Categories
Planning

How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

Telemetry is a type of data collection system that collects engineering data about your browsing history. Most of the data that is collected is hardware and customization based, however it does also contain a portion of usage statistics. The data is collected anonymously and is used to improve browser performance in newer versions. Privacy advocates are against telemetry data, especially when apps and services opt-in by default. You can also read How To Disable Telemetry and Data Collection in Windows 10 and Regain Your Privacy.

How to Disable Telemetry Data Collection on Firefox

First we’ll cover the simpler items to disable. These can be found in the Firefox Settings.

  • Open Firefox and in the address bar type about:preferences#privacy to open the Firefox Settings and go to the Privacy section
  • Scroll down to the Firefox Data Collection and Use section and uncheck everything

In Firefox 93, Mozilla introduced Contextual and Sponsored Suggestions in the Address Bar. Unfortunately, this means that they need to collect data that you type into the address bar to offer those suggestions.

  • Open Firefox and in the address bar type about:preferences#privacy to open the Firefox Settings and go to the Privacy section
  • Scroll down to the Address Bar – Firefox Suggest section
  • Uncheck Include Occasional Sponsored Suggestions and Contextual Suggestions

For the more advanced settings, you can individually disable some hidden settings. Change these with caution as they could break some features that you use in Firefox.

  • Open Firefox and in the address bar type about:config
  • In the Search bar, search for each one of these settings and double-click on them to change the setting to False except for the one that says True:
  • Search for toolkit.telemetry.server, double-click on it and delete the value of the server

Once you’ve made all of these changes, restart Firefox and all of the telemetry data collection should be disabled. As Firefox releases updates, we’ll keep this article updated if new features are rolled out as opt-in and could cause a privacy concern.

Brady Gavin has been immersed in technology for 15 years and has written over 150 detailed tutorials and explainers. He’s covered everything from Windows 10 registry hacks to Chrome browser tips. Brady has a diploma in Computer Science from Camosun College in Victoria, BC. Read more.

How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

To maintain transparency, Mozilla has made all of the data Firefox collects about you and your machine available to view. Using a hidden page in your browser, here’s how to see what’s sent to the company’s servers.

Mozilla engineers recently starting shipping stable releases of Firefox with a hidden page that details the telemetry metrics used for debugging Firefox test installs. This move ties into its push for an increase in privacy controls and transparency in how the company handles your data.

Do not worry; all data collected by Mozilla and Firefox is anonymized and aggregated to ensure each user’s privacy.

How to See Firefox Telemetry Data

To view the hidden page in Firefox that shows you all of the telemetry details uploaded to Mozilla servers, type about:telemetry into the address bar and hit the Enter key.

When the page loads, you’ll see a summary of how the information is used. The types of telemetry that you can view are listed on the left side of the window. Click on any of the options to get a granular look at the telemetry data.

How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

All of the information dives deep into the browser build, version, installed add-ons, sessions, running processes, and your system’s operating system and hardware.

How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

There is a lot of data here, and if you know what you’re looking for, you can use the search bar to locate a specific metric quickly.

How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

If you find data beautiful or want to see how the information is used, you can take a look at Mozilla’s telemetry portal or weekly Firefox Public Data Report. Here is where you can view graphs and charts relating to how Firefox is used and read the documentation regarding what data is available and how to use it.

How to Disable Firefox Telemetry Collection

In general, allowing an application to upload data about performance and general usage in the real world isn’t inherently bad. In fact, it’s generally a good thing. The data collected allows engineers and developers the knowledge needed to make apps perform better on devices similar to your own, along with deciding what changes to make in future releases.

Before you go ahead and disable telemetry completely, feel free to check out our article on usage statistics, error reports, and telemetry.

If you don’t like the idea of Mozilla collecting, storing, and displaying your information, you can always opt-out of data collection using the privacy settings in Firefox.

Open up Firefox and type about:preferences#privacy into the address bar. Press the Enter key to load the Privacy subsection of Settings.

How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

From here, scroll down until you see the Firefox Data Collection and Use heading. Untick the box next to “Allow Firefox to send technical and interaction data to Mozilla.”

How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

Along with disabling future telemetry collection, Firefox will delete the last 30 days of data.

If you want to go the extra mile and take things a bit further, you can disable telemetry options from the Advanced Preferences page—similar to enabling flags in Chrome.

Warning: Firefox stores every setting on this page, so you have to be careful when tinkering around here. Changing these settings can be harmful to the stability and security of the browser. You should only continue if you’re confident and sure of what you’re doing.

Type about:config into the address bar and then hit the Enter key. The page loads with a warning about the impacts of changing these preferences and the effect it can have on Firefox. Click the “Accept the risk and continue” button.

How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

In the search bar, type each of the following preferences and then set them to the value provided to the right:

To change a boolean value (true or false), double-click the setting or click the two-way arrow on the right of the setting.

Finally, type toolkit.telemetry.server into the search bar. Double-click on the first setting, delete the URL and then select the checkmark to save changes.

After you finish, you can close the tab. All changes are saved immediately and don’t require any further action.

Although it’s a bit of extra effort, after changing the values of the preferences above, you should no longer be inadvertently sending your telemetry data to Mozilla’s servers.

Firefox collects telemetry data by default. We collect this data to help improve the performance and stability of Firefox. Telemetry data is made up of two data sets: interaction data and technical data.

Interaction data includes information about your interactions with Firefox such as number of open tabs and windows, number of webpages visited, number and type of installed Firefox Add-ons and session length, as well as Firefox features offered by Mozilla or our partners such as interaction with Firefox search features and search partner referrals.

Technical data includes information about your Firefox version and language, device operating system and hardware configuration, memory, basic information about crashes and errors, outcome of automated processes like updates and safebrowsing. When Firefox sends data to us, your IP address is temporarily collected as part of our server logs. IP addresses are deleted every 14 days.

Yes! You can learn about our telemetry data collection by typing about:telemetry in the browser’s address bar. This page will show you the telemetry data being sent to Firefox for your current session. You can also see archived information.

Learn more about how we handle your data by reading the Firefox Data Documentation Overview and the telemetry documentation for Desktop. You can get additional information about specific probes in our probe dictionary which is publicly available for our users.

Any data collection or sharing adheres to our Firefox data collection policy.

Telemetry collection- Windows default browser trends – learn more about one example of how we collect and use telemetry data for Windows users.

We keep telemetry data for 13 months.

You can opt out of sending any Firefox telemetry information at any time. If you opt out of sending telemetry data, we will also treat this as a request to delete any data we previously collected. Data will be deleted within 30 days after you opt out.

To opt out of sending any Firefox telemetry information:

In the Menu bar at the top of the screen, click Firefox and select Preferences . Click the menu button and select Options Preferences . Click the menu button and select Settings .

  • Select the Privacy & Security panel.
  • Scroll to the Firefox Data Collection and Use section.
  • Deselect the Allow Firefox to send technical and interaction data to Mozilla checkbox.
  • To learn more about what data Mozilla receives and how it’s used, see Mozilla’s Firefox Privacy Notice.

    These fine people helped write this article:

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    Volunteer

    Grow and share your expertise with others. Answer questions and improve our knowledge base.

    Related Articles

    Share data with Mozilla to help improve Firefox

    It’s helpful for Mozilla’s engineers to be able to measure how Firefox behaves in the real world. As you use Firefox, the Telemetry feature sends.

    Mozilla always was for the privacy of its users. To make Firefox more open in this aspect, developers added the option to see all the data they collect about you.

    This is autotranslated version of this post.

    On this page you can see all the information that the developers gather about you and your computer.

    How to view the collected data

    Make sure you have the latest version of the browser. After that, open the page about:telemetry .

    Here you will find all the information that the browser collects on you. In the left frame you can view information for each of the data types.

    Among the data collected there is a version of browser used, plugins, sessions, running processes and information about the operating system and hardware.

    To understand how and why the developers of Firefox use this information, you can visit the appropriate portal Opera or read a weekly public report about the used data and to know the answers to all the questions.

    How to disable gathering of telemetry

    To prevent the browser to follow you, you need to go to the page about:preferences#privacy .

    Scroll down to the data Collection and use Firefox. Clear the checkbox next to Enable Firefox to send technical data and interaction data with Mozilla. From that moment all information about you will cease to gather. Moreover, Firefox will remove all the information for the last 30 days.

    For most users this will be enough. However, it is possible to be safe and additionally to disable the collection of telemetry by using flags. To do this, open the page about:config and accept all the risk in a special warning.

    In the search field in turn, enter all the lines specified below and for each, specify false.

    Then find toolkit.telemetry.server . Double-click the first configure, delete the URL and save the changes.

    Now collecting telemetry in Firefox is completely disabled.

    – Last updated on January 8, 2018 by VG

    We have shared exclusive tutorials in past to disable telemetry and data collection in operating systems such as Windows 7/8/8.1 and Windows 10 . We have also shared tips to improve privacy in Microsoft Office suite and Opera web browser.

    Today it’s turn of Mozilla Firefox web browser. The latest Firefox Quantum version comes with lots of changes and improvements such as new Photon UI, redesigned new tab page and preferences page, etc. Apart from these changes, Firefox also comes with privacy changes and improvements. Mozilla has provided few settings on Options (About:Preferences) page to select what kind of data do you want to share with Mozilla and want to send to Mozilla servers.

    You can turn on/off options such as “Allow Firefox to send technical and interaction data to Mozilla“, “Allow Firefox to install and run studies” and “Allow Firefox to send crash reports to Mozilla” servers. You can change these settings using “Privacy & Security” section on Preferences page as shown in following screenshot:

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    But even after you disable these options, Firefox still collects and sends data to servers. In this tutorial, we’ll tell you how to completely disable telemetry and data collection in Mozilla Firefox Quantum version.

    If you want to improve your privacy in Firefox Quantum and want to turn off data collection and telemetry, following steps will help you.

    We’ll change some preferences on Firefox’s hidden secret advanced configuration page i.e. about:config page to disable telemetry and data collection.

    1. Open Mozilla Firefox and type about:config in the addressbar and press Enter. It’ll show you a warning message, click on “I accept the risk!” button.

    2. Now type telemetry in Search filter box and look for following preferences in the result:

    browser.newtabpage.activity-stream.feeds.telemetry
    browser.newtabpage.activity-stream.telemetry
    browser.ping-centre.telemetry
    toolkit.telemetry.archive.enabled
    toolkit.telemetry.bhrPing.enabled
    toolkit.telemetry.enabled
    toolkit.telemetry.firstShutdownPing.enabled
    toolkit.telemetry.hybridContent.enabled
    toolkit.telemetry.newProfilePing.enabled
    toolkit.telemetry.reportingpolicy.firstRun
    toolkit.telemetry.server
    toolkit.telemetry.shutdownPingSender.enabled
    toolkit.telemetry.unified
    toolkit.telemetry.updatePing.enabled

    Double-click on each above mentioned preference except “toolkit.telemetry.server” and change their values to false. Alternatively, you can right-click on the preference and select Toggle option.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    Now double-click on toolkit.telemetry.server preference and empty its value i.e. remove everything from the value text box.

    3. Now type experiments in Search filter box and look for following preferences in the result:

    experiments.activeExperiment
    experiments.enabled
    experiments.supported
    network.allow-experiments

    Double-click on each above mentioned preference and change their values to false. Alternatively, you can right-click on the preference and select Toggle option.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    That’s it. Now you can browse your favorite websites in Firefox without worries.

    Published in: Mozilla Firefox

    About the author: Vishal Gupta (also known as VG) has been awarded with Microsoft MVP (Most Valuable Professional) award. He holds Masters degree in Computer Applications (MCA). He has written several tech articles for popular newspapers and magazines and has also appeared in tech shows on various TV channels.

    Comments

    NOTE: Older comments have been removed to reduce database overhead.

    Nice list, Vishal! Firefox just got a bit faster yet. 🙂
    Thanks for that!

    I would imagine most of these tweaks would cripple Firefox Test Pilot Experiments, although, the project looks all but abandoned; I haven’t seen a new Experiment in almost a year!
    What are your thoughts on that?

    Yes. The experiments preferences are related to the test pilot program. I have also not seen any experiment since 2016 yet.

    Excellent, but for 64-bit system i prefer Waterfox. Free from telemetry already lol..

    My quantum install has “toolkit.telemetry.enabled” as locked in the true position. Any idea how to unlock?

    ^^ Are you using public stable version or Nightly build?

    Also one can lock those preferences with mozilla.cfg configuration file. See more @ developer.mozilla.org/en-US/Firefox/Enterprise_deployment

    Add the following lines in that configuration file, also add the other preferences:

    lockPref(“experiments.activeExperiment”, false);
    lockPref(“experiments.enabled”, false);
    lockPref(“experiments.manifest.uri”, “”);
    lockPref(“experiments.supported”, false);
    lockPref(“toolkit.telemetry.infoURL”, “”);
    lockPref(“toolkit.telemetry.cachedClientID”, “”);
    lockPref(“toolkit.telemetry.server”, “”);

    This also makes the telemetry server preference as blank.

    Contents

    • 1 Telemetry and User Control: FAQ
      • 1.1 What is Telemetry and why is it good for Firefox users?
      • 1.2 What kinds of data does Telemetry send to Mozilla?
      • 1.3 What are the privacy implications with Telemetry?
      • 1.4 How do Firefox users enable/disable Telemetry?
      • 1.5 Why is Telemetry enabled by default on the Firefox pre-release channels?
      • 1.6 Is Telemetry enabled by default on normal Firefox releases?
      • 1.7 Can Firefox users change their mind and enabled/disable Telemetry later?
      • 1.8 Can Firefox users view the data that Telemetry collects?
      • 1.9 How does Mozilla use the data that is collected?
      • 1.10 How have you acquired product-related data in the past to help improve Firefox?

    What is Telemetry and why is it good for Firefox users?

    Telemetry is a Firefox feature that collects valuable engineering data about the browsing experience in order to make Firefox perform better. Telemetry measures and collects browser data such as performance, hardware, usage and customizations. This data, used in aggregate, allows Mozilla to identify new issues and regressions, obtain more specific information about problem areas in the browser, and, as a result, provide a better browsing experience.

    Telemetry may also enable experimental Firefox features from time to time.

    What kinds of data does Telemetry send to Mozilla?

    Telemetry collects information about your Firefox browsing experience to improve Firefox features, browser performance and stability. Examples of the kind of data Telemetry sends to Mozilla includes start-up time, time between cycle collector runs, memory heap used, whether hardware graphics acceleration or Java is enabled, and more.

    Telemetry does not collect any bookmarks or passwords. It may collect anonymized site visit information in some circumstances, such as when a secure browsing connection fails to connect, or for some experiments.

    What are the privacy implications with Telemetry?

    Mozilla takes user privacy very seriously. More information about our privacy practices can be found here: http://www.mozilla.org/privacy/; and in our Firefox Privacy Policy here: http://www.mozilla.org/legal/privacy/firefox.html.

    How do Firefox users enable/disable Telemetry?

    Enabling and disabling Telemetry is easy. Instructions can be found in the support articles for Firefox for Windows, Mac and Linux and Firefox for Android.

    Why is Telemetry enabled by default on the Firefox pre-release channels?

    Users use Firefox pre-release builds in order to test and provide feedback on new features; enabling Telemetry by default on these channels makes it easier for them to do so by allowing Mozilla to better identify new issues and regressions early in the development cycle and make Firefox a better product. Users can choose to disable Telemetry at any time. See How do I enable/disable Telemetry data collection?.

    Is Telemetry enabled by default on normal Firefox releases?

    No. Users of Firefox release builds must explicitly opt in to Telemetry.

    Can Firefox users change their mind and enabled/disable Telemetry later?

    Yes. Users can enable or disable Telemetry data collection at any time. The change will take immediate effect. See How do I enable/disable Telemetry data collection?.

    Can Firefox users view the data that Telemetry collects?

    Yes. When Telemetry is enabled, the about:telemetry page in Firefox provides the ability to view all of the data measured and collected from the browser. Type about:telemetry into the URL bar in Firefox to view this page.

    How does Mozilla use the data that is collected?

    The data measured and collected by Telemetry allows Mozilla to identify new issues and regressions, obtain more specific information about problem areas in the browser, and, as a result, provide fixes for rising problems more quickly. With this, the Firefox engineering team looks to answer these types of questions, among others:

    • How long does it take Firefox to start?
    • How long does it take Firefox to load a web page?
    • How much memory is Firefox consuming?
    • How frequently do the Firefox cycle collector and garbage collector run?
    • Was your session successfully restored when you last launched Firefox?

    Users can now go to about:telemetry and see what Mozilla is collecting about their Firefox installs.

    There is now a special page in the Firefox browser where users can see what telemetry data Mozilla is collecting from their browser.

    Accessible by typing about:telemetry in the browser’s URL address bar, this new section is a recent addition to Firefox.

    The page shows deeply technical information about browser settings, installed add-ons, OS/hardware information, browser session details, and running processes.

    The information is what you’d expect a software vendor to collect about users in order to fix bugs and keep a statistical track of its userbase.

    A Firefox engineer told ZDNet the page was primarily created for selfish reasons, in order to help engineers debug Firefox test installs. However, it was allowed to ship to the stable branch also as a PR move, to put users’ minds at ease about what type of data the browser maker collects from its users.

    The move is in tune with what Mozilla has been doing over the past two years, pushing for increased privacy controls in its browser and opening up about its practices, in stark contrast with what other browser makers have been doing in the past decade.

    While Mozilla has had its missteps — most notable being the Mr.Robot add-on incident — the organization has been mostly open in its dealings with users.

    Even before adding about:telemetry to Firefox, the organization was listing on its website all the telemetry data types it was collecting from users, and the reasons why.

    But besides debugging and staging new version rollouts, this telemetry data is also what powers the Firefox Public Data Report, a web portal showing weekly-updated Firefox usage stats.

    However, if users are still uncomfortable with allowing Mozilla to collect even the most basic details about their browser install, they can disable Firefox’s telemetry feature from the browser’s settings section, at about:preferences#privacy in the “Firefox Data Collection and Use” section

    It’s not like they use it to build a profile of you, as goddamn chrome does.

    I feel that whatever Mozilla does can never be good enough for some people, even though they are one of the most important players in the “fight” of OSS. Just think about it, linux is only usable as a desktop OS because most of the desktop apps migrated to the web – and firefox is the only free browser that is actually capable, as well as the only engine that is not google-controlled. We should support them as much as we can.

    It’s great that you consent. In that instance it is fine. Many do not, and to proceed with the assumption of consent should be a crime.

    What is done with the data is irrelevant. Spying without explicit consent is the problem.

    Eh? Says who? Them?

    So many times, companies have lied, cheated, made excuses. So many times “we don’t”, then they do.

    So I should just trust Mozilla, because. well, why?

    And this doesn’t even take into account new corporate owners, leveraging existing data in a new way. Or rogue elements in corps, employees stealing data for profit, or even data leakage due to misconfigured servers.

    These thongs have all happened.

    Corps have left dumps of entire client databases, credit cards, id, on open portals!

    Over and over, again and again, we have been shown, never ever trust anyone with your data. Ever.

    Disable “datareporting.healthreport.uploadEnabled” and Firefox will not send telemetry data around. But users cannot be expected to mess around in about:config, right? That why there is a checkbox in the Firefox preferences just for this. In the Privacy & Security tab.

    Also, when you create a fresh Firefox profile (e.g. when you use it for the first time), it will open their privacy policy page, with a somewhat hidden button that brings you straight to those checkboxes. I don’t like that it’s a bit hidden now by default, and they could do better there (and actually did better in the past, where there was a very visible popup asking you about this stuff).

    As for “they should test this!”: Right, and they do have unit tests[2].

    I had the Preferences option Off for years and yet there was a laundry list of telemetry options enabled in about:config.

    This is shady as fuck if you pardon my French. Completely unacceptable.

    Best is irrelevant – it’s not good enough.

    Disabling telemetry is like refusing to register to vote: you minimise the chance of people doing bad things to you, but you also minimise the chance of people doing good things for you. Maybe that trade-off is worth it for you, maybe it isn’t, but don’t complain that the trade-off exists and don’t get annoyed that other people choose differently.

    At work I handle more sensitive data and there it’s turned off (the basic stuff, without diving into about:config to make it completely silent).

    On the other extreme, I also use Firefox during security assessments. My browser making noise on a network where I’m not supposed to be detected is not something I can have happen. Removing all URLs and disabling all telemetry settings in about:config used to be enough, but recently they added a new system and that URL doesn’t seem to be in about:config, I guess it’s hard-coded. With covid-19 our on-site assessments are on hold anyway, but sooner or later I’ll need to disable that either in Firefox itself or in the proxy configuration (on localhost, which logs any requests I make).

    It’s already anonymous, no? Of course if you consider a CGNAT IP address not-anonymous then nothing can help you.

    Similarly, it’s not as if CGNAT is an anonymisation technology. Crooks would love it: download and upload whatever you want and nobody can ever tell it was you! No, ISPs log who used which IP and port at which time.

    Processing the IP address and port number is essential for TCP to work, and even if you don’t store it and filter it on your network’s edge, it’s still covered by privacy law–technically. A judge might not award you damages, but technically the processing (not storage) of personal data is also covered by privacy laws.

    Of course, if they don’t store it then I would consider it anonymous. The question to me is what they do with the data. But it’s not correct to assume that it’s anonymous just because you share an IP address with others, or to assume that everyone has CGNAT. Where I live a personal address is the default.

    I am surprised, for a product that claims to be privacy focused to behave in this way. I am a Firefox user and have not disabled telemetry since I think it can help Firefox and I trust them no to do anything wrong with it. But I would have expected that unchecking the telemetry option would actually disable telemetry.

    Create a customized version of Firefox that:

    – has support for removing the top bar when tst or something similar is installed. It should probably be possible to disable/reneable it using a menu option and an optional toolbar button.

    – actually disables all telemetry when you try to disable telemetry

    – optional but recommended: a “getting started wizard” where you select your preferred search engine, if you want to install TST or Sidebery, and if you want to set memory consumption to sane defaults.

    – otherwise works exactly like Firefox

    – Charge $50 a year, possibly more.

    I’d probably sign up immediately.

    Q: what if Mozilla finally gets it and implements this?

    A: Fine, just go to the next thing they broke.

    ‘Firefox provides you with several mechanisms to protect your privacy. However, some of them are not enabled by default. In this guide you’ll learn how to configure your Firefox browser settings to strengthen your online privacy.

    Changing settings in Firefox menu

    To change basic privacy settings in Firefox, access the preferences menu by clicking on Edit > Preferences on the menu-bar, or by entering about:preferences in the URL bar, and then click on Privacy & Security (Fig. 1)

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    Enable content blocking

    Content blocking should be enabled by default on your Firefox installation. If not, find the Enhanced Tracking Protection setting and set it to Standard (Fig. 2). If you want stronger protection set it to Strict, but keep in mind this can prevent some pages from displaying correctly.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    Enable Do Not Track

    When browsing the web, your browser can warn websites that you do not want to be tracked. Beware that not all websites respect this! For more consistent protection, please see our guide on installing an ad-blocker. Still, warning websites that you do not want to be tracked is an added protection. Scroll down until you see the Send websites a “Do Not Track” signal that you don’t want to be tracked and then click on Always (Fig. 3).

    Disable telemetry services

    To improve its services, Firefox collects technical and interaction data that it later sends to Mozilla for processing. Part of this also includes the ability to remotely install extensions on your browser, which can pose a privacy risk. To disable telemetry services, find the section titled Firefox Data Collection and Use and make sure to un-tick all boxes (Fig. 4).

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    Changing settings in the about:config page

    To manage advanced privacy settings, type about:config in the URL bar and press Enter. You’ll then be greeted by a warning stating that some settings may affect Firefox’s performance and security (Fig. 5). Click Accept the Risk and Continue to enter the settings page.

    Warning: This settings page gives access to advanced features that might affect Firefox ability to function properly. Make sure you understand what you do. All changes are reversible.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    Table 1 shows some of the advanced settings you can change to better protect your online privacy. Next to each setting is the value we recommend applying, as well as a brief summary on what that setting concerns. To enable or disable an option, enter its name in the search bar, and then double click to change the value. When you do so, the updated value is highlighted in bold and is automatically saved (Fig. 6).

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    Found a mistake? An outdated screenshot? Think this could be improved? Check out our Github repository and contribute to help keep these guides up-to-date and useful!

    More steps to take

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    Cómo aislar tu actividad en línea – Firefox Multi-Account Containers

    Una manera de minimizar el rastreo y mejorar tu privacidad en línea es almacenar la menor cantidad posible de cookies de navegación en tu dispositivo. Sin embargo, algunas es práctico tener cookies almacenadas en sitios web como tu cliente de correo electrónico o tu aplicación web para tomar notas, para que no tengas que iniciar una sesión cada vez que visites el sitio. Esta guía explicará cómo instalar y configurar los contenedores de Firefox Multi-Account Containers para mantener diferentes partes de tu actividad en línea aisladas entre sí, reduciendo así tu huella digital.

    [German]The just released Firefox 75 comes in the Windows version with a nasty surprise. A telemetry function transmits daily the used operating system as well as the standard browser to Mozilla.

    I had just introduced the new version of the browser in the blog post Firefox 75 and 68.7.0esr released. Mozilla’s developers had also diligently documented what the new browser can do. What I didn’t notice while browsing the change logs is that new telemetry feature is on board.

    With the release of Firefox 75, Mozilla has introduced a new executable and scheduled task that sends some basic operating system info, the current default browser, and the previous default browser every to their servers.

    — BleepingComputer (@BleepinComputer) April 8, 2020

    Bleeping Computer now points out in the above tweet to the ‘by-catch’ of Firefox 75. With this version, a new program file default-browser-agent.exe is shipped an will be stored into the folder:

    C:\Program Files\Mozilla Firefox\

    The portable version keeps this file in the directory::

    The program collects telemetry data like the operating system version and which standard browser is used. The whole thing is transferred to Mozilla once a day.

    Mozilla explains the approach

    Mozilla has revealed the details in this blog post. With Firefox 75 for Windows, developers are launching a new telemetry feature in the form of a scheduled task. This should help the developers to understand changes in the default settings of the browser.

    • The telemetry task collects information about the current and previous default browser settings of the system as well as the locale and version of the operating system.
    • This data cannot be associated with regular profile-based telemetry data. If you are interested in the schema, you can find it here.
    • The information collected by the task is sent to Mozilla as a background telemetry ping every 24 hours.
    • The developers want to respect the user-configured telemetry opt-out settings stored in the last used Firefox profile.
    • In enterprise environments, the custom policy settings are evaluated in relation to enterprise telemetry (if they exist). The browser also respects the policies for specifically disabling this telemetry task.

    The developers see the collection of telemetry data as a way to ensure that they can understand standard browser trends to improve Firefox.

    The task in task planner

    When Firefox 75 is installed as a browser on Windows, it sets up a task in the task planner that runs every 24 hours. The entry should be located in the Task Scheduler in the Task Scheduler Library/Mozilla branch.

    The colleagues from Bleeping Computer have collected more details about this task in this post. Since I am only using the portable version of Firefox for testing here, I checked. This task does not exist on my system.

    Turn off the telemetry

    To prevent the collection of telemetry data, go to the burger menu with the three bars in the upper right corner of Firefox and select the menu command Settings. On the settings page, select the category Privacy & Security.

    (Firefox Telemetry settings, Source: Bleeping Computer)

    If you then scroll down the page, you will find the group Data collection by Firefox and its use. In my case, only Allow Firefox to install and run studies was marked. The option Allow Firefox to send data on technical details and interactions to Mozilla, which is responsible for telemetry, was disabled. This means that no telemetry data will be sent.

    Group policies and more

    Mozilla has introduced a Windows group policy that prevents the executable default-browser-agent.exe from sending telemetry data with the default browser information. To enable this policy, created the 32-bit DWORD value DisableDefaultBrowserAgent under the registry key:

    and set it to 1. Bleeping Computer has ceated a reg file to import this setting.

    Even if disabled via telemetry settings or group policies, the scheduled task will need to be removed manually to prevent it from continuing to run.

    — BleepingComputer (@BleepinComputer) April 8, 2020

    Bleeping Computer indicates that the telemetry data collection task is still being performed in the task planning. The entry in task scheduling must therefore be removed manually. The steps are described here.

    privacy protection

    Mozilla Firefox collects so-called telemetry data through your browser and sends it to Mozilla for improvement. We show you where to view telemetry data collected by Firefox and turn off data transmission.

    With so-called telemetry, Mozilla Firefox can collect data about technical details and interactions with websites to further develop the browser. This non-personal measurement data focuses on the performance of the rendering engine, so it will not cause any problems for your privacy.

    If you still feel uncomfortable, you can use a hidden overview in your web browser to see what telemetry data Firefox collects and passes. If you don’t like transferring data to Mozilla, you can also turn off telemetry data collection for Firefox completely. The following steps show how to do this.

    In order to browse Firefox anonymously, you should make further settings. We show you this in the linked description.

    You still have to know this!

    Are these instructions helpful or confusing? Give us feedback and score between 1 and 10.

    On my computer, Firefox has collected over 400KB of information .

    Firefox now collects default browser settings data

    In March, Firefox announced that they would start to gather more information about your default option browser to understand changes in default browser settings .
    “ With Firefox 75, we ’ rhenium launching a raw scheduled undertaking for Windows that will help us understand changes in default browser settings. As with all other telemetry related changes here at Mozilla, this scheduled task has gone through our data follow-up, a process designed with user choice and privacy at its core… ” Mozilla stated in a blog mail .
    Mozilla has broken down this action to show precisely what is being collected :

    • We’re collecting information related to the system’s current and previous default browser setting, as well as the operating system locale and version. This data cannot be associated with regular profile based telemetry data. If you’re interested in the schema, you can find it here.
    • The information we collect is sent as a background telemetry ping every 24 hours.
    • We’ll respect user configured telemetry opt-out settings by looking at the most recently used Firefox profile.
    • We’ll respect custom Enterprise telemetry related policy settings if they exist. We’ll also respect policy to specifically disable this task.

    After installing Firefox 75, which was released yesterday, a newfangled platform named default-browser-agent.exe will be installed into the C : \Program Files\Mozilla Firefox\ booklet that sends telemetry back to Firefox every 24 hours .
    Firefox Default Browser Agent This program is executed through a scheduled task named “ Firefox Default Browser Agent” that will be configured after upgrading/installing Firefox 75. This task will be scheduled to run every 24 hours at the like fourth dimension you install install or upgraded the browser .
    Firefox Default Browser Agent scheduled task This scheduled tax will execute the follow command, which will gather data that includes your default option browser, configured venue in the operate system, your function system version, your previous default browser, and the presently installed interpretation of Firefox .

    once the information is gathered, the C : \Program Files\Mozilla Firefox\pingsender.exe program will be executed to upload the data to Firefox ‘s telemetry servers at hypertext transfer protocol : //incoming.telemetry.mozilla.org/submit/default-browser-agent/1/default-browser/ [ UID ] .

    As some may consider this a trespass of privacy, below are instructions on how to prevent Firefox from uploading your information and to delete the job if wanted .

    How to disable Firefox’s Default Browser Agent telemetry

    To prevent the Firefox Default Browser Agent program from sending your default browser information, operating system information, and location, you can disable it through the browser settings and group policies .

    Option 1: Disable using Firefox settings

    The easiest way to prevent default-browser-agent.exe from sending your default option browser data to Firefox a well as disable all early telemetry is to simply disable it in the Firefox settings.

    To disable telemetry in Firefox, please follow these steps :

    1. Click the Firefox hamburger menu button () and select Options.
    2. Click on the Privacy & Security section.
    3. Scroll down to “Firefox Data Collection and Use“.
    4. Uncheck ‘Allow Firefox to send technical and interaction data to Mozilla‘ so it appears as in the image below
      Disable Firefox telemetry
    5. Close the settings.

    With this determine disabled, no telemetry, including the default option browser information, will be sent to Firefox .

    Option 2: Disable using Firefox group policies

    Mozilla has introduced a Windows group policy that prevents the default-browser-agent.exe feasible from sending your default option browser information .
    To enable this policy, create the “ DisableDefaultBrowserAgent “ value under the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Mozilla\Firefox Registry key and set its value to 1 as shown in the Registry file below .
    You can besides copy the register file shown in the greens box below and save it in Notepad as disable-def-browser.reg. then double-click this file to import the policy into the Registry for you .
    Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
    [ HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Mozilla\Firefox ]
    ” DisableDefaultBrowserAgent ” =dword:00000001
    once this policy is configured, when default-browser-agent.exe is executed, it will not send any of your data to Firefox ‘s telemetry servers .
    This policy works immediately after being created .

    Remove the Firefox Default Browser Agent scheduled task

    If you used the above steps to disable the Default Browser Agent, all you have done is prevent the program from uploading your information .
    It will still, though, continue to execute every 24 hours due to a schedule tax mention ‘Firefox Default Browser Agent ‘.

    To remove this task so that the default-browser-agent.exe is no farseeing executed every day, please follow these steps :

    1. Click on the Start Menu and search for “task” and then click on the Task Schedule result when it appears.
      Open Task Scheduler
    2. When Task Scheduler opens, click on the arrow next to the Task Scheduler Library key to expand it. Then click on Firefox to see the Default Browser Agent scheduled task.
      Go to the Mozilla leaf
    3. Right-click on the Default Browser Agent task and select Delete.
      Delete the Default Browser Agent task
    4. The task should now be deleted and you can close the Task Scheduler.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    A Firefox system add-on called telemetry-coverage may still be sending your IP address data to Mozilla even if you explicitly turn off telemetry data – which has privacy implications most people aren’t aware of as Mozilla stores telemetry data with a unique identifier tied to your specific Firefox client. All Firefox clients come with preinstalled system add-ons that function just like add-ons that a user would install themselves from the Add-ons store, except they’re there by default. A Mozilla employee commented on the SuperUser forum attempting to defend this action:

    “It is true that we’re now releasing some features internally as something we call “System Extension”, which technically is the same as an addon you could install on addons.mozilla.org, with the difference that these come pre-installed with Firefox and there is no way to disable them. We mainly do this to be able to ship updates faster, but it’s also nice that we have some features totally separated, which makes the development process easier for us!”

    Since 2018, Firefox has come up with a way to use a system add-on called telemetry-coverage to estimate the “unknown portion of our users [that] do not report telemetry for a variety of reasons.” Mozilla claimed that there are two types of Firefox configurations that end up with telemetry disabled: some enterprise installations, and when a user manually goes in and disables telemetry. Mozilla stated in their blog post announcing their new way of measuring their telemetry coverage:

    “We believe the large majority of clients do send telemetry but currently have no way of measuring this.”

    Mozilla doesn’t need telemetry-coverage to understand their telemetry coverage – so why is it installed?

    Why does Firefox even need to know what percentage of Windows users or Mac users or Linux users prefer telemetry off? As an explanation, Mozilla claims that “we need better insight into our opt-out rates for telemetry” to “ensure new features improve your user experience and to guide Mozilla’s business decisions.”

    This reasoning flies in the face of logic. By default, Mozilla is able to measure the amount of people that manually go in and disable telemetry. Sure they may not be able to tell how many Firefox clients are being fired up by corporate entities and those clients won’t be able to have a say in what features come and go – but that’s clearly a tradeoff those enterprise users and especially the ones who manually turn off telemetry are willing to make.

    The telemetry data provided by those that don’t care they are providing telemetry data or don’t know they’re providing telemetry data is more than enough data for Mozilla to gauge if new features improve the user experience. They already have the data to see if new updates and features increase bug reports – so the real reason isn’t that. The real reason Mozilla is so keen on having telemetry data that they run a study and install an unremovable add-on for those that have disabled telemetry the way they’re allowed to must be the latter reason: to guide Mozilla’s business decisions.

    It’s entirely possible and dare I say likely that the business decision here is to try and get that telemetry data because the government often wants that telemetry data and will try to make Mozilla’s business very hard unless they work to provide it.

    Didn’t I opt out of Firefox studies when turning off telemetry?

    When turning off telemetry in Firefox’s privacy preferences (about:preferences#privacy) you need to uncheck the following three boxes:

    • Allow Firefox to send technical and interaction data to Mozilla
    • Allow Firefox to make personalized extension recommendations
    • Allow Firefox to install and run studies

    So even though a telemetry-disabling user explicitly tells Mozilla that they don’t want to “Allow Firefox to install and run studies,” Mozilla goes ahead and runs a study on telemetry coverage using their system add-on.

    Mozilla intends to add a Unique User Identifier (UUID) to this telemetry data the users explicitly opted out of

    While their blogpost announcing this system add-on did emphasize that it doesn’t send a client identifier, the bugtracker reveals Mozilla’s true intentions. If Mozilla was serious about running this study as a study and not as a nefarious way to siphon more identifiable information from users, they’d make sure that there would never be a UUID for this telemetry data that is sent after the user opts out of sending telemetry data. Fittingly, acomment by a Mozilla dev reads:

    “After discussion we decided not to do a UUID, as this is one-shot and no retry mechanism etc.”

    However, the immediate followup comment is:

    “(To clarify we’d like to add this in the future but we wanted to simplify this to get it going a little sooner)”

    Also, each telemetry-coverage “check” does contain an identifier in the form of a Document ID. Since each ping obviously includes the IP address of the ping originator – that’s still way more information than someone who has opted out of telemetry is comfortable with sharing with Mozilla.

    The information isn’t just shared with Mozilla, BTW, it’s also shared with Amazon

    Mozilla runs their telemetry-coverage study using Amazon Web Services (AWS). Those servers are guaranteed to be logging everything in case the government ever comes knocking (“good business decisions,” remember?) and now Amazon knows if your IP address is one of those IP addresses that prefers telemetry off. As Julien Voisin wrote a year and a half ago in a post titled: “Mozilla is still screwing around with privacy in Firefox,” when telemetry-coverage was released:

    “No, I don’t want to leak details about my Linux distribution, nor at what time I’m using my browser, not my kernel version, nor my IP address to you, just because I’m using your browser. But when I say you, it actually includes other parties, like Amazon.”

    The good news is that it is possible to turn off telemetry-coverage if you are one of the lucky 1% selected to have it installed. To do so, you need to manually create a preference to opt out of Firefox telemetry antics a second time. Information on how to do so isn’t so forthcoming, either. It’s buried in the bugtracker for the telemetry-coverage system add-on but has been tested as working by Mozilla’s devs:

    “The only other thing to test here is that this extension has a special boolean opt-out pref: “toolkit.telemetry.coverage.opt-out”. This pref does not exist by default and must be created, if set to true then the extension should not send a payload as above for users in the 1% sample (such as the Telemetry client ID above will be)”

    The bad news is that Firefox is a privacy nightmare despite all the posturing to the otherwise. It’s honestly incredibly similar to Apple pretending to be a privacy champion in the Western world while kowtowing to Communist China’s censorship demands in the Eastern world.

    How to Enable or Disable Brave Rewards (BAT) in Brave Browser

    How to Enable or Disable Ransomware Protection in Windows 10 & 11

    How to Change The Windows 10 & 11 Clock to 12 or 24 Hour Format

    How to Change Automatic Maintenance Times

    How to Change the Windows 10 Notification Display Time

    Show Your Support for MajorGeeks a Donation

    How to Remove the Shortcut Arrow Icon in Windows 10 & 11

    How to Reset and Renew Your Internet Connection With a Batch File

    How to Enable or Disable Memory Compression in Windows 10 & 11

    How to Create a “Guest Account” on Windows 10 & 11

    Published by Timothy Tibbetts on 05/03/2018

    Firefox Quantum Developer Edition features the latest changes and development tools you need to build for the web, but it can be slow thanks to telemetry and data collection. Here’s how you can disable them and speed Quantum up.

    TIP : Hard to fix Windows Problems? Repair/Restore Missing Windows OS Files Damaged by Malware with a few clicks

    Go to the menu by clicking on the three small lines in the top right corner. Then go to Options > Privacy & Security. Finally, we can scroll down to “Firefox Developer Editions Data Collection and Use.” But, before we do, there are a few other tweaks you might want to look at if your Firefox Quantum is running slowly.

    Look for Cached Web Content and Site Data and choose Clear Now or Clear All Data. Under this, you will see Tracking Protection. Here you can select “Never” and manage site exceptions if needed.

    Data Collection:

    Now we can go to “Firefox Developer Editions Data Collection and Use” and uncheck both “Allow Firefox Developer Edition to send technical and interaction data to Mozilla” and “Allow Firefox to install and run studies.”

    Telemetry:

    TIP : Hard to fix Windows Problems? Repair/Restore Missing Windows OS Files Damaged by Malware with a few clicks

    Disabling telemetry takes a little more work but can be accomplished in about five minutes. Type “about:config” in the address bar, and you will be notified that you could void your warranty (Firefox has a warranty?). Click on “I accept the risk.” Type in “telemetry” in the search bar to see the results. Only some can be changed, and according to Mozilla, they are:

    You need to double-click on each, and that changes the value to false. Next, click on “toolkit.telemetry.server” and empty the string value which should be “https://incoming.telemetry.mozilla.org.”

    Finally, search again for “experiments” and look for the following four entries and double-click them to change their Value to False:

    That’s it! Telemetry and data collection are now disabled, and Firefox Quantum should be faster, and your privacy improved.

    Чтобы сохранить прозрачность, Mozilla сделала все данные, которые Firefox собирает о вас и вашей машине, доступными для просмотра. Используя скрытую страницу в вашем браузере, вы видите, что отправляется на серверы компаний.

    Инженеры Mozilla недавно начали поставки стабильных выпусков Firefox со скрытой страницей, котораяДетализирует метрики телеметрииИспользуется для отладки Firefox Test installs. Этот шаг связан с его толчком к усилению контроля конфиденциальности и прозрачности в том, как компания обрабатывает ваши данные.

    Не волнуйтесь; все данные, собранные Mozilla и Firefox, анонимны и агрегированы для обеспечения конфиденциальности каждого пользователя.

    Как увидеть данные телеметрии Firefox

    Чтобы просмотреть скрытую страницу в Firefox, которая показывает вам все данные телеметрии, загруженные на серверы Mozilla, введите

    Когда страница загружается, вы увидите краткое изложение того, как используется информация. Типы телеметрии, которые вы можете просмотреть, перечислены в левой части окна. Нажмите на любой из вариантов, чтобы получить детальный взгляд на данные телеметрии.

    Вся информация углубляется в сборку браузера, версию, установленные надстройки, сеансы, запущенные процессы, а также операционную систему и оборудование ваших систем.

    Здесь много данных, и если вы знаете, что вы ищете, вы можете использовать панель поиска, чтобы быстро найти конкретную метрику.

    Если вы находите данные красивыми или хотите увидеть, как используется информация, вы можете взглянуть на MozillasПортал телеметрииИли еженедельноОтчет о публичных данных Firefox. Здесь вы можете просмотреть графики и диаграммы, относящиеся к тому, как используется Firefox, и прочитать документацию о том, какие данные доступны и как их использовать.

    Как отключить коллекцию телеметрии Firefox

    В общем, разрешение приложению загружать данные о производительности и общем использовании в реальном мире не является по своей сути плохим. На самом деле это вообще хорошая вещь. Собранные данные позволяют инженерам и разработчикам получить знания, необходимые для улучшения работы приложений на устройствах, аналогичных вашим, а также решить, какие изменения внести в будущие выпуски.

    Прежде чем полностью отключить телеметрию, не стесняйтесь проверить нашу статью оСтатистика использования, отчеты об ошибках и телеметрия.

    Если вам не нравится идея сбора, хранения и отображения вашей информации Mozilla, вы всегда можете отказаться от сбора данных, используя настройки конфиденциальности в Firefox.

    Откройте Firefox и введите

    Отсюда прокрутите вниз, пока не увидите заголовок Firefox Data Collection and Use. Спустите флажок рядом с Разрешить Firefox отправлять технические данные и данные о взаимодействии в Mozilla.

    Наряду с отключением будущего сбора телеметрии Firefox удалит данные за последние 30 дней.

    Если вы хотите пройти лишнюю милю и пойти немного дальше, вы можете отключить параметры телеметрии на странице Advanced Preferences, аналогично включению флагов в Chrome.

    Предупреждение:Firefox хранит все настройки на этой странице, поэтому вы должны быть осторожны, возясь здесь. Изменение этих настроек может нанести вред стабильности и безопасности браузера. Вы должны продолжать только в том случае, если вы уверены в том, что вы делаете.

    В строке поиска введите каждое из следующих предпочтений, а затем установите для них значение, предоставленного справа:

    Чтобы изменить логическое значение (true или false), дважды щелкните настройку или щелкните двусторонней стрелкой справа от настройки.

    После того, как вы закончите, вы можете закрыть вкладку. Все изменения сохраняются немедленно и не требуют каких-либо дальнейших действий.

    Несмотря на то, что это немного дополнительных усилий, после изменения значений предпочтений выше, вы больше не должны непреднамеренно отправлять свои данные телеметрии на серверы Mozillas.

    By CHEF-KOCH
    Post date

    The latest Firefox Quantum version comes with lots of changes and improvements such as new Photon UI, redesigned new tab page and preferences page, etc. Apart from these changes, Firefox Quantum also comes with privacy changes and improvements. Mozilla has provided few options on Preferences page to select what kind of data do you want to share with Mozilla and want to send to Mozilla servers.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about youWhat exactly has been submitted and collected is explained in their FAQ.

    You usually can turn off all the given options but there is a small problem doing it – even after you disable these options, Firefox still collects and sends data to servers. In this tutorial, I’ll tell you how to completely disable telemetry and data collection in Mozilla Firefox Quantum version.

    1. Open Mozilla Firefox and type about:config in the addressbar and press Enter. It’ll show you a warning message, click on “I accept the risk!” button.

    2. Now type telemetry in Search filter box and look for following preferences in the result:

    browser.newtabpage.activity-stream.feeds.telemetry browser.newtabpage.activity-stream.telemetry browser.ping-centre.telemetry toolkit.telemetry.archive.enabled toolkit.telemetry.bhrPing.enabled toolkit.telemetry.enabled toolkit.telemetry.firstShutdownPing.enabled toolkit.telemetry.hybridContent.enabled toolkit.telemetry.newProfilePing.enabled toolkit.telemetry.reportingpolicy.firstRun toolkit.telemetry.server toolkit.telemetry.shutdownPingSender.enabled toolkit.telemetry.unified toolkit.telemetry.updatePing.enabled

    Double-click on each above mentioned preference except “toolkit.telemetry.server” and change their values to false. Alternatively, you can right-click on the preference and select Toggle option.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about youIt is not needed to remove or touch any URL’s, they never getting called when you opt-out of the main features e.g. telemetry!

    Some projects like the ghacks-user.ks project also removing the URL’s which is nothing but nonsense because once you disable the main function, the URL/Domain never gets any ping or call because – as said the main function was already disabled. There is no benefit touching each entry unless you really know what you’re doing.

    3. Now double-click on toolkit.telemetry.server preference and empty its value i.e. remove everything from the value text box.

    experiments.activeExperiment
    experiments.enabled
    experiments.supported
    network.allow-experiments

    That’s it. Now you can browse your favorite websites in Firefox without telemetry!

    Please notice

    Telemetry can be useful in case you want to contribute & support the project, it’s not as all over the place wrongly advertised to collect only your private data, moreover in most cases, like in the Mozilla case, it’s to help solving crashes, testing new functions and to provide information to Mozilla to improve their product.

    Personally I see telemetry not as a bad thing, it can help, especially I as a developer know that it’s hard to explain the user what data they should provide to help solving the problem and no one likes to fill out endless papers manually, so this is why we got Telemetry. The problem is the data transparency here, telemetry must be explained in as much as possible details and there must be toggles given, which Mozilla provides since the day one. The only problem I currently have is that most products by default enabling the telemetry by default (so is Firefox) which I not like or understand because unless there is a crash or issue there is not much reason to submit anything unless you’re really a opt-in beta-tester.

    Firefox Quantum released at the end of 2017 with considerable speed gains, performance tweaks and a sleek new look. If you did switch over to Firefox Quantum and would like to disable two small data collection features, this guide will show you how to disable telemetry services and of course traditional data collection.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    If you aren’t familiar with Telemetry it is another type of data collection system in place that collects engineering data about your browsing history. Most of the data that is collected is hardware and customization based, however it does also contain a portion of usage statistics from time to time. The data is collected anonymously and is used to improve browser performance in newer versions, however, if you’d rather not contribute anything to Firefox it is possible to completely disable Telemetry.

    How to Disable Basic Data Collection on Firefox Quantum.

    As the first data collection point on Firefox Quantum is the easiest to disable, we will start there. To begin open Firefox, then go to the main settings page, which can be accessed by pressing Alt on your keyboard and going to Tools >Options. On the settings page, change to Privacy & Security, then scroll down to the heading Firefox Data Collection and Use and uncheck the boxes next to Allow Firefox to send technical and interaction data to Mozilla and Allow Firefox to send crash reports to Mozilla. Once both of these boxes are unticked, you can move onto disabling Telemetry.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    How to Turn Off Telemetry Data Collection on Firefox Quantum.

    Disabling Telemetry on Firefox Quantum is a little more complicated, so you will need to be patient. To begin, open Firefox, enter about:config into the address bar, then press Enter. (accept the warning when it appears) On the next screen, you will need to use the search bar to find and disable all of the following entries. Double-clicking on an entry will change its status from True (on) to False (off)

    Note: Do not disable toolkit.telemetry.server

    Once all of the above entries are disabled, search for toolkit.telemetry.server, double-click on it and delete the String Value from the popup box.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    For the final step, enter Experiments into the search box and disable the following entries by double-clicking on them and changing them from True (on) to False (off) once again. Alternatively, you can just copy and paste them into search to find them individually.

    The Fine Print: The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. We are not responsible for them in any way.

    Put users mind at ease?? ( Score: 4, Insightful)

    Seems to me that if you’re paranoid about what info your browser collects about you, you might just look at that page and decide that it is neither complete nor conclusive.

    In other words, why would someone who didn’t trust their browser decide that “of course they put absolutely everything they’re collecting about you on that page, and not keeping the really important things secret by just not displaying them. “?

    Re: ( Score: 2)

    If they’re that paranoid and also on slashdot I expect them to be able to snoop on their own network traffic to find out.

    Re: ( Score: 2)

    I guess you never heard of encryption?

    Re: ( Score: 2)

    hurr, hurr, good wun

    Re: ( Score: 2)

    I guess you’re not smart enough to understand that encryption specifically exists to prevent man in the middle attacks of the kind that traffic sniffing is.

    Re: ( Score: 2)

    If only you knew how to add your own trusted CA, then you could do that too. But you’re already too smart, so it isn’t possible that you would learn how to do it, or even ask why the thing you don’t understand is true.

    Re:Put users mind at ease?? ( Score: 5, Informative)

    why would someone who didn’t trust their browser decide that “of course they put absolutely everything they’re collecting about you on that page, and not keeping the really important things secret by just not displaying them. “?

    I don’t trust my browser, I trust that at least one of the independent people who inspect its source code will rat on the others if they find the browser doesn’t do what it says on the tin

    That’s why I trust this:

    about:telemetry#home-tab

    Telemetry is collecting release data and upload is disabled.

    Raw Payload (data:application/json;base64)

    The start of a new year often brings changes, and for enterprise security teams when the calendar rolled over to 2020 it brought with it the beginning of the CCPA era. The new California Consumer Privacy Act went into effect on Jan. 1, requiring businesses to be clear about the data they collect on consumers and offer simple mechanisms for them to opt out of collection, among other things.

    CCPA has a broad definition of personal information, which includes basically anything that can be connected directly or indirectly to a specific person or even a household. That data includes things such as names, home addresses, Social Security numbers, email addresses, IP addresses, driver’s license numbers, and other identifiers. The law requires companies to make it simple for consumers to refuse the sale of their data and allow people to request access to whatever data a business has collected on them.

    In order to comply with the requirements of CCPA, which applies to many companies that do business in California, enterprises are making changes to their data collection and retention policies. One of the companies making changes is Mozilla, which will soon allow individuals to request that Mozilla delete all of the telemetry data it has collected about their Firefox sessions. In the next version of Firefox, due for release on Tuesday, Mozilla will provide a simple mechanism in the browser to ask the company to delete all past data it has collected on their browsing.

    “We don’t think people should have to choose between the technology they love and their privacy.”

    Telemetry data is not the same as personal data and generally just includes information about the browser’s performance, any crashes or other anomalies, and how long a person’s browsing session was. Most browsers collect some kind of telemetry data, as do many other applications, including security tools. Mozilla has decided that with the advent of CCPA, now is the time to give people the opportunity to have their data erased.

    “We don’t collect telemetry in private browsing mode and we’ve always given people easy options to disable telemetry in Firefox. And because we’ve long believed that data should not be stored forever, we have strict limits on how long we keep telemetry data,” said Alan Davidson, vice president of global policy, trust, and security at Mozilla.

    “We’ve decided to go the extra mile and expand user deletion rights to include deleting this telemetry data stored in our systems. To date, the industry has not typically considered telemetry data “personal data” because it isn’t identifiable to a specific person, but we feel strongly that taking this step is the right one for people and the ecosystem.”

    The change applies to all Firefox users, not just those living in California. Davidson said the move is part of Mozilla’s effort to make privacy easier and more accessible for its users.

    “For Firefox, privacy is not optional. We don’t think people should have to choose between the technology they love and their privacy. We think you should have both. That’s why we are taking these steps to bring additional protection to all our users under CCPA,” he said.

    Update: Stop getting error messages and slow down your system with our optimization tool. Get it now at this link

    Although Microsoft has been collecting telemetry data since Windows 7, nothing has been as comprehensive as Windows 10. By default, Windows 10 has telemetry enabled, which collects all types of user activity. users and sends it directly to Microsoft. Since Microsoft doesn’t provide a way to completely disable it from the GUI menu (unless you have the Enterprise version), some users have been looking for alternatives so that their Windows installation doesn’t collect telemetry data.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    What is telemetry data?

    Windows 10 telemetry includes basic system diagnostics, logs of how often you use features and applications, system files, and possibly other metrics that have not yet been revealed. Fortunately, Microsoft allows users to set how much data they want to transfer, but there’s no way to completely disable it. Enterprise-level settings have even more minimal settings, but even then a small amount of security and diagnostic information is sent.

    Microsoft divides telemetry settings into four levels.

    • Security – Windows security data and logs, including client settings and metrics collected by the Malware Remover and Windows Defender. Available for enterprise installations only.
    • Basic – device information, including application compatibility and security.
    • Advanced – everything from security and baseline to Windows and Windows application usage and performance data.
    • Completed – all of the remaining three levels and above. This information may include user-generated content that may have caused a failure or problem.

    If you want to prohibit Windows 10 from collecting telemetry data, there is only one GUI setting available to regular users. Setting the diagnostic and usage data to Basic will limit the amount of telemetry data collected, depending on how it is collected. You can also block telemetry data collection from the registry editor, but this is not much more efficient than the GUI equivalent.

    However, if you want to further limit this feature, you should also consider disabling the Microsoft compatibility telemetry service with a high CMD and disabling the Microsoft Compatibility Assessor (via the task scheduler or via Powershell).

    January 2022 Update:

    You can now prevent PC problems by using this tool, such as protecting you against file loss and malware. Additionally it is a great way to optimize your computer for maximum performance. The program fixes common errors that might occur on Windows systems with ease – no need for hours of troubleshooting when you have the perfect solution at your fingertips:

    • Step 1 : Download PC Repair & Optimizer Tool (Windows 10, 8, 7, XP, Vista – Microsoft Gold Certified).
    • Step 2 : Click “Start Scan” to find Windows registry issues that could be causing PC problems.
    • Step 3 : Click “Repair All” to fix all issues.

    However, if you have Windows 10 PRO or Windows 10 Enterprise, the best way to do this is to use the Group Policy Editor.

    Disable telemetry using the registry editor

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    If you want to completely disable telemetry in Windows 10 Pro, Enterprise or Education, you can also use the Windows Registry Editor to do so.

    Windows 10 Home users can also do this to change their telemetry settings. However, you can only limit data collection, not stop it completely. For Windows 10 Home users, it’s better to use the Windows 10 settings menu instead.

    • First, open the registry editor by pressing Windows + R and typing regedit in the “Run” command window that opens. Click OK to get started.
    • In the Windows Registry Editor window, use the left tree menu to navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE> SOFTWARE> POLICY> Microsoft> Windows> DataCollection. In the right pane, right-click and select Create> “DWORD Value (32-bit)”.
    • Name the new value “Allow Telemetry”. Once created, double-click the value to change the value.
    • Enter the value in the Edit DWord (32-bit) value field. These correspond to the values used by the Group Policy Editor. You can select 0 (disabled, for Windows 10 Pro, Enterprise, and Education users), 1 (basic data collection, for all users), 2 (for advanced collection, but no longer used), or 3 (full data collection). When you have made your selection, click OK to save.

    After you change the value, the telemetry setting you selected becomes active. At this point you can close the registry editor.

    Disabling Telemetry Using Group Policy

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    Step 1: Open Group Policy using the startup command. Press Windows + R to open Run, and type gpedit.msc. Click OK or press Enter.
    Step 2: A new window called “Local Group Policy Editor” opens up. This is where you may need to look –
    Computer Configuration> Administrative Templates> Windows Components> Data Collection and Preview Build.
    Step 3: Double-click on the data collection and preview versions. The options are displayed in the right pane. Now double-click Allow Telemetry.
    Step 4: Under Allow Telemetry, select the Disable option. Click Apply to apply the changes you made.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    CCNA, Web Developer, PC Troubleshooter

    I am a computer enthusiast and a practicing IT Professional. I have years of experience behind me in computer programming, hardware troubleshooting and repair. I specialise in Web Development and Database Design. I also have a CCNA certification for Network Design and Troubleshooting.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    Firefox 75 is collecting data from you by default, and you may not know it. (Image via Firefox w/ edits)

    Working For Notebookcheck

    Are you a techie who knows how to write? Then join our Team! English native speakers welcome!

    News Writer (AUS/NZL based) – Details here

    Firefox is the second-most popular desktop web browser and with good reason. The browser is highly malleable thanks to the robust extension library available to users. However, Mozilla (the company behind Firefox) has been under heavy criticism the past few years for seemingly anti-consumer and anti-privacy practices.

    The key criticism lobbied against Mozilla is its drift toward surreptitious telemetry. The latest version of the Firefox browser, Firefox 75, is a key example of this: Firefox 75 actively reports users’ default browser settings to Mozilla once a day by default.

    Collecting user data isn’t uncommon for web browsers, but considering Mozilla’s and Firefox’s histories of consumer- and privacy-focused ethoses, the browser’s steady march towards data collection is somewhat troubling.

    This particular piece of telemetry tracking was expected, as Mozilla announced Firefox 75 would include a scheduled task that would “help [them] understand changes in default browser settings” back in March.

    Essentially, Firefox 75 collects information regarding a user’s current and previous default browser settings once every 24 hours. For what it’s worth, the data sent is not associated with Firefox’s regular “profile based telemetry data.”

    If you’re uncomfortable with Mozilla knowing your default browser settings, turning off the telemetry collection is easy. In Firefox, click on the hamburger menu in the upper right of the browser window (the three lines). From there, select Options, Privacy & Security, and scroll down to “Firefox Data Collection and Use.” Here, you can uncheck the box next to “Allow Firefox to send technical and interaction data to Mozilla.”

    While you’re here, you may also want to uncheck the option for “Allow Firefox to install and run studies;” when this option is enabled, it allows Firefox to install extensions and collect data to analyze user behavior. These extensions can be installed without your knowledge or consent, so unchecking this option prevents the extensions from installing themselves.

    What do you think of Firefox 75’s new telemetry practices? Is it time to switch to another browser, or is Mozilla well within acceptable bounds? Let us know in the comments.

    Follow MUO

    As a result of CCPA, Mozilla is offering all Firefox users the chance to delete their personal data. Specifically, telemetry data.

    Mozilla is offering all Firefox users the chance to delete their personal data. Specifically, telemetry data, which most of the technology industry doesn’t even consider to be personal data. Still, Mozilla is going the extra mile with regards to privacy and security.

    What Is CCPA?

    This move has been prompted by the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), which went into effect on January 1, 2020. CCPA expands the rights of Californians to manage their data. They can access their data, see if it has been sold, and request it be deleted.

    The CCPA only applies to citizens of California. However, as happened with the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), some companies are expanding the rules to users elsewhere. Including Mozilla, which has supported CCPA from the beginning.

    Mozilla Offers to Delete Your Firefox Data

    As a direct result of the CCPA legislation, Mozilla is offering all Firefox users around the world the opportunity to delete the personal data the company collects. Mozilla explains the change, which will be available with Firefox 72, on the Open Policy & Advocacy Blog.

    Mozilla is keen to point out that “Firefox already collects very little of your data,” stating that most of it is “to help us improve the performance and security of Firefox”. Mozilla calls this “telemetry data”, which offers very general information about browsing habits.

    If you use Firefox in private browsing mode none of this telemetry data is even collected. What’s more, the company has “always given people easy options to disable telemetry in Firefox” and enforces “strict limits on how long we keep telemetry data”.

    However, Mozilla is now expanding user deletion rights to include this telemetry data. Therefore, Firefox will now “provide users a way to request deletion for desktop telemetry directly from Firefox – and a way for us, at Mozilla, to perform that deletion.”

    Maximize Your Privacy When Using Firefox

    As previously noted, the option to request your data is deleted is available to all Firefox users worldwide, and not just Californians covered by CCPA. Which is a classy move. And here are some more ways to maximize your online privacy when using Firefox.

    Need to squeeze extra processing power out of your Raspberry Pi? Try one of these lightweight Raspberry Pi operating systems.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    Dave Parrack is a Deputy Editor at MUO. He has 15 years of experience writing and editing for tech publications, and has been with MUO since 2011.

    Subscribe to our newsletter

    Join our newsletter for tech tips, reviews, free ebooks, and exclusive deals!

    It is now possible to request Mozilla about the deletion of Telemetry Data in the Firefox browser. In this blog post learn, how to do that.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    Starting with Firefox v72, the Mozilla now offers a setting using which users can request about the deletion of telemetry data. The company offers this setting to respect California Consumer Privacy Act(CCPA), and Mozilla become the first browser to do this. The same version of Firefox is set to release on January 7, 2020.

    As per the information shared by the company, Firefox doesn’t collect personal information of the user, but collection technical and performance data which help them in fixing bugs and improving the browser performance.

    Request Mozilla to Delete Telemetry Data for Firefox

    In case, you find this setting handy and want to request Mozilla about the deletion of Telemetry data for Firefox from their services. Here’s how you can do that:

    1. Download or Update Firefox browser to latest version i.e. Firefox 72 (Download Firefox Offline Installer)

    2. Click on the Open menu (Hamburger icon) and then select Options.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    3. On the left side, you need to switch to ‘Privacy and Security‘ and then on the right-side head over to the “Firefox Data Collection and Use” section.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    4. Here, you need to uncheck the box for option “Allow Firefox to send technical and interaction data to Mozilla

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    When you do this, the browser will send a request along with Client_ID of your profile to the Mozilla server about the deletion of telemetry data.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    4. The browser will now show you a notification that reads “You’re no longer allowing Mozilla to capture technical and interaction data. All Past data will be deleted within 30 days.

    If you click on the learn more link, you will be redirected to the SUMO page. which is not working at the moment. Maybe, you will find complete information about this process.

    What are your thoughts about this new feature added to the Firefox browser by Mozilla? Let us know in the comments.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    To maintain transparency, Mozilla has made all data that Firefox collects about you and your machine available for viewing. Using a hidden page in your browser, you can see what has been sent to the company’s servers as follows.

    Mozilla engineers have recently started sending stable Firefox releases with a hidden page with details about the telemetry metrics used to debug Firefox test installations. This step is related to an increase in privacy control and transparency in the way the company handles your data.

    Don’t worry; all data collected by Mozilla and Firefox are anonymized and aggregated to ensure the privacy of every user.

    How to view Firefox telemetry data

    To view the hidden page in Firefox with all telemetry data uploaded to Mozilla servers, type about: telemetry in the address bar and press Enter .

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    when the page loads, u See a summary of how the information is used. The types of telemetry that you can view are on the left side of the window. Click on one of the options to get a detailed overview of the telemetry data.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    All information delves deep into the browser build, version, installed add-ons, sessions, active processes and the operating system and hardware of your system.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    There is a lot of data here, and if you know what you are looking for, you can use the search bar to quickly find a specific item.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    If you like data or want to see how the information is used, you can take a look at the Mozilla telemetry portal or the weekly Firefox Public Data Report. Here you can view graphs and charts that relate to how Firefox is used and read the documentation about what data is available and how to use it.

    How to disable Firefox Telemetry Collection

    In general, an application allow uploading data about performance and general use in the real world is not inherently bad. In fact, it is generally a good thing. The data collected gives engineers and developers the knowledge needed to make apps perform better on devices similar to yours, along with deciding what changes to make in future releases. our article about usage statistics, error reports and telemetry.

    RELATED: Do I have to send apps “usage statistics” and “error reports”?

    If you don’t like the idea that Mozilla collects, stores, and displays your information, you can always opt out of data collection using the privacy settings in Firefox.

    Open Firefox and type about: preferences # privacy in the address bar. Press the Enter key to load the Privacy subsection of Settings.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    Scroll down here until you see the Firefox data collection and use heading. Uncheck the box next to “Allow Firefox to send technical and interaction data to Mozilla.”

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    Along with turning off future telemetry collection, Firefox deletes the last 30 days of data.

    If you want to go one step further and go a little further, you can disable telemetry options via the Advanced Preferences page – similar to enabling flags in Chrome.

    Warning: Firefox saves every setting on this page, so you must be careful when tinkering here. Changing these settings can be harmful to the stability and security of the browser. You should only continue if you are sure and know what you are doing.

    Type about: config in the address bar, and then press Enter. The page is loaded with a warning about the consequences of changing these preferences and the effect this can have on Firefox. Click on the “Accept the risk and continue” button.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    In the search bar, type each of the following preferences and then set them to the value on the right:

    If you want to change a Boolean value (true or false), double-click the setting or click the two-way arrow to the right of the setting.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    Finally, type toolkit.telemetry.server in the search bar. Double-click the first setting, remove the URL, and then select the checkmark to save changes.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    After you are done, you can close the tab. All changes are saved immediately and require no further action.

    Mozilla Firefox is an open source software, which means that any user can access its code. If you know what you’re doing, you can make changes to the existing code, and release a brand new browser. That’s how Waterfox came to be. It is a browser originally based on Mozilla Firefox code.

    There are other similar projects based on Firefox, like Pale Moon, and Basilisk. However, Waterfox has gotten the most attention as an independent browser.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    What Is Waterfox?

    Waterfox is a browser based on Firefox code. The following reasons contributed to the success of Waterfox:

    • It was the first 64-bit browser on the web.
    • It not only offered better speed, but also gave users freedom and control to run any extensions or add-ons they like, including traditional XUL Firefox extensions and NPAPI plug-ins like Java and Silverlight.
    • Waterfox promised that no data or telemetry would be sent to Mozilla or the Waterfox project, and ensured enhanced privacy and security.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    Waterfox is compatible with Windows, Mac OS, and Linux operating systems. There’s also an Android version available to download for free in the Google Play Store if your smartphone or tablet runs 64-bit Android.

    Firefox vs Waterfox: Which One Is Safer to Use?

    When Firefox Quantum and Firefox 57 were released, many users weren’t happy with the transformations even though it was much faster than its predecessor because they dropped the traditional Firefox extensions and interface everyone knew. In that regard, Waterfox seemed like a better alternative as it could match Quantum’s speed and also keep the add-ons.

    However, since Mozilla released Firefox Extended Support Release or Firefox ESR, there aren’t too many differences between Firefox ESR and Waterfox. In fact, Waterfox feels like Firefox ESR with a few settings changed.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    Let’s look at how the telemetry function works in both browsers. Firefox collects this data and sends it to the developer (Mozilla) to improve the browser. You can read exactly the type of information that is captured here. If you consider that a violation of your privacy, Waterfox might appeal to you since it’s free of telemetry. However, in Firefox ESR you can easily disable this function and stop your data from being sent to Mozilla.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    The biggest issue with the Waterfox browser is the slow security updates. Since Waterfox is based on Firefox ESR, the Waterfox developers have to wait for Mozilla to release the security updates and then work on integrating them into Waterfox.

    This may take them anywhere from a couple of days to a few weeks after the security patches have been released for Firefox ESR users. This may leave your computer vulnerable to all sorts of attacks.

    How to Implement Waterfox Features in Firefox

    If you find certain Waterfox features appealing, you can tweak the Firefox browser settings to get the privacy features of Waterfox and enjoy the best of both browsers.

    Remove Pocket from Firefox

    Waterfox disables Pocket by default, while Firefox (especially Firefox Quantum) has Pocket deeply integrated within the browser’s working processes. The good news is that you can remove Pocket from Firefox with just a few clicks.

    Open Firefox and start a search. Hover over the Pocket icon in the search bar, right-click it, and select Remove from Address bar. This gets rid of Pocket.

    Stop Sending Telemetry Data to Mozilla

    If you don’t like the idea of telemetry data being sent to the developer, you can disable that function also.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    To do that, follow the path Options (Windows) or Preferences (Mac) > Privacy & Security > Firefox Data Collection and Use and edit the preferences for sharing telemetry data with Mozilla.

    Disable DRM-controlled Content

    Digital Rights Management or DRM is technology that allows online video and audio services, like Netflix, to enforce their own requirements when the content they provide is being played. Waterfox has the DRM feature disabled by default. This will, however, prevent you from watching DRM protected content from sites like Netflix.

    How to see (and disable) the telemetry data firefox collects about you

    To disable DRM-controlled content, go to Options (Windows) or Preferences (Mac), then scroll down until you see Digital Rights Management (DRM) content. Deselect Play DRM-controlled content to disable it.

    Which Browser Should You Choose?

    We recommend using Firefox because it receives security updates on release. If you have used both browsers you will realize that the advantages that Waterfox initially had over Firefox no longer apply.

    Share your thoughts on whether you prefer Firefox vs. Waterfox in the comments section below.