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How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

How to see which programs are using all your memory on windowsSource: Windows Central

On Windows 10, when your computer suddenly becomes really slow and apps are unresponsive, the reason could be that the system already exhausted all the available Random Access Memory (RAM). However, it does not immediately mean that a memory upgrade is needed since the problem might be a misbehaving application.

If you suspect a problem with how apps are using the available memory, Windows 10 includes at least two ways to check the memory usage using Task Manager and the Resource Monitor tool, which you can also use to terminate apps and restore the device to a working condition.

In this Windows 10 guide, we will walk you through the steps to find out the memory usage for an app running on your computer and what to do when a particular app is hogging the resources.

How to check app memory usage on Windows 10

To determine which apps are using the most memory, use these steps:

    Open Start.

Search for Task Manager and click the top result to open the app.

Quick tip: You can also right-click the taskbar and select the Task Manager option, or right-click the Start button and select the Task Manager option. Or you can also use the Ctrl + Shift + Esc keyboard shortcut – just to name a few options.

Click the More details option (if in compact mode).

Source: Windows Central

Click the Memory header to sort the applications by memory usage.

Source: Windows Central

Confirm the apps using the most memory.

Source: Windows Central

(Optional) Select the app consuming a large amount of memory.

Quick note: It is only best to terminate an app in the event that it is not responding or consuming an unusual amount of memory since shutting it down you may lose unsaved work.

  • Click the End task button.
  • Once you complete the steps, the program will be terminated, freeing up more memory for other applications.

    How to check app memory usage with Resource Monitor

    To check the amount of RAM that apps are using, follow these steps:

    1. Open Start.
    2. Search for Resource Monitor and click the top result to open the app.
    3. Click the Memory tab.

    Click the Private (KB) header to sort the applications by memory usage. (The information is presented in kilobytes.)

    Source: Windows Central

    Confirm the apps using the most memory.

    Source: Windows Central

    Quick note: Unlike Task Manager, the Rources Monitor only provides the processes name, not the friendly name of the app — for example, “msedge.exe” instead of “Microsoft Edge,” and “MsMpEng.exe” instead of “Windows Defender Antivirus.” As a result, if you cannot determine the name of the app, right-click the item, and select the Search Online option. Also, using this tool, you can only terminate one process or tree at a time, which means that to terminate the application, you may need to end all the related process (usually they all have the same name).

    (Optional) Right-click the app consuming a large amount of memory and select the End process option to terminate the process.

    Source: Windows Central

    After you complete the steps, you will know the apps consuming the most memory on the device.

    If you have problems ending a task or there too many processes consuming most of the memory, consider restarting the computer as the process will reset all the applications, potentially fixing the resources issue.

    While it is always recommended to understand which apps are using the most system memory because an app uses many resources, it does not necessarily mean that it’s not behaving correctly. Some software like photo and video editing and games usually require a large amount of system RAM to operate.

    In the case your device suddenly becomes slow, then an app may be a problem. However, if you recently installed an application that requires a significant amount of resources or the total memory usage is hitting around 70% all the time, you may want to consider upgrading the system memory or getting a new computer that can handle the load.

    More Windows 10 resources

    For more helpful articles, coverage, and answers to common questions about Windows 10, visit the following resources:

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    Benj Edwards is an Associate Editor for How-To Geek. For over 15 years, he has written about technology and tech history for sites such as The Atlantic, Fast Company, PCMag, PCWorld, Macworld, Ars Technica, and Wired. In 2005, he created Vintage Computing and Gaming, a blog devoted to tech history. He also created The Culture of Tech podcast and regularly contributes to the Retronauts retrogaming podcast. Read more.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    If your Windows PC feels mysteriously sluggish or refuses to load more programs, it may have run out of working memory. When that happens, PCs often fall back to using virtual memory, which can be much slower. Here’s how to see which programs are eating up all your memory.

    It’s worth clarifying that we’re only talking about memory as in RAM, which is temporary working room for your programs, not disk storage space. The best tool to see which Windows programs might be using too much RAM is a utility called Task Manager.

    First, let’s open the Task Manager. Right-click the taskbar, and in the menu that pops up, select “Task Manager.” (You can also press Ctrl+Alt+Delete and select “Task Manager” from the screen that appears.)

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    If you see the simple Task Manager interface, click the “More Details” button.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    In the full Task Manager window, navigate to the “Processes” tab. You’ll see a list of every application and background task running on your machine. Collectively, those programs are called “processes.”

    To sort the processes by which one is using the most memory, click the “Memory” column header. The process using the largest percentage of RAM will move to the top of the list.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    In this window, it’s a good idea to look for programs that might be using a suspiciously large amount of memory. What counts as “suspicious” varies based on how you typically use your machine. If you frequently render 4K video projects or run complex computer games, it might be no surprise if one of those processes is using a large amount of memory (perhaps even several gigabytes).

    But if a process you don’t recognize is using the memory, or if a memory-hogging application has become unresponsive and you can’t exit the program by normal means, you might want to consider killing the process. To do that, select the process from the list in Task Manager and click “End Task.”

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    After that, the offending program will close (sometimes it takes a few moments). If it doesn’t, try restarting your machine, which can temporarily solve a variety of problems, including a runaway application that might be using more memory than it’s supposed to.

    If you’re having trouble with running out of memory on a regular basis, it might be time to consider adding more RAM to your PC, if possible. Good luck!

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    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

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    Having several Web browser windows, email, Word documents and Excel spreadsheets all open at the same time has become a way of life for small business owners. For this reason, it’s important to keep an eye on how much memory is being used before your computer starts to slow down. RAM is used to store information that needs to be accessed quickly. It’s emptied each time you turn off your computer, as opposed to the hard drive, which stores information permanently. If you find your computer is becoming sluggish, you can use the Windows Task Manager to determine what’s taking up so much RAM.

    Identifying Memory Hogs

    Press “Ctrl-Shift-Esc” to launch the Windows Task Manager. Alternatively, you can right-click the Windows taskbar and select “Start Task Manager” from the drop-down menu.

    Click the “Processes” tab to see a list of all processes currently running on your computer.

    Click the “Memory” column header until you see an arrow above it pointing down to sort the processes by the amount of memory they’re taking. The largest memory gluttons are at the top of the list, and the smallest at the bottom.

    Click “Show Processes From All Users” to look for processes that may be currently running under other user accounts. Enter an administrator password if prompted.

    Look at the process’s entry in the Description column to see what the process is used for. Many processes are hard to identify simply from the name. For example, Smss.exe is the Windows Session Manager.

    Right-click the process if its description doesn’t help you determine what it’s used for. Select “Go To Services(s)” from the drop-down menu. The service associated with process is listed. If no service is listed, that particular process isn’t associated with any services.

    Right-click a process and select “Properties” from the drop-down menu. Click the “Details” tab of the Properties dialog box to see additional information to find additional information about the process.

    Use an online service like ProcessLibrary.com to determine the purpose of any process if you can’t figure it out.

    Clearing RAM

    Select the process in the Task Manager and click the “End Process” button to stop it. Stop a program or process from running in the Task Manager only if you know what it’s for.

    Restart your computer to clear the memory. This is especially useful if your computer has been running for prolonged periods of time, as programs you use and then close may leave residual processes running in the background. When the computer starts again, only the programs activated during startup will occupy RAM.

    Click the Windows Start button and then click ” Control Panel.” Type “Troubleshooter” in the Control Panel search field and then select “Troubleshooting.” The Windows Performance Troubleshooter opens. Click “Check Performance Issues” located under System and Security to identify problematic processes that may be taking up a lot of RAM.

    Delete or uninstall any programs you don’t use. Even if you don’t use a program, it can still occupy memory if it’s programmed to load upon startup. You can also download Autoruns for Windows, a free download from Microsoft Technet, which you can use to manage which programs run on startup.

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    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

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    A computer’s RAM stores active and recently used data. Because the RAM works much faster than the hard drive, keeping data in active memory helps speed up your computer. When a program uses up all of your RAM, however, it will cause the whole system to slow down, impacting work as the system swaps data in and out of memory. The Windows Task Manager can help identify and resolve excessive RAM use.

    Tracking RAM Use

    To open the Task Manager, press “Control-Shift-Esc.” Switch to the “Processes” tab to see a list of everything running on your computer, including both visible programs and background processes. If you’re on Windows 8 and don’t see any tabs, click “More Details.” Click the “Memory” column header to sort the processes by RAM use. If the top entries show little or no RAM use, click the header again to sort in the opposite direction.

    Identifying and Closing Programs

    On Windows 8, items in the Processes list use full program names and process descriptions, making them easy to identify. To force-close a process, select it and press “End Task.” On older systems, processes display file names. If you don’t recognize one, right-click it and pick “Open File Location” to locate it on your computer, helping to associate it with a program. Click “End Process” to quit the selected item. Note that forcibly ending processes for open programs can cause lost data, and closing system processes can crash the system, forcing a reboot.

    How does one diagnose/discover memory-related problems, if Task Manager appears to not be reporting correctly?

    I must have a memory leak or something — I’m at 75% usage of my 12 GB of memory, but Task Managers listings of processes’ memory usage isn’t adding up (yes, “Show processes from all users” is checked).

    It seems like this “phantom” memory usage grows in relation to how long the system’s been up. It shows that there are 118 total processes. Besides the top 5, all of them are under 50 MB.

    The top process is firefox, using 2.6 GB. Adobe Premiere at 900 MB. Plugin-container at 300 MB. Pale Moon at 275 MB. Explorer.exe at 94 MB.

    How in the world can I find what’s using up the rest of my memory? It seems as if Task Manager isn’t seeing everything that’s being used. Perhaps there’s some kind of memory leak? Or program’s aren’t releasing used memory properly?

    Resource Monitor reports (click for larger version):

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    1. As my main OS drive is an SSD, SuperFetch is disabled on my system.
    2. And I understand the principal that unused ram is “wasted” ram, so to speak. However, when I see my memory usage nearly used to peak capacity, it’s stopping me from running/loading subsequent programs (from my own concern), and even sends me to task to close many down (with hardly much effect on decreasing memory usage, at least noticeably and within short time period).
    3. When the memory fills up, I hate seeing the 1GB page file on my SSD expand to the 6GB limit I’ve set, and me “sweating” with the knowledge that my “poor” SSD is likely being ground down to dust as Windows heavily/rampantly turns to using it as a full-fledged memory stick. (On that note, should I just hard-cap the page file to a static 1GB?)

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    5 Answers 5

    You can usually gain better insight into what is using up your memory with tools like RamMap.

    Often, the memory can be used up by memory mapped files that have been pulled into RAM to increase performance.

    Take note of the Active column in RamMap. That is the memory that is actually currently being utilized. Indicators regarding free memory can often be misleading. This includes Windows tools like Task Manager.

    Further information

    • Mysteries of Memory Management Revealed,with Mark Russinovich (Part 1 of 2)
    • Mysteries of Memory Management Revealed,with Mark Russinovich (Part 2 of 2)

    I also wanted to address some additional points from your question.

    However, when I see my memory usage nearly used to peak capacity, it’s stopping me from running/loading subsequent programs (from my own concern), and even sends me to task to close many down (with hardly much effect on decreasing memory usage, at least noticeably and within short time period).

    Your reasoning is perfectly fine. But, unless you’re experiencing issues due to low memory situations, you should refrain from this practice. The operating system should handle this task and flush data out to the paging file when physical memory is required.

    Possibly, you’re also using the wrong indicator for your practice. You want to have an eye on your Commit Charge (Process Explorer terminology).

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    The commit charge is the sum of all used memory. You can see in the screenshot, there is also a limit to it. That limit is the size of my physical memory + the size of my paging file. If that limit was to be hit, that would be an issue.

    Which brings us to our next topic.

    When the memory fills up, I hate seeing the 1GB page file on my SSD expand to the 6GB limit I’ve set, and me “sweating” with the knowledge that my “poor” SSD is likely being ground down to dust as Windows heavily/rampantly turns to using it as a full-fledged memory stick. (On that note, should I just hard-cap the page file to a statci 1GB?)

    In my opinion, there are several things wrong here. In general, it should be strongly discouraged to set limits on the size of the paging file. Mark Russinovich explains this in the videos I linked above (much better than I ever could).

    Only bad things can come from that. What is Windows supposed to do when it needs to flush out more than 6GB of data to the paging file but you capped it at 6GB? That is a major issue.

    Let Windows handle the paging file. The only thing I would strongly advise you to do, is moving the paging file away from your SSD. Tom Wijsman explains this excellently in his blog post Maximizing the lifetime of your SSD, which I recommend you to read.

    Random Access Memory has a major contribution to the working of any operating system. It is a non-writable memory, unlike ROM. The increased RAM can be helpful in the smooth working of the operating system. You must have noticed that initially, the system works with an accurate speed by gradually its speed decreases and it begins to hang up while the ongoing task. It happens because of the occupied memory of RAM by the application programs. This post will guide you on how much RAM an app is using so that you could determine which application program is consuming your memory more.

    How to check how much RAM an app is using

    You can determine the portion of RAM used by the processor, operating system, driver, and the remaining memory available for usage. Let us know how to find out the details about the random access memory of our computer using the following suggestions:

    1. Open the Resource Monitor system application.
    2. Go to the ribbon and select the Memory tab.
    3. Click the Private (KB) column.
    4. Now check and confirm which app is using the memory most.

    You can now see the above steps in detail if it’s required.

    If you want to check how much RAM an app is using, you need to open the Resource Monitor system application.

    To do so, open the Windows Task Manager and switch to the Performance tab. Now go to the bottom area and click on the Open Resource Monitor link. Alternatively, simply type resmon in the Search box and hit Enter.

    Inside the Resource Monitor app, go to the Memory tab and then click on the Private Kb header on the right-hand side.

    The name of the programs shown in the Resource Monitor is not the same as displayed in a Task Manager. This is because the Resource Monitor uses the processor name and the Task Manager uses user-friendly names. In case of any confusion, the name of the programs can be searched on the internet for better clarity, if needed.

    The Private KB will help you know that which of your application program is occupying most of the memory and making the operating system work slowly. In case the applications with high memory occupancy do not require the ongoing task, you can choose to end the process.

    To stop the application program, simply select the program in the resource monitor. Then right-click and select the End Process option from the context menu. This will stop the application program and will increase the available space in RAM.

    That’s it. Hope you find this article helpful.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Is it time to buy more RAM for your computer’s total memory capacity? Test how much your Windows system is using with Performance and Resource Monitor.

    Is it time to buy some more RAM and upgrade your computer’s total memory capacity? One way to find out is to test how much memory you’re using. Windows has two built-in tools that work perfectly for this and not just the basic little green boxes you find in the Task Manager.

    Just like when I showed you how to check if memory is going bad, this time, we’ll take a look at how it is being used. The tools we’ll look at are called the Resource Monitor and the Performance Monitor.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Check Computer Memory Usage Easily

    To open up Resource Monitor, press Windows Key + R and type resmon into the search box.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Resource Monitor will tell you exactly how much RAM is being used, what is using it, and allow you to sort the list of apps using it by several different categories. However, it doesn’t offer much else. For more details, you’ll need to open up Performance Monitor.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Check Detailed Memory Usage with Performance Monitor

    To open up Performance Monitor type: perfmon into the Run window (Windows Key + R).

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    In the window that comes up, click the Performance Monitor under Monitoring Tools in the left pane.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    The right pane turns into a live graph/chart that looks like the screenshot below. Since you’re looking at memory usage, you need to add it to what’s tracked by the live graph. Click the green plus symbol or hit Ctrl + N on your keyboard.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Now scroll down the list of counters in the left pane and select Memory, then click Add. Memory is added as an active counter in the right pane, and once it is, you can click OK to save changes and exit.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Now back on the graph, the memory will start to be tracked. If you’re looking for average memory use over time, click the Committed Bytes line, and it will display that information in the box above. There are a few things to note about this chart:

    • The graph and stats are generated live.
    • This chart only shows data as far back as the moment you added the counter type.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Schedule & Log Performance Monitoring

    If live reporting isn’t what you’re looking for, scheduled/logged monitoring might work better. Right-click on the Data Collector Sets and select User Defined > New > Data Collector Set to set this up.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Give the data collector set a name (it can be whatever you like), and then set it to Create Manually (Advanced) before clicking Next.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Next set it to a Create Data Logs, check the Performance counter box, and click Next.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    On the next page, click the Add button.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Just as before with the live graph, add Memory to the list of active counters.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    The same page where we clicked the Add button will show a list of the counters you just added. Now click the Next button to continue.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Then it’s time to choose where the logs will be saved. I suggest your Documents folder or somewhere easy to find.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Now you can choose to Save and close, and then press Finish to exit.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    The performance log is ready to run; all you need to do is start it. There are two different ways to go about starting this thing too. The first is to right-click on it and manually start it. Yeah, annoying. The second way is to right-click and open up the Properties window.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Within the properties window of the data collector, you can set up when you want this thing to log system performance. You can create multiple schedules for multiple different times. It’s quite useful!

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Once you’ve run a log, all that’s left to do is open it up and view the results in Performance Monitor.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    These tools are still present in Windows 8 too. But it’s worth mentioning that Task Manager in Windows 8 and RT provides a lot of additional info concerning memory usage on its own.

    If your PC is running slowly or giving you “low memory” error messages, you may need more PC memory. Or perhaps you are just curious about the specs of your PC? Read on to learn how to check RAM on Windows 10.

    (Please note, checking RAM in a Mac is different and is not covered within the scope of this tutorial.)

    A brief intro to RAM

    Random access memory (RAM) is an important and fast type of short-term storage your computer uses to hold data that is in-use. This short-term storage is used for whatever applications your computer is running, such as browsing or word processing. RAM clears when you shut down your computer. RAM is different from a hard disk drive or a solid state drive, which holds files and applications on a permanent basis.

    How to check how much RAM you have on Windows 10

    Checking RAM on Windows 10 operating systems is simple. Following the steps below should tell you how much memory you currently have installed.

    Step 1: Click “Start”

    Begin by clicking on the “Start” menu, located in the bottom left of your screen.

    Step 2: Find “About Your PC”

    Next, type “About Your PC” and press enter when the correct result appears.

    Step 3: Navigate to “Device Specifications”

    A window should appear called, “About.” Scroll down using the navigation bar on the right side of the window until you see a section titled, “Device Specifications.”

    Step 4: Find out how much RAM you have

    Look for a line titled, “Installed RAM.” This will tell you how much RAM your PC currently has installed.

    If your computer has bogged down and you want to know how your RAM is being used, you can always check the “Windows Task Manager.”

    How to check RAM usage in Windows Task Manager

    Many modern computers are sold with 8GB of RAM pre-installed. Some higher-end computers, including gaming computers, may come with 16GB of RAM or more pre-installed. In general, the more RAM your computer has, the better ability it has to handle multi-tasking (running multiple programs at the same time and potentially switching between them).

    However, not everyone needs more RAM or has a computer capable of handling more RAM. One way to check RAM on Windows 10 and find out your usage is via the “Windows Task Manager.” To consult the Windows Task Manager about your memory usage, use the following steps:

    Method 1– ctrl, shift, esc

    1. Press the following keys: Ctrl + Shift + Esc
    2. The Task Manager should appear
    3. Click on the “Performance” tab and check the section titled “Memory”

    Method 2 – ctrl, alt, del

    1. Press the following keys: Ctrl + Alt + Del
    2. Click on “Task Manager”
    3. Click on the “Performance” tab and check the section titled “Memory”

    Method 3 – start, task manager, performance

    1. Select the “Start” menu, located in the bottom left of your screen
    2. Next, type “Task Manager” and press enter when the correct result appears
    3. Click on the “Performance” tab and check the section titled “Memory”

    After you have followed any of these three methods on Windows 10, you should see a graph that presents the current performance and usage of your RAM. If the graph indicates your RAM usage is above 70% and you are only performing simple tasks or are not doing anything at all, you may need additional RAM to prevent sluggish performance. However, sometimes high RAM usage shown on the Task Manager can be due to having too many programs running in the background.

    Once you have checked your memory usage, you can start to work out how much RAM your computer needs.

    Upgrading your RAM

    If you have checked both your installed RAM amount and the Task Manager and have determined you need more RAM, finding compatible memory for your system is a relatively simple process. Whether you’re upgrading RAM on a laptop or desktop, there will be an option available for you.

    The Crucial System Scanner is an easy-to-use tool that will look in your BIOS for information about your complete PC system and then search Crucial.com for compatible memory upgrades. The video below explains more about the tool and how it works.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Sometimes you’ll be using your PC and suddenly notice it feels sluggish, for no apparent reason. It’s the type of situation where you’re clicking on things and doing your normal “Windowsing,” but for whatever reason your PC is not as responsive as it usually is. You’re not doing anything intense like encoding video, so why is your PC chugging along all of a sudden? The truth is, Windows 10 PCs have a zillion different processes running in the background all the time, which take up both CPU bandwidth and system memory, so when your PC begins to lag, you want to know what is taxing your resources.

    Check resource usage in Task Manager

    To begin your investigation, start with the Task Manager—a handy tool built into Windows that shows you myriad stats, specs, running programs, and a lot more.

    In order to open the Task Manager, there are two keyboard shortcuts:

    • Ctrl + Shift + Escape
    • Ctrl + Alt + Delete, and then click Task Manager from the options presented.

    Additionally, you can find the Task Manager via the Start Menu or the Taskbar:

    • Right-click the Windows button, select Task Manager
    • Right-click on the Taskbar and select Task Manager

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Once you’ve opened the Task Manager, donned a pair or rubber gloves, and leaned in a bit to get a closer look at the “evidence,” it’s time to begin sleuthing.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    You’ll want to pay close attention to those first two vertical columns: CPU and Memory. If you click either column header, the list of running processes will sort in order of resources used—from most to least, or vice versa.

    For example, say that you notice the Memory column is registering 30 percent usage. Clicking the top of the column ranks processes from most to least RAM hungry, and by golly, Google Chrome is at the top of the list! We would have never expected to see that, and that’s sarcasm, by the way.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    In this particular scenario we don’t mind if Chrome devours 1GB of our system memory, since we have 32GB total, but if that was a problem for you, you can just right-click the memory-muncher in question and select End Task.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    If that’s too much effort, Windows will automatically highlight programs that are taking up excessive resources. Colored flags, such as yellow, orange, and red, indicate the relative severity of the resource consumption. Mind you, using even excessive resources isn’t necessarily a bad thing, if you are intentionally running those processes.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    The Task Manager makes it easy to see what’s going on so you can make those determinations. Sometimes Windows will run various processes intermittently to index files or perform system checks and interrupts, which can cause unexpected slowdowns. If you find a program hogging resources, but you don’t have the option to simply End Task, you can always reboot your system, and then check Task Manager to see if it’s still running.

    Create a floating CPU monitor

    Task Manager also offers a way to keep an eye on CPU usage in real-time, provided you can spare some screen real estate. To create a floating CPU monitor, click on the Performance tab of Task Manager, click CPU, then hover your mouse over the charts showing your CPU cores, right-click, and select Graph Summary View. You can resize it to fit your desktop—it makes a nice and nerdy addition!

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Use Resource Monitor to get more details

    If you’re not satisfied with what the Task Manager is showing you, Windows has a more fine-tuned resource monitor that shows a bit more information on what’s happening with your CPU and memory.

    To open this program, just click Start, then Run, then type Resmon to open the Resource Monitor.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    While Task Manger is preferable if all you’re strictly interested in CPU use, the Resource Monitor offers more detailed information about memory usage. A handy graphical interface shows you the amount of RAM in use, by which programs, as well as how much is available, how much is installed, and lots more. You can see how much each program is chewing up, and even automatically search the internet for a highlighted program, if you’re not sure why it’s running or what it is in the first place.

    Great, but I want more information

    What we covered above is more than enough to figure out what’s using all your CPU and memory resources. But if you’re the type of person who says, “That’s great, but what kind of CPU do I have, and how fast is my memory?” then we’ve got you covered as well. If you really, really want a deep dive into every nook and cranny of your system, we recommend HWINfo.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    The slickest feature of this program is when you hover your mouse over one of the fields it will tell you in plain English what that information means, which should satisfy your craving for specs and more info on your hardware. If you want more options, be sure to check out our article on How to Check Your Specs in Windows 10.

    If the Windows 10 memory usage is high, you can use the task manager to find which application or program is using the most RAM or Memory. Here’s how.

    Every program running in Windows requires a certain amount of RAM (Random Access Memory) or Memory to function. In case you don’t know, RAM is temporary or volatile storage used by programs to store temporary data like current settings, workflow, unsaved data, etc. In general, the RAM is many times faster than your hard disk or SSD. As such, programs require this memory to function properly. If a program is using up all the available RAM, other programs might not be able to function properly due to low RAM. In a worst-case scenario, the program or operating system itself might crash due to low RAM.

    Most systems nowadays have at least 8GB of RAM. For general day-to-day activities like browsing, office work, and media consumption, that of RAM will suffice. However, if you are running intense programs like Photoshop or playing games, you have to keep an eye on Windows 10 RAM usage. This is especially important for systems with 8GB or less RAM. If a certain program is using too much RAM, you can end it before it goes out of control or makes other programs slow. That way, you can reduce RAM usage in Windows 10.

    Rather than wondering what is using all my RAM, you can find which program is using all or most RAM in Windows 10 in just a few steps. Here are the exact steps you should follow to locate programs using excessive RAM.

    Using Task Manager to Find Programs Using Most RAM

    The built-in task manager in Windows 10 can easily show what app is using all or most of the memory. To do that, open the task manager, to go the “Processes” tab, and click on the “Memory” heading to sort by programs using most RAM. Below are the detailed steps you should follow.

    1. First, right-click on the Taskbar.
    2. From the list, select “Task Manager” to open the Task Manager.
      How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows
    3. In the Task Manager, go to the “Processes” tab.
    4. Once you are here, click on the “Memory” heading.
    5. As soon as you click on it, the Task Manager will sort by processes using the most RAM.
    6. So, you will see the process or program that is using the most RAM at the top of the list. In my case, Chrome using most memory compared to others.
      How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Once you find the process or program responsible for hogging all the RAM, you can either force quit the application or reduce the workload in that specific program. Doing any of these two actions will reduce RAM usage of the target program.

    Important Note: Do keep in mind that if you forcefully quit an application to free RAM, you might lose any unsaved data. So, I recommend you manually save the data and then close the application rather than ending the process from the task manager. Only force quit when the application is not responding.

    That is all. I hope that helps. If you are stuck or need some help, comment below and I will try to help as much as possible.

    Highlights:

    Is one process eating up nearly all your CPU’s resources? Here’s how to fix high CPU usage.

    Is one process eating up nearly all your CPU’s resources? Here’s how to fix high CPU usage.

    The central processing unit (CPU) is a PC’s brain. All of the system’s major components, like the graphics card and RAM, rely on the CPU’s instructions. This makes a properly functioning processor a critical part of every gaming PC.

    When a game stutters or crashes, open applications stop reacting to new inputs, or programs open at a snail’s pace, abnormally high CPU usage can be the cause. Let’s go over the steps on how to fix high CPU usage in Windows* 10.

    1. Reboot

    First step: save your work and restart your PC. “Turn it off and on again” is classic troubleshooting advice for a reason. This may resolve the issue, especially if it’s been a long time since you last restarted — a reboot can clear out temporary files and potentially resolve slowdown in long-running processes.

    2. End or Restart Processes

    Open the Task Manager (CTRL+SHIFT+ESCAPE). If a program has started climbing in CPU use again even after a restart, Task Manager provides one of the easiest methods for tracking it.

    Note that full-screen programs like games will sometimes take focus away from the Task Manager (hiding it behind their own window). To prevent this, click “Options” in the top menu bar, then select “Always On Top”. If you have a second monitor, you can also just drag the Task Manager window over there.

    Once you’re in the Task Manager, click the Processes tab at the top. Click “More details” at the bottom of this tab to reveal background Windows processes. Look for the “CPU” column near the top of the Processes tab and click it to order by CPU usage:

    You can expect high CPU utilization when playing some games, running a video-editing or streaming application, performing an antivirus scan, or juggling many browser tabs. If you’re dealing with this kind of everyday high-CPU usage situation, you should close all background programs and tabs you aren’t using, then return to Task Manager and see if the situation has changed.

    It’s important to remember that high CPU usage while multitasking can be normal. Modern CPUs handle multitasking situations by splitting processes between multiple processor cores, which work through different sets of instructions simultaneously. Intel® Hyper-Threading Technology (Intel® HT Technology) takes it a step further, creating multiple “threads” of execution in each core, each of which handles different processes. If the CPU usage of a heavy-duty program like Adobe Premiere is high, it may just be efficiently using the CPU cores available to it.

    Intel® Turbo Boost Technology can also help processing of heavy workloads by dynamically increasing the frequency of your CPU. Intel® Core™ X-series processor family have another tool to help avoid slowdowns, as their Intel® Turbo Boost Max Technology 3.0 automatically assigns the biggest tasks to your fastest processor cores, as well as boosting the frequency of those cores.

    These processor technologies can greatly increase the speed of multitasking and using demanding programs, but abnormal CPU usage situations can still arise. If you see a background process with a name like Runtime Broker, Windows Session Manager, or Cortana at the top of the CPU column when you hit 100% CPU usage, then you have an issue.

    These Windows processes are designed to use very little of your processing power or memory under ordinary circumstances — you’ll often see them using 0% or 1% in Task Manager. When your PC is idle, all of these processes together will usually use less than 10% of your CPU capacity. However, buggy or unexpected behavior — for example, one Windows process trying and retrying to perform a search action that has been disabled elsewhere — can sometimes cause a process to eat up nearly all of your system’s resources.

    After you’ve opened Task Manager and found the process unexpectedly using up a chunk of your CPU, search online to identify it. You don’t want to stop a process like explorer.exe (which manages many graphical elements like the desktop and Start menu) or winlogon.exe (startup tasks and the CTRL+ALT+DEL screen), unless you have a good reason.

    Once you’ve identified the process as non-critical (and, again, checked that you’ve saved whatever you were working on), click on the process to select it, then click End Process at the bottom right of Task Manager. End Process will cause the program to terminate without saving.

    Memory is the component that your computer uses to temporarily store data so that it can access it quickly. The most common type is called RAM, which stands for random access memory, and it comes in the form of chips mounted onto long strips called dual inline memory modules, or DIMMs, that are attached to the motherboard. Because these DIMMs can be easily removed and swapped, it’s possible to upgrade the amount of RAM your computer has to improve its performance. However, if your computer’s running without any problems, you may already have all the memory that you need.

    To help you decide if you need to add more memory to your computer, please read this short list of performance signs to look out for in your machine:

    1. Files don’t open immediately, or programs are slow to load.

    Almost all modern computers should respond instantly when you click on an icon to launch a program. If there is a delay of more than a second or two, this is a sign that your operating system is using too much of your system’s memory

    2. You receive a memory error message or your computer is using 80 percent or more of its memory.

    Check in Task Manager on Windows, Activity Monitor on a Mac, or type “vmstat” into a Linux terminal, and this will tell you what percentage of your memory is being used. Be aware that the more programs you have running at the same time, the higher your memory use will be, so it’s best to test it when you first load your operating system to get the base usage levels.

    3. You are unable to run multiple programs at the same time.

    Unless you’re using a very resource-heavy program, such as an animation program or a graphical suite, your computer should be able to run several programs without any noticeable loss of performance. For instance, if you’re unable to run a word processor, a Web browser and a media player simultaneously, this is a sure sign that your computer is running out of memory.

    Note about 32-bit systems:

    If you’re running a 32-bit Windows or Linux system, the maximum amount of RAM that you’ll be able to use is 4 GB. Adding any more than 4 GB will not be recognized and might cause a startup error. For most 64-bit systems, the maximum is 512 GB.

    Quickly see how much memory is available on your computer

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

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    If you need to know how to check RAM on Windows 10, you’ll be happy to know there are several ways to do so, including using Windows utilities and the command prompt. The option you choose depends on which method feels more convenient to you, but it’s always good to know the total installed RAM on your system, and the amount of available or unused RAM.

    How to Check RAM Using Command Prompt

    It’s very easy to check both total RAM and available RAM using the command prompt. Open the command prompt, then enter one of the following commands:

    • To obtain total RAM is: systeminfo | findstr /C:”Total Physical Memory”
    • To check available RAM: systeminfo | find “Available Physical Memory”

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    How to Check RAM Using Windows Tools

    You can also check RAM in Windows 10 using the System Information utility. If you check System Information in the Control Panel, you’ll see total installed memory (RAM) and how much of this is usable.

    Using Control Panel

    Open the Control Panel, then select System. Here you will see your RAM details.

    Usable memory differs from installed memory because the computer reserves installed RAM specifically for hardware installed in the system. Because of this, usable RAM will always be slightly less than installed RAM.

    Using the Advanced System Information Utility

    The basic System Information screen doesn’t show available RAM. To see this, you’ll need to use the advanced System Information utility. Select the Start icon, type System, then select the System Information app.

    Here you’ll see Total Physical Memory (RAM), Total Physical Memory, and Available Physical Memory.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    You can also launch the advanced System Information utility by launching msinfo32.exe. To do this, select the Start icon, type Run and press Enter, then in the Open field type msinfo32.exe and press Enter.

    Using Task Manager

    If you want to get a more realtime view of total and available RAM, use the Task Manager. To access this, right-click in the Windows taskbar and select Task Manager. Select the Performance tab, then select Memory from the left navigation menu.

    Here you’ll see view of RAM being used and available RAM. This line graph and the values below it will update in realtime as you open and close applications.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    In addition to all of the Windows utilities you have available to check RAM on Windows 10, there are also a lot of third-party system information tools you can download and use as well, including apps like Driver Easy.

    Why You Should Check RAM

    Knowing the total RAM and the available RAM in Windows 10 can help with many things, including:

    • Diagnosing a slow computer: If your available RAM is always low, it could explain why your computer is running slow.
    • Meeting software requirements: Knowing your total RAM helps to determine if your computer meets the specifications to run certain software.
    • Upgrading hardware: Checking total RAM in Windows 10 helps with upgrading your RAM memory.

    Since RAM provides quick read and write access to data when you run software, verifying that you have enough RAM installed for your needs is very important.

    Note: starting with Parallels Desktop 17, we advise using the Automatic Resource Manager feature. Parallels Desktop 17 evaluates your Mac hardware before starting a virtual machine to allocate as many resources as needed to provide a better out-of-the-box experience. To make sure this feature has been activated, shut down your virtual machine and open your virtual machine configuration > Hardware > CPU & Memory > make sure the Automatic (Recommended) option is selected.

    To manually change a virtual machine’s memory, follow the steps below:

    1. Shut down your virtual machine (from the menu bar select Actions >Shut Down) How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows
    2. Open virtual machine’s configuration >Hardware >CPU & Memory >Manual.

    Set the required amount of RAM by selecting a value in the drop-down menu:

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Note: although Parallels Desktop 17 and earlier allows you to set a custom RAM value, we strongly advise keeping the value a multiple of 1024 (1024, 2048, 3072, etc.), otherwise Windows may behave inappropriately. We strongly recommend not to assign more than half of the total Mac’s RAM since it may cause severe performance degradation of both Mac and the virtual machine.

  • Close the configuration window and start your virtual machine.
  • Change amount of RAM in a virtual machine in Parallels Desktop 16 and earlier

    To manually change a virtual machine’s memory, follow the steps below:

    1. Shut down your virtual machine (from the menu bar select Actions >Shut Down) How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows
    2. Open virtual machine’s configuration >Hardware >CPU & Memory.

    Set the required amount of RAM by selecting a value in the drop-down menu:

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Note: we strongly recommend keeping the value within the recommended range. Assigning more RAM than recommended may cause severe performance degradation of both Mac and the virtual machine.

  • Close the configuration window and start your virtual machine.
  • Parallels Desktop Memory Requirements

    Please check the system requirements of your Parallels Desktop version to see how much RAM your Mac should have for running Parallels Desktop virtual machines. System requirements can be found in a User’s Guide or in the KB 124223.

    Recommended memory values

    The amount of memory you can assign to a virtual machine depends on the total amount of RAM your Mac computer has (to check Mac memory click on Apple logo > About this Mac).

    It is recommended to assign not more than half of your Mac’s memory (RAM) to a virtual machine. And if you want to run multiple virtual machines simultaneously, it applies to all of their memory combined.

    NOTE : Please pay attention when exceeding the recommended RAM value – your overall Mac performance may be significantly decreased.

    The maximum amount of RAM Parallels Desktop supports

    In Parallels Desktop for Mac, you can assign up to 8 GB of RAM to your virtual machine. In Pro Edition you can assign up to 128 GB of memory.

    Additional information

    There is also a memory limitation that may prevent you from assigning the maximum memory – it’s the maximum physical address size supported by your Mac’s processor. To check the maximum address size on your Mac:

    Run MacCPUID utility. Go to the Misc tab > Address Sizes > Physical Address.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

  • If the value is 64 or below, you will not be able to assign all 64 GB of memory to your virtual machine due to the processor technology limitation.
  • When your virtual machine runs, by default it tries to lock all the memory assigned to it from the Mac RAM. However, your virtual machine runs on top of the macOS, so we need to make sure the macOS is always provided with an efficient memory amount to run with no glitches. It was concluded the macOS should always have access to some significant amount of RAM installed on the Mac.

    The amount of memory your virtual machine will use can be divided into 3 parts:

    – the virtualization overhead: uses only about 8-9 % of the total amount of RAM assigned to the virtual machine, however, it is always stored in the Mac physical RAM.

    – the “main” memory, which works as RAM as such inside the virtual machine: configured in the virtual machine configuration > Hardware > CPU & Memory.

    – video memory: Hardware > Video (Graphics).

    The virtual machine tends to use the Mac “wired” memory. This is a memory that cannot be compressed or swapped to the Mac hard disk. This is done to provide your virtual machine with the best performance. However, if your Mac runs any other applications that use the “wired” memory and the virtual machine’s memory is set outside the recommended RAM range, the “wired” memory may soon reach the size of the physically available memory that will significantly degrade your Macs performance.

    To avoid performance degradation of your Mac when the amount of memory assigned to your virtual machine is in the “yellow” or “red” zone Parallels Desktop can swap some amount of the virtual machine’s memory to the Mac Hard disk. Taking into account that the read/write speeds of the RAM and the HDD devices are significantly different, your virtual machine may endure some performance degradation.

    Even though Parallels Desktop can swap some amount of the virtual machine’s memory to the disk thus making the total amount of memory available for the virtual machine even bigger than the total size of the physical RAM installed on the Mac, the amount of the virtual machine’s memory that cannot be swapped to the disk will always be not less than about 30% of the total memory assigned to the virtual machine. This is done to guarantee the performance and the stability of work for your virtual machine. That is why, for example, it will not be possible to assign more than 7.4 GB of memory (both the main Memory and the Video Memory) for the virtual machine running on the Mac with 4 GB of RAM installed.

    Была ли эта статья полезной?

    Как, по вашему мнению, можно улучшить эту статью?

    Computer acting sluggish? You might need more memory. Here’s how to check RAM usage on Mac and PC.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    If your PC is feeling a little sluggish—plagued by freezing, spinning wheels, or even error messages about “low memory”—you might need more RAM.

    What Is RAM?

    RAM stands for Random Access Memory, and it’s a type of super-fast storage your computer uses to hold data it needs in the short term. Think of your hard drive as a filing cabinet where all your data is stored and the RAM like your desk, where you put the stuff you’re currently working on. The more RAM you have, the more projects and programs your computer can keep open at once without getting bogged down by taking things in and out of the proverbial filing cabinet.

    Unfortunately, in the age of thinner and thinner devices, many modern laptops have their RAM permanently soldered to the motherboard, meaning you can’t upgrade it without buying a whole new PC. But if you have a desktop PC or an upgrade-friendly laptop, adding more RAM is usually quite easy. You just need to find a compatible stick (which may require some Googling), pop open your computer, and swap the RAM into its dedicated slot. Before you blow $50 on a new stick, it’s a good idea to see if you actually need it, or if that money is better spent on another upgrade, like a solid-state drive.

    Here’s how to see how much RAM is currently in your PC, and whether you need to upgrade.

    Find Out How Much RAM You Have

    If you’re using a Windows 10 PC, checking your RAM is easy. Open Settings > System > About and look for the Device Specifications section. You should see a line named “Installed RAM”—this will tell you how much you currently have.

    If you’re still using Windows 7, you should upgrade because official support has ended. In the meantime, open the Start menu, right-click on Computer and then click Properties. This should bring up a window with your computer’s basic specs. Under System, you should see a line denoting your Installed Memory.

    Mac users have a simple way of checking their computer’s specs: just click the Apple icon in the upper-left corner of the screen, and select About This Mac. In the Overview tab, you’ll be presented with a simple list of specs, including the amount of memory currently installed.

    RAM Problems? Consult Task Manager or Activity Monitor

    As a general rule, 4GB is starting to become “not enough,” while 8GB is fine for most general-use PCs (with high-end gaming and workstation PCs going up to 16GB or more). But this can vary from person to person, so there’s a more precise way to see if you actually need more RAM: the Task Manager.

    Go about your work as normal, and if the computer begins to slow down, press Ctrl+Shift+Esc to bring up Windows Task Manager. Click the Performance tab and select Memory in the sidebar to see a graph of your current RAM usage.

    You don’t want the graph to be completely empty—after all, unused RAM is wasted RAM—but if your RAM is completely full when you’re trying to do basic tasks like browse the web or write up some Word documents, you’re probably due for an upgrade. (Though you can also try closing applications that Task Manager says are using lots of RAM, or uninstalling needless extensions from your browser.)

    What’s your preferred way of getting current system status (current CPU, RAM, free disk space, etc.) in Python? Bonus points for *nix and Windows platforms.

    There seems to be a few possible ways of extracting that from my search:

    Using a library such as PSI (that currently seems not actively developed and not supported on multiple platform) or something like pystatgrab (again no activity since 2007 it seems and no support for Windows).

    Using platform specific code such as using a os.popen(“ps”) or similar for the *nix systems and MEMORYSTATUS in ctypes.windll.kernel32 (see this recipe on ActiveState) for the Windows platform. One could put a Python class together with all those code snippets.

    It’s not that those methods are bad but is there already a well-supported, multi-platform way of doing the same thing?

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    19 Answers 19

    The psutil library gives you information about CPU, RAM, etc., on a variety of platforms:

    psutil is a module providing an interface for retrieving information on running processes and system utilization (CPU, memory) in a portable way by using Python, implementing many functionalities offered by tools like ps, top and Windows task manager.

    It currently supports Linux, Windows, OSX, Sun Solaris, FreeBSD, OpenBSD and NetBSD, both 32-bit and 64-bit architectures, with Python versions from 2.6 to 3.5 (users of Python 2.4 and 2.5 may use 2.1.3 version).

    Here’s other documentation that provides more concepts and interest concepts:

    Use the psutil library. On Ubuntu 18.04, pip installed 5.5.0 (latest version) as of 1-30-2019. Older versions may behave somewhat differently. You can check your version of psutil by doing this in Python:

    To get some memory and CPU stats:

    The virtual_memory (tuple) will have the percent memory used system-wide. This seemed to be overestimated by a few percent for me on Ubuntu 18.04.

    You can also get the memory used by the current Python instance:

    which gives the current memory use of your Python script.

    There are some more in-depth examples on the pypi page for psutil.

    Only for Linux: One-liner for the RAM usage with only stdlib dependency:

    edit: specified solution OS dependency

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Below codes, without external libraries worked for me. I tested at Python 2.7.9

    CPU Usage

    And Ram Usage, Total, Used and Free

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    To get a line-by-line memory and time analysis of your program, I suggest using memory_profiler and line_profiler .

    Installation:

    The common part is, you specify which function you want to analyse by using the respective decorators.

    Example: I have several functions in my Python file main.py that I want to analyse. One of them is linearRegressionfit() . I need to use the decorator @profile that helps me profile the code with respect to both: Time & Memory.

    Make the following changes to the function definition

    For Time Profiling,

    Run:

    For Memory Profiling,

    Run:

    Also, the memory profiler results can also be plotted using matplotlib using

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows Note: Tested on

    line_profiler version == 3.0.2

    memory_profiler version == 0.57.0

    psutil version == 5.7.0

    EDIT: The results from the profilers can be parsed using the TAMPPA package. Using it, we can get line-by-line desired plots as How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Here’s something I put together a while ago, it’s windows only but may help you get part of what you need done.

    NOTE: the WMI interface/process is also available for performing similar tasks I’m not using it here because the current method covers my needs, but if someday it’s needed to extend or improve this, then may want to investigate the WMI tools a vailable.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    We chose to use usual information source for this because we could find instantaneous fluctuations in free memory and felt querying the meminfo data source was helpful. This also helped us get a few more related parameters that were pre-parsed.

    Code

    Output for reference (we stripped all newlines for further analysis)

    MemTotal: 1014500 kB MemFree: 562680 kB MemAvailable: 646364 kB Buffers: 15144 kB Cached: 210720 kB SwapCached: 0 kB Active: 261476 kB Inactive: 128888 kB Active(anon): 167092 kB Inactive(anon): 20888 kB Active(file): 94384 kB Inactive(file): 108000 kB Unevictable: 3652 kB Mlocked: 3652 kB SwapTotal: 0 kB SwapFree: 0 kB Dirty: 0 kB Writeback: 0 kB AnonPages: 168160 kB Mapped: 81352 kB Shmem: 21060 kB Slab: 34492 kB SReclaimable: 18044 kB SUnreclaim: 16448 kB KernelStack: 2672 kB PageTables: 8180 kB NFS_Unstable: 0 kB Bounce: 0 kB WritebackTmp: 0 kB CommitLimit: 507248 kB Committed_AS: 1038756 kB VmallocTotal: 34359738367 kB VmallocUsed: 0 kB VmallocChunk: 0 kB HardwareCorrupted: 0 kB AnonHugePages: 88064 kB CmaTotal: 0 kB CmaFree: 0 kB HugePages_Total: 0 HugePages_Free: 0 HugePages_Rsvd: 0 HugePages_Surp: 0 Hugepagesize: 2048 kB DirectMap4k: 43008 kB DirectMap2M: 1005568 kB

    Last Updated: 4 months ago

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    3) Type in the following command and then hit Enter.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    4) Now see if the problem continues. If the problem persists, please try the methods that follow. Step Three: Run SFC in Safe Mode 1) Hit Start button, then type msconfig in the search box. Then choose System Configuration from the list of choice.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    2) Navigate to Boot category, then choose Safe boot > Minimal. Then click Apply and OK to save the change.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    3) Now save an close your files and programs, choose Restart to go into Safe Mode. How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows4) When you restart into safe mode, you will see the word Safe Mode on the four corners of your desktop and your screen background will be all black. How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows5) Now press Windows key and X at the same time, then choose Command Prompt (Admin). How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows6) In the command prompt window, type in the following command and then hit Enter.

    Then press Y key to give permission to the disk check the next time you start your computer.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows7) In the same window, type in the following command and then hit Enter. How to see which programs are using all your memory on windowsThe second command could take some time to finish. When it finishes, restart your computer into normal mode by reversing the procedure in 1) to 3). You will see that your computer go through a disk check before it restarts. The process should not take too long if your disks are problem free. Step Four: Run RAMMap If the memory still runs high after all the options above, please consider RAMMap, which is a diagnostic tool provided by Microsoft Sysinternals that is able to provide you with more advanced information that will help you take care of more complex problems. 1) Download RAMMap. 2) After the download, double click it to run the installation. 3) Lets’ first take a look at the Use Counts category. Hit Activate so the items will listed in the order of size. How to see which programs are using all your memory on windowsIf you see item Process Private lists on top, that means most of your system’s RAM consumption is due to memory allocated by a single process. 4) Now let’s click Process tab on the top, and then click Private so you will have a better idea what program or programs are taking so much memory. How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows5) Open Task Manager, then go to Details tab. Locate the services that are hogging your system memory as per the result from RAMMap. Highlight that item and then choose End task. If you have more than one items, repeat the procedure until the memory usage goes back to normal again. How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows6) Let’s go back to Use Counts tab. This time, check to see if there is anything listed under column Bad. If things are okay with your system memory, you should not see anything listed here. But if you do, that means your RAM is failing and you need to run Windows Memory Diagnostic Tool to look for the exact cause.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    7) Stay in Use Counts category, then check your Driver Locked item. If you spot a large increase here with no obvious explanation, that means there is some kind of driver problem in your computer.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    To solve the possible driver problem, it is always suggested that you update your device drivers in the first place.

    You can update the device drivers manually, for sure, but that will usually costs you tons of time. Why not have a try at a modern way to update drivers with the help of Driver Easy? It automatically detects, download and install drivers when you need it with just two steps. How easy!

    • memory
    • Windows 10

    To check your installed RAM in Windows 10:

    1. Launch Task Manager with Ctrl+Shift+Esc.
    2. Click the “Performance” tab.
    3. Look at the capacity displayed under “Memory”.

    Your RAM (random access memory) is one of the major contributors to the overall performance of your PC. Programs consume RAM while they’re open, so multitasking with multiple apps requires you to have sufficient memory available.

    You can check how much is in your PC using Windows 10’s Task Manager. Press Ctrl+Shift+Esc to launch the tool. Click the “Performance” tab at the top of the window. Next, click “Memory” in the pane on the left.

    You can easily see how much RAM is inside your system by looking at the number displayed to the right of the “Memory” header – in this case, 32 GB. In addition, the screen shows you how much memory is currently in use. In this example, it’s 14.5 GB, or 45% of the available total.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    A further useful metric is the speed of your memory. This is displayed in the bottom-right of the window. Higher memory speeds, measured in MHz, offer small performance increases. The benefits aren’t generally noticeable in everyday use, so we’d always recommend spending money on more RAM instead of faster RAM.

    There’s no clear threshold that dictates when you should upgrade your RAM. Windows 10 employs a variety of techniques to make the most of the memory that is available. Consequently, an apparently high memory usage might not necessarily have a serious impact on your system.

    Windows will terminate background processes and suspend apps to keep your foreground programs running. When this happens, you might find you notice to wait for apps to reload when you switch back to them. You may also find browser tabs reloading or behaving sluggishly as you switch between them. At this point, you might want to purchase additional RAM, or a higher-spec device if yours doesn’t have accessible memory slots.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    RAM is an essential part of your computer system, and it determines the performance of your system. At some point, you may need to increase your RAM. Then you need to determine what sort of RAM you already have. If you are curious about your RAM and wish to learn more about it, look no further. This tutorial will address this and show you how to check your RAM details on Windows 11 systems.

    RAM Details Windows 11

    One of the simplest ways to check your RAM is in the About section in the Settings app. Just follow the steps below:

    Step-1: Click on the Windows icon on the taskbar and select the Settings cog. (You can also open the Settings app using the shortcut keys Win + I).

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Step-2: Select the System option from the left pane.

    Step-3: Scroll down in the right pane and click on About.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Step-4: In the Device Specifications section in the left pane, you will see Installed RAM.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    RAM Type and Speed

    You can also check your RAM type and speed in Task Manager:

    1. Right-click on the Windows icon on the taskbar to get the WinX menu. (You can also use the shortcut keys Win + X).
    2. Select Task Manager.
      How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows
    3. If you see the following window, click on the More details option at the bottom of the window. If you see an expanded version directly, skip this step.
      How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows
    4. Click on the Performance tab.
      How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows
    5. Click on the Memory option on the left.
      How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows
    6. You will see the RAM capacity at the top corner of the Memory window.
    7. You will also be able to see the Speed at the bottom of the Memory window.
      How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Utilities for Diagnostics

    The previous methods mentioned utilized in-built Windows features to check your RAM details. However, some utilities do a much better job at monitoring and diagnosing your system information. Some of the utilities that you can use include HWinfo, CPUz, AIDA64. You can use any of these utilities. However, in this tutorial, I will show you how you can use HWinfo, for checking your RAM details.

    1. Open this link and click on Free Download.How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows
    2. Hover your cursor on the Free Download option for the Installer. When you hover over the option, you will get new options. Click on Local (U.S).
      How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows
    3. Once the download is complete, open the downloaded file.
    4. You will be asked, do you want to allow this app to make changes to your device? Click Yes.
    5. Follow the on-screen instructions to finish the installation.
    6. Click Run when you see the following window.
      How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows
    7. A System Summary will open, and you will see a ton of information regarding your system. Since, for this tutorial, we wish to see RAM details, close the System Summary.
    8. Click on Memory from the left pane, and you will see RAM speed, size, and other diagnostics.
      How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    The symptoms of high CPU usage are familiar: the cursor moves jerkily and slowly, and applications begin to lag or shut down. The workstation might even begin to physically heat up as it strains to perform tasks. When diagnosing a malfunctioning system, these are signs you should start by checking the processor.

    Luckily, it’s actually fairly simple to look under the hood of a Windows desktop or laptop and understand whether the workstation can be fixed, or if it’s time to replace the CPU.

    What does CPU time mean?

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windowsAt the core of any computing device is the Central Processing Unit (CPU), or processor, which is responsible for fulfilling the user’s instructions. A device’s CPU only has the capacity to deal with so many processes or tasks at once, and when those resources are strained, the computer’s performance begins to suffer. CPU time or processing time is measured by counting the seconds that a CPU spends processing instructions from an application or your OS. A longer count means the system is busy or overloaded.

    High physical memory usage is often a consequence of using too many demanding apps, but can also be the result of a bug in a process that would normally be far less resource-intensive. Slow processing can stem from a variety of different causes, some of which will be more difficult to fix than others. But in the vast majority of cases, if you’re wondering how to lower CPU usage, the process is actually as simple as pressing Control + Shift + ESC.

    How do I check CPU usage in Windows?

    In order to find out what percentage of CPU a computer is using, simply open Windows Task Manager (Control + Shift + ESC) and click the Performance tab. The Processes tab offers a closer look at what might be contributing to the problem and provides a rundown of which processes are taking up the most power and RAM, which is key for figuring out how to lower CPU usage. From there, you can then either stop the processes that are using up disproportionate resources, or, if the process in question isn’t normally such a drain on CPU and memory, work to fix the underlying issues.

    How do I fix high CPU usage?

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windowsIf you’ve looked at the Processes tab and found that the issue can’t be attributed to uniquely demanding apps, it very well could be the result of a bug in an otherwise inconspicuous process. While any number of different issues could be plaguing your computer, let’s explore a few of the most common causes, and how to diagnose and troubleshoot high CPU usage:

    1. The WMI Provider Host process
      The WMI Provider Host process—which typically appears as Service Host: Windows Management Instrumentation in your Processes tab—is an important part of Windows that often runs in the background. The process is used to monitor a large number of systems on a given network, and if its CPU usage is any higher than a few percentage points, that may be a sign your system is struggling with a pernicious bug.The quickest solution to this problem is the oldest one in the IT troubleshooting book: turn off the process and then turn it back on again. Use Windows Search to find Services.msc, find Windows Management Instrumentation in the window that appears, right click it, then select Restart. That should restart the service, but if you prefer, you can also simply restart your computer.If this doesn’t work, the WMI Provider host may simply be dealing with another process that is the real source of the problem. Open the Windows Event Viewer and select Applications and Service Logs, then Microsoft, then Windows, WMI-Activity, and Operational. Look for recent error entries and take down the ClientProcessID for every error you suspect is contributing to the problem. Go back to the Task Manager, click the Services tab, and sort the list by order of process ID. You can run your list of suspect processes against this list to identify the source of your malfunction.
    2. Too many background processes
      Any computer is bound to have background processes—which are run without the user opening them in a window—taking up a percentage of CPU. But as time goes on and more applications are downloaded, those background processes can accumulate and begin to take up a nontrivial amount of resources. These processes can be stopped by unchecking them in the Startup tab, then restarting your computer, which will prevent them from being started again automatically when you turn on your device.
    3. A virus or an antivirus
      The causes of high CPU usage are wide-ranging—and in some cases, surprising. Slower processing speeds could easily be the result of either the antivirus program you are running, or a virus that the software was designed to stop.Constantly scanning your hard drive for potential threats can take up a surprising amount of CPU power, especially if you’re using an older device or OS. If the device starts lagging at random times, it might be the result of an antivirus that’s eating into your processor load. To stop it, use your antivirus’s scheduling function to make sure it only scans your device during times that you aren’t likely to use it.Alternatively, you may have a piece of malware running on your computer that is sucking up all the processing power from your CPU, whether by running several background processes or attempting to spread itself via your email and social media. Identifying a virus on your computer isn’t easy—even scanning your device with an antivirus may not work, as many forms of malware run something called “anti-forensics” that prevents them from running if they detect security software installed on your device. Try either scanning with multiple antivirus tools or performing a manual virus removal.

    A surprisingly complex issue

    High CPU usage is one of the simplest issues that can impact a computer’s performance, but it can be challenging to detect the underlying cause if you don’t know where to look. If you find that high CPU usage persists—even in support of standard processes—you may simply need a faster computer. You can also reduce CPU load by adding more RAM, which allows your computer to store more application data. This reduces the frequency of internal data transfers and new memory allocations, which can give your CPU a much-needed break.

    That said, even everyday users can be made aware of common CPU issues and learn to troubleshoot them, saving IT teams time and ensuring that productivity can resume as quickly as possible.

    Read through our blog for other common questions and concerns related to troubleshooting:

    Allocating RAM can help optimize performance.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    Some applications in Windows require more RAM to run than others. Games require far more random access memory (RAM), otherwise known as operative memory, to run than word processing apps because they have intense graphics requirements.

    Windows 10 typically allocates RAM automatically to each program with a limit on how much they can use. While this system is adequate for most apps, some games may suffer from slow performance or long load times because of their RAM limitation. The best way to rectify this issue is by allocating more RAM to the game to increase its performance.

    What is RAM?

    RAM is the operating memory used by programs to run. Instead of storing data permanently, like a hard disk drive (HDD) or solid-state drive (SSD), it stores temporary information required to run a program. When a user opens a game, the RAM keeps it running because the process would be too slow if it had to run from the drive. When the game is closed, the RAM doesn’t store any permanent data and can be allocated to other programs.

    T\he more RAM a PC has, the more processes it can run. Since PCs process tasks sequentially, having lower RAM means it has limited processing power and will take longer to complete each one. More RAM allows the PC to process more tasks faster.

    RAM chips with the same memory size often operate at different speeds. It’s best to get the highest frequency possible while taking into consideration the motherboard capabilities. There’s some debate as to whether it’s best to have a higher quantity of RAM or lower RAM with higher speeds. In most cases, it’s best to have more RAM, but it’s a bit of a gray area and depends on factors such as the type of CPU and the motherboard’s capabilities.

    How to allocate more RAM to a game in Windows

    • Press Ctrl, Shift, and Esc simultaneously on the keyboard.
      • The Task Manager will open, displaying all the running programs as well as the central processing unit (CPU) and memory (RAM) usage.
    • Click on the Details tab at the top of the Task Manager Window.
    • Scroll down to the game you want to allocate more RAM to.
    • Right-click and scroll down to Set Priority.
      • It will display options ranging between Realtime and Low.
    • Click on High.
      • A window will open asking to confirm your choice.
    • Click on Change priority to confirm your choice.
    • The game will now have more RAM allocated to it in Windows.

    Allocating more RAM to a game can sometimes increase its performance a\nd loading times. On the other hand, if the PC has limited RAM, it might affect other programs’ performance and lead to crashes. It’s advisable to monitor your system and change the settings back to what they were if you experience any problems.

    Answers to Personal Computing Questions

    How do find out how much RAM my computer has and how much it is using?

    Answer: Knowing how much RAM, or memory, your computer has is important because it determines what programs you can run on your machine. The more RAM you have, the more memory-intensive programs you can run. It also allows you to run more programs at one time. Having “excess” RAM is even beneficial, as it helps your computer avoid bottlenecks when processing large amounts of data.

    If you are using Windows, you can find out how much RAM you have by right-clicking the My Computer icon and selecting “Properties. ” This will open the System Properties window and you can view the amount of physical memory installed under the General tab. You can find out how much memory your computer is currently using by right-clicking anywhere in the open space of the Taskbar and selecting “Task Manager.” Then click the Performance tab of the window that opens and you will be able to view your memory usage.

    If you are using Mac OS X, you can see you much RAM is installed in your computer by choosing “About This Mac” from the Apple menu. This is located in the far upper left-hand corner of the screen. To find out how much memory is being used, open the Activity Monitor program, located in the Utilities folder (within the Applications folder). Then click the System Memory button near the bottom of the window to see how much memory your system is currently using.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    As a Windows 10 user you sometimes get used to the system feeling a bit slow. This can be for various reasons. The most common reason, however, is that the working memory is completely used. You can check this by looking at the RAM usage of the computer. This is how you proceed.

    RAM stands for Random Access Memory and is used by the computer for quickly storing data, which is deleted after use. This type of memory works in tandem with ROM (read-only memory), which takes on longer-term tasks. This is an SSD or other hard drive.

    In many cases, the computer can remain fast for a long time when there is more than enough RAM. That is true, but it can also sometimes help to check which apps, programs and components are using that fast RAM to see if you can adjust something that provides a speed boost. Fortunately, you can easily check and adjust this within Windows 10, if necessary.

    Check RAM usage on Windows 10

    To simply check the working memory usage, proceed as follows. The most popular method is the button combination Ctrl + Alt + Del and then the option Task management to select. Now a separate window will open. If this is your first time arriving here, then you need to click the More details button at the bottom left.

    Now click on the tab Processes (Chances are you’re already on it, though) and press the button with the text Memory. This allows you to sort the programs by memory usage and see which apps and programs use the most RAM Windows 10. Now find the app that uses a lot of memory. If that is the normal course of events, then you do not have to do anything. If a program has crashed or is not responding, you can end the process here. By the way, do not do this when you are still actively using that program, otherwise you could lose your work.

    Using Resource Control

    If you want to gain a little more insight into the memory usage of the apps on your Windows 10 device, you can use Source Control. You will find it very quickly through the Windows key + R and tapping resmon.exe in the new window. And otherwise you can Start open, scroll down until you see Windows System Management found and there Source control Selecting. In this new window, click on the tab Memory and all the way to the right then on Own (kB).

    Now you will again see the apps that use a lot of memory. Unlike Task Manager, you don’t see any user-friendly program names here. Instead, you see the processes that are currently running. If you have any doubts about which process belongs to which app, right-click on the task and select the option Search Online. Then you will see more information about it. It is also true that when you end a process here (right mouse button > End process), only that process is stopped. The program will continue to run until you have canceled all processes.

    Finally

    In both cases, you can find out which apps and processes are responsible for memory usage. If you encounter problems while closing apps and processes, you can do well to restart the computer. All processes will then be terminated at once, which may cause the problem to resolve itself.

    By the way, keep in mind that there are always apps that simply use a lot of memory. For example, Google’s Chrome browser is known to ‘eat up’ working memory, while programs like Photoshop also use a large part of that RAM. If you come across such apps, it does not mean that there is a problem with the RAM usage, even though the computer may feel slow at that time.

    If you run into the limitations of your current working memory more often, you can always choose to expand that memory. If that is not possible, you may have to buy a new computer or laptop.

    Plus the risks of using too much

    RAM, or random access memory, is used to allow programs to boot more quickly and carry out tasks in a fraction of the time it would take if the program had to load from your hard drive. RAM is vital to performance in any program that needs to access a tremendous amount of data.

    For example, a word processing program won’t rely heavily on RAM due to the low performance requirements. A detailed Excel spreadsheet or Photoshop, however, needs as much RAM as you can spare it. So do games. In many cases, you need to allocate extra RAM to gaming, especially if you’re using a lot of mods.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    This is true in titles like Minecraft, as do games like Shadow of Mordor which needs a whopping 8.3 GB of VRAM. The good news is that you can allocate more RAM to specific apps to help improve their performance.

    What is RAM?

    RAM is an acronym for random access memory, and it is one of the most important parts of your computer. RAM is necessary for programs to run. Without it, you will be unable to run most applications, and those that you can run will perform at a seriously reduced level.

    Think of RAM as short-term memory for your computer. It allows your system to access data far more quickly than it can through even the SSD. If you have multiple applications running at the same time, you will need more RAM than if you are only using a few at a time.

    In modern computers, RAM is typically found in multiples of 4. Motherboards often use something called dual-channel memory, which means you want RAM of the same type–either sticks of 4, sticks of 8, or sticks of 16. There is no upper limit to the amount of RAM you can have except what your motherboard can support, although there is a limit to how much you can reasonably ever use.

    Allow Windows 10 to Allocate More RAM

    The easiest way to improve performance across the board is to allow Windows to use as much RAM as necessary to ensure performance. Find the This PC application and right-click the icon, then select Properties. Select Advanced system settings > Settings. Under the Visual Effects tab, there are four options. Select the Adjust for best performance option.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    After you do this, click Apply. The changes will take effect after you restart your PC. This setting allows Windows to allocate RAM as needed to ensure programs run as smoothly as possible.

    Prioritize RAM Usage

    Another way you can ensure specific programs have more than enough RAM, particularly if you are running multiple applications at once, is to prioritize RAM usage within the Task Manager. Open Task Manager and right-click the application you want to prioritize, then select Go to details.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    This opens the Details tab of the Task Manager. Right-click the process and choose Set priority. From here, you can designate what priority the program receives: Realtime, High, Above Normal, Normal, Below Normal, or Low.

    Designate RAM Usage Within Specific Programs

    Another option–and arguably the best choice–is to allocate more RAM within the settings of a given program. This holds especially true in games like Minecraft that are often played with mods. Many modpacks will not run correctly without more than the default amount of RAM.

    Bear in mind that the exact process for doing this varies from program to program. Even among Minecraft, the process for allocating RAM depends on the launcher you use. As a brief example, you can select the Installations tab in the default launcher and click New > More Options and change the text under JVM Argument from Xmx2G to XmX2n, where n is the amount of RAM you want to use.

    How to see which programs are using all your memory on windows

    If you are looking for a more in-depth explanation, here is another article than can help.

    Each game and program will have a different method for allocating more RAM, if it is even possible. Many applications are coded to use a specific amount of RAM based on your operating system, regardless of how much you have available. For example, Microsoft Excel on 32-bit operating systems is restricted to 2GB of RAM.

    Risks of Using Too Much RAM

    For the most part, RAM is harmless. You aren’t likely to cause catastrophic damage to your system because you use too much RAM on an application–the worst that happens is that a program will crash or background programs might behave in odd ways.

    However, there are times when it can cause more serious damage. Anyone that has ever worked in coding has experienced a stack overflow error–a problem that happens when the call stack memory is exceeded. This error results in a crash. A similar type of problem often happens when a program throws the “Not Responding” error message within Windows.

    This happens when it exceeds its allotted amount of RAM and can no longer operate properly. Waiting for the memory to clear can sometimes resolve the problem, but the go-to method is to force quit a program by using the Task Manager.

    Patrick is an Atlanta-based technology writer with a background in programming and smart home technology. When he isn’t writing, nose to the grindstone, he can be found keeping up with the latest developments in the tech world and upping his coffee game. Read Patrick’s Full Bio

    There’s an obvious appeal to off-the-shelf, “install this to fix everything!” software suites. Or, they sound great on paper, anyway: Dump an app (or a few apps) on your PC, and they’ll continually scan your system to make sure it’s free of viruses or malware. And depending on the suite, they’ll even work all kinds of other magical tricks to make your computer as fast as possible.

    Lifehacker reader Lloyd wrote to me with a question that illustrates the downsides of these kinds of all-in-one packages for this week’s Tech 911 Q&A:

    “My last two “system health checkers” – currently Norton Utilities Premium – frequently tells me that “System Memory is Low” with numbers like 28% or 42%. I’ve never seen this problem before. When I click to repair the problem, Norton reports that it now has fixed the problem – and it does not find it again if I re-run Norton immediately.

    However, the next time that I use the computer I usually get the “system memory low” diagnosis tho’ the number may vary (38%, for example).

    What is going on? What causes this problem? Could this be a flaw in Windows 10?”

    Your system is fine, save for Norton itself

    If you don’t mind, Lloyd, I’m going to take a slight digression in answering your question. I don’t think you need to use Norton Utilities Premium at all. You’re paying $40 per year for a suite of utilities that you don’t really need, at best, and ones that are contributing to your system’s clogged resources, at worst.

    That’s not just me planting a flag in the ground. I can’t count the number of computer geeks, reviewers, IT experts, and pundits who have come down hard on these kinds of “all-in-one fix-it” applications. While Windows 10 is far from perfect, the operating system does a pretty reasonably efficient job of managing all that stuff entirely in the background. There’s not really much you can or should be doing to “clean up” your PC to unlock performance levels you never knew it was capable of. Nor is there really a great way to “fix” having “low system memory,” aside from the obvious step of having fewer programs open (in the background or otherwise) to eat through said memory.

    You can always check your system’s available memory yourself by pulling up Windows’ Task Manager. You’ll quickly see which programs are consuming various percentages of your total memory:

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    In fact, that’s the first place I’d turn when faced with a sluggish system or, as in your case, some kind of warning about low system memory. But also, know that having low system memory isn’t necessarily a bad thing. It might indicate that you could stand to add a bit more to your rig if you’re always running low (and if you even can upgrade), but it’s also common for Windows and your various apps to, well, use your memory. If you don’t have a lot, it’s certainly possible that whatever you’re doing on your PC simply occupies a good chunk of it.

    That said, I would wager Norton Utilities Premium also consumes a decent amount of your system resources and/or memory. I mean, it practically says so in its description : “Automated PC care that works when your PC is idle.”

    Were I you, I’d uninstall Norton Utilities Premium and unsubscribe. Many of the “advantages” it offers you can achieve all by yourself. For example:

    • Use Task Manager > Startup to see which applications launch when your computer launches. Disable any you don’t need.
    • Use Task Manager more generally to check for apps that are eating up a ton of system resources. Consider whether it’s the app that’s to blame, or your underpowered PC.
    • Use Windows 10’s built-in Disk Cleanup utility to quickly and easily scan for unwanted files you can safely delete
    • Check Windows 10’s Optimize Drives app to make sure your system is automatically defragmenting/trimming your hard drives/SSDs as needed.
    • Make sure you’re regularly checking for (and installing) the latest updates for your operating system, as well as the latest drivers and firmware.
    • Use Windows’ built-in antivirus (Windows Defender) and supplement it with a run-as-needed malware app (like Malwarebytes’ offerings)
    • Use your browser’s built-in tools to regularly clear your cache, remove your history, delete your cookies, etc.

    That sounds like a lot, but this is simple stuff that you don’t need a paid program to do on your behalf. I wouldn’t stress about Norton’s warnings. Remove the app, stop paying for something you don’t need, and start to feel out whether your PC is actually running sluggishly. If it is, consider upgrading its memory , upgrading to an SSD instead of a mechanical hard drive (if you’re still using one), using a flash drive as a RAM disk , or even performing a clean reinstall of Windows 10 .

    Do you have a tech question keeping you up at night? Tired of troubleshooting your Windows or Mac? Looking for advice on apps, browser extensions, or utilities to accomplish a particular task? I answered a lot of these questions in three years’ worth of Tech 911 columns, which ran every Friday at Lifehacker from March 2018 to May 2021. This is my last post on the site, and it’s been a real honor and joy to help out as many of you as I could. Keep your devices updated. Don’t forget about firmware. Hack the planet. You’ve got this.