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How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

Walter Glenn is a former Editorial Director for How-To Geek and its sister sites. He has more than 30 years of experience in the computer industry and over 20 years as a technical writer and editor. He’s written hundreds of articles for How-To Geek and edited thousands. He’s authored or co-authored over 30 computer-related books in more than a dozen languages for publishers like Microsoft Press, O’Reilly, and Osborne/McGraw-Hill. He’s also written hundreds of white papers, articles, user manuals, and courseware over the years. Read more.

How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

In addition to facial recognition and some other nice features introduced in iOS 10, your Photos app also now lets you search for specific objects–from trees to animals to facial expressions–in your photos. Here’s how it works.

In iOS 10, the Photos app now scans your photos behind the scenes against a database of searchable objects and labels your photos accordingly. Your Photos app doesn’t tell you that this scanning is happening, doesn’t let you view the labels that it attaches to your photos, and doesn’t really even tell you that you can now search by objects. According to developer Kay Yin, who went poking into this stuff back when iOS 10 was in beta, the database against which your photos are scanned contains over 4,400 objects. You can go check out the complete list if you’re interested, along with the categories used for memories and facial expressions. Or you can just play around with it yourself by searching for common objects like “tree”, or even more specific variations like “oak tree.”

Searching for objects in your photos works pretty much like searching for anything else. Open up your Photos app, switch to either the “Photos” or “Albums” tab and tap the Search button.

How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

Start typing the object for which you want to search. As you type, Photos will populate the results with available categories. When you see the category you want, tap it…

How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

….and you can browse through the results of the search.

How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

Photos doesn’t let you save your searches as albums or anything like that for easy browsing, though you could create an album manually from the search results if you want. Photos does retain your recent searches, though. Just hit the Search button again and they’ll show up in a “Recent” list at the bottom of the search results page.

How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

You can also search for photos with objects using Siri if you prefer. Just say something like “Show photos with cars.” If photos are found, Siri will immediately open the Photos app with the results displayed.

How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

Just note that Siri can be a little finicky with searches. Be sure to use the word “Show” instead of “Search” because if you use “Search,” Siri will search the web for you instead. If you search for a category that isn’t in Photos’ list, Siri will also search the web for you. And finally, if you search for a category that Photos recognizes, but you don’t have any photos that match the category, Siri will still open the Photos app but to a page showing all your photos.

If you’re looking for a specific photo in the Photos app, it’s nice to know you can search for it in a number of ways. Try using the Photos app search function to search for a photo by the object or objects in it!

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Not only can you search for people in the Photos app, with iOS 10 and later you can also search for objects. Want to see all the cute pictures you have of dogs? You can search for photos of dogs and find them. Perhaps you’re looking for that picture of your Christmas tree from last year—search trees. The Photos app on iPhone is getting better and better at being able to recognize what’s in a photo, making it much easier for you to find exactly the picture you’re looking for. Plus, recent iOS updates have given us the ability to add captions to photos in the Photos app, which makes searching even more likely to turn up accurate results. The search function works even without captions, though, and is pretty impressive. Here’s how to search for objects in the Photos app on your Apple device.

How to Search for Objects in the Photos App

Searching for objects or non-human beings (such as horses, cats, and dogs) became much easier when iOS 14 rolled out, but was already much-improved starting with iOS 10. Here’s how to use your Photos app search function to search for objects in your photo library:

  1. Open the Photos app.
  2. Tap on the Search tab, which is represented by the magnifying glass icon at the bottom right.

How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

  • Tap into the Search bar.
  • Type a search term, such as “horse” or “hat.”

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    You’ll see that the Photos app search returns some surprisingly accurate results! It even considers my hood a hat, which is evidence of how intelligent this search feature is. Try it out with your own search terms!

    With iOS 15, you can use Live Text to copy and share text within photos, translate languages, make a call, and more. And with Visual Look Up, it’s easy to identify objects found within your photos.

    Use Live Text to get information in photos and images

    Live Text recognizes useful information within your photos and online images, so you can make a call, send an email, or look up directions with just a tap on the highlighted text in a photo or an online image. You can also use Live Text in the Camera app — just point your iPhone camera at a photo or image with text, then tap the indicator icon . From here, you can quickly do things like make a phone call, translate the text, and more.

    To turn on Live Text for all supported languages, go to Settings > General > Language & Region, and enable Live Text.

    Live Text is currently supported in English, Chinese, French, Italian, German, Portuguese, and Spanish. You need an iPhone XS, iPhone XR, or later with iOS 15 to use Live Text.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Copy text within a photo or image

    1. Go to the Photos app and select a photo, or select an image online.
    2. Touch and hold a word and move the grab points to adjust the selection.
    3. Tap Copy. To select all the text in the photo, tap Select All.

    After you copy text, you can paste it in another app or share it with someone. To highlight all text within a photo or image, select a photo or image, then tap the indicator icon in the lower-right corner of the photo.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Make a call or send an email

    1. Go to the Photos app and select a photo, or select an image online.
    2. Tap the phone number or email address.
    3. Then tap Call or Send Message. Depending on the photo, image, or website, you might also see an option to Make a FaceTime call or Add to Contacts.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Translate text within a photo or image

    1. Go to the Photos app and select a photo, or select an image online.
    2. Touch and hold a word and move the grab points to adjust the selection.
    3. Tap Translate. You may need to tap Continue, then choose a language to translate in, or tap Change Language.

    Translate is currently supported in English, Chinese, French, Italian, German, Portuguese, and Spanish.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Find text on the web

    1. Go to the Photos app and select a photo, or select an image online.
    2. Touch and hold a word and move the grab points to adjust the selection.
    3. Tap Look Up.

    After you tap Look Up, if you selected just one word, a dictionary appears. If you selected more than one word, you’ll see Siri Suggested Websites and other resources for the topic.

    Use Visual Look Up to learn more about the objects in photos

    With Visual Look Up, you can quickly learn more about popular landmarks, art, plants, pets, and other objects that appear in your photos or on the web. Here’s how:

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    1. Open a photo, then tap the Visual Look Up button .
    2. Tap the icon that appears in the photo or below the photo. For example, you might see a paw print icon for pets and animals, or a leaf icon for plants and flowers.

    If you don’t see the Visual Look Up button , Visual Look Up isn’t available for that photo.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    In addition to facial recognition and some other nice features introduced in iOS 10, your Photos app also now lets you search for specific objects–from trees to animals to facial expressions–in your photos. Here’s how it works.

    RELATED: How to Add Names to the “Recognized Faces” List in the iOS 10 Photos App

    In iOS 10, the Photos app now scans your photos behind the scenes against a database of searchable objects and labels your photos accordingly. Your Photos app doesn’t tell you that this scanning is happening, doesn’t let you view the labels that it attaches to your photos, and doesn’t really even tell you that you can now search by objects. According to developer Kay Yin, who went poking into this stuff back when iOS 10 was in beta, the database against which your photos are scanned contains over 4,400 objects. You can go check out the complete list if you’re interested, along with the categories used for memories and facial expressions. Or you can just play around with it yourself by searching for common objects like “tree”, or even more specific variations like “oak tree.”

    Searching for objects in your photos works pretty much like searching for anything else. Open up your Photos app, switch to either the “Photos” or “Albums” tab and tap the Search button.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Start typing the object for which you want to search. As you type, Photos will populate the results with available categories. When you see the category you want, tap it…

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    ….and you can browse through the results of the search.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Photos doesn’t let you save your searches as albums or anything like that for easy browsing, though you could create an album manually from the search results if you want. Photos does retain your recent searches, though. Just hit the Search button again and they’ll show up in a “Recent” list at the bottom of the search results page.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    You can also search for photos with objects using Siri if you prefer. Just say something like “Show photos with cars.” If photos are found, Siri will immediately open the Photos app with the results displayed.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Just note that Siri can be a little finicky with searches. Be sure to use the word “Show” instead of “Search” because if you use “Search,” Siri will search the web for you instead. If you search for a category that isn’t in Photos’ list, Siri will also search the web for you. And finally, if you search for a category that Photos recognizes, but you don’t have any photos that match the category, Siri will still open the Photos app but to a page showing all your photos.

    The new Photos app in iOS 10 has finally become smart. Much like Google Photos, it can now do object recognition inside your photos and log them all based on categories (what’s inside them).

    And as this is Apple we’re talking about, all of this is done in a hush-hush, no servers involved way. All the processing happens on the device itself, no photos are sent to a server, and your personal data is intact. The fact that the scanning takes place on the device does mean that some of use with huge libraries are bound to end up with different scanned processes and search results On all of our devices, but maybe that’s a price worth paying.

    How To Search For Objects Inside Photos

    The Photos app keeps a log of things it recognizes – Categories. And as long as the objects in the image meets the data in one of those categories, it will be tagged. Currently, generic things like beach, horses, bottle etc are identified easily.

    To start searching, open the Photos app and from either the Memories, Shared or Photos tab, tap the “Search” button from the top toolbar.

    Now just start typing the term. If it matches any of the categories, they’ll show up in the results below.

    Tap a result and you’ll see all the images pertaining to the category.

    Same Works For Places

    You can also search the same way for places as well. This is a great way to find images taken at a particular place. I find this method far more efficient than going to the “Places” album and zooming into the map.

    4,432 Categories

    Believe it or not, but Apple has created 4,432 different categories for the object and facial recognition. When it comes to faces, they recognize 7 different facial expressions (Greedy, Disgust, Neutral, Scream, Smiling, Surprise, Suspicious) . If you want to have a look at all of them, check out the link here.

    What Did You Search For?

    I’ve been searching for random stuff, hoping to see what works and doesn’t. What all categories have you found in the Photos app? Share with us in the comments below.

    Taking full advantage of Apple’s A-series of processors, Photos app in the latest iOS 10 will feature the advanced face, object and scene recognition, which will use the foremost computer vision and deep learning techniques to recognize people faces, objects and scene of your photos locally in Photo library on the device.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    • New designs in Photos app
    • Deep learning techniques and computer vision
    • Facial, Object & Scene Recognition
    • Memories and search feature

    New designs in Photos app

    Inside iOS 10, Apple has totally renovated its Photos app, along with new features and excellent improvements. There are four options when you launch the app: Photos, Memories, Shared and Albums.

    Photos : Besides remaining almost previous version, Photo option will use facial and object recognition and give you relevant pictures or events when you are looking at a specific photo. What’s more, fresh “Markup” enables users to draw, manage and delete iPhone photos.

    Memories : You will be displayed a series of photos arranged by Photos app in chronological order. The biggest highlight of the Memories is that the section will automatically create a slideshow video when entering it. There will be a grid of all photos and videos below the video. You are able to customize and edit them.

    Shared : The same function as the previous Photos app, Shared option allows you to share images or videos with the people you choose and let them add photos, videos and comments.

    Albums пјљThe section will show all albums to you, with two brand new additions, People and Places.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Deep learning techniques and computer vision

    Utilizing local processor power and kinds of deep learning techniques, Photos app in iOS 10 will adopt the advanced computer vision, which enables to analyze and recognize the contents showing from photos. Performing more than eleven computations, iOS 10 Photo app will not only feature facial recognition, but also pick out and identify objects and scenes, such as mountains, rivers, flowers, horses, beaches and so on.

    Facial, Object & Scene Recognition

    The new Photos applies image recognition of people face, objects and scene. Taking facial recognition as an example, click the People album, you are displayed a classification according to the photo numbers the Photos app has found. Tap on one of the faces, you will be shown all of the photos which include the target people face. Besides, you can set your preferred people to show always on the top in the People folder. Once you look at a specific people, Photos app will automatically innovate a memory video or a slideshow between you and that particular person, with the locations where those photos are taken.

    Memories and search feature

    Thanks to the brilliant artificial intelligence, you are able to search and scan all your photos from the whole Photos library to fast locate and cluster the target photos which you are looking for. Tap “Memories” option, the screen will show all recent photos, with the location, time, etc on the surface. You can use the search function on the upper-right corner, and type the information to search for complicated requests.

    For instance, enter “sunset”, Photos will show you all pictures related to sunset. Searching for “beach” will display all photos of beach. Inputting “Linda sitting on the beach at sunset”, Photos app will show all pictures with content of “Linda sitting on the beach at sunset”.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Photos app features from iOS 10 update will surprise Apple Users. In this article, we mainly discuss about the new features of face, object & scene recognition in Photos app.

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    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    July 02, 2018 20:13 / Updated by Louisa White to iOS

    iPhone won’t send pictures via text messages or iMessages? You can fix the problem after you read this post.

    This article introduces the best 9 photo editors to help you edit photo effects online, on computer, as well as on smart phones easily and freely.

    How to get photos off iPhone for backup or storage cleanup? Find the easiest method to get photos off iPhone in this post.

    The Photos app in Windows 10 gathers photos from your PC, phone, and other devices, and puts them in one place where you can more easily find what you’re looking for.

    To get started, in the search box on the taskbar, type photos and then select the Photos app from the results. Or, press Open the Photos app in Windows.

    Find photos fast

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Browse your collection by date, album, video projects, people, or folder. Or search to find a specific person, place, or thing. The app recognizes faces and objects in images and adds tags to help you find what you need without endless scrolling. For example, try searching for “beach,” “dog,” or “smile,” or select a face shown in the search pane to see all photos that person is in.

    Upload photos automatically

    One of the simplest ways to copy all your photos and videos to one place in the Photos app is to set up automatic upload to OneDrive from your mobile device.

    Install the OneDrive app on your iOS or Android device. Next, turn on Camera Upload in the settings. The latest photos and videos that you take will automatically start uploading. Once uploaded, they’ll automatically appear in the Photos app on your PC.

    Import photos and videos

    You can import photos and videos you have stored on a camera’s SD card, a USB drive, or on another device.

    Use a USB cable to connect your device to the PC.

    In the search box on the taskbar, type photos and then select the Photos app from the results.

    Select Import and follow the instructions to import from a folder or a USB device. The app automatically selects items you haven’t imported before, or you can choose what to import.

    Note: If you’re using an Android phone and Import isn’t working, you might need to change your phone’s USB setting to allow it to transfer photos.

    Help the app find more photos

    The Photos app automatically displays the photos and videos in the Pictures folder on your PC and OneDrive. Here’s how to add more source folders to the Pictures folder.

    In the search box on the taskbar, type photos and then select the Photos app from the results.

    Select More … > Settings .

    Under Sources, select Add a folder .

    Choose a folder from your PC, an external drive, or a network drive connected to your PC, and then select Add this folder to Pictures to add it to the app. Subfolders of the folders that you add will be included, too.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Did you know you can search for objects in Photos on your iPhone? It’s just one of the ways you can find images from your handset.

    If you’re like most folks, you probably have many pictures taking up residence on your Photos app on iPhone and iPad. Over the years, Apple has added different ways to find images on the app, including data and location. You can also search for objects in photos. Here’s how to do it.

    Search for Objects in Photos

    In 2017, Apple added facial recognition to the Photos app with iOS 10. However, perhaps more importantly, the app also introduced the slick search by objects feature. The tool scans images on your Photos app and matches them to a database of like objects. These primarily focus on categories such as dogs, beaches, sunsets, trees, and many more. It can also identify events like sports games or concerts, food products, and more.

    For example, if you enjoy going to football games and taking lots of photos, the Photos app can quickly identify any photo that contains objects like a stadium (or the stands), fans, and players. Conversely, a search for “trees” could result in images for “Christmas Trees,” “Palm Trees,” “Oak Trees,” and “Maple Trees.” And that’s one of the benefits of the search by object feature; search results can lead to additional searches that the Photos algorithm suggests.

    Full Integration

    But, there’s more. Object search is only the latest in a series of search abilities in the iPhone Photo app. You can also search by date (month or year), place (city or state), person, and caption. You can also perform combination searches where you search with multiple keywords. For example, “ocean” and “beach” or “flower” and “summer.”

    Doing a Search

    To search for images:

    1. Tap on the Photos app on your iPhone or iPad.
    2. Choose the Search icon at the bottom right of the app.
    3. Drill down by tapping on any of the other recommended search terms, which could include additional keywords, locations, people, dates, and more.

    Each page includes results separated by the number of Photos, Moments, Categories, Places, Titles, and more, when applicable. Tap any of the options to see the images.

    Example Searches

    The following examples show how results can change by adding another keyword. This is a great way to drill down to find the photo(s) you want.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Search for Objects in Photos with Siri

    Not surprisingly, you can search for objects in Photos by using Siri, Apple’s voice assistant. Instead of typing your search, use your voice.

    Sample searches include:

    • “Hey Siri, show me photos from California.” (Location)
    • “Hey Siri, show me photos from Christmas 2017” or “Hey Siri, show me photos from April 2020,” or “Hey Siri, show me photos from last month.” (Date)
    • “Hey Siri, show me photos of my dog,” or “Hey Siri, show me photos of dogs in Ohio,” or “Hey Siri, show me photos of pizza.” (Objects)

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    There is much you can do with your iPhone’s camera and Photos app. We’ve covered many of the features, including how to edit videos, how to take better photos with your iPhone, and many more.

    Apple is expanding the iPhone’s photo editing abilities in iOS 10 with a new feature called “Markup” that lets you doodle, magnify, and place text on any picture you have within the Photos app. Thanks to Markup’s flexibility, it could be used for both casually sharing photos with friends and family, and also to enhance and add detail to an image in an enterprise situation.

    Markup is also available directly through the Messages app in iOS 10, adding it to the roster of inventive and colorful updates coming to text messaging in the new iPhone operating system this fall. In both locations, Markup is a bit buried and somewhat difficult to find, so follow these steps to discover the new photo editing feature in iOS 10.

    Finding Image Markup in Photos

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    1. Open the Photos app.
    2. Find the image you want to edit and tap on it.
    3. Tap the editing slider button.
    4. While in editing mode, tap the button that looks like an ellipsis within a circle and choose “Markup” from the popup menu.

    Finding Image Markup in Messages

    1. Open Messages.
    2. Tap the contact you want to send the photo to.
    3. Tap the Camera icon to the left of the iMessage conversation box.
    4. Find the image you want to edit by taking a new picture, scrolling right to browse all your images, or scrolling left to jump into a vertical version of your Photo Library.
    5. Tap on the photo to place it in the conversation box, then tap on it once again within the box.
    6. Tap “Markup” in the bottom left corner.

    Using Image Markup

    In Photos or Messages, the editing features of Markup are mostly similar, although the former app presents a darker layout, while the latter has a lighter one. First, the feature lets you doodle on the picture you’ve decided to edit, with eight different colors and three different stylus thickness options to the right of the color dots.

    Within each of the three options, you can change the thickness of the doodle by pressing harder or softer as you draw on the photo if you have a device that supports 3D Touch. If you begin free-styling on the photo and draw a recognizable shape, Markup will intelligently suggest a more true-to-form representation, be it a basic circle, oval, square, or even a star. You can also keep your hand-drawn option.

    The last option on the bottom row of the Markup screen is a simple text box that lets you type out any message on top of the photo, and adjust its size by dragging the two blue dots on each side of the box. Similar to the magnifying glass, tap anywhere within the box to drag it, and double tap to add text. You can also change the color of the text by choosing any from the color dot menu, and a new “aA” option to the right of the color dots allows for new font options, sizes, and indentations.

    Since there is no direct trash button, the only way to undo a mistake is a simple undo button, which is one of the major differences between marking up a photo in Photos or in Messages. In Photos, the reversed arrow is located at the bottom right of the screen; in Messages, it appears at the top left, next to “Cancel,” once you start editing the photo. If you want to change a lot about the edits you’ve made to a photo, it’s potentially faster to simply tap “Cancel” and then jump back into Markup to start over.

    The biggest difference between Markup in these two apps lies in how permanent you want the edits to be. If done within Photos, your Markups will remain a permanent addition to each picture within the app, which can of course be reversed using the “Revert” option in the editing menu of each image. If executed within Messages, Markup is more transient, keeping the edits only on the version of the image sent to your contact, and not saving any edits onto the version in your own Photos app.

    Follow MUO

    Reverse image search lets you learn more about any image. Here are the best image search apps and tools for Android and iPhone.

    Search engines make it easy to find information or buy products, but what if you want to identify a picture you have? In these cases, reverse image search comes to the rescue. This powerful feature allows you to upload an image to search instead of entering text.

    Let’s take a look at the best reverse image search tools available on your iPhone or Android device.

    1. CamFind

    Image Gallery (3 Images)

    CamFind is a basic yet functional reverse image search tool. The next time you want to search for an image, just open up CamFind and take a picture. Once the picture uploads, the app matches it against others on the internet and identifies the object. After this, have a look at the available results.

    Unlike other image search apps, CamFind’s functionality focuses on helping you find related videos from your app. While less versatile than other options on this list, you can set a visual reminder and share your finds with others.

    Download: CamFind for iOS | Android (Free)

    2. Google Lens

    Image Gallery (3 Images)

    Google Lens initially arrived as a Pixel exclusive; the company later integrated the feature into Google Photos. Now both iOS and Android users can use Google Lens to reverse search images.

    On Android, Google Lens is available as a standalone app. iOS users can access Lens within the Google search app or Google Photos app. In Google Photos, open an image that you’ve taken and tap the Lens icon (second from the right, next to the trash icon). In the Google Lens app, tap the Lens icon on the search bar then point your camera and tap the magnifier icon.

    Google’s visual search engine will analyze the image; the results will display the most relevant information. For instance, if you take a photo or use one from your gallery of an unfamiliar animal, you’ll see the Google search results. Take or use a photo of a product like a laptop and Google Lens will suggest shopping results to you.

    Google Lens is one of the best picture search apps.

    Download: Google Photos for iOS (Free, in-app purchases available)

    Download: Google Lens for Android (Free)

    Sponsored Links

    Apple is making artificial intelligence a big, big cornerstone of iOS 10. To start, the software uses on-device computer vision to detect both faces and objects in photos. It’ll recognize a familiar friend, for instance, and can tell that there’s a mountain in the background. While this is handy for tagging your shots, the feature really comes into its own when you let the AI do the hard work. There’s a new Memories section in the Photos app that automatically organizes pictures based on events, people and places, complete with related memories (such as similar trips) and smart presentations. Think of it as Google Photos without having to go online.

    AI plays a role even when you’re punching out a message, for that matter. QuickType text suggestions now lean on Siri intelligence to understand the broader context of what you’re trying to say. It’ll be aware of what you’re doing that day, and suggest things based on elements such as your contacts or your location. If a friend asks for someone’s email address or wonders where you are, you can share it with one tap. QuickType is better at handling multiple languages and schedules as well.

    These features were somewhat expected — until now, Apple was one of the few big tech companies that wasn’t focusing heavily on AI as a helper for all your day-to-day tasks. We’re not going to knock a serious upgrade, though, and that local support might come in handy for those times when internet access isn’t always guaranteed.

    Get all the latest news from WWDC 2016 here!

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10iOS 10 is filled with practical improvements that most of us would use – if we knew about them. Some things are obvious, but others are little hidden gems that most of need to be told about. One of our favourites is the Night Shift mode which turns your screen red by filtering out the blue light that stops melatonin production for a better night’s sleep. But there are lots more!

    Here are our other top tips and tricks for iOS 10.

    Allow Selected Contacts to Bypass Do Not Disturb

    The VIP system for allowing selected contacts to still call you has been improved dramatically in iOS 10. Now you can pick out contacts that can make your phone ring individually.

    Go into Contacts, select a contact, click Edit, and then you can set the ringtone and text tone to Emergency Bypass On.

    Where is my car?

    You can now use Apple Maps to find where you parked your car. You can use the little car icon on the map, or you can search for Parked car.

    Send Smaller Photos in iMessage

    If you don’t have a very good signal, or if you aren’t on an unlimited data plan – you may want to send smaller photos. Go to Settings > Messages and enable Low Quality Image Mode.

    Time for Bed

    This is a rather weird feature, but one some people really like. If you are the type of person that needs a certain number of hours of sleep each night, you can now have your phone remind you when to go to bed. The feature is in the Clock app – just tap Bedtime.

    Prioritise App Installations

    If you are recovering your iPhone or installing multiple apps, you can control which are installed first by doing a long press on any app waiting to be downloaded on the home screen and tapping the Prioritise Download option.

    Note this requires a device with 3D Touch.

    Better iMessage Read Receipts

    Now you can set your read receipt preferences by clicking on the “I” icon found at the top-right of iMessage window, then turn read receipts on or off.

    This setting syncs across all your devices.

    Find Your Apple Watch

    Find My iPhone has saved the day for many people on more than one occasion. Now you can Find your Apple watch with the same app.

    Unlock Your Phone the Old Way

    Apple’s tweaked the way you unlock you iPhone with the Touch ID sensor, but if this new feature annoys you, then you can revert to the way it worked in iOS 9.

    Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > Home Button and enable Rest Finger to Open.

    Delete the Apple Apps

    Apple’s own apps used to be a fixed feature, and the best you could do was hide them from view. But now you can delete apps such as Main, Stocks, and Weather just like you would delete any other app (and if you change your mind, they’re in the App Store).

    Get to the Camera – Pronto!

    The icon might be gone, but you can still get to the camera from the lock screen. All you need to do is swipe left.

    Search Your Photos

    From Memories in the Photos app you can search for photos containing particular objects. This is quite spookily accurate. I typed “tree” in and it brought up every photo I had with a tree (or bush) in it.

    Emojify Everything

    The Messages app now highlights words that you can turn into emojis. It is quite funny but if overused it can make a message almost impossible to understand. For example if you call your partner “honey” and turn it into the honey emoji – it could easily be misconstrued for a beer keg. Hmmm.

    Unsubscribe Easier

    Mail automatically floats unsubscribe links from mailing list emails to the top, so you can find them easily. Yay!

    Save on Storage Space

    If you are low on space you can get iOS 10 to remove music you have not listened to in a while by going to Settings > Music > Optimise Storage and enabling Optimise Storage.

    As part of the live Talk Show at WWDC 2016, Apple senior vice president of software engineering, Craig Federighi, and senior vice president of worldwide marketing, Phil Schiller, provided more details on how deep learning and artificial intelligence is being used in iOS 10 to surface search results without requiring you to share your data with Apple.

    How will Apple index my existing photos?

    When you first download iOS 10, if you have existing photos in your library, your iPhone or iPad will begin to process them in the background at night when you’re plugged in. That way you won’t see any performance degradation or excessive power drain during the day when you’re trying to use your iPhone or iPad.

    Once complete, all your old photos will be indexed for the new, better search.

    What about on macOS?

    Same thing. iOS typically gets released a few weeks before macOS (formerly OS X), though, and not everyone with an iPhone or iPad has a Mac, so Apple wants you to be able to enjoy the new search benefits immediately.

    When the macOS Sierra update arrives later this fall, it’ll index your Mac Photos library the same way.

    Wait, won’t the search index just sync between devices?

    Not right now, but maybe one day. A system would need to be built that securely, privately shared metadata and index information between iPhone, iPad, Mac, and other products.

    What about new photos? Do I have to wait for them to index?

    Nope! Apple enjoys a tremendous lead when it comes to chipset architecture in mobile, and they’re “spending” some of it on deep learning and AI processing immediately when photos are capture.

    The image signal processor (ISP) inside the Apple A9 already handles an incredible amount of calculations for everything from white balance to burst selection. Deep learning and AI take a couple billion more, but the A9 GPU can still handle those near-instantly.

    Why doesn’t Apple need me to give them and their servers my photos data to get the indexing done?

    According to Federighi, Apple doesn’t need our photos to figure out what a mountain looks like in a photo. Their “detectives” managed to look at public domain images and figure that out.

    But will it work as well as services that do require photo data sharing?

    To be determined. We’ll have to wait for iOS 10 to launch this fall and really put it through its paces. Personally, privacy is as valuable to me as money, time, or attention, so having the option is great for customers.

    I don’t use Google or Facebook photos today, so for me any upgrade will be great. If you aren’t sure yet, you’ll need to see how much functionality it gives you, weigh the options, and make the best choice for you.

    • You can use reverse image search on your iPhone to identify images or find other websites that have used a specific image.
    • Reverse image search can help you request permission from the image’s original copyright owner or see if your own photos are being used without permission.
    • You can reverse image search on your iPhone using Safari, Chrome, or a handful of other apps that you may find more useful.
    • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

    If you ever need to know if a photo has been used elsewhere on the internet, or discover where it originated, reverse image search is a convenient tool that helps you find where else an image exists online.

    You can conduct a reverse image search several different ways on you iPhone.

    Check out the products mentioned in this article:

    iPhone Xs (From $999 at Apple)

    How to reverse image search an image on your iPhone using Safari and Google

    If you have an image already on your iPhone and want to know where it appears on the web, you can use Google image search on Safari – but not the mobile version of the Google site – you’ll need to switch to the desktop version.

    1. Start the Safari app and navigate to images.google.com.

    2. Tap the Share button at the bottom of the screen (it looks like a square with an upward arrow) and then tap “Request Desktop Site.”

    3. After the desktop version of the Google page loads, tap the camera icon in the search box.

    4. If you have the URL of the photo you want to search for, paste it into the search box. Otherwise, tap “Upload an image” and choose the photo from your iPhone.

    For more information on Google’s reverse image search, read our article, ” How to reverse search an image on Google with your phone, tablet, or computer .”

    How to reverse image search an image you find on an iPhone’s Chrome app

    Chrome makes it easy to do a reverse image search directly on an image you find online, without downloading it to your iPhone or knowing its URL. If you don’t already have the browser’s app installed on your iPhone, though, you will need to download Chrome from the App Store .

    1. Start the Chrome app and navigate to the web page with the image you want to do a reverse search on.

    2. Tap and hold the image for a couple of seconds until the pop-up menu appears.

    3. Tap “Search Google for This Image.”

    Use dedicated reverse-image search apps and websites

    While Safari and Chrome are great for quickly searching for photos on the web, there are a number of other tools you might want to use instead.

    First of all, tineye.com is a convenient website because you can use it in Safari without switching to the desktop version, like you need to do with Google images.

    In addition, there are a few dedicated reverse image search apps you might want to try. These are often more thorough because they reference multiple search engines, rather than just Google. The best free reverse image search apps that we recommend include Reverse Image Search , Reversee , and Veracity .

    Share this story

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    Share All sharing options for: Apple has been categorizing all your ‘brassiere’ photos for over a year now

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Photo by James Bareham / The Verge

    A tweet by user ellieeewbu today revealed that searching “brassiere” in the Photos app on iPhones categorizes photos featuring bras automatically into a group. Women have been responding to the tweet posting screenshots with similar results. Most searches show photos of lingerie, bikinis, bare skin, or in some cases, memes.

    Should the fact that “brassiere” is a category at all be concerning? Or is it more alarming that most people didn’t know that image categorization was a feature at all?

    ATTENTION ALL GIRLS ALL GIRLS. Go to your photos and type in the ‘Brassiere’ why are apple saving these and made it a folder.

    Image recognition was introduced with iOS 10 in June 2016, when the Photos app was updated with deep learning for object and scene detection. Apple stressed during the keynote, as well as on its website, that all object detection is done completely locally on the device.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    In a Medium post, developer Kenny Yin detailed all of the facial expressions and objects the Photos app recognized, which he found through a few lines of code in the framework of macOS Sierra’s Photos app. At the time it was released, the app was capable of recognizing seven different facial expressions, and a total of 4,432 keywords, “brassiere” included. You can read the full list here.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    One thing to note here is that while women’s undergarments like “bra” are listed as categories, there’s no mention of men’s boxers or briefs. Clearly someone had to have made a conscious decision to include (or not include) certain categories. Even “corset” and “girdle” are on the list. Where is the same attention to detail for mens’ clothing?

    Despite the fact that this categorization has been around for over a year, there’s something to be said about users just finding out about it now. Considering that machine learning image recognition was hyped as a prominent Google Photos feature since May 2015, I was surprised to find out that the Photos app on my iPhone had the same feature. Most people know about the facial recognition and Memories features on their phones, but based on the reactions from today, it’s likely that many people (myself included) now know just how specific the image categories can get.

    For the record, Google Photos does the exact same thing when you search “brassiere,” except your photos are stored on the cloud, in Google’s servers. If anything, this should be the bigger security concern that’s freaking out people on Twitter.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    AppleInsider is supported by its audience and may earn commission as an Amazon Associate and affiliate partner on qualifying purchases. These affiliate partnerships do not influence our editorial content.

    With the new iOS 10 and macOS Sierra updates Apple introduced a set of automated Photos tools, like new machine learning algorithms that automatically identify faces and places, that combine to make image search and organization easier than ever.

    Before the update, Apple users had to manually sift through their photo library to surface individual images. Discovering photos from years ago meant picking through albums organized by date going back potentially years and years.

    With iOS 10 and macOS Sierra, intelligent Photos search features analyze the content of your photo library and automatically organize images based on detected faces, objects and scenes. Results are filtered into one of two albums: People and Places.

    Want to find photos that include Aunt Karen? No problem. Just look for her photos in the People album and add her name. You can now search all your photos that include her. How about photos from the food truck festival you attended four months ago? It’s just a keyword search away.

    Although the scanning is automatic, don’t expect it to be quick. After the initial update, iOS 10 on an iPhone 6 Plus took almost three hours for a library of roughly 350 “optimized” images to process. Face recognition software automatically groups similar faces together in the People album. Photos will also scan your photos and videos for object and scene recognition, as well as location, and gathers them by thousands of possible keywords.

    To organize photos of friends and family by faces, first go to the People folder in Photos, then click on the desired mini album. Apple’s software automatically detects faces as part of the scanning process and creates individual mini albums for each face, populated by all the photos in which they appear.

    Tapping on an individual’s mini album allows you to add attach a name to the software-detected face. Now you have a go-to album that has all your photos of and with that person.

    For photos snapped at specific locales, click on the Places album and map populated with geotagged images will appear. Zoom in and out to find the location you’re looking for, then click on the photo over the location and a list of photos you’ve taken at that location will show up in chronological order.

    You can also use Siri to search for photos based on a specific date, time frame or location. For example, if you want to find photos from that food truck festival we mentioned above, just ask Siri to “Show you photos from August 18th.” Want to find photos from your latest vacation? Ask Siri “Show me photos from Pensacola.”

    As noted above, you can input the names of the people in your photos to easily search for photos of them by name and you can even drag and drop people to your favorites section at the top. Users can also search for items, such as “dog,” “beach” and “food” in your photos as well.

    The Photos app also has a new Memories feature that pulls photos based on the locations, times and/or names to create a video slideshow. It culls photos from your Camera Roll for the video. Apple calls them “highlights” from “forgotten events, trips and people.” This could be an interesting and entertaining endeavor depending on what types of “forgotten” information is lurking in your device. You can also easily share the Memories videos with family and friends.

    One of the biggest downfalls of the new features is that it doesn’t sync between devices. Information you’ve already input from previous Photos is lost. It also means all the work you put into adding names, creating videos, merging people files won’t automatically transfer to another iOS device.

    The release of iOS 10 marks the debut of a bunch of major new features to Apple’s Photos app. By far the biggest change to Photos is the addition of a comprehensive machine-learning algorithm that scans the contents of your photos to automatically identify people, objects, settings, and other items in your images without any help from you.

    With both macOS Sierra and iOS 10, all the images in your Photos libraries will be scanned millions of times with machine-learning algorithms to identify faces, as well as more than 4,000 different scenes or objects. Every time you take a photo in iOS 10, Apple will scan that image for any possible information and use that metadata in several different ways. For all the photos already in your library, well—your device will need to scan them all, one at a time. That will take time and use a whole lot of processor power, so be sure to leave your iPhone plugged in overnight after you upgrade so that it can stealthily scan your photos while you sleep.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10Memories are automatically generated and come with an optional video slideshow.

    Photos exposes all the faces that it identifies via its new algorithms in the new People album. The rest of the machine-learning data is best discovered via the search box. Objects Apple identifies—including things like dogs, cows, and beaches—are organized in Categories, and you can search for them just by typing whatever you can think of. If you type dog, Photos will show you all the photos it thinks might feature dogs.

    Another major addition to Photos is Memories, automatically generated collections of your photos. To create a Memory, Photos selects photos based on location, time, and even the people identified in the photos. You can tap on the header image at the top of any memory to view an automatically generated video highlight reel for that memory, a collage of audio and video clips that’s assembled by iOS. You can also tap on the clip and edit it, choosing a mood from a palette of choices such as Uplifting and Chill, and a length (Short, Medium, or Long). If you really want to go to town, you can add or omit items, pick custom music, and adjust the length down to the second.

    The new Places album lets you browse all of your photos based on where they were taken. Maps are also more prevalent throughout Photos, most notably in Memories.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10I loved being able to view photos taken on a beach hike, location by location, using the Places album. How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10The Details view will tell you a lot about who’s in your photo and where it was taken.

    A new Details view lets you see more information about any given photo in your library. Open an image and then tap the Details button or just scroll. You’ll see the people Photos has identified as being in the photo, the location where the photo was taken (with an address, a map, and an option to show other photos taken nearby), a set of Memories related somehow to the contents of your photo, and even a link to see all the photos taken on that particular day.

    Those “related Memories” links spread throughout Photos are cleverly generated based on the metadata gleaned from Apple’s machine-learning algorithm. An image of a baseball game offered other outings to the ballpark; an image of my mother offered collections of her various visits to our house and ours to hers.

    When you’re viewing details of a photo, you can teach Photos the name of the person it detected by tapping one of the faces in the People section. Photos opens a screen for that face, with a collection of photos, related groups and people, places where that person was spotted, and related collections of photos. At the very top of that screen, tap the Add Name header and enter in the person’s name. Photos suggests names based on the Contacts list, but you can also assign a name that isn’t currently in Contacts. If you identify a person that’s already in People, Photos offers to merge the two entries into one.

    I’m finishing up a new edition of my Photos Crash Course ebook that will cover a whole lot more about Photos on macOS Sierra and iOS 10. When it’s ready to go we’ll announce that here at Six Colors.

    If you appreciate articles like this one, support us by becoming a Six Colors subscriber. Subscribers get access to an exclusive podcast, members-only stories, and a special community.

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    • All Articles
    • Photo Tips
    • 10 Tips to Organize Your Camera Roll

    If you’re like us, that camera roll of yours is anything but organized. And while our phones hold a digital record of our days, we’re sure of one thing: it’s time to make space for what’s to come. Follow along for simplified tips to clean up your camera roll — you’re 10 steps away from an organized photo life.

    Select Favorites

    Let’s start with identifying the photos that mean the most to you. Set aside time to press the heart on the bottom of the photos that are most significant. This will automatically filter them into your “favorites folder.” Pro tip: be decisive. Only save the phots that you know you will want to return to. Make sure you have 1-2 photos of each major event for recording’s sake, but don’t get tied up about each individual image.

    Embrace the Delete Button

    Set yourself up for success and make the delete button a good friend. Trust us — decluttering can only be achieved by getting rid of the images that are duplicates, blurry, or unnecessary screenshots. If you didn’t put a heart on the image originally, consider why you are keeping it around. Clean out any photos that don’t capture your attention or epitomize a moment. Short on time? Press the “select button” in the upper right corner to drag over multiple images to delete at once.

    Create Albums

    Once you’ve simplified your camera roll, create a series of albums under the “My Albums” section to categorize your photos. Some of our favorite ways to organize? By months, people, or events. Take a mental inventory of the photos you gravitate towards taking, and then create your albums based on what makes sense from that.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Make An Edit

    If you find yourself always scanning your photo library to select the photos you want to edit and share, we recommend creating “To Edit” and “Edited” folders in your albums. Make your way into your “Favorites” folder to select the photos that you want to edit. Select and copy them into the “To Edit” folder so that you have a centralized spot for all of the photos that need to be edited. Pro tip: select all of the photos at once from your favorites folder by hitting “select all” — transfer them into the folder in bulk. Once you edit a photo, make sure you add it to your “Edited” folder.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Set Priorities

    Organize your albums in terms of priority so that you see the most important ones first. (We tend to put the “To Edit,” “Edited,” and the current month first.) To rearrange their order, head to your albums and scroll down to “My Albums.” Press “edit” in the upper right hand corner and hold down the album to drag it to where you want.

    Set A Routine

    To make your organized photo life into a habit, set a recurring event on your calendar to remind yourself to pay a bit of attention to the process. Need a little inspiration to start? Here’s how we do it —

    • Weekly: Delete photos that don’t make your heart skip an extra beat; favorite the ones that do
    • Monthly: Categorize photos from the previous month into their corresponding albums, and then make sure to back them up into Google Photos
    • Yearly: Use your organized albums as a compass to create gifts or yearly photo projects

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Back It Up

    Lo and behold, the most crucial (and missed) step. We’ve found Google Photos to be the simplest, most effective way to back up your photos. Download their app to get started. We recommend “backing up” your library once you’ve gone through and deleted photos so that it resembles an organized camera roll. If you set the backup period to manual, you can control when the app backups the photos. (Pro tip: create a recurring event on your calendar to delete, categorize, and back up your photos every month). This leads us to.

    Search and Select

    If you find yourself overwhelmed with the sheer quantity of photos, use the “search” and “select” buttons to add specific photos into their corresponding albums, in bulk! Head to the “photos” tab on your albums, type in what you’re looking to organize into the search icon (like names of cities, dates, etc.) and it will pull any matching pictures. Hit the “select” button and hold and drag down on the photos to select them all at once. Then, add them into their corresponding album.

    Find Faces

    Speaking of people, there’s no better way to easily find your favorite faces than by using the “people” album in your camera roll. The album will automatically find faces and group them together so that all you have to do is go in and approve the set of photos it has categorized. Gone are the days of searching through the entirety of your photos for that one specific photo of that one specific person.

    Better When Shared

    Another easy way to gather photos in an organized way is by utilizing shared albums. These albums are “shared” with your friends and family (think: a folder to which everyone can contribute photos.) Go through this album and add the photos that you want to keep on your phone by selecting them and pressing “save image.”

    ATTENTION ALL GIRLS ALL GIRLS. Go to your photos and type in the ‘Brassiere’ why are apple saving these and made it a folder. 😱😱😱😱

    On Monday, several Twitter users noticed that on Apple products running iOS 10 or newer, the Photos app uses object recognition to automatically sort pictures featuring bras into a folder named “brassiere.” Several women at The FADER tried searching for “brassiere” in their Photos app on Monday afternoon and were shown an album of pictures of their cleavage.

    The update that made this possible was announced in June 2016. TechCrunch reported at the time, “The computer vision tech used by Apple runs natively on your iPhone or iPad, meaning that it doesn’t require you to upload all the images to the cloud. In can recognize faces in your photos and group by person, but it also has advanced object recognition, making it possible to find images of any number of different things from your distant past.”

    At launch time, Apple reportedly used 4,432 different keywords in all of its recognized languages to sort your photos. Judging by that original list, and subsequent searches by FADER staff, it doesn’t appear to recognize any other risqué categories or any equivalent categories for men like “underwear” or “boxers.” It does have folders for “shower,” “bathtub,” and “sunbathing,” though.

    It’s worth mentioning that Google has been doing object recognition similar to this for photos since at least 2013. In 2016, Facebook made some of their own object recognition tools open source. A representative for Apple was not immediately available for comment.

    If you have hundreds of iPhone/iPad pictures and you find yourself swiping and browsing your photo library, you might consider the tools that are available to help you find photos.

    The Photos app provides a Search function makes it easy to find photos of a person, place, event or thing.

    Access the Search tab by tapping Search on the lower right of the Photos app.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    You are presented with a Search bar with other headings like Moments, People and Places.

    Scroll down and you will see search suggestions that include:

    • Moments – collections from events and themes found in your photos
    • People – the Photos app automatically groups photos by the faces it finds.
    • Places – Map locations that have groups of pictures are displayed
    • Categories – Photos with similar objects are grouped together
    • Recently Searched – Previous searches in the Photos app.

    Take some time to browse these grouping to give you a sense of how the app is organizing your search tools.

    Search Bar

    Use the Search bar to enter search terms. Consider people, places, events and categories, even those that were not identified in the groupings automatically created.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Take some time to experiment with search by searching for items that you know are in your photo library. For example, I can search for lake, ocean, tractor, tree and find photos with those objects. Experiment by searching for a State that you traveled to. Try events or dates.

    Search with Siri

    You can also search your photos collection using Siri. Here are some sample searches that you can use:

      • Show me photos of concerts
      • Show me photos of one year ago.
      • Find my photos of Arizona

    iCloud Link Required

    The Search and collection tools require that you are connected to iCloud and have the iCloud Photo Library turned on. Information on this can be found in Senior Tech Recipe #404 How to use iCloud to expand and optimize storage .

    Tip: Get to understand Searches, people and places in order to find specific photos on your iPhone.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    People who wear bras got a fun (if “fun” means “vaguely horrifying”) pre-Halloween surprise: Apple’s iOS automatically sorts pictures featuring bras into a folder called “brassiere.” But “brassiere” isn’t the only keyword iOS uses to sort your photos. In fact, there are almost 4,500 searchable keywords to find photos on your iPhone and other Apple devices running iOS 10 or newer.

    Twitter user @ellieeewbu was the first to point out the “brassiere” tag on Oct. 30, but it turns out the function has been in place for more than a year. Developer Kenny Yin outlined the changes to the Photos app when it was updated in June 2016, and those changes include the ability to recognize “thousands of objects, scenes, and facial expressions,” Yin wrote. Photos can also recognize seven distinct facial expressions: Greed, disgust, screaming, smiling, surprise, suspicion, and neutral.

    So while discovering your iPhone is able to bring up every cute bra selfie you’ve taken can be disconcerting, your iOS hasn’t been designed to perv on you. (It’s worth noting, however, that Fader pointed out there don’t appear to be equivalent tags for things traditionally associated with men, like “boxers.”)

    This new discovery may have you wondering what other objects your Apple device is capable of recognizing, and the answer is: A lot. Some of which is mundane, and some of which is totally out there.

    A few of iOS’s search-capable keywords — gathered from a list compiled by Yin — are both expected and gifts to the internet: “Cat,” “dog,” and “animal” are all searchable, making it easy to scrounge up every picture you’ve ever taken of your cat, your friend’s dog, and that squirrel you saw eating pizza in a trash can. Also searchable are useful terms normal people might need on a regular basis, like “house,” “car,” and “cheeseburger.”

    Then you have the unusual ones. Here’s a short but scintillating selection: “Squeezebox,” “pleasure grounds,” “clock tower” and “clock towers” for the adventurous, “cold meat,” “trilbies,” “comestible,” “tomato ketchups,” “Legos,” “unitard,” “legerdemain,” “picture takings,” “puffins,” “hoofed mammal,” “lavabo,” and “corgi.”

    Why you would need most of those is a mystery, but at least if you did find yourself in a surprise pop-up contest somewhere, you could whip out your iPhone to quickly show off your various squeezebox photos and win. whatever it is you’d win for that.

    All joking aside, being able to quickly search your photos is honestly pretty useful. According to TechCrunch, who wrote about Apple’s improved Photos app back in June 2016, “[iOS] can recognize faces in your photos and group by person, but it also has advanced object recognition, making it possible to find images of any number of different things from your distant past.”

    So squeezebox searches may be funny, but Photos can also find things like “computer monitor,” which would be handy if you needed to prove your monitor was damaged on a certain date by someone else, as well as event tags like “graduation” and “commencement,” helpful for those who, like me, hardly ever dump their photos from their iPhone into their laptop and then have a hopeless mess of 10,000 pictures to sort through.

    With advancements in technology have come countless privacy concerns, from hackers hijacking laptop webcams to surveillance via smartphone. But if you’re worried about people being able to see how many photos you have of yourself in a bra, you can rest a little easier. As TechCrunch reported, “The computer vision tech used by Apple runs natively on your iPhone or iPad, meaning that it doesn’t require you to upload all the images to the cloud.”

    And feelings about the fact that there aren’t “brassiere”-equivalent tags for underthings things traditionally worn by men can only be summed up in one perfect meme: Disappointed, but not surprised.

    The company’s Photos app includes AI that can recognise thousands of search terms. Should we worry that one of those is ‘brassiere’?

    Apple’s AI can can tell the difference between brassieres and brasseries. Photograph: Alex Segre/Rex/Shutterstock

    Apple’s AI can can tell the difference between brassieres and brasseries. Photograph: Alex Segre/Rex/Shutterstock

    Last modified on Tue 13 Mar 2018 18.21 GMT

    D on’t freak out, but your iPhone knows all about your underwear selfies. On Monday, a viral tweet led to thousands of users discovering that the Photos app, on Apple’s iOS and macOS operating systems, knows what a bra looks like – and lets you search for it.

    Apple being Apple, it’s vaguely classy, of course: the app will only give responses for “brassiere”. But type that into the search bar and there, in all their glory, are likely to be a fair few pics of people – maybe you – in various states of undress.

    Users were perturbed by the discovery (“why are Apple saving these and made it a folder. ”, asked the original tweeter), but it is actually a feature that has been hovering in iPhones for a year now. And, no, it doesn’t involve someone at Apple scanning through all your images looking for salacious ones.

    ATTENTION ALL GIRLS ALL GIRLS. Go to your photos and type in the ‘Brassiere’ why are apple saving these and made it a folder. 😱😱😱😱

    Since the launch of iOS 10, iPhones have been capable of classifying more than 4,000 objects and scenes based on the imagery alone. Everything from abacus to zucchini can be searched for, even if you have never labelled a single picture.

    The AI that recognises objects was trained on a library of hundreds of thousands of labelled images, and is almost uncannily accurate (not only can it distinguish a dog from a cat, it can tell a dachshund from a corgi). But the actual recognition is carried out entirely on the iPhone itself, with a unique version of the AI running on each device, meaning your brassiere pictures remain entirely private – a secret between you and Siri.

    That is different to how some of Apple’s competitors do it. Google, for instance, uploads all images stored on Google Photos to its own cloud, and carries out the bulk of the object recognition there. It can also recognise a brassiere from a brasserie, and is generally better than Apple at the same task – but with a trade-off: the images are (anonymously, and without human involvement) used to further train its own AI.

    It may be that Apple’s privacy-focused approach is actually the cause of the furore. Unlike Google, which went to great lengths to explain what it is doing and ask permission to upload pictures, Apple took its trademark approach of playing down the tech in favour of promoting the fact that “it just works”. Sometimes that leads to a moment of magic; here, it seems, the result is simply an awkward surprise.

    – Jun. 24th 2016 11:35 am PT

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    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Apple is making many of its services smarter in iOS 10 and macOS Sierra through the use of differential privacy which enables artificial intelligence to become smarter while still balancing privacy. Given Apple’s strong position on protecting user privacy, Recode requested more details on how the company’s use of differential privacy would work. Apple so far has resisted collecting a lot of user data that could make Siri, iCloud, and other services smarter.

    Its use of differential privacy to collect some user data to improve its AI services will be totally opt-in, according to the new report, and hasn’t been used in services before iOS 10 and macOS Sierra. Apple also reiterated that it isn’t collecting user data in iCloud-stored photos to improve the AI behind its subject recognition in Photos. That’s why indexing photos happens separately on each device (like Mac, iPhone, and iPad) and object/facial recognition data isn’t synced. Craig Federighi used the example earlier this month that Apple can recognize what a mountain is on their own without using customer photos.

    Recode also shared that Apple’s use of differential privacy is mostly limited in scope at launch:

    As for what data is being collected, Apple says that differential privacy will initially be limited to four specific use cases: New words that users add to their local dictionaries, emojis typed by the user (so that Apple can suggest emoji replacements), deep links used inside apps (provided they are marked for public indexing) and lookup hints within notes.

    Here’s an example of Apple detailing how differential privacy works with deep links in its iOS 10 documentation:

    iOS 10 introduces a differentially private way to help improve the ranking of your app’s content in search results. iOS submits a subset of differentially private hashes to Apple servers as users use your app and as NSUserActivity objects that include a deep link URL and have their eligibleForPublicIndexing property set to YES are submitted to iOS. The differential privacy of the hashes allows Apple to count the frequency with which popular deep links are visited without ever associating a user with a link.

    Apple also detailed these efforts in its official press release for iOS 10:

    Starting with iOS 10, Apple is using technology called Differential Privacy to help discover the usage patterns of a large number of users without compromising individual privacy. In iOS 10, this technology will help improve QuickType and emoji suggestions, Spotlight® deep link suggestions and Lookup Hints in Notes.

    The report also clarifies other AI-driven efforts Apple already has underway that don’t rely on differential privacy at all. Proactive, for example, is a concept that matches much of what Google does through data collection but Apple relies on indexing data locally on the device without information ever being shared across the Internet. For example, iOS 9 started recommending calendar appointments based on information from email saved locally on your iPhone or iPad.

    FTC: We use income earning auto affiliate links. More.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    At its 2016 WWDC developer conference in San Francisco today, Apple unveiled the next version of iOS.

    The 3D Touch capability in newer iOS devices is becoming far more capable. You’ll be able to touch on items on a redesigned lock screen, and you can do more when you push down on specific app icons.

    Notifications have been redesigned. So has the Control Center, with changes specifically coming to its music controls. You’ll be able to do things with connected-home systems through a new Home app that’s integrated into the Control Center, as well as the lock screen.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    But now iOS is getting something that has only been available in some Android devices: raise to wake. It’s just like it sounds — the display turns on and the lock screen activates when you raise your iOS device in the air.

    This is just as you would expect for Apple’s annual developer conference — now developers will know what will be possible for current and future applications. Meanwhile, users can get a taste of what they’ll get when they upgrade (or switch from another platform).

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Here’s a rundown of some of the other features of the upcoming iOS release that will distinguish it from its predecessor, iOS 9:

    • A completely revamped Photos app that will more directly take on Google’s cross-platform Google Photos app. Face recognition, object recognition, and scene recognition will draw on deep learning, an increasingly popular type of artificial intelligence, just like Google Photos does. But the big distinction here is that Apple won’t be doing all the important processing remotely — that will be happening locally, in line with Apple’s historical preference for privacy over data sharing, which differs from Google. The app will cluster photos based on people, groups of people, topics, and even trips. It will surface highlights of a weekend or even a year. It will automatically make slick videos called Memory Movies with background music. Oh, and you can run the app on Apple TV.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Above: The next version of the Photos app.

    • The default iOS keyboard is also drawing heavily on deep learning. Siri’s suggestions about next words to type will be more intelligent. Siri can automatically generate calendar events based on information in things like text messages. The app will be able to check calendar availability for a certain date and time, it will show your current location, integrate with contact information, show recent addresses, type with multiple languages, and look up locations such as movie theaters and restaurants.
    • Apple Maps is becoming more proactive. There will be suggestions when you slide up from the bottom. There’s new information about traffic on your route, and you can pan and zoom to see the traffic a while away, just like Google Maps. You’ll be able to search for things like gas stations on your route. This will all be available on CarPlay, of course. The app will let users choose routes that avoid tolls. There will be an extension of Apple Maps that will let developers add in third-party integrations like OpenTable and Uber. And Apple Maps will display air quality information in China.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Above: The new Apple Maps.

    • Apple Music, which now has more than 15 million paying users, has been redesigned. It’s added a new lyrics feature, too.
    • Apple News is redesigned. You’ll be able to subscribe to publications, get breaking news notifications on the lock screen, get news about specific topics you’re interested in, and see featured stories.
    • A new Home app that will let you do things with your home by drawing on the existing HomeKit technology. You can have Siri perform actions with the Home app in reaction to voice commands. Home will integrate with Apple Watch, too.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Above: The new look for phone calls in the Phone app.

    • The Phone app is getting automatic transcription of voicemails. There’s a new look for incoming calls, and there will be integrations with third-party calling apps like WhatsApp that can take advantage of the redesign.
    • The Messages app is getting rich links that show photos and even videos. Emojis will show up three times bigger in the app. It will offer emoji predictions (this feature came first to Google’s Gboard for iOS), and it will even highlight words that can be turned into emojis and automatically convert text to emoji with a tap. You can add visual effects to the chat bubbles, which eventually resolve to regular message bubbles. And that applies to photos, too. You can tap a thumbs-up just like Facebook, and you can use handwritten messages. You can draw a message using a Digital Touch feature, and you can also show “full-screen effects” that temporarily adjust the background of the message window. Songs from Apple Music can be played right in chat messages, including in group chats.
      And Messages is being opened up to developers, so that you can use several other apps right inside Messages. For example, you can drop GIFs into message transcripts, or you can order food without leaving the app.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Above: The upcoming version of iOS will include the ability to turn certain words into emoji automatically.

    • The Notes app will let multiple people collaborate on documents, just like Microsoft Word and Google Docs.

    How to search your photos for specific objects in ios 10

    Above: Multiple people can collaborate in the new Notes app.

    • The FaceTime app for making calls will be end-to-end encrypted by default. That’s a big difference from the upcoming Duo video calling app from Google. And FaceTime will connect more quickly.
    • The Swift Playgrounds app for iPad will become available for download for free.
    • The Camera app will launch more quickly than in previous iOS releases.
    • The Safari app will let you keep an unlimited number of tabs open. And the Split View feature for the iPad Pro now allows you to have two Safari windows open at one time.
    • The iCloud Drive app will show your desktop folder from a Mac.
    • The stock Clock app is getting a bedtime alarm.

    The developer preview of iOS 10 available today. It will become available in beta in July and as a free upgrade in the fall.

    As for device support, iOS 10 will be rolled out to iPhone 5 and later, all iPad Air and iPad Pro devices, iPad 4th generation, iPad mini 2, and later, and the 6th-generation iPod touch, Apple said in a statement.

    Platform Compatibility

    Name Default Description
    photosPermission “Allow $(PRODUCT_NAME) to access your photos” iOS only A string to set the NSPhotoLibraryUsageDescription permission message.
    cameraPermission “Allow $(PRODUCT_NAME) to access your camera” iOS only A string to set the NSCameraUsageDescription permission message.
    microphonePermission “Allow $(PRODUCT_NAME) to access your microphone” iOS only A string to set the NSMicrophoneUsageDescription permission message.
    • options ? ( PermissionHookOptions object > )

    Check or request permissions to access the camera. This uses both requestCameraPermissionsAsync and getCameraPermissionsAsync to interact with the permissions.

    Example

    • [ null | PermissionResponse , RequestPermissionMethod PermissionResponse > , GetPermissionMethod PermissionResponse > ]
    • options ? ( PermissionHookOptions< writeOnly: boolean >> )

    Check or request permissions to access the media library. This uses both requestMediaLibraryPermissionsAsync and getMediaLibraryPermissionsAsync to interact with the permissions.

    Example

    • [ null | MediaLibraryPermissionResponse , RequestPermissionMethod MediaLibraryPermissionResponse > , GetPermissionMethod MediaLibraryPermissionResponse > ]

    Checks user’s permissions for accessing camera.

    A promise that fulfills with an object of type CameraPermissionResponse.

    • writeOnly ( boolean ) – Whether to request write or read and write permissions. Defaults to false

    Checks user’s permissions for accessing photos.

    A promise that fulfills with an object of type MediaLibraryPermissionResponse.

    Android system sometimes kills the MainActivity after the ImagePicker finishes. When this happens, we lost the data selected from the ImagePicker . However, you can retrieve the lost data by calling getPendingResultAsync . You can test this functionality by turning on Don’t keep activities in the developer options.

    • Promise ( ImagePickerResult | ImagePickerErrorResult ) [] >
    • On Android: a promise that resolves to an array of objects of exactly same type as in ImagePicker.launchImageLibraryAsync or ImagePicker.launchCameraAsync if the ImagePicker finished successfully. Otherwise, to the array of ImagePickerErrorResult .
    • On other platforms: an empty array.
    • options ( ImagePickerOptions ) – An ImagePickerOptions object.

    Display the system UI for taking a photo with the camera. Requires Permissions.CAMERA . On Android and iOS 10 Permissions.CAMERA_ROLL is also required. On mobile web, this must be called immediately in a user interaction like a button press, otherwise the browser will bloc the request without a warning.

    Therefore, calling launchCameraAsync in componentDidMount , for example, will not work as intended. The cancelled event will not be returned in the browser due to platform restrictions and inconsistencies across browsers.

    If the user cancelled the action, the method returns < cancelled: true >. Otherwise, this method returns information about the selected media item. When the chosen item is an image, this method returns < cancelled: false, type: 'image', uri, width, height, exif, base64 >; when the item is a video, this method returns < cancelled: false, type: 'video', uri, width, height, duration >.

    • options ? ( T ) – An object extended by ImagePickerOptions .

    Display the system UI for choosing an image or a video from the phone’s library. Requires Permissions.MEDIA_LIBRARY on iOS 10 only. On mobile web, this must be called immediately in a user interaction like a button press, otherwise the browser will block the request without a warning. Animated GIFs support If the selected image is an animated GIF, the result image will be an animated GIF too if and only if quality is set to undefined and allowsEditing is set to false . Otherwise compression and/or cropper will pick the first frame of the GIF and return it as the result (on Android the result will be a PNG, on iOS — GIF).

    Therefore, calling launchImageLibraryAsync in componentDidMount , for example, will not work as intended. The cancelled event will not be returned in the browser due to platform restrictions and inconsistencies across browsers.

    • PromiseExpandImagePickerResult T > >

    If the user cancelled the action, the method returns < cancelled: true >. Otherwise, this method returns information about the selected media item. When the chosen item is an image, this method returns < cancelled: false, type: 'image', uri, width, height, exif, base64 >; when the item is a video, this method returns < cancelled: false, type: 'video', uri, width, height, duration >.

    Asks the user to grant permissions for accessing camera. This does nothing on web because the browser camera is not used.

    A promise that fulfills with an object of type CameraPermissionResponse.