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How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

In times of crisis, as Facebook group admins, we can often bear the brunt of people’s anxiety and frustrations.

I personally made the move to post approval about a year ago and have never regretted it, but I am especially happy about that decision now, during the Coronavirus pandemic. Post approval allows me to be able to proactively prevent posts that might cause problems in the group.

I highly recommend making the switch.

Here’s how to do it:

1. Go to More> Edit Group Settings at the top of the group:
How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

2. Scroll down almost to the bottom of the page and check the box under Post Approval that says, “All group posts must be approved by an admin or a moderator.” Don’t forget to SAVE!

Going forward, you or another Admin or Moderator will need to approve all posts:

You’ll see the pending posts at the top of your group:

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

When you click on them, you’ll see the posts, with the option to approve or decline:

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

At this point you can approve or decline the post:

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

If you decline, you have the option to check the rule that was violated, and you can also add additional notes:

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

You also have the option to share the violated rule and notes with the original poster. You’ll need to check “Share violated rules and notes with…” box in order to make this happen.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

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Harry Guinness is a photography expert and writer with nearly a decade of experience. His work has been published in newspapers like The New York Times and on a variety of other websites, from Lifehacker to Popular Science and Medium’s OneZero. Read more.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

By default, any member can post anything they want in your Facebook Groups. This means they could post horribly offensive content, and while you can remove it, it might be a while before you get to it.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

If you want to play it safe, you can set your group so that every comment has to be approved by a moderator. Here’s how.

Go to your Group, click on the three dots and select Edit Group Settings.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Scroll down and under Post Approval, check the box that says All Group Posts Must Be Approved By an Admin or a Moderator, then click Save.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Now when someone posts in the group, you’ll get a notification that a post needs approval.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Click on it to go to Pending Posts.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Click the checkmark to approve the post, the X to remove the post, or the circle to block the poster and remove the post.

Once you approve a post, it will appear on the page as normal.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

In times of crisis, as Facebook group admins, we can often bear the brunt of people’s anxiety and frustrations.

I personally made the move to post approval about a year ago and have never regretted it, but I am especially happy about that decision now, during the Coronavirus pandemic. Post approval allows me to be able to proactively prevent posts that might cause problems in the group.

I highly recommend making the switch.

Here’s how to do it:

1. Go to More> Edit Group Settings at the top of the group:
How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

2. Scroll down almost to the bottom of the page and check the box under Post Approval that says, “All group posts must be approved by an admin or a moderator.” Don’t forget to SAVE!

Going forward, you or another Admin or Moderator will need to approve all posts:

You’ll see the pending posts at the top of your group:

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

When you click on them, you’ll see the posts, with the option to approve or decline:

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

At this point you can approve or decline the post:

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

If you decline, you have the option to check the rule that was violated, and you can also add additional notes:

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

You also have the option to share the violated rule and notes with the original poster. You’ll need to check “Share violated rules and notes with…” box in order to make this happen.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Submit a Comment Cancel reply

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Sometimes it makes sense to have a second set of eyes on a message before the message is delivered. As an Exchange Online admin, you can set this up. Requiring approval before a message is deliver is called moderation, and the approver of the message is called the moderator.

There are two basic ways to do moderated mail flow in Exchange Online:

Require the approval of a moderator for messages sent to a specific recipient: You can configure groups for moderation in the Exchange admin center (EAC). For other recipient types, you need to use Exchange Online PowerShell. For instructions, see Configure moderated recipients in Exchange Online

Require approval for messages that match specific criteria: You use mail flow rules (also known as transport rule) to specify the message criteria (for example, message content, the message sender, or message recipients) and who needs to approve the message for delivery (which might include multiple levels of approval). For instruction, see Use mail flow rules for message approval scenarios in Exchange Online.

The rest of this article describes how moderation works in Exchange Online.

How the message approval process works

When you send a message to a moderated recipient in Outlook on the web (formerly known as Outlook Web App), you’re notified that your message might be delayed as shown in the following screenshot:

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

The moderator receives an email notification to approve or reject the delivery of the message. The text of the notification includes buttons to approve or reject the message, and the attachment includes the original message to review.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

A message that’s waiting for approval is temporarily stored in a system mailbox called the arbitration mailbox. The original message is kept in the arbitration mailbox until a moderator takes action on the message. The moderator can take one of the following actions:

Approve: The message goes to the original intended recipients. The original sender isn’t notified.

Reject: A rejection message is sent to the sender. The moderator can add an explanation as shown in the following screenshot:

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Ignore or delete the approval message An expiration message is sent to the sender. In Exchange Online, the approval request expires after two days.

The processing of expired moderated messages runs every seven days. This means that a moderated message can expire at any time between two and nine days.

The message flow and result of a moderator’s actions are described in the following diagram:

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Moderated recipient FAQ

Q: What’s the difference between a group moderator and a group owner?

A: The owner of a distribution group is responsible for managing the membership of the group. For example, an IT admin might be the owner of the All Employees distribution group, but the Human Resources manager might be set up as the moderator who’s responsible for approving messages that are sent to the group.

Also, messages that the owner sends to the distribution group do not need to be approved by a moderator.

Q: What happens when the moderator sends a message to the distribution group?

A: The message goes directly to the group, bypassing the approval process.

Q: What happens when only a subset of recipients need approval?

A: Consider a message that’s sent to 12 recipients, one of which is a moderated distribution group. The message is automatically split into two copies. One message is delivered immediately to the 11 recipients that don’t require approval, and the second message is submitted to the approval process for the moderated distribution group.

If a message is intended for more than one moderated recipient, a separate copy of the message is automatically created for each moderated recipient and each copy goes through the appropriate approval process.

Q: What if a distribution group contains moderated recipients that require approval?

A: A distribution group can include moderated recipients that also require approval. In this case, after the message to the distribution group is approved, a separate approval process occurs for each moderated recipient that’s a member of the distribution group. However, you can also enable the automatic approval of the distribution group members after the message to the moderated distribution group is approved. To do this, you use the BypassNestedModerationEnabled parameter on the Set-DistributionGroup cmdlet.

Q: Is this process different if we have our own Exchange servers?

A: By default, one arbitration mailbox is used for each on-premises Exchange organization. If you have your own Exchange servers and need more arbitration mailboxes for load balancing, follow the instructions for adding arbitration mailboxes in Reassign and remove arbitration mailboxes that are used for moderated recipients. Arbitration mailboxes are system mailboxes and don’t require an Exchange license.

You can use a Facebook group like a private room

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

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A Facebook Group is a place for group communication, letting people share their common interests and express their opinions. Groups let people come together around a common cause, issue, or activity to organize, express objectives, discuss issues, post photos, and share related content. Anybody can create and manage a Facebook Group, and you can even join up to 6,000 other Groups.

Groups, as discussed below, are not the same as private group messaging used in Facebook Messenger.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Quick Facts About Facebook Groups

Here are some short tidbits on how Facebook Groups work:

  • Any Facebook user can make a group.
  • Some groups let anyone join, but others might be private.
  • When joining a group, whether private or public, your Facebook friends might see that you’ve joined it.
  • Some groups are secret and can’t be searched for, in which case a qualifying group member has to invite you.
  • Leaving a group will not notify the other members.
  • Only the creator of the group, and anyone they make an admin, has the power to invite someone to a group.
  • You can create events, upload pictures and videos, and share files within a group.
  • Groups can be deleted by removing all the members.
  • Group admins can invite people to become Group Experts; experts have a badge next to their name and can help spread credible information to the group.

Facebook Pages vs. Groups

Groups on Facebook have undergone changes since they were first implemented. There was a time when a user’s groups would appear on their own personal page. So, if you were in a group called “Football Fans,” everyone who could see your profile would know this about you.

Now, however, those types of open forums are known as Facebook Pages, created by companies, celebrities, and brands to engage with their audience and post interesting content. Only administrators of Pages can post to the account, while those who like the Page can comment on any posts and pictures.

You use your personal profile to engage with other Page users and group members. Whenever you post something, you’re posting with your Facebook profile’s name and photo.

Unlike Facebook Pages, which are always public, a Facebook Group doesn’t have to be. Many Facebook Groups are closed; you submit a request to join the group and have access when an admin approves you. Only other members of a private group can see your posts, questions, and comments. (More on this below)

On the other hand, if you comment on or like a Page, all of your information will be available to anyone on Facebook who looks at that Page.

So, if someone were to visit the NFL on CBS Facebook Page, they could see anyone who was commenting on a photo or discussing an article. This could cause some privacy concerns, especially if you don’t have a solid understanding of how to use Facebook’s privacy settings to protect your personal profile.

Closed Facebook Groups

A Group can be more private than a Page because the creator has the option to make it closed. When a group is closed, only those invited to the Group can see the content and information shared within it.

An example of a Facebook Group might be team members working on a project together and want to communicate with one another more efficiently. By creating a Group, the team is given a private forum to share ideas on the project and post updates, just like with a Page.

Still, all information is shared only with those within the group once it’s made closed. Others will still be able to see that the group exists, but they won’t be able to see its members or any posts or information within the closed Group unless they are invited.

Secret Facebook Groups

Even more private than the closed Group is the secret group. This type of group is exactly what you would expect it to be: secret. Nobody on Facebook can see a secret group other than those in the group.

This group will not appear anywhere on your profile, and only those within the group can see who the members are and what is posted. These groups could be used if you are planning an event that you don’t want somebody to know about, or if you just want a secure platform to talk with friends.

Another example might be a family who wants to share pictures and news on Facebook but without other friends seeing everything.

Public Facebook Groups

The third privacy setting for a Group is public, meaning that anyone can see who is in the group and what has been posted. Still, only members of the group can post within it.

Networking: Groups vs. Pages

Another way groups are different from Pages is that they work on smaller networks than the entire Facebook network. You can limit your group to the network for your college, high school, or company, as well as make it a group for members of any network.

A Page can accumulate as many likes as possible. Facebook doesn’t set a limit on the number of group members you can have, but after a group reaches 5,000 people, there are some restrictions put into place, such as admins not being able to send one message to all group members.

Once inside the group, you can choose to sort by most recent posts or most recent activity. If a Facebook group has fewer than 250 people, group members can see how many times the post has been viewed. After a group exceeds 250 members, this feature is disabled.

Another difference between joining a group and liking a Page is the number of notifications that you receive. When in a group, you can set your notification preferences to be alerted every time there’s a post in the group or when a friend posts, or you can turn off notifications.

With a Page, however, you’ll be notified when someone likes your comment or tags you in a comment, much like with regular comments and likes on Facebook.

Unique Features

A unique feature only offered in Pages is Page Insights. This allows the Page administrators to see what activity the Page has been receiving during a period of time, even in a graphical representation.

This is just one of the many ways Facebook Pages allow you to monitor the audience and how well your product or message is being received. These analytics are not offered, or needed, in Groups because they’re meant to communicate with a small, select number of people rather than a wide-scale audience.

Groups have unique features, as well, including the admin’s ability to designate members as Group Experts. Experts have a badge next to their name so group members can pay particular intention to informative posts. Admins and Group Experts can collaborate on Q&A sessions, address concerns, respond to questions, and more.

Mahesh Makvana is a freelance tech writer who specializes in writing how-to guides. He has been writing tech tutorials for over a decade now. He’s written for some of the prominent tech sites including MakeUseOf, MakeTechEasier, and Online Tech Tips. Read more.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

If you’d like to post something in a Facebook group without revealing your name, use Facebook’s anonymous posting feature. It’s easy to do, assuming that a group administrator has enabled the feature. We’ll show you how to use it.

What to Know About Anonymous Facebook Posts

To make an anonymous post in a Facebook group, the group must have enabled the feature for that. Also, know that the group admins, moderators, and Facebook team can still see your name in your anonymous posts. In addition, anonymous posts won’t appear immediately. You’ll have to wait for approval from an admin or moderator.

If you’re the admin of a group and you want to enable anonymous posting in your group, check out the instructions at the end of this guide.

Post Anonymously in a Facebook Group

To create an anonymous post in a Facebook group, you can use any Facebook-supported device, such as a Windows, Mac, Linux, Chromebook, iPhone, iPad, or Android device.

The steps to compose an anonymous post are pretty much the same on all devices. We’ll use Facebook’s web version to demonstrate the procedure in this guide.

To get started, launch a web browser on your computer and head over to the Facebook site.

When the site loads, from the sidebar on the left, select “Groups.”

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

On the “Groups” screen, from the sidebar on the left, select your group. Then, in the pane on the right, click the “Anonymous Post” option.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Facebook will open an “Anonymous Post” window. Click “Create Anonymous Post” at the bottom of this window.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

You’ll now see a “Create Post” window. Here, click the large text field and compose your message like you normally would. When you’re done, at the bottom of the window, click “Submit.”

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Facebook will submit your post to the group admins and moderators. Your post will only be published when either an admin or a moderator approves it.

And that’s how you post something in a group without revealing your identity!

How to Enable Anonymous Posting in a Facebook Group

To turn on anonymous posting in a Facebook group, you must be an admin in that group.

Once you confirm that you’re an admin, open the Facebook site. On the site, from the sidebar on the left, select “Groups,” and then choose your group.

On your group screen, from the “Admin Tools” section on the left, select “Settings.”

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Scroll down the “Settings” page to “Features.” Here, next to “Anonymous Posting,” click the pencil icon.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

On the “Anonymous Post” window that opens, from the “Anonymous Posting” section at the bottom, choose “On.” Then, click “Save” at the bottom of the window.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

And you’ve successfully enabled anonymous posts in your Facebook group!

You can turn anonymous posts off in your group at any time, too. To do so, open the same “Anonymous Post” window. From the “Anonymous Posting” section, select “Off.” Then, click “Save” at the bottom of the window.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

It’s great to see Facebook have an option like this, where you can post certain content without revealing your name. This should work great for posts that you don’t want your name published with, for various reasons.

On a related note, did you know that you can report the whole group to Facebook if you find it suspicious in any way?

You can use a Facebook group like a private room

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

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In This Article

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A Facebook Group is a place for group communication, letting people share their common interests and express their opinions. Groups let people come together around a common cause, issue, or activity to organize, express objectives, discuss issues, post photos, and share related content. Anybody can create and manage a Facebook Group, and you can even join up to 6,000 other Groups.

Groups, as discussed below, are not the same as private group messaging used in Facebook Messenger.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Quick Facts About Facebook Groups

Here are some short tidbits on how Facebook Groups work:

  • Any Facebook user can make a group.
  • Some groups let anyone join, but others might be private.
  • When joining a group, whether private or public, your Facebook friends might see that you’ve joined it.
  • Some groups are secret and can’t be searched for, in which case a qualifying group member has to invite you.
  • Leaving a group will not notify the other members.
  • Only the creator of the group, and anyone they make an admin, has the power to invite someone to a group.
  • You can create events, upload pictures and videos, and share files within a group.
  • Groups can be deleted by removing all the members.
  • Group admins can invite people to become Group Experts; experts have a badge next to their name and can help spread credible information to the group.

Facebook Pages vs. Groups

Groups on Facebook have undergone changes since they were first implemented. There was a time when a user’s groups would appear on their own personal page. So, if you were in a group called “Football Fans,” everyone who could see your profile would know this about you.

Now, however, those types of open forums are known as Facebook Pages, created by companies, celebrities, and brands to engage with their audience and post interesting content. Only administrators of Pages can post to the account, while those who like the Page can comment on any posts and pictures.

You use your personal profile to engage with other Page users and group members. Whenever you post something, you’re posting with your Facebook profile’s name and photo.

Unlike Facebook Pages, which are always public, a Facebook Group doesn’t have to be. Many Facebook Groups are closed; you submit a request to join the group and have access when an admin approves you. Only other members of a private group can see your posts, questions, and comments. (More on this below)

On the other hand, if you comment on or like a Page, all of your information will be available to anyone on Facebook who looks at that Page.

So, if someone were to visit the NFL on CBS Facebook Page, they could see anyone who was commenting on a photo or discussing an article. This could cause some privacy concerns, especially if you don’t have a solid understanding of how to use Facebook’s privacy settings to protect your personal profile.

Closed Facebook Groups

A Group can be more private than a Page because the creator has the option to make it closed. When a group is closed, only those invited to the Group can see the content and information shared within it.

An example of a Facebook Group might be team members working on a project together and want to communicate with one another more efficiently. By creating a Group, the team is given a private forum to share ideas on the project and post updates, just like with a Page.

Still, all information is shared only with those within the group once it’s made closed. Others will still be able to see that the group exists, but they won’t be able to see its members or any posts or information within the closed Group unless they are invited.

Secret Facebook Groups

Even more private than the closed Group is the secret group. This type of group is exactly what you would expect it to be: secret. Nobody on Facebook can see a secret group other than those in the group.

This group will not appear anywhere on your profile, and only those within the group can see who the members are and what is posted. These groups could be used if you are planning an event that you don’t want somebody to know about, or if you just want a secure platform to talk with friends.

Another example might be a family who wants to share pictures and news on Facebook but without other friends seeing everything.

Public Facebook Groups

The third privacy setting for a Group is public, meaning that anyone can see who is in the group and what has been posted. Still, only members of the group can post within it.

Networking: Groups vs. Pages

Another way groups are different from Pages is that they work on smaller networks than the entire Facebook network. You can limit your group to the network for your college, high school, or company, as well as make it a group for members of any network.

A Page can accumulate as many likes as possible. Facebook doesn’t set a limit on the number of group members you can have, but after a group reaches 5,000 people, there are some restrictions put into place, such as admins not being able to send one message to all group members.

Once inside the group, you can choose to sort by most recent posts or most recent activity. If a Facebook group has fewer than 250 people, group members can see how many times the post has been viewed. After a group exceeds 250 members, this feature is disabled.

Another difference between joining a group and liking a Page is the number of notifications that you receive. When in a group, you can set your notification preferences to be alerted every time there’s a post in the group or when a friend posts, or you can turn off notifications.

With a Page, however, you’ll be notified when someone likes your comment or tags you in a comment, much like with regular comments and likes on Facebook.

Unique Features

A unique feature only offered in Pages is Page Insights. This allows the Page administrators to see what activity the Page has been receiving during a period of time, even in a graphical representation.

This is just one of the many ways Facebook Pages allow you to monitor the audience and how well your product or message is being received. These analytics are not offered, or needed, in Groups because they’re meant to communicate with a small, select number of people rather than a wide-scale audience.

Groups have unique features, as well, including the admin’s ability to designate members as Group Experts. Experts have a badge next to their name so group members can pay particular intention to informative posts. Admins and Group Experts can collaborate on Q&A sessions, address concerns, respond to questions, and more.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Facebook this morning announced a series of new rules designed to further penalize those who violate its community standards, specifically around Facebook Groups. It also introduced rules meant to crack down on the spread of misinformation through these more private networks. The changes will impact those who had helped lead groups that were later banned and members who participated in them. The rules will also remove some of the more potentially harmful groups from Facebook’s group recommendations, among other things.

Facebook’s existing recidivism policy was meant to prevent people from creating new groups similar to those that were banned for violating its community standards. However, the rule had only applied to group admins. Now, Facebook says both admins and moderators alike will not be able to create any new groups for “a period of time” after their group had been banned for a policy violation. Facebook tells us this period is 30 days. If after the 30 days, the admin or moderator tries to create another violating group, they’ll be again paused for 30 days.

In addition, group members who had any community standards violations in a group will now require post approval for the next 30 days. That means all their posts will have to be pre-approved by a group admin or moderator. This could help groups deal with those whose behavior is often flagged, but it could also overwhelm groups with a large number of users. And Facebook says if the admins or moderators then approve a post that violates community standards, the group will be removed.

Facebook will also require groups have an active admin. Often, admins get busy and step down or leave their group. Facebook will now attempt to identify groups where an admin is not involved and proactively suggest admin roles to members who may be interested. You may have already received notifications from some of your groups that an admin is needed. If so, it’s because Facebook identified you as someone who has the potential to lead the group, as you don’t have a history of violations.

The company will begin to archive groups without an active admin in the weeks ahead, it said. This will occur when admins leave and no one else assumes the admin role.

This change could help to crack down on the unmoderated flow of information across groups, which can lead to spam and misinformation spreading quickly. It is helpful to have direct moderation, as other forum sites like Reddit have shown, but it’s often not enough. Group culture, too, can encourage certain types of content — including content that violates Facebook’s rules — and admins are often willing participants in that.

Another change will impact which groups are suggested to users.

Health groups will no longer be recommended, as “it’s crucial that people get their health information from authoritative sources,” the company said.

Unfortunately, this change alone can only mitigate the danger of misleading health information, but does little to actually stop it. Because health groups can still be found via Search, users will be able to easily surface groups that fit their beliefs, even when those beliefs are actively harmful to themselves or to others.

There are, today, a large number of groups that continue to spread misleading health information or push users to try alternative or untested cures. These group participants may have the “right” to have these discussions online, at least in Facebook’s view, but there’s disagreement on whether the groups should be allowed the same search billing and discoverability as more expert-led resources.

For instance, if you search Facebook today for vaccines, Facebook will gladly point you to several large groups that tell you not to get one. By doing so, Facebook has effectively taken away medical experts’ and doctors’ authority on health-related matters and handed it over to the general public. Multiply this at the scale of Facebook’s billions of users and across all subject matters, and it’s easy to see why simply not “recommending” some groups barely makes a dent.

Facebook is also today reminding users of its rules to reduce the spread of groups tied to violence. It already removes them from recommendations, restricts them from search, and in the near future, it says it will reduce their content in News Feed. These groups are also removed if they use veiled language and symbols in an attempt to avoid being flagged. Recently, 790 groups linked to QAnon were removed under this policy, Facebook said.

This change, however, comes too little, too late. QAnon, left unchecked for years, has tapped into the mainstream consciousness and is now involving people who may not even realize they’re being manipulated by QAnon-driven initiatives.

Then there is the not-small matter of whether Facebook can actually enforce the rules it comes up with. A quick glance at Facebook search results for QAnon indicates it cannot. It may have removed 790 of these groups, but after scrolling for a couple of minutes we couldn’t even reach the bottom of group search results after searching using “QAnon” as the keyword. And they weren’t anti-QAnon groups, either.

This demonstrates that much of Facebook’s work in this area is performative, rather than effective. A one-time sweep of harmful groups is not the same as dedicating resources and personnel to the task of pushing these dangerous fringe movements, violence-prone organizers or anti-medical science believers to the edges of society — a position they once held back in the offline, unconnected era. Today’s Facebook instead gives these groups access to all the same tools to organize as anyone else, and only limits their spread in dribs and drabs over time.

For instance, Facebook’s policy on groups tied to violence practically contradicts itself. It claims to remove groups discussing violence, but simultaneously includes a number of rules about limiting these same groups in recommendations and downranking them in search. That indicates even Facebook understands it can’t remove these groups in a timely fashion.

People disagree whether Facebook’s role should involve moderating this sort of content on its platform or to what extent any of this should be protected as “free speech.” But Facebook never really took a moral position here or argued that it’s not a governmental body, so it can make its own rules based on what it stands for. Instead, it built out massive internet infrastructure where content moderation has been an afterthought and a job to be outsourced to the less fortunate. Now Facebook wants accolades for its clean-up work, before it even successfully solves the problems it has created.

I sometimes use affiliate links in content. This doesn’t cost you anything but I may make a commission payment from anything you buy through these links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. All opinions remain my own.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Whether you run a Facebook group or are a member of one, understanding the invites process is an important one. You may need to know how to find group invites on Facebook, add someone to a group or even what it means when you have to interact with content after being invited.

Whatever the query around Facebook invites, let’s dive in and cover it.

Table of Contents

How to see group invites on Facebook

The main place to see group notifications is amongst the other notifications you receive on your Facebook account or on the app. You can open the invite to take a look and decide if you want to be a part of the group or not.

Once you have accepted the group invitation, then you can go to the ‘groups’ section on your left-hand menu and here is more information about your groups. In this section you will find a few areas:

  • Suggested for you – groups you aren’t a part of, but Facebook thinks you might be interested in
  • Categories – effectively groups of groups to help look for one in a specific area
  • Friends groups – groups that your friends are members of but that you aren’t
  • Popular near you – location based groups
  • More suggestions – a range of other groups based on your existing ones (this one just seems to keep going if you scroll!)

On the left-hand menu, there are a couple of other features. There’s groups you manage (if you have any) and groups you’re in. There’s also the option to create a group here as well as discover more.

New Facebook version

On the new Facebook layout, there are two places to see group invites. The first is similar to the old place where there’s a side menu with the groups option in it. You’ll probably need to click the arrow to open it up far enough to see it.

The other place is along the top menu. Shows how important groups now are! There are a series of icons there and the end one takes you to the new group section.

Once you are in the section, there’s a few options! For starters, on the side menu you can see any groups you run. Below this are groups you are a member of and if you have pinned any, these show at the top. I think you can still pin around 10 things and these show on your main page under the menu.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

The middle of the screen covers some suggested groups based on what you already interact with. Then there’s a feed of content from your groups. This doesn’t seem to be chronological so I think the algorithm is at work somewhere here.

If you select the ‘Discover’ option above, there’s also more suggested groups. These include local groups, group categories and friend’s groups. Because we all need more groups!

How to invite someone to a Facebook group

When it comes to inviting someone to a Facebook group, you can invite anyone you are friends with, whether the group is public or private. When you do this, they can preview the group to see if they want to join it. If you aren’t the admin of the group, then the admin is likely to need to authorise the person joining before they are accepted.

As a group admin, you can do the same to invite people to the group and there’s no need for anyone else to okay them if they accept the invite. You can invite by their name if you are friends with them. Or you can invite by their email address if you have this.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

On the new Facebook layout, this is much the same. There’s an ‘invite’ button beside the member’s pictures on the main screen. Or you can go into the members tab and follow the same process from there.

Can you send a Facebook group invite message?

Unlike LinkedIn for example, you can’t send someone a message along with the invite. It would be great if you could tell your friend why you sent them the invite but there’s not the facility right now. Of course, you could simply message them and tell them why you invited them to the group.

Group preview mode

Once you invite someone to a group and they are accepted by the admin, they will be in ‘preview mode’. This means they won’t be able to post in the group or comment on any posts. They won’t be able to invite anyone else to the group. Members of the group that you are previewing can see you are previewing it but anyone who isn’t a member won’t see this.

If you are happy with the group, you can accept the invitation and then you will have full access to the group. Or you can decline, and the preview will vanish.

How to see who invited someone to a Facebook group

If someone invites a friend to your group, this now shows on the page where you accept members. It can be handy, especially as the person being invited doesn’t seem to get the option to answer the questions. So by seeing another member has invited them, you can decide if to let them in or not.

Joining Facebook groups as a page

One of the more recent additions is the ability to join a group as you or as your Page. Not all groups allow this, there’s a setting to toggle to allow this. But if the group does, when you go to join there will be a box pops up that asks whether you want to join as you or your page.

Pages can request to join a group but cannot be invited by someone. However, if you join as you or a Page and want to switch to the other, if the group allows Pages you can change who you are interacting as.

How to add an admin to your Facebook group

There are lots of reasons why you might want someone as an admin of your group. Whatever the reason, go to the members section of the group settings and click the three dots beside the person’s name. select either ‘make admin’ or ‘make moderator’ depending on how much access you want to give them.

This will send them an invite to become the admin. You can hit the three dots to remove this invite if you change your mind. Admins can remove members, add them, edit settings and group descriptions. However only people not Pages can be an admin.

Missing Group invites

Facebook group invites are a little complicated as if you miss the notification, it can be tricky to find it again. But if you search for the group with the search bar and find it, your invitation will appear along the top for you to accept.

Angela Tempest

Angela is a blogger and content marketer with over 8 years experience. She has worked with clients around the world to create blog post content as well as running her own blogs on areas such as food, crafts and lifestyle topics.

Member Request Settings for Facebook Groups

We stumbled over a great new feature for Groups recently that anyone who administers a large Group will be delighted to see.

Most Groups tend to be Closed meaning that prospective members have to apply to join. For large Groups that attract multiple applications a day sorting and vetting these applications can be an onerous task?

Why not just let everyone join your Facebook Group?

Because a good number of those people attracted to your Group are attracted for the potential to spam sell to your members with their own products and services. Because, unlike on Facebook Pages, member posts in Groups get the same visibility as posts by Admins, Groups are hunting grounds for spammers, trolls and other undesirables. Some Groups deal with this by vetting all posts before they go public, but that kind of sends the wrong message to your genuine members about their value, and the trust you have in them in your carefully facilitated community.

How do Group Admins currently vet prospective members?

In a closed Group a prospective member applies to join and the Admin gets a membership request. The Admin can see if the user has other friends in the Group (normally positive), when they joined Facebook and how many other Groups they are part of. People that joined recently or who are members of hundreds of Groups normally raise a red flag to an experienced Admin as acceptance generally results in an avalanche of spammy posts shortly afterwards. The screen grabs below show how it appears on desktop and mobile.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

The Admin can also click through to their Facebook Profile to suss out aspects such as interests, where they live etc etc.

This is all very well but it all takes time to do and if you have very precise criteria for prospective members it would make sense to be able to simply ask them a few questions when they apply.

That’s not been possible. Until now.

Since December 2016 Facebook has been testing and gradually rolling out a new feature called Member Request Settings. It looks like this:

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Where to find Facebook Group Member Request settings

This is not the easiest thing to find in your Group settings. You need to go to the Group on desktop (it doesn’t yet work on mobile) and look for the three little dots (…) on the right of the top nav bar. Go to Manage Group then look for Member Requests in the left hand menu. If you don’t see it, be patient, it is still to be fully rolled out.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Once there you get the option to ask open ended questions of your choice and also to set up to three priorities (places they have lived, where they work and education) to see if the prospective member’s profile matches the criteria you select.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Once completed you can then sort through your pending members by priority.
The priorities are fairly limited at the moment. Places they have lived are towns and cities rather than countries. Work is by specific company (great if you are creating a Facebook Group for employees or ex-employees) and Education is by particular learning institute. My first Facebook Group was for alumni of Manchester Metropolitan University’s Digital Marketing MSc. This level of criteria would have been very useful:
How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Where to go for further resources on Facebook Groups

Want to know more about setting up and running a Facebook Group?

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook groupWe’ve got an entire course on Facebook Groups over at the Digiterati Academy (this includes an additional hours’ module covering all the recent updates to Facebook Groups) as well as a Masterclass on using Group Member Request settings (which goes into even more detail than this blog post!)

Update (summer 2017)

Several months after writing this post we have seen this Ask Questions feature fully rolled out to all Groups. It’s been pretty much universally applauded and for large groups at least, Admins are welcoming the ability to weed out people they would rather not have (these are typically spammers).

In my own Groups I’ve refined my questions a little and use one of the three for data capture. In return for an email address they are sent some freebies. Be aware that you don’t get to keep a list of the responses to the questions so you need to screen grab or copy and paste them into your database at the point of acceptance. This is a very manual process so not ideal for huge Groups unless you have some patient Admins with time on their hands!

Some Groups are simply not accepting people who have not answered the questions (you need to make this policy clear). Others use the questions as a form of interview “Why do you want to join this Group?” “What value will you bring?” I cover this in a lot more detail (with examples) in the new Masterclass I’ve created for the Digiterati Academy on all the changes to Facebook Groups.

And if you would prefer not to add friction to the Group joining process of course you can opt not to use the questions. This is arguably the right approach for new, small Groups that are keen to grow and not a likely target for “unsuitables” anyway.

There have been lots of exciting updates to Groups in recent months and more are still rolling out. Facebook is really emphasising Groups at the moment so we’d encourage all organisations to think hard about shifting emphasis from Pages to Groups and riding this particular zeitgeist.

In this post we’re going to learn how to add someone as a moderator on your business or organisation’s Facebook page, and also what it looks like when you are added as a moderator of a page. For more basic information about setting up your Facebook page, see my article on Facebook for business.

How do I add someone as an administrator to my Facebook page?

To be added as an administrator of a page, you must Like that page first (or to be added as an administrator of a group, you must be a member of that group)

To add someone as an administrator of a page, they must Like that page first.

To add someone as a moderator, find See Likes on the Admin Panel of your page

You will see a list of people who have “Liked” your page, each with a little icon to the right.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Find the person you want to add, click on the icon and choose Make Admin:

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Once you’ve done that, you will get another screen which shows all of the people who are admins of that page:

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

This shows that you’ve added someone to have admin rights. Note the x top right – this can be used to remove them. Press Save … and you’ll be asked for your password (just as a safety measure):

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Add your password and there they are, an admin.

How do I access the Page Roles area to change what my moderators can do?

If you want to change the roles that people have in moderating your page, go into the Page roles area by choosing Edit Page in the Admin Panel, then Manage Page Roles:

What are the different Facebook page moderator levels?

You can choose different levels of moderation to give to your admin people. If you want to change these at any time, go into the Page Roles area by choosing Edit Page then Manage Page Roles (see screenshot in the previous section.

Now, click on the arrow by the role name assigned to your moderator, and you will see a list of choices. The role that the administrator currently has will have a tick next to it. Click on a role to change the privileges that the administrator has.

An Editor can do everything that an Admin can do, plus they can edit the page itself.

A Moderator can do everything that an Admin can do, plus they can delete comments on the page

An Advertiser can see who created posts and comments, view insights (stats) and create adverts

An Analyst can see who created posts and comments and view insights

What does it look like when I’m added as an Admin of a Facebook page or group?

When the moderator of the page adds you as an admin, you will receive a notification. Depending on how you have notifications set up, you may receive an email – there will be a notification in your Facebook Notifications list. Here’s Laura’s which arrived after I’d added her, above:

On your own Facebook feed, you will see all of the Pages you administrate under the Pages heading. For groups, there is also a section called Groups You Admin under the Groups heading.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

And here’s Laura’s Facebook menu, showing that she’s now administrator of her own page and mine:

To view the page or group for which you have admin rights, click on the page or group and your view will be that of the administrator, with the Admin panel at the top:

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

What does having moderator status for a Facebook page actually mean?

Once you’re a moderator / admin, you can do any or all of the following (see list above for the different roles): see all of the statistics for the page, who likes that page and how the posts on the page are doing; comment under the name of the page (so in my case, Laura can post on the page as if she’s called Libro Proofreading and Copyediting Services) and delete other people’s comments as appropriate; create adverts.

So, if you are the owner of a page and add admins, be careful if you’ve associated a bank account or PayPal account with the page, or make sure you choose the appropriate role level for your moderators and make sure you trust any people to whom you’ve given full roles to not to go booking millions of adverts without your say-so!

To summarise – if someone asks you to be a page administrator / moderator for their or their business’s Facebook page:

  • Make sure you ‘Like’ their page first
  • Ask them to find you in the list of people who ‘Like the page’
  • Ask them to click and make you a moderator
  • You will receive a notification and the page will appear at the top of your page list in the left-hand margin
  • Click on the page name in the left-hand margin and you will have full administrator rights

In this post, we’ve learned how to add someone as a page administrator, and what happens to that person’s view of Facebook once this has been done. Thanks to Laura Ripper for providing screen shots and being a guinea pig page admin! Her Facebook page is here and the Libro one is here.

If you’ve enjoyed this post and found it useful, please share it using the buttons below! Thank you!

You can find more resources on social media in my blog resource guide (link takes you to the social media section) and read about using social media for your business in my book on growing your business.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

We only get to ask three questions when people join our groups, so it’s important to make sure we make the most of the information we’re getting from new group members!

Not sure which questions to ask in your group?

We know we can currently only ask three, but sometimes it’s hard to figure out what those three should be!

Here are some ideas for your group questions:

#1 The email grab

This one’s essential. Grab their email addresses as soon as they join!*

Example: “Give us your email address if you’d like to receive updates about (group, business, etc.).”

#2: Rule & group policy reminders:

Rule & policy reminders are helpful for pointing out that yes, you have rules, and yes, you expect them to be followed.

  • Do you agree to the rules?
  • Paraphrase one of the group rules listed below. (This is great for making sure people at least skim the rules, plus it helps out bots!)
  • Hiding something in the rules to make sure people are paying attention.
    • Example: What is the group’s collective favorite pizza spot? (“hide” the answer in one of the rules)
  • Do you agree to the rules? Which one stands out to you? (This one serves two purposes: to bring attention to the rules and to prove the person is a human.)
  • The “warning” question
    • Examples
      “Do you understand that there may be discussion here you won’t like and you should just scroll past these threads?”
      “Will you be upset if we turn off comments off for any reason?”
      “Do you know what to do if someone upsets you in this group?”
  • Emphasis on privacy question:
    • Will you uphold the privacy of the group?”
  • Head troublemakers off at the pass question: “Have you ever been booted or banned from a group? Please explain.”

#3: Prove you’re human questions:

If your group is prone to fake profiles, these are really helpful for weeding out bots and Nigerian princes!

  • What did you have for breakfast?
  • What’s your favorite color?
  • What’s your favorite TV show?

#4: Business and group helper questions:

These questions might help you focus on your marketing, on group topics, or something else that helps your group and/or business.

  • How did you find us? – This one is great for tracking where the best investment might be in advertising your group.
  • What do you expect from this group? – This helps you to create content that is helpful to your uses
  • Why do you want to join?
  • What are you struggling with (in your town/with your health/in your business, etc.)?

#5: Super specific targeted questions:

This is an example of some rules that are really specific to a group. These are helpful for groups where it’s super important to group admins to stay on-topic.

  • What was the last Urban Fantasy book you read?
  • Who are your top 5 favorite Urban Fantasy Lead Characters?
  • Who is your most read Urban Fantasy Author?

Don’t forget: you now have question formulation options!

For many (but not all) groups, Facebook now offers different types of questions, which you might want to also consider using. Previously, only a written answer was available, whereas now you can formulate your questions using checkboxes or multiple choice options.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

I hope these ideas help you to refine your group rules!

*Editor’s Note: It has been brought to my attention that some people have concerns regarding GDPR and privacy policy with asking people for their email address in the questions. It is my belief at this time that if Facebook took major issue with this, they would prevent the words “email, email address, etc.” from being added in the questions. Given the new Apple iOs restrictions going into place along with Google phasing out tracking, I believe these privacy issues will be addressed at a much higher level.

That being said, an alternative to asking for an email address in the questions is to simply provide a link to a sign-up form. This is not ideal, because you need a website or a place to house the sign-up form, where you can also include your privacy policy. I also strongly recommend including an incentive, such as a free download. Example question: “Visit www.samplesite.com/signup to get our 10 most popular recipes.”

I have noticed that some people are requesting to be part of my private FB group without answering my three questions…and when I dig further, I find that they honestly did not see them….SO what is in the settings that I am missing that some poeple who join see the questions and other don’t see the quesitions. For example, one gal this morning was requesting to be added and didn’t answer my questions…my initial reaction was just to delete request…and instead, I asked what brought you to the group. and from there I discovered that she did not see the questions that i set up. So some are seeing the qeustions and some are not ….Help! Send response to [email protected] Thank you.

I have noticed this on occasion as well and I believe it is a Facebook bug, especially when it comes to answering the questions on a mobile device. I had the same problem and got in touch with Facebook. It was not resolved, but the more people they hear from, the better. I would contact Facebook support to let them know (this is what I did as well). Good luck!

Are the answers to the questions stored anywhere?

Looking to set up a Facebook page for your condo or homeowner association? Here are seven tips for creating and managing it so it doesn’t backfire.

1. Think about whether it’s your best move.

“I’ve helped boards that want to set up community pages, but I don’t know if I’d want them to do it on Facebook,” says Joshua Krut, a partner at Weiss Serota Helfman Cole Bierman & Popok, a law firm with offices in Ft. Lauderdale and Coral Gables, Fla., that represents about 250 associations. “I prefer to see associations use websites, instead. There are companies that can help you set up a website, and you can put things like architectural review documents there and have community chat rooms. You can have a Facebook pages, and it’s not a big problem if you do. But with Facebook, the association doesn’t control the page. You’re dealing with a third-party administrator.”

2. Know that it may draw in owners who otherwise wouldn’t pay attention.

“I’m a big tech fan,” says Melissa Garcia, a partner at Hindman Sanchez, a law firm in Arvada, Colo., with about 1,600 association clients. “I’m on Twitter, and I pass along lots of HOA practice pointers. I see the benefits of Twitter, and I also see the benefits of associations using Facebook. They allow associations to connect with owners whom they may not necessarily connect with by going to meetings, like millennials.”

3. Understand the liability of the easy sharing on social media.

“There’s greater potential for liability for boards on social media if they’re not thinking about monitoring what’s being said or putting protections in place,” explains Garcia. “With social media, there’s an element of conversation that you don’t get with vehicles like a newsletter. People can comment and they can forward, and social media posts get catapulted into the cyberworld. Boards need to understand that maybe the people you intended to see something got it, but that it also went to a lot of other people. Boards also forget that the attraction of social media is that people can post on the go. So people forget to think about what they’re posting, which may lead to more defamation and invasion of privacy claims.”

4. Have a policy in advance.

“Boards can do a lot of things to protect themselves,” says Garcia. “They absolutely need to have some social media policy in place to define who gets to post and what kinds of posts are prohibited, and reserving the right to block repeat offenders who are putting up inappropriate posts. They should also adopt individual controls—like Facebook can block words, and boards should use those controls, too. The policy should also include a code of conduct. It should state things like you can’t post confidential information, and you can’t use derogatory terminology.”

5. Make your page closed, but send invitations to join.

Screen people who want to join your page to be sure they’re actual residents or owners of property within your HOA, suggests Eric Colburn, founder of Verdei Properties Inc., a community association management company in Dallas. But also send invitations to all residents so everybody knows the page is available, and encourage those who do join to check your page regularly to stay informed. As part of that effort, determine whether your page will be open to teens in the community or only adult residents. And when people move out of or sell their home in your association, remove them from the page’s membership.

6. Don’t bore residents to tears.

Yes, it’s tempting to post lots and lots of board information on the page. But residents will stop checking in if your page is full of monotonous and lengthy posts about those issues, contends Colburn. He suggests posting excerpts from your rules only when a reminder seems to be needed, and adding a prompt to get members to read the whole document for context.

7. Provide helpful documents.

Create a tab on your Facebook page where you post important documents like your bylaws and rules and regulations, meeting minutes, agenda items for your annual meeting, amenity rules, and so on, suggests Colburn. Also have a tab that opens to a list of important contacts for people like your property management company; reliable vendors for electrical, HVAC, and plumbing issues; and your neighborhood watch contact.

Facebook has announced the full roll-out of a new, automatic member approval process for groups, which could help reduce management time for group admins, while still enabling them to maintain some control over group membership.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

As you can see in this example, the new process enables group admins to set up to four requirements for automated membership.

Admins can require that applicants:

  1. Complete all membership questions
  2. Live within a specific city or region (as listed on their Facebook profile)
  3. Be approved only if they are friends with people who are current members of the group
  4. Have been active on Facebook for at least one year

As noted, this enables admins to maintain some level of control over incoming members, even if they’re not individually approving each. What’s more, these variables can’t be falsified or cheated, because they’re not manually entered. That’ll help provide some assurance to group admins that they’re only letting real people in – though it does somewhat reduce their control, which could still allow undesirables to join up. But they can, of course, be removed at any time after as well.

As your Facebook group grows, so too do your management tasks and admin requirements, and approving new members is one of those elements that can quickly become overwhelming. That’s generally a good problem to have, but automated tools like this could take a lot of the pressure off, and help admins focus on other, more important aspects, like moderation and maximizing engagement.

And when those tasks also start to stack up, you can tap into Facebook’s new ‘Suggested Moderator’ recommendations, which will highlight active members who could make good assistants for such.

Facebook has made groups a bigger focus in 2019, with more conversations shifting to enclosed spaces, where users can discuss their thoughts and beliefs without having to share the same with all of their connections. That enables Facebook to maximize engagement, but it may also hide some of the more controversial posts in private areas, away from public scrutiny.

Whether that’s a good thing or not remains to be seen, but clearly, groups are on the rise, and new tools like this will help admins better manage their forums.

To set up automatic member approvals:

  • Go to “Moderate Group” on your desktop computer
  • Click on “Automatically Approve Members”
  • Follow the instructions to set up your membership requirements
  • You can always return to this screen to edit your membership requirements anytime

The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.

Facebook shows it’s tyrannical overreach ( Score: 5, Insightful)

Because the option of allowing group founders and moderators to allow/block posts as they like and people to freely associate with them by joining or not joining if they want to see them or not is right out for the folks at Facebook, right?

They’re not the government, but they’re surely driving people off their platform for alternatives.

Re:Facebook shows it’s tyrannical overreach ( Score: 5, Insightful)

Re: Facebook shows it’s tyrannical overreach ( Score: 2)

Re: ( Score: 2)

They’re not the government, but they’re surely driving people off their platform for alternatives.

I oppose censorship by corporations, but I don’t see anyone leaving the platform yet because of this.

Re: ( Score: 2)

I’ve seen at least two complete groups pick-up and move elsewhere (fan groups for fiction authors) and three more post instructions on where to go when Facebook eventually goes after the moderators and closes the group down after they don’t moderate as Facebook desires.

Re: ( Score: 3)

Good, why should all these groups be behind a walled garden, that is censorship by exclusion. At least with Twitter you can easily join with a pseudonym.

And to anyone who ever said forcing people to use their real names would stop trolling, lies and misinformation my answer is: Facebook.

I sincerely hope all good groups leave Facebook and set up in a more open manner.

Re:Facebook shows it’s tyrannical overreach ( Score: 4, Insightful)

“I don’t want to sound like a killjoy, but because this is not to my taste I don’t think anyone else should be allowed to enjoy it.” – Marge Simpson

Re: ( Score: 2)

“They’re not the government, but they’re surely driving people off their platform for alternatives.”

They are a private company and they can throw out whoever they dislike or who is ruining their business, just like you in your house.

Say it with me ( Score: 2)

Facebook is a private company just like slashdot. Slashdot deletes posts here all the time. Is that tyrannical overreach? If you disagree with how facebook handles their content feel free to use the dozens of other social media platforms. I see many triggered Trump supporters moving to Parler now.

Re:President-elect is a conspiracy itself. ( Score: 5, Insightful)

Re: ( Score: 2, Insightful)

You, of course, would never stoop so low as to actually watch Fox News, so you are just sure that it is all pro-Trump all the time.

The reality is that Fox has maybe a half dozen explicitly pro-Trump personalities (most or all of whom needed to be convinced because they started out openly hostile towards him) and many, many more who are nominally pro-Republican but are somewhere between indifferent to hostile towards him. When Paul Ryan joined the board, he reportedly said that he wanted to use his position

Re: ( Score: 2)

This is the funniest shit I’ve read all morning. Can you point me towards any Fox stories that are critical of Trump? I’ll keep checking back here.

Re: ( Score: 2)

Re: President-elect is a conspiracy itself. ( Score: 5, Interesting)

“But even if Fox really were rabidly right wing, which it isn’t”

Besides the dozen or so explicitly right wing personalities you mentioned, the very right leaning foxnews.com content, right leaning fox affiliates on radio, and you forgot to mention Rupert Murdoch, the owner, with his thumbprint on everything.

I know there are actual news teams at Fox News and its affiliates that do a very good job of being unbiased, like news updates during the breaks on the radio that sometimes conflict with the current host’s view of reality. When the reporter signed off with “Fox News, fair and balanced”, I believe that person meant it sincerely, but then the biased-AF talk show host returns from the break.

And foxnews.com, there is no defense of that piece of work, it’s a kaleidoscope of shit from Fox personalities, transcripts from the latest Ingraham show, opinion pieces everywhere that are only marked as such after you click the headline, with random bits from the real news team mixed in for authenticity. To save Fox News’s credibility they really ought to start there and split off the entertainment side, same way they do in their other media.

So Fox News isn’t OAN, if that’s what you mean, but it’s impossible to say it isn’t rabidly right wing, it is, by design, explicitly so, but it’s not explicitly Trumpian. I expect it will eventually slide to the usual entertainment/news with a slant to make conservatives feel good, once Trump fades.

Facebook Groups have gained a lot of prominence in the last few years. There are now groups for everything from entertainment to educational and professional purposes. For example, a group dedicated to a TV show can be created for all the fans of that particular show to discuss about it. Similarly, a group can also be created for students enrolled in the same course in a college.

Thus, with extensive uses come more responsibilities. The groups need to be managed properly and the Admins must make sure that all group rules and policies are being followed. In addition to that, it is important for groups to add only the right people.

For these purposes until now, Admins had the option to test the users before they could approve their requests to join. The test comprised of multiple descriptive questions relevant to the group’s theme. For the rules and regulations, a pinned post was prepared.

However, Facebook is now making things easier for Group Admins. In addition to questions requiring written answers, Admins can now ask multiple choice and checkbox questions for ensuring that the right people get approval to join their group.

  • Also read: Facebook will soon Allow Users to Mute Notification Dots and Push Notifications!

As for the rules, Admins will have a toggle available along with the Membership Questions, that will allow them to include the group rules and regulations and members would have to agree to the rules. Filter options have also been spotted, allowing Admins to filter the requests based on multiple factors including Profile Type, Questions, Rules etc.

The news of this beneficial Group feature was shared by Social Media Consultant Matt Navarra, who also included screenshots to show this feature in action. It remains to be seen how Social Media Managers react to this change after incorporating it into their groups.

Facebook Group admins will be happy about this new feature. 👍❤️

To help make it easier for admins to review responses from potential members and grow their group, we are adding more format options to membership questions. Now, admins will be able to ask not only open-ended questions, but also single-answer multiple-choice questions and multiple-answer checkbox questions. Admins will also be able to set up rules agreements that will ask members to agree to their group rules before submitting their membership request.
To set up these new formats of membership questions on desktop:
Go to your group on desktop and click Member Requests. From there, click the gear icon labeled Settings. Type in the custom questions you would like to ask potential members. Once you create your membership questions, you or other admins can edit or remove them at any time.
To set up these new formats of membership questions on mobile:
Go to your Group Settings on your mobile device. Tap on “Pending Member Questions”. Add or edit your membership questions. These new enhancements are available on desktop and mobile. We’re beginning to test these features with a small number of groups and will continue to roll it out in the coming weeks. Click here for more general information about membership questions.

This post was originally published on 29 June 2019.

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Currently there is no way to moderate comments on Facebook business page’s. This means any comment posted will be visible, there is no way of keeping a comment private until you view it and approve it.

Understandably, this can make some people feel a little uneasy and unsure of whether they should create a Facebook business page incase a negative comment is posted.

This post will explain a few options you have to control comment posting.

Facebook page moderation blocklist.

Facebook page settings give you the option of creating a list of ‘blocked words’, which in theory means you could prevent any negative comments being posted on your walls if you blocked negative words like ‘bad’ or ‘awful’.

Any comments containing any of the blocked words will be flagged as spam and will not be posted to the page wall.

There is also the option the block profanities, which has two settings; medium and strong.

You can do this by;

  1. Viewing your page and clicking on the ‘Edit page’ icon in the top right hand corner of the page.
  2. This will take you to the ‘Manage permissions’ tab where you will be able to edit your moderation blocklist and profanity blocklist as shown in the image above.

Comment moderation

As mentioned at the beginning of the post, there’s no way to hold a comment for moderation on a Facebook page but there are a couple of commenting settings you can tweak.

You could go all out and block comments entirely by removing the posting ability by unticking the ‘People can write or post content on the wall’ box

You can alter the page people land on when they go to your Facebook page.
Instead of them being taken straight to the page wall, visitors could be taken to a welcome page and then choose the page they want to visit.

These features can be accessed by:

  1. Viewing your Facebook page and clicking on ‘Edit page’ in the top right hand corner.
  2. You will then automatically be taken to the ‘Manage Permissions’ tab where you can alter the ‘Default landing tab’ and the ‘Posting ability’.

If you decide not to disable comments and you’re concerned about negative comments, there are a couple of things you can do to limit damage.

The comment can be removed by hovering over the comment and clicked the world icon and then selecting ‘delete post’.
Alternatively you could just hide the post or report it as abuse if you consider it to be abusive.

The page settings can be altered, so an email will be sent as soon as someone comments on something on the page. The comment can then be read and decision can be made over whether to keep it on the page or delete it.

This can be done by;

  1. Viewing your page and clicking on the ‘Edit page’ button.
  2. Then select ‘Your settings’ from the tab on the left hand side.
  3. When you are taken to this page you will be able to check the box saying ‘Email notifications’.

It’s a shame Facebook don’t allow full comment moderation, it would make people feel much more comfortable and happier about putting their brand out there, knowing a negative comment would never have to be seen by the public.

So many questions pop up when it comes to social media, but don’t get stuck, just head over to our social blogs for all the answers you need.

Remember you can find us on facebook, twitter and pinterest for all our latest social media updates. Or if you feel you may need a little advice with your own social media, whether that’s getting started, or refreshing your knowledge, give us a call on 01543 495752 for a no obligation chat.

Harry Guinness is a photography expert and writer with nearly a decade of experience. His work has been published in newspapers like The New York Times and on a variety of other websites, from Lifehacker to Popular Science and Medium’s OneZero. Read more.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Groups are one of Facebook’s best features. They’re really handy for anyone who wants to run a club or interact with people who share the same hobbies.

Groups can have one of three different privacy levels: Public, Closed, and Secret.

If it’s set to Public, your Group is visible in Facebook searches. Anyone who finds it can see everything that’s posted to the group and can join it without needing another member’s approval.

If it’s set to Closed, your Group is still visible in Facebook searches but the content is private. Anyone can request to join but they need to be approved by another member.

If it’s set to Secret, your Group is invisible on Facebook. Only members and former members will see it exists. New members must be invited by an existing one.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

There are plenty of different reasons for changing the privacy of your Group, so let’s look at how.

One thing to note before we begin: if your group has less than 5000 members, you can change the Group’s privacy as much as you like. If you’ve more than 5000 members, you can always move it to a more private setting, but you can’t make it less private.

Open your Facebook Group and click the three little dots just below the cover photo.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

From the dropdown, select Edit Group Settings.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Scroll down until you see Privacy then click Change Privacy Settings.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Select the new Privacy setting you want and click Confirm.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Finally click Save to set the new Privacy settings.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Facebook has released a new update which adds some new parameters around how group admins are able to invite and add new members to their groups.

Up until now, Facebook users have been able to add friends to groups which they believe those people will be interested in, and those friends would automatically be added to said group. You’ve likely experienced this for yourself – you get a notification that you’ve been added to a group of some kind, then you see a range of group updates making their way into your News Feed.

This can be a good way for group admins to inflate the size of their groups, because while those added users can, of course, remove themselves from the group, friends, in particular, may simply mute notifications, so as to not cause offense, but filter the updates out of their feed.

As Facebook notes, this also means that there may well be people who’ve been added to your group who’ve never actually visited it. So now, these users will not be automatically added, but will be put onto a new ‘Invited’ list in the group admin dashboard. If a user is invited by a friend, they’ll need to manually accept that invitation by visiting the group. They’ll also no longer be included in the total group member count, which could see some group audience figures drop.

Facebook is also giving admins the capacity to send one reminder note to each invitee to re-prompt them to join their group. If those users don’t take action, they won’t be added, or listed in group member counts.

It’s a fairly simple, and logical addition for Facebook – as noted, it can be annoying to be added into a group, and to have your News Feed invaded by random updates from discussions that you may actually have little to no interest in. But it will, as noted, affect some group member counts. If you’ve invited a heap of people to join your Facebook group, and you haven’t seen those people active in your community, you could see your numbers decline.

The changes are going into effect over the next few weeks.

Last Updated on December 3, 2021 by Peter Wood

Posting photos on Facebook should be one of the great pleasures for Facebook users. When you share your amazing pictures with your Facebook friends by posting images on your Facebook page, you also share your happiness with them. They are different kinds of Facebook photos include profile pictures, cover photos, and Facebook Timeline pictures. So knowing how to post images on the Facebook app in the easiest way is deemed essential. Just start learning to post photos on Facebook from a computer for various types of pictures in multiple ways as below.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

  • Part 1. How to Post Photos on Facebook Profile
  • Part 2. How to Post Photos on Facebook Timeline
  • Part 3. How to Post Photos on Facebook Comments
  • Part 4. How to Post Photos on Facebook without Notification
  • Extended Reading: Top 5 Websites to Find Photos to Put on Facebook

Part 1. How to Post Photos on Facebook Profile

Facebook Cover photo and profile photo is the most stunning parts on Facebook profile. They are visible to any people who are visiting your Facebook page by default. To some extent, upload profile photos and cover photos on the Facebook page should attract more people and highlight your unique personality. Take a post cover photo on Facebook as an example. You can post photos on your Facebook profile by following easy steps.

Step 1. log in to your Facebook account and go to your Facebook profile.

Step 2. Click on Update Cover Photo in the top-left of your current cover photo.

Step 3. Choose one cover photo. You can post a new photo on Facebook by clicking Upload photo.

Step 4. Reposition the cover. After picking a picture, you can drag it up or down until the photo is incorrect position.

Step 5. Click Save Changes. You will find the cover photo has already changed.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

When you finished changing the cover photo on Facebook, the new cover photo is usually showed up on Facebook Timeline. And your Facebook friends can see your style has changed immediately. Besides, the method to post profile photos on Facebook is similar to posting cover photos way on Facebook. You can also apply to change profile photos on Facebook.

Part 2. How to Post Photos on Facebook Timeline

Upload cover photo and profile are the necessary skills. Also, it is easy to post photos on Facebook Timeline. When you take magnificent photos while traveling, you can post multiple photos on Facebook to record and share your pleasant memories. At this time, if you want to post photos on the Facebook wall rather than just a single photo, you can learn the way to post photos on Facebook Timeline as below.

Step 1. Go to your Facebook News Feed or go to Timeline.

Step 2. Click on the text field on the top of your current page.

Step 3. Click on Photo/Video button. Then it will navigate to the photos you want.

Step 4. Select photos in bulk by using Ctrl+Select to pick pictures you want to post or click Choose a file to upload pictures one by one.

Step 5. Wait for the pictures to load and share your photos.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

With all five simple steps above, you can post photos on the Facebook wall effectively. The methods of posting pictures on Facebook album and posting photos on Facebook Timeline are consistent. Therefore, if you want to post images on a Facebook album, you can create a new album to add pictures on Facebook. Otherwise, you can post photos on Facebook’s current albums. You need to go to the Photos area and choose an album you won’t post pictures. Enter the album and click Add Photos/Videos.

People Also Read:

  • How to Make Photos Private on Facebook
  • How to Delete Photos on Facebook

Part 3. How to Post Photos on Facebook Comments

Usually, when you post photos on Facebook, you will receive comments from other people. It is common to see people post a photo or a sticker in a comment box to express their vivid feelings. You can also save fantastic photos from Facebook comments. If you post stunning photos on Facebook comments, that can delight the people who can see them. And you can try to post pictures on Facebook comments to convey your appreciation for some awesome stuff instead of type your text comment.

Step 1. log in to Facebook before going to Home

Step 2. Find the post you like, and click the camera icon on the right side of a text box.

Step 3. Choose a photo you want to attach and then press Enter with your keyboard to post a photo on the Facebook comment.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Post a photo on Facebook comment is easy to learn. If you prefer to post multiple pictures on Facebook comments, you can post images on Facebook again by repeating the No.3 step above. You can comment with a photo. You can post a picture on Facebook comments and write something on your Facebook friends’ profiles. To share something your Facebook friend perhaps interests in. Meanwhile, add a beautiful photo for text.

Part 4. How to Post Photos on Facebook without Notification

If you post photos on the Facebook album, they can always show on Facebook Timeline. Facebook will announce to all your friends that you uploaded photos to an album. It almost posts everything you do. It can be annoyed and also will invade your privacy. To protect the photo’s privacy, you can choose to make photos private on Facebook or hide photos on Facebook. Moreover, you can post pictures on Facebook without publishing.

Step 1. Go to your Facebook profile.

Step 2. Click the Photos button undercover photo. Choose an album you want to import photos.

Step 3. Click Add Photos/Videos and select a file you want.

Step 4. Wait for the image to upload and then do not click anything.

Step 5. Click the back button and choose Leave this page.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

You saved the photo added to the album without posting to any feeds. You can post pictures on Facebook without going on the newsfeed. If you want to post cover photos or profile pictures on Facebook without notifying anyone, you can make photos private on Facebook or hide photos on Facebook. Post photos on Facebook but not publish will also help you to enjoy a better social media life on Facebook. You can have more time to appreciate splendid photographs rather than deal with meaningless notifications.

UPDATE: Jan 2020 – Video Update at bottom of this blog re: questions about where the pending invitation goes Cheers!

From time to time, you may need to give someone access to your Facebook page to post or create ads on your behalf. It is a good practice to check in on who has access to your page every so often or as people join or leave your team so you can maintain the security of your business page.

Here are the instructions on adding someone to your page:

There’s no limit to the number of people who can have a role on a Page. Learn more about what each Page role can do.

Give Someone a Role

If you’re an admin:

  1. Click Settings at the top of your Page.
  2. Click Page Roles in the left column.
  3. Type a name or email in the box:
    • If the person is your Facebook friend, begin typing their name and select them from the list that appears.
    • If the person isn’t your Facebook friend, type the email address associated with their Facebook account.
  4. Click Editor to select a role from the dropdown menu.
  5. Click Add and enter your password to confirm.
  1. Click Settings at the top of your Page.
  2. Click Page Roles in the left column.
  3. Click Edit next to the person you want to remove, and then click Remove.
  4. Click Confirm. You may need to enter your password.
  1. Click Settings at the top of your Page.
  2. Click Page Roles in the left column.
  3. Click Edit next to the name of the person whose role you want to change and then select a new role from the dropdown menu.
  4. Click Save. You may need to enter your password to confirm.

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Facebook announced a dramatic update to it’s news feed designed to limit the reach of pages and groups that violate it’s content policies. Facebook introduced a new algorithm signal focused on links that decides whether a site has authority and if not, will see it’s news feed reach diminished.

Click-Gap Signal

While Facebook uses partners such as the Associated Press to judge the validity of content, it announced a new automated approach that relies on inbound and outbound linking patterns to determine if a site linked by Facebook users is authoritative or not.

Facebook revealed that the Click-Gap metric is in use right now.

What is the Click-Gap Signal?

The Click-Gap signal is a measurement of the inbound and outbound link patterns of a site that is being linked out from Facebook. Facebook will reduce the reach of of a post if the number of links from Facebook are at a level that is higher than the link popularity of the site on the Internet.

This is an authority signal that will reduce the reach of articles published on Facebook.

This is how Facebook’s announcement explained it:

“This new signal, Click-Gap, relies on the web graph, a conceptual “map” of the internet in which domains with a lot of inbound and outbound links are at the center of the graph and domains with fewer inbound and outbound links are at the edges.

Click-Gap looks for domains with a disproportionate number of outbound Facebook clicks compared to their place in the web graph. This can be a sign that the domain is succeeding on News Feed in a way that doesn’t reflect the authority they’ve built outside it and is producing low-quality content.”

This sounds like a form of statistical analysis. Any time you’re measuring a baseline for what represents normal in order to catch the outliers that are abnormal, that’s statistical analysis.

While Facebook didn’t use the phrase Statistical Analysis, the Click-Gap algorithm certainly sounds like statistical analysis.

Statistical Analysis has been a feature of search engine algorithms since at least 2005, possibly earlier. The use of statistical analysis by Google was formally announced at PubCon New Orleans in 2005.

Facebook Using Algorithms to Remove Content

Facebook announced that it will be using algorithms to automatically remove links to low quality content that is posted in groups. This algorithm will look at content posted in all groups, including private groups.

According to Facebook:

“…we identify and remove harmful groups, whether they are public, closed or secret. We can now proactively detect many types of violating content posted in groups before anyone reports them and sometimes before few people, if any, even see them.”

Facebook Group Admins Required to Police User Content

Facebook’s algorithms will consider what posts the Facebook group admins approve as a way to determine if a group will be shut down.

A Facebook group will be closed if an admin regularly approves content that is false, misleading or violates Facebook’s guidelines.

This effectively places the burden of policing member content on the shoulders of the admins. Private or secret groups will be removed if the admins approve misinformation or spam.

This is how Facebook explained it:

“Starting in the coming weeks, when reviewing a group to decide whether or not to take it down, we will look at admin and moderator content violations in that group, including member posts they have approved, as a stronger signal that the group violates our standards.”

Facebook Clickbait Will Lose Reach

Facebook’s news feed algorithm will limit the reach of content that Facebook determines is clickbait or misinformation.

According to the announcement:

“There are types of content that are problematic but don’t meet the standards for removal under our Community Standards, such as misinformation and clickbait….we’re using both technology and people to fight the rise in photo and video-based misinformation…”

News Feed Reach on Facebook

Clearly, improving inbound and outbound linking patterns on a website is important for making sure content is spread on Facebook. Sites with poor linking metrics will be considered inauthentic and lacking in authority and will see their news feed reach minimized.

Images by Shutterstock, Modified by Author

I have always emphasized the importance of Facebook presence for a Blog or any brand. Being one of the largest social networking community, if you use Facebook properly for your marketing effort, you might not need to be dependent on search engines for traffic and sales. Facebook offers many ways to promote your brand on FB and two most important are:

Facebook Pages and Facebook groups.

Both have their advantages as well as disadvantages. Here you will get to know whether you should create a ‘page’ or a ‘group’ for your blog.

Now, you could be either one of those Bloggers, who follow the year age trend and just create a Page to inform your Blog readers about latest updates and use it to connect with them. Though one major issue or I would say, the problem with Facebook pages is, it’s more like one to many communication. When any of your fans need a query to be resolved, his messages never get so much impact, and you miss out the biggest opportunity of giving a community-like feeling.

Let me track back to Blog community feature here: You can create a community around your blog only when, your readers can interact with each other and not with just you.

When it comes to a Facebook page, it can be defined as a platform where it is: ‘you’ and your ‘fans’. While a Facebook group is a platform which enables a ‘discussion’ between people who share the same interests. With a ‘page’ you can provide your fans with updates, and it’s not meant for your fans to interact with each other. If you want your fans to interact with one another and discuss the things they are interested in, then creating a ‘Group’ if for you because it will provide you and your fans with a ‘discussion environment.’

Difference Between Facebook Pages and Facebook groups:

How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Let’s look at some of the differences between Fb Pages & Fb groups:

The Purpose

A ‘Page’ is meant for representing a particular brand or a person. A ‘Group’ provides an environment where a group of people can interact with each other. A page is must have for every Blog and brand whereas a Facebook group is an additional option to take your Fb marketing efforts to next level. Officially, Facebook offers many features which are “Page” only options. Like you can use Fb advertising to get more fans or use sponsored stories to make your content reachable to more audience.

Similarly, Facebook groups offer some unique features like “Seen by”, which will let you know how many people and who all have seen your posts on the group.

The Restrictions

The ‘Page’ can be made public or admin-only. The ‘Group’ can be made public, or closed in which it’s visible but a request needs to be made, or a secret in which it can’t be found by search or other means.

Facebook pages lack the feature of instant chatting using Fb chat, where as a Facebook group members can interact using Chat feature. Which is very useful if you give an alternative way for your members to shout and communicate with each others.

Viewing other fans or members

Other people can’t be viewed on a ‘Page’. Members can be viewed in a ‘Group’.

Other than the above-mentioned points, anyone can search, find and then join a ‘Page’ unless it’s set to admin-only. The admin of a page can ban or delete a person. In a ‘Group’, an existing member can add another member. However, this can lead to the group getting out of control. The admin can delete or ban a member of the group. Like Pages, Facebook Groups offer role like a moderator, which helps admin to add more people to manage groups effectively.

Groups won’t provide you with tabs or applications. This means that you won’t be able to have a competition, a contact page or even a welcome page, etc. Having a group provides you with a ‘shared documents’ option.

The posts made in a ‘Group’ don’t go to the newsfeed, and a ‘notification’ tells about the post. This is beneficial in the sense that the members won’t miss out on a post.

However, if a lot of members are posting, then it can become annoying, and people turn off the notification option. This leads to people not coming back and seeing if something new has been posted. This is where a strict moderation rule comes into the picture.

Another thing which is common about both Pages and groups is Branding. Both have adopted new Facebook timeline cover picture, which will help you to showcase your brand.

  • How to keep your Facebook group Secret

Guideline for creating FB group for your Blogs:

I have been running a Facebook group with the name Bloggers lounge for long, and it has been a great initiative for young bloggers to interact and communicate with others.

However, one limitation which I have found using a generic name and not your brand name is keeping the group focused when thousands of people join the group. Over the time, when group members increase, it makes it hard for admins to control and being a completely open community, you can’t impose certain rules, banning defamers to keep the group spam free and clean. Here are few things which you would like to consider when creating a Fb group for your Blog:

  • Keep your group Closed. (Don’t keep it public or private)
  • Members could be added after admin approval; this will reduce the spam addition.
  • Add 1-2 moderators whom you can trust and are active on Facebook. This will help to reduce the spam.
  • Use your exact brand name to create a group, and this will ensure brand visibility and give a more professional touch to the group. You can do so by going to edit and select the name.
  • Keep posting by members open; this will help them to post their queries.

Conclusion

In the nutshell, the Facebook page is a must have for any brand and officially Facebook promote pages for using as marketing purpose. Having a group for your brand or blog will help your readers to create a discussion forum without spending a dime. Moreover, since Facebook is for real people, spam on Facebook groups will be less compared to any question and answers forum or discussion forum you are creating.

Do let me know how many of you have created a Group and a Page for your Blog and how you are using it for your Facebook Marketing effort?

Having issues with page role requests on your company Facebook page? Don’t worry, you’re not alone. Unfortunately this happens pretty often, but there’s usually a way to get around it.

If you’re trying to get someone to add you to a Facebook page:

First, you need to LIKE the page to which you’re trying to be added as a user.

If someone sends you an page role request and you don’t see the request as a notification when you login to Facebook, follow this link: https://www.facebook.com/pages/?category=invites and you should be able to see and accept the request there.

If you still can’t see the request, you should wait an hour or so and then log out of Facebook and log back in.

If you’re trying to add someone to your Facebook page:

If you’re already a user on the Facebook page, but are trying to add another user, here’s what you need to do (if you are NOT an Administrator on the page, then you need to have an Administrator complete the following steps):

  • Login to your personal Facebook and go to the Business page.
  • Click Settings at the top right of the Page.
  • In the left column, find and click Page Roles.
  • Under Assign a New Page Role, type a name or email in the box and select the correct person from the list that appears.
  • Click Editor to select a role from the drop-down menu, and then select Admin.
  • Click Add and enter your password to confirm.

If the person you’re trying to add doesn’t show up in the drop-down list, then you need to make sure the person has LIKED the page you’re trying to add him to.

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How to Approve and Reject Moderation Emails in Exchange Online with the Microsoft Graph API and Powershell

A while ago I published this blog post about doing this using EWS and a few people have recently asked if it is also possible to do this with the Graph API(which it is) so I’ve decided to include this one in my Graph Basics series.

Moderation is an Exchange feature that was introduced in Exchange 2010 that allows the Human control of mail flow to a distribution group or mailbox see https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/exchange/security-and-compliance/mail-flow-rules/manage-message-approval for more detail.

1. ItemClass– Set the ItemClass on the Message your sending in the Graph use the singleValueExtendedProperties like

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All sample scripts and source code is provided by for illustrative purposes only. All examples are untested in different environments and therefore, I cannot guarantee or imply reliability, serviceability, or function of these programs.

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How to require moderator approval for posts in your facebook group

Just as the internet as a whole erupted in discussion about the killing of George Floyd and the subsequent protests about police brutality, so have Facebook groups.

That is, if mods keep the posts up.

Some Facebook groups have fallen apart according to The Verge, as a result of infighting or post deletion by mods, or a combination of the two. Anyone who’s in a group for their seemingly-unrelated interest — dancing, being a mom, bullet journaling — can see the purview of opinions not just about Black Lives Matter and the protests, but about the discussion itself being allowed in said groups.

Facebook has been heavily criticized for how it handles racism, both on the platform and within company walls. Perhaps in an effort to course correct, the company released the blog post Navigating Your Community Through Race and Social Issues on Friday with tips for group moderators. (Zuckerberg also released an open letter where he said black lives matter).

“Many people are reaching out to their communities right now, both on- and offline, to discuss racial injustice, share personal experiences and organize ways to support,” the post reads. “Some admins may be unsure of how to manage these important discussions in their communities, especially for groups originally created around a topic unrelated to social issues.”

Facebook’s first tip is for moderators to educate themselves on these issues, linking to the National Museum of African American History and Culture’s page on Talking About Race.

Next, the post suggests adding people of color in affected communities as actual mods themselves. Facebook implores members who are already mods to make space such as by asking members of color to join the team and by reaching out to organizations about how to proceed with making their community more diverse.

Other tips include acknowledging what’s going on in the news; considering mod approval for posts to mitigate discussion; being open to change; and listening to members. There’s even a video from Deran Young, psychologist and founder and mod of Facebook group BLACK THERAPISTS ROCK, on compassion fatigue. The post concludes with a a list of Facebook features that help manage community and keep members safe (i.e. turning off comments).

Facebook, like every social network right now, is inundated with news (and opinion) about the protests. The company know that these discussions can and should happen everywhere, even in groups that on the surface have “nothing to do” with race. “We know these conversations are hard and reflect ongoing disparities in our society,” the post reads. “They are also necessary, and we hope that we can continue to help you facilitate ongoing discussions and learning.”

The social network will also stop recommending health groups.

Queenie Wong is a senior writer for CNET News, who focuses on social media companies including Facebook’s parent company Meta, Twitter and TikTok. She previously covered social networks for The Mercury News in San Jose. Before that, she wrote about politics and education for the Statesman Journal in Salem, Oregon. A native of Southern California, she took her first journalism class in middle school.

Facebook has been making a stronger push to get people to join groups, which are public and private online spaces on the social network where users gather to discuss shared interest such as cooking, sports or parenting. But people have also used Facebook groups to share conspiracy theories, vaccine misinformation and hate speech, raising concerns about whether the company is doing enough to moderate content in these online spaces.

On Thursday, Facebook outlined several steps it’s taking to make groups safer, including making it tougher for users who violate the site’s rules to create new groups. The move comes as civil rights groups, celebrities, advertisers and even its own employees criticize the company for how it enforces its rules against hate speech and how quickly it takes action against offensive content.

Facebook already bars users who manage groups from creating new groups that are similar to the ones that the company pulled for violating the site’s rules. Now the company says it will prevent administrators and moderators of groups who have been removed from creating any group, not just ones about similar topics for 30 days.

Facebook users who have violated any of the company’s rules will also be required to get new posts approved from an administrator or moderator for 30 days before it appears in a group. If administrators or moderators repeatedly approve posts that violate Facebook’s rules, the company said it will remove the group.

Groups that don’t have an active administrator to oversee the online space will also be archived on the social network, which means users will still be able to see the content, but they can’t post anything new in the group. Facebook will stop recommending health groups to users, but you’ll still be able to search for them on the social network. Health misinformation, especially about vaccines, has been a bigger concern after the outbreak of the novel coronavirus.

Facebook has been promoting groups as more users shift to more private spaces online to chat with new people or talk to their family and friends. While Facebook’s rules apply to groups, this shift has sometimes made it tougher for the company to moderate content. Some anti-vaccination Facebook groups, for example, have a higher level of privacy where members have to be approved in advance to join, The Guardian reported last year. That could make it tougher for others to flag posts that they think violate Facebook’s rules. Pulling down content can also be like a game of whack-a-mole for social networks.

In late June, Facebook said that it pulled down 220 Facebook accounts, 95 accounts on Facebook-owned Instagram, 28 pages and 106 groups tied to the boogaloo movement, a far-right extremist movement. Two boogaloo members conspired in a Facebook group to murder federal security guards in Oakland, California, according to the Federal Bureau of Investigation . CNET also reported on a private “Justice for George Floyd” group that was filled with racist content. Facebook didn’t remove the group after it was brought to their attention, but it’s no longer visible to the public as of Wednesday.

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In August, Facebook took down 790 groups, 100 pages and 1,500 ads tied to a far-right conspiracy theory called QAnon that falsely claims there’s a “deep state” plot against President Donald Trump and his supporters.

For the first time, Facebook also revealed how much hate speech content it removes from groups. The company relies on a mix of technology and user reports to find prohibited content. Over the last year, Facebook removed 12 million pieces of content in groups for hate speech and 87% was flagged before a user reported the posts. The company said it took down about 1.5 million pieces of content in groups for organized hate and 91% was found proactively. Facebook said it pulled down 1 million groups for violating these policies.

Facebook defines hate speech as “a direct attack on people based on what we call protected characteristics — race, ethnicity, national origin, religious affiliation, sexual orientation, caste, sex, gender, gender identity, and serious disease or disability.” You can’t compare Black people to apes, for example, refer to women as objects or use the word “it” when describing transgender or non-binary people, according to the site’s community standards.

The amount of content that Facebook removed represents a fraction of the posts in groups. More than 1.4 billion people use Facebook groups every month and there are more than 10 million groups on Facebook.