare your results with the download speed you’re currently paying for.

Not pleased with the results? Think about switching internet providers.

Reset your Spectrum Internet equipment

If you don’t feel the need to switch internet providers, try resetting your equipment online.

  1. Log in to your Spectrum account
  2. Click on the Services tab
  3. Click on Internet
  4. Select your modem/router
  5. Click on Experiencing Issues?
  6. Click Reset Equipment

Much like manually rebooting your modem and Spectrum Wi-Fi router, resetting your Spectrum equipment can help restore a broken connection, clear up much needed memory, and get rid of any minor bugs.

It also has the added benefit of re-syncing your modem to your home internet connection.

Reset your internet-connected devices

Is your modem/router reset and ready to rock, but you’re still having connection problems? We recommend restarting your device.

Sometimes, when an internet-connected device is left on too long, it suffers the same fate as forlorn modems and routers: outdated operating systems and apps, minor bugs, clogged caches, and full memories.

Turning your device off and on will stop apps and programs from running and free up computing power that could improve performance.

Confirm a Spectrum service outage

If resetting your modem/router and devices doesn’t do the trick, your service might be out. A power outage is easy to detect, but a Spectrum service outage might be a little less obvious.

Just to be sure, you’ll want to confirm your suspicions by using the Ask Spectrum chat window (found on the lower right-hand corner of your screen) on the Spectrum Storm Center page.

Related Spectrum internet service troubleshooting articles

  • Spectrum Storm Center
  • Change Your Wi-Fi Name and Password
  • Spectrum Cybersecurity

Troubleshooting your Spectrum cable box

Unable to watch your favorite shows through Spectrum cable? Chances are your TV tussles have to do with poor picture quality or an insubordinate interface.

In either case, the first thing you’ll wanna do is check your HDMI cables and inputs.

Check your cables and connections

  1. Make sure that your TV and cable box are turned on.
  2. Double-check that you’re using the right HDMI input (sometimes referred to as Source) on your TV.
  3. Unplug your HDMI cables and plug them in again.

Back in business? Great, you just saved yourself a couple minutes of fumbling around trying to figure stuff out.

Still no signal? We got you.

Refresh your signal to your Spectrum cable box

When you’re experiencing “picture problems” that often means you have a fuzzy signal, no access to your channel guide, or even no picture at all (like those old-timey TV blizzards that The Ring ruined for us).

One way to combat those symptoms is to refresh your TV signal by logging in to the Spectrum customer service portal or the Spectrum app.

  1. Log in to your Spectrum account
  2. Click on the Services tab
  3. Click on TV
  4. Click on Experiencing Issues?
  5. Click Reset Equipment

Again, much like with your modem/router, resetting or refreshing your cable box allows it to clear its memory, clean out any minor bugs, and get back on track.

Pro tip: You can also refresh your signal by unplugging your cable box, waiting 60 seconds, and plugging it back in.

Spectrum cable box error codes

When you see an on-screen error code, it means that your Spectrum TV box is having a problem that typically can’t be solved with a reset. In the table below, we’ve listed the most common Spectrum cable box codes and we’ll tell you what to do next.

This guide applies to any tower or box-style CenturyLink modem/router.

For all following models:
Actiontec * Adtran * Calix * Technicolor * Zyxel

Not the right kind of modem? Try the C4000 lights guide instead.

There’s a lot of technology built into that black box that brings your internet connection into your home. Learn what the flickering lights on the front of your modem mean, and how to troubleshoot problems with your connection.

Power light

Once the modem is plugged into power, it will start booting up. Once it has tested its own systems, the power light will turn solid GREEN. Check the DSL light next, or see below if the power light does not turn green.

Power light OFF: The modem isn’t plugged in or doesn’t have a power source.

Power light RED: The modem is testing its own hardware. If it’s still red after a few minutes, there could be hardware or sofware failure.

Power light ORANGE or blinking GREEN/ORANGE: The modem is testing its own software.

Troubleshooting the power light

If the power light remains off, red, amber, or blinking for more than 30 seconds, there may be a problem. Here are some things you can try:

  1. Make sure you are using the correct power supply (the one that came with the modem).
  2. Try rebooting your modem by turning it off and unplugging it, waiting 30 seconds, then plugging it in and turning it back on.
  3. To prevent overheating, make sure your modem is in a place with good air circulation, 2 to 3 feet away from other devices that create heat.
  4. If you are using a power strip, surge protector, or you have a lot of devices using the same power source as your modem, it may not be getting sufficient power. Make sure it’s plugged directly into a wall outlet, or try a different outlet.
  5. As a last resort, try resetting your modem.

If the problem persists, contact technical support for help.

Few first world problems are as frustrating as your web browser reporting that it’s no longer connected to the internet. There are many different problems that could potentially affect your broadband, but the tips below should be enough to cover the most common issues.

Keep this list close by in case your internet suddenly breaks (or bookmark it to send to friends and family the next time they call you for help).

1. Reset your router

It’s an IT troubleshooting cliché, but that’s because it often works. Resetting your router (or cable box or modem or any other device that brings the internet into your home) should clear away any temporary connection faults and bugs, forcing the device to reconnect to the web from scratch with a clean slate.

Most routers have a reset button on them for this specific purpose, but you can always unplug the hardware as well. Wait 30 seconds or so before restarting the device and then give it (and your computer) a few minutes to get up and running again. Internet fixed? Good, you can stop reading here.

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2. Test multiple devices

If rebooting your router doesn’t work, the next step is to determine whether the problem’s inside or outside of your home. A quick way of doing this is to see if your smartphone, tablet, or any other computers can get online. If they can, plug a laptop directly into the router using a spare Ethernet cable.

If none of your devices can get online, there might be a problem on your ISP’s end. Check out its official website and Twitter feed to see if there’s a problem currently being reported (using cellular data, of course), or call them to see if they can offer an estimate on when a fix will arrive.

3. Troubleshoot wifi issues

Not everyone has a laptop and Ethernet cable at home, but if you do, you can plug the laptop directly into the router to check if the problem is with your internet as a whole (see above) or the wifi in particular. There are all kinds of ways to improve the wifi in your home , but they don’t necessarily apply to a sudden and unexplained drop.

If your wifi was working but isn’t anymore (and the problem persists across multiple devices) then pinpointing the problem is tricky. You should check your router’s settings for clues, reverse any recent modifications to the network, and more sure no one in the house has changed the network password.

If wired internet connections are working but wifi ones aren’t on any device, it’s a bit of a head-scratcher, unless your router has suddenly developed a fault. If you’ve just decided to put a wireless device like a baby monitor or a microwave next to your router, then this could be one potential cause—you really need to put wireless devices like these as far apart as possible to avoid signal interference.

Heavy bandwidth use by one particular device might drag the internet connection speed down, but then you’d probably see the effect on a wired connection, too. Using a speed test site or app might give you some more clues as to what’s causing the wifi to slow down or drop completely.

4. Troubleshoot issues with a specific device

If only one of your devices can’t get online, the focus of your troubleshooting can be much narrower, and it should be easier to find a fix. Resetting the device in question often works wonders; forcing a reconnection with the router and device can iron out plenty of temporary problems.

You should make sure that the device is updated and running the latest version of its operating system. On computers, that applies to wifi adapter firmware as well. If necessary, uninstall and reinstall the drivers associated with your wifi hardware to make sure they’re functioning correctly.

If you’re troubleshooting a laptop or desktop, then a virus scan is worth trying, and both Windows and macOS include wireless diagnostic tools that can help you pinpoint exactly what’s gone wrong.

Trying a different web browser can sometimes help—it’s possible that an extension, plug-in, or browser bug is the root cause of your internet hang-ups. If you find that your browser’s at fault, uninstall and then reinstall it to force a complete reset of the software ( more on that here ).

In this case, we’re specifically concerned with a device that was getting online fine before but now isn’t, so a recent change is most likely to blame. Try uninstalling any recently added apps, particularly network-related ones such as VPNs. As a last resort, you can try factory resetting the device.

5. Double-check your settings

Resetting your connection to your router can sometimes help. Try ‘forgetting’ the network you’re connected to and then connecting again (Network & Internet in Settings on Windows; Network in System Preferences on macOS). This will at least make sure you’re trying to connect to the right wifi network.

Switching to a different wifi channel can sometimes improve connection speeds if your home is in a crowded space (perhaps in a building with apartments surrounding yours). Routers normally put you on the best channel automatically—it’s basically the frequency at which your internet signals are beamed through space—but if several nearby routers choose the same one, then everything can get a little congested.

You’ll need to dig into your router settings to find the option to change channels. Usually switching to a channel several numbers removed from your current one is best, as it avoids overlap. If you need help, an app like NetSpot can warn you about congestion and help you take the next steps.

Some routers, particularly newer and more expensive ones, will do this job for you. They’ll find the channel with the least interference and make sure you’re on it (check the user documentation if you’re not sure). Nevertheless, it’s another potential fix to be aware of.

At the moment, there are many types of Internet connections in the market. But to implement most of them, you need a modem. You can always change the settings or make adjustments to the modem yourself at home. However, you should be aware of different properties of the model to configure (or reconfigure) the modem manually.

There is always a need for checking the modem configuration or setting, when your system fails to recognize the model despite the installation. The difficulties with the connection may occur due to mismatched settings.

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Instructions

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To check the settings, find “Control Panel” after clicking the “Start” button. In the menu, you will see an icon, “Modems”. Check the model of the modem. If the information does not match with the equipment installed, run “Add Hardware Wizard”. Make sure that the modem is connected properly before making changes to the setting.

If you see a list of devices, select the modem which you want to add by recognizing the modem on your system. If your modem is not available in the list of the modems, you need to install the driver. The name of your modem should appear in the list of devices.

Ensure the availability of equipment. Go to the “Control Panel” then click “System” and find the “device”. Select the installed modem. In the context menu, check the “Network Security” and make sure that the device is properly functioning.

To check the port settings, click on “Modems”, choose the device installed and locate the “Properties” button. Next, click on “Binding” and check that the current port settings.

Check the settings for data transfer in the tab, “Modem”. Click on the icon to your device, and then select “Properties.” Next, go to the menu and select the “General” tab. Set the baud rate to match the capabilities of your modem.

Right click on the icon “My Computer” and select “Properties.” Next, go to the “Hardware” tab and click on “Device Manager.” Installed modem will appear in the list.

Check “Options Communications”. See if any settings needed to be changed for USB modem. Next, go to “Diagnostics”, check the modem settings by clicking the “Query Modem”.

Select your modem/router to view settings and features

How to find the model number

Find the model number on your modem sticker

Check the sticker on the back or bottom of the modem to find your model name and number.

Other modems

Actiontec modems

Technicolor modems

Zyxel modems

Don’t see your modem listed here?

Install your modem and connect your internet

Setting up a new modem or new internet service from CenturyLink? Choose the type of modem you have to view a setup video and written instructions.

For the following models:
Greenwave C4000BG * C4000LG * C4000XG * Zyxel C4000LZ

For all following models:
Actiontec * Adtran * Calix * Technicolor * Zyxel (except C4000)

Connect devices to your WiFi network

Top modem troubleshooting tips

Slow or spotty internet connection? The best place to start is rebooting your modem/router.

Is your firmware up to date? Modems usually update themselves, but you can check the settings to see if there’s an upgrade available.

Tried the above and still having trouble? In more severe cases, a modem reset can solve the problem.

How to read and troubleshoot the modem lights

Depending on the model of CenturyLink modem/router that you have, the lights will function a bit differently. Choose the correct guide to help you understand what the status lights tell you and how to use them to troubleshoot your internet connection.

For the following models:
Greenwave C4000BG * C4000LG * C4000XG * Zyxel C4000LZ

For all following models:
Actiontec * Adtran * Calix * Technicolor * Zyxel (except C4000)

Modem WiFi settings

Modem security settings

Note: Screenshots shown in our how-to articles may differ slightly from your modem’s particular settings. Features may be different from model to model, and differences are noted where possible.

Advanced modem settings

Please proceed with caution! The advanced options and settings on your modem are for experienced users only. Our how-to articles provide basic instructions. In most cases, you do not want to change these settings unless you have advanced knowledge of networking or are advised by a technician.

There are few things in life as frustrating as an “Address Not Found” message in your Web browser. Timed-out connections, a little red X in your network connection icon, or an “Internet Explorer cannot display the Web page” error screen all add up to the same dismal problem — something’s wrong with your Internet connection.

Finding and fixing the problem is never easy, mainly because there are so many places where something can go wrong. We’re going to walk you through five relatively easy steps that will solve the majority of broadband Internet connection problems, no matter what kind of Internet service you use. We’ll have you up and running, reading celebrity gossip and updating your Facebook status in no time.

5: Check the Wires

It may seem obvious, but one of the easiest troubleshooting steps you can take yourself is to check all the cables and connections involved in your Internet connection. This is true no matter what kind of connection you have. Even if you’re sure nothing has changed, it only takes a minute to make sure.

Start where your Internet service enters your house. This might be your cable company’s line drop, a satellite dish antenna or a phone line. Make sure the cable is connected securely, and any cabling that runs outside the house hasn’t been damaged by weather or chewed on by birds, bugs or squirrels. Just be careful if there are any electrical lines around — and if you see damaged lines of any kind, don’t touch them, just call the cable or phone company.

Next, follow the cables through your house, checking connections at every appropriate point. If you use a router, check those connections, too, and make sure the correct cable is going to the correct place. If your router feeds several different computers or gaming systems, it can get confusing to keep track of which cable goes where.

If the cabling and connections seem OK, the next step is to power cycle your modem.

4: Power Cycling

Power cycling might sound exciting, but it just means turning your modem off, waiting a few seconds, then turning it on again. This works regardless of your connection type, whether you get your Internet via cable, DSL or satellite. The easiest way to turn it off is to disconnect the power cord where it plugs into the modem itself (they don’t always have on/off switches, but if yours does, that should work, too). Wait about 30 seconds, and then plug it in again. Sometimes, that’s all it takes. Once the modem has cycled through its usual boot-up sequence, you may find your connection works again.

If this doesn’t do the trick, a more elaborate power cycling sequence might. You’ll have to turn off every device on your network, then power them on again in a particular order.

First, shut off your computer, then unplug the power cords from your modem, router, access point and hub.When you turn things on again, follow the signal from the modem toward the computer. In other words, power up the modem first, then power up your router or hub, then turn on your computer last. As you turn on each device, wait for it go through its boot-up sequence before powering up the next device in line. You can determine the status by watching the lights on the device itself.

Still no connection? If you use a satellite Internet service, we’ll troubleshoot your unique problems in the next section.

3: Weathering Storms with Satellite Internet Connections

If you access the Internet with a satellite service, you have your own set of issues to deal with. The first potential issue is line of sight. Satellite Internet connections use a special two-way dish, and the dish has to be pointed directly at the satellite at a very particular angle. The problems start when anything gets between your antenna and the satellite.

Overgrown greenery, snow and ice or leaves and other debris could be blocking your dish, so you’ll have to get to the dish to clear it off. This can be especially difficult if it’s mounted on the roof.

Odd as it may seem, weather hundreds of miles away can also affect your satellite connection. Because the satellite is over the equator, your dish points south (that is, if you’re in the Northern Hemisphere). The farther you are from the equator, the less direct the line of sight is. Your dish has to send and receive signals through a long stretch of atmosphere to the south, so southerly storms many miles away can still cause interference.

If there’s nothing in the way, and the weather is clear from your roof all the way to Guatemala, your dish might be misaligned. If it isn’t pointing in the proper direction, your connection will fail. Satellite dish antennas require much more precise adjustment than TV dish antennas do – it’s probably a good idea to call your Internet service provider for help, rather than trying to adjust it yourself.

And on top of that, the problem might be beyond everyone’s control. Sunspots are massive flares on the surface of the sun that send intense blasts of energy at the Earth. That energy can severely disrupt satellite communications.

Next, we’ll diagnose some common wireless problems.

2: Wireless Router Outages

If you use a wireless access point or wireless router to access the Internet with a laptop, then the wireless connection might be the cause of your problem. You may have to use a wired connection to your network until the wireless problem is solved. You’ll also want to have a copy of your wireless access point or router’s user manual nearby.

There are two main potential issues with wireless connections: configuration problems and security problems. Consult the user manual to see how to access the wireless device — this is usually done by typing the device’s IP address into a Web browser. From there, you’ll need to check the manual to find the proper settings. You’ll probably have to call your Internet service provider (ISP) for assistance, because the necessary configuration will vary tremendously depending on the type of network you have and the type of connection provided by your ISP.

The wireless device’s security settings could also be causing problems. You can access these settings the same way you accessed the configuration. If you have a wireless security protocol enabled, you won’t be able to access the wireless device without using the proper password. You can set and reset the password the same way you can change the other settings.

If none of these steps have solved your connection problem, there are still a few last-ditch efforts you can attempt.

1: More Cable and Configuration Problems

Choose the service type you would like to troubleshoot.

Simply click on an option below and we will retrieve your equipment information.
Note: In order to troubleshoot you’ll need to be able to see and possibly reset your equipment.

We’ve found the equipment on your account. Click the “Begin Troubleshooting” button to get started.

Sorry, there was an error fetching status of your device(s). Please try again.

Sorry, no device found on your account. Please try again.

Follow the simple steps below so we can help solve your issue.

Your equipment

Here are the modems you have on your account.

Note: The CMAC Address is located on the bottom of your modem on the white sticker.

Your online modem(s).

These modems are online so we can send a signal to refresh them automatically.
To continue select “Reset online modems” below.

>Where’s my CMAC address?

Your CMAC address can be found on the bottom of your modem on the white sticker.

Your offline modem(s)

We are unable to communicate with these modems. You’ll need to reset them manually. Sometimes this happens if you have a loose connection. Before you reset your offline modem(s) make sure there are no loose plugs and the outlets and circuit breakers are working.
After checking your connections, click the “Reset offline modems” button below to get started.We will guide you through the reset steps.

>Where’s my CMAC address?

Your CMAC address can be found on the bottom of your modem on the white sticker.

Your equipment

Here are the modems you have on your account.

Note: The CMAC Address is located on the bottom of your modem on the white sticker.

Your online modem(s)

These modems are online so we can send a signal to refresh them automatically. Reset these modems first. Click the “Reset online mdoems” button to get started.
After resetting your online modem(s) follow the steps to reset your offline modem(s) manually.

>Where’s my CMAC address?

Your CMAC address can be found on the bottom of your modem on the white sticker.

Your offline modem(s)

We are unable to communicate with these modems. You’ll need to reset them manually. Sometimes this happens if you have a loose connection. Before you have reset offline modem(s) make sure there are no loose plugs and the outlets and circuit breakers are working.

>Where’s my CMAC address?

Your CMAC address can be found on the bottom of your modem on the white sticker.

Here are the digital cable boxes on your account.

Click the “Continue” button below to begin troubleshooting your issue.

>Where’s my serial number?

It’s located on the back of your digital cable box on the white sticker. For Samsung digital cable boxes it is the number after a series of letters that looks like this: JCAS ID CV SN.

Let us know what you are experiencing.

>Where’s my serial number?

It’s located on the back of your digital cable box on the white sticker. For Samsung digital cable boxes it is the number after a series of letters that looks like this: JCAS ID CV SN.

What are you experiencing?

Select each issue that applies. If you do not see your issue, select “I have a different issue”.

After selecting your issue(s), click the “Continue” button below.

Your online modems

Let’s reset your online modem(s) and see if that fixes the issue. If you have more than one modem with an issue you will need to reset each one separately. – Before you begin the reset make sure there are no phone lines in use in your home.
– Do not close out of your web browser or navigate away from this page. When the reset is complete this page will automatically reload and you can continue troubleshooting from here.
To get started click the “Reset modem” button.If you have more than one modem to reset, wait until the first one finishes resetting before clicking on the next.

>Where’s my CMAC address?

Your CMAC address can be found on the bottom of your modem on the white sticker.

Follow these steps below.

1. Unplug the modem from its power source
Once your modem is unplugged, all of the lights on the modem should go off. If the lights are on after you disconnect it, you may have a battery backup that also needs to be disconnected. So go ahead and disconnect that, too.

2. Unplug the router from its power source
Not sure if you have a router? Routers are connected to your modem with an Ethernet cord and will have several additional Ethernet ports to manually connect computers. Common brands include Linksys, Netgear, Cisco, Belkin and D-Link.

3. Tighten the coaxial cable connector on your modem
Use your hand or a small 7/16-inch wrench to make sure the cable connection is secure.

4. Reconnect the modem to its power source
Wait until it has fully restarted and the lights on the modem turn on. This can take up to a few minutes. And if you use a battery backup, be sure to reconnect it now.

5. Reconnect the router to its power source
Wait until it has fully restarted. This also can take up to a few minutes.

6. Check your internet connection
Open your web browser and visit optimum.net. Once the page loads, you’ll be good to go.

Not connected? Unplug the modem and router again, restart your computer and then repeat Steps 3 – 6. If you are still having trouble, contact our customer service team.

Reset Your Digital Cable Box

There are two ways to reset your Scientific Atlanta cable box:

Option 1

1. Unplug your cable box from either the wall outlet or the box itself.
2. Wait 5 seconds and plug it back in.
3. During the reset process, the digital cable box will display hold followed by turn on. This may take 3-5 minutes.
4. When the front panel on the digital cable box displays the time, the reset is complete.
5. Turn on your TV and cable box. There may be a slight delay while the menu screen loads.

Option 2

1. To restart the digital cable box, simultaneously press VOL+, VOL- and INFO on the front of the digital cable box and hold until the digital cable box shuts down.
2. Release the buttons and the digital cable box will automatically reset. During the reset process, the digital cable box will display hold followed by turn on. This may take 3-5 minutes.
3. When the front panel on the digital cable box displays the time, the reset is complete.
4. Turn on your TV and cable box. There may be a slight delay while the menu screen loads.

Samsung Digital Cable Box HD

There are two ways to reset your Samsung HD cable box:

Option 1

1. Unplug your cable box from either the wall outlet or the box itself.
2. Wait 5 seconds and plug it back in. The reset process may take 3-5 minutes.
3. During the reset process, the cable box may display a series of numbers, characters or letters.
4. When the front panel on the digital cable box displays turn on, the reset is complete.
5. Turn on your TV and cable box. There may be a slight delay while the menu screen loads.

Option 2

1. To restart the digital cable box, simultaneously press VOL+, VOL- and INFO on front of digital cable box and hold until the digital cable box shuts down.
2. Release buttons and the digital cable box will automatically reset. The reset process may take 3-5 minutes.
3. During the reset process, the cable box may display a series of numbers, characters or letters.
4. When the front panel on the digital cable box displays turn on, the reset is complete.
5. Turn on your TV and cable box. There may be a slight delay while the menu screen loads.

This common error usually resolves with basic troubleshooting

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When your computer can’t connect to the network, you may see an error message that reads “A network cable is unplugged” and see a red “X” on the taskbar or in Windows Explorer. This message may appear only once every few days or once every few minutes, depending on the nature of the problem, and it can occur even when you’re on Wi-Fi.

Causes for Network Cable Unplugged Error

Errors regarding unplugged network cables have several potential causes. Typically, the message appears on a computer when an installed Ethernet network adapter attempts unsuccessfully to make a local network connection.

Reasons for failure might include malfunctioning network adapters, bad Ethernet cables, or misbehaving network device drivers.

Some people who have upgraded from older versions of Windows to Windows 10 have also reported this issue.

How to Fix the Unplugged Network Cables Error

Try the following procedures, in order, to stop these error messages from appearing, and then reconnect to the network:

Restart the computer by fully powering down, waiting a few seconds, and then turning the computer back on. If you’re on a laptop, take the extra step of removing the battery, if possible, and walking away for 10 minutes. Just unplug the laptop from power and remove the battery. Reattach the battery, plug the laptop back in, and start Windows again when you get back.

Turn off the Ethernet network connection if you’re not using it. This step applies, for example, when you’re running a Wi-Fi network with computers that include built-in Ethernet adapters. Double-click the small A network cable, is unplugged error window, and choose the Disable option to turn off the adapter.

Check both ends of the Ethernet cable to ensure that they are not loose. One end connects to your computer, and the other connects to the primary network device, probably a router. If this procedure doesn’t help, try testing for a faulty cable. Instead of buying a new one outright, plug the same cable into a different computer or temporarily swap out the Ethernet cable for a known good one.

Update the network adapter driver software to a newer version if available. If it’s already running the latest version, consider uninstalling and reinstalling the driver or rolling it back to a previous version. It might seem impossible to check the internet for outdated network drivers when the network can’t reach the internet—however, some free driver updater tools such as Driver Talent for Network Card and DriverIdentifier help.

Use Device Manager or Network and Sharing Center (through Control Panel) to change the Ethernet adapter’s Duplex settings to use a Half Duplex or Full Duplex option instead of the default Auto selection. This change works around the technical limitations of the adapter by changing the speed and timing at which it operates. Some people report more success with the Half Duplex option, but this setting lowers the maximum total data rate that the device supports. Go to the device’s properties and find the Speed & Duplex setting within the Advanced tab to adjust it.

The Ethernet adapter is a removable USB dongle, PCMCIA, or PCI Ethernet card on some older computers. Remove and reinsert the adapter hardware to verify that it’s connected properly. If that doesn’t help, try replacing the adapter, if possible.

Troubleshoot other network connections. If none of the above procedures fix the “A network cable is unplugged error, it’s possible that the device on the other end of the Ethernet connection, such as a broadband router, is malfunctioning. Troubleshoot these devices as needed.

Wireless technologies, such as Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, have replaced computer networking cables in many offices and homes. Wireless technologies are also desirable in cases where the cable has to run outside, in conditions that might likely damage it.

There are several steps to troubleshooting a home network router problem. Some things you’ll look for include mismatched Wi-Fi security settings, loose or disconnected cables, and defective or outdated hardware.

If you experience issues with the Internet resulting in the repeated disconnection and reconnection to the network, it could be for multiple possible reasons. Below are some of the most common ways to try and fix the issue.

This page discusses troubleshooting options for Internet stability issues on a computer, and not on a smartphone or tablet.

If you have another computer, smartphone, or tablet that uses the same Internet connection, use it to test if there’s a connection or computer issue. If all devices on your network have the same problem, that indicates an issue with the cable or DSL modem, network router, or ISP. If only one computer is disconnecting and reconnecting, it’s likely a problem with the computer.

Cable or DSL modem

If the cable modem is having trouble maintaining a steady connection, power cycling it might resolve the issue or it might be overheating.

Restart the modem

First, we recommend you power off the computer.

Next, turn off the cable modem by disconnecting the power cord from the back of the modem. Leave it unplugged for at least ten seconds, then plug it back into the modem.

It takes a few minutes for the cable modem to run through all its self-checks and reconnect to the Internet. Look for the Internet connectivity indicator light on the front of the modem. When it is illuminated, plug in your router and turn on your computer.

If you did not unplug your router before unplugging the modem, other devices connected to the router may disconnect from the network. The restarting of the modem can result in a wireless router connection being reset as well.

Test the Internet connection on your computer and see if it’s stable.

Check if modem is overheating

If the Internet connection is still unstable, check the cable modem to see if it feels hot. When a modem overheats, it can cause the Internet connection to be unstable. If this is the case, turn it off and let it cool down, then try turning it on and testing the Internet connection. If it’s more stable, you either need to find a way to keep the cable modem cooled down, or you may need to replace it.

Wired/Wireless router

If you have not reset your router yet, turn off your computer and unplug the power cord from the router. Wait at least 10 seconds, then plug the power cord back into the router. Wait for the indicator lights on the front of the router to stop blinking. The blinking lights indicate the router is completing self-checks and working to establish an Internet connection. Then, turn on your computer.

Test the Internet connection on your computer and see if it’s stable.

Network issues on ISP side

Your ISP (Internet service provider) may be a good resource to check with if your computer is still experiencing an unstable Internet connection. The ISP’s technical support can run system and line checks to determine if there are any issues between them and your computer. They may also have other suggestions for fixing the connection.

If your Internet is still not stable, before trying the following steps, contact your ISP to make sure the problem is not on their end. If other devices on your network are working fine, continue with the steps below.

Network card

The network card in your computer may also be experiencing issues with keeping a stable Internet connection. There are two things you can try to fix this.

We only suggest the steps below if your network has other devices that are working with no problems.

Reinstall network card drivers

If the Internet connection is still unstable, another fix to try is deleting the network card from your computer’s Device Manager. Restart the computer and let Windows reinstall the network card and its drivers. Reinstalling the network card can sometimes fix device driver issues (corruption) and stabilize the network card’s Internet connectivity.

After Windows reboots and the device is reinstalled, test the Internet connection on your computer and see if it’s stable.

Update network card drivers

We recommended checking the network card manufacturer’s website, or the computer manufacturer’s website, and see if there are updated device drivers for the network card. If there are, download and install the updated drivers. After installing the updated drivers, restart the computer and test the Internet connection again to see if it’s more stable.

Reseat the network card

If you have a desktop computer and the network card is removable expansion card, you can try reseating the network card. If you feel comfortable opening the computer, turn off your computer, unplug the power cord, and remove the network card.

Many desktops use network cards built into the motherboard (onboard). These network cards cannot be removed.

  • How do I open my computer case?
  • How do I remove an expansion card in my computer?

Once the card is removed, insert the network card back into the PCI slot, making sure it is firmly seated into the slot. Close the computer case, plug in the power cord, and turn the computer back on.

Test the Internet connection on your computer and see if it’s stable.

Corrupt Windows system files

If system files in the Windows operating system become corrupted, it can sometimes cause Internet connectivity issues. If the connectivity issues started recently, you can try restoring Windows back to a previous point before the issue started to occur. Restoring to a previous point replaces the corrupt files with good, non-corrupt files. If corrupt files are causing the Internet connectivity issue, restoring should fix the issue.

Windows update issues

If a Windows update was recently installed on your computer, and the Internet became unstable afterwards, the Windows update may have caused the problem. Some Windows updates can cause issues with other software on the computer, or even cause problems with Internet connectivity.

If your Internet connectivity issues started after a Windows update was installed, restoring Windows back to a previous point before the Windows update was installed often fixes the issue. You may also want to check for the latest Windows updates, as Microsoft may have released new updates that could fix issues caused by previous Microsoft updates.

Virus or malware infection

A virus or malware infection can cause Internet connectivity issues. If the infection is severe enough, the Internet connection can become unstable or not work at all. You need to remove the virus or spyware from the computer to stabilize the Internet connection.

Interference by antivirus program

Some antivirus programs have built-in security that may interfere with an Internet connection. Check the security settings for the antivirus program to see what settings are enabled. Try disabling each setting to see if any of them cause the Internet connection to stabilize. If there is a setting causing an unstable connection, check with the antivirus program manufacturer to determine if those settings are absolutely necessary to keep your computer protected. If they’re not necessary, leave those settings disabled.

Internet connection still unstable

If the Internet connection is still unstable after trying all the suggestions above, you may have a defective Cable/DSL modem, wired/wireless router, or network card. You may want to get a new modem, router, or network card to see if any of those devices are causing the problem.