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How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

Have you ever checked into a dingy hotel that only gives out just one Wi-Fi credential per room and charges extra if you ask for separate credentials? More often than not, the Wi-Fi is locked behind a dynamic captive portal and can’t be used on multiple devices. Thankfully, there are a few easy ways to share the hotel’s Wi-Fi connection which doesn’t involve cracking the Wi-Fi password. You can achieve this with a Windows, Mac or even an Android smartphone. Let’s see how.

How to Share Hotel Wi-Fi with multiple devices

1. Windows

If you’re running Windows 10 on your computer then this process is just one step long. Windows natively let you create a hotspot and share the Wi-Fi connection you just got from the reception. It works because most Windows laptops have two separate Wi-Fi bands and one is used to access the Wi-Fi and the other to create one. To share the Hotel Wi-Fi, connect your Windows laptop to the hotel wi-Fi. After that Go to Settings > Network & Internet > Mobile Hotspot > Share Connection from Wi-Fi > Share Connection over Wi-Fi. Turn it on and you’re set.

By default it pickups an SSID something like Desktop- followed by a random alphanumeric number. If you want to change that, click on the Edit button, type whatever network name and password you want to use like ‘Hotel WiFi extended’ or something and then click “OK.”

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

If you’re running an older version of Windows such as 8.1, 8, or 7, you can use any popular Wi-Fi sharing software such as Connectify.me, Maryfi, My Public Wi-Fi, etc.

Unlike Windows, you can’t create a Wi-Fi hotspot and connect using Wi-Fi at the same time. However, macOS does offer other simple solutions if you’re trying to share Mac’s internet connection to your iPhone. You can either do it by connecting a lightning cable between your iPhone and Mac or share the internet via Bluetooth. USB offers greater speed but Bluetooth is wireless. Open System Preferences> Sharing> Internet Sharing> Share your connection from: Wi-Fi> To Computers using: Bluetooth and iPhone USB.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

If you don’t have an iPhone or want to share the internet connection to multiple devices then you should invest in a cheap Wi-Fi Adaptor for your future trips. You can get one from Amazon for as low as $8. I tried it on a TP-Link TL-WN722N Wi-Fi adaptor but theoretically, it should work with any Wi-Fi adaptor.

To share the Wi-Fi, connect to the hotel Wi-Fi from the Wi-Fi Adaptor app. Go to System Preferences > Sharing > Internet Sharing. Share your connection from Wi-Fi Adaptor(listed as 802.11n NIC or something)> To computers using: Wi-Fi. Configure the hotspot by clicking the Wi-Fi options and edit the name and password of the hotspot.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

Simply connect the devices to the newly created hotspot and enjoy the Wi-Fi on all the devices.

3. Android

If you have flagship Android devices like Google Pixel, Samsung Galaxy Note 9, etc, then just like Windows you can share the hotel Wi-Fi natively. To Share the Wi-Fi, go to Settings> Wireless> Mobile Hotspot> Setup. Turn it on and connect all the devices to your mobile hotspot.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

In case your phone doesn’t have this option, you can still do it with third-party apps like Netshare No Root Tethering. The only requirement is that your smartphone should have a dual-band Wi-Fi Adaptor. A quick Google search would tell you if your phone is supported or not. If it is then simply run the app and share the internet using the app.

We have done a detailed article on how to share Android’s WiFi over hotspot using Netshare No Root app, you can read more on it here.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

4. Carry A Wireless Repeater

If you travel often and don’t want to use your existing devices as WiFi repeater, maybe you can consider buying a cheap Wireless Repeater.

Most WiFi repeater works in 3 modes; Ethernet, WPS, and usual password-protected network. So, if anyone of this option is available in the hotel you frequently visit, then you can buy a cheap WiFi repeater. However, WiFi repeater doesn’t work if the WiFi is open WiFi or if the network has a captive login. In such cases, it’s better if you restore to above options.

Closing Words

So these were some of the ways to share a single Wi-Fi connection at a hotel. Things get easier, especially if you do a little bit of planning ahead of time. Alternatively, you can request the reception to upgrade your Wi-Fi devices, most of them do it for free if you ask them nicely. At the same time, if the hotel is ripping you for every service, maybe it’s time to switch hotels. Or, if you have a decent data plan, you could always use data tethering to share your smartphone’s data connection with your other devices. What do you think of these methods, let me know in the comments below?

Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He’s written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami’s NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times—and that’s just here at How-To Geek. Read more.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

Many hotels still limit you to one or two Wi-Fi devices per room–a frustrating limitation, especially when traveling with someone else. Connection restrictions can apply anywhere you have to log into a Wi-Fi network via a portal instead of a standard passphrase. Here are some ways to get around that limitation.

Connect to the Wi-Fi with Your Laptop and Share the Connection

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

If you’re carrying your Windows or Mac laptop with you, it’s fairly easy to share your hotel’s Wi-Fi connection with other wireless devices–especially if you do a little bit of planning ahead of time.

How you turn your Windows laptop into a Mobile Wi-Fi Hotspot depends on which version of Windows you’re running. With Windows 10, it’s as simple as flipping a single switch that you can find at Settings > Network & Internet > Mobile Hotspot. In Windows 7 or 8, you’ll need to install a free tool named Virtual Router to get the job done. Macs, on the other hand are not able to share a single Wi-Fi adapter. Each adapter can either be connected to a Wi-Fi network or hosting its own network, but not both. To turn your Mac into a mobile Wi-Fi hotspot, you’ll need to purchase an inexpensive USB Wi-Fi adapter. After that, though, all the tool you need to share your Mac’s Wi-Fi connection are built right in.

Create a Bluetooth PAN

If the devices you want to connect have Bluetooth hardware, you could potentially use Bluetooth to share the connection with them. This requires creating a Bluetooth “PAN”, or “Personal Area Network.”

For example, on a Mac you can open the Sharing interface in the System Services window and enable Internet sharing over “Bluetooth PAN.” Pair your other devices to the Mac via Bluetooth to take advantage of the PAN and the Mac’s Internet connection. This could be a decent option if all you have available to you is a Mac — as long as your other devices have Bluetooth hardware and support the PAN profile, you’re good to go.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

Purchase a WiFi-to-WiFi Router

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

If you’re thinking in advance, you can purchase a router designed specifically for this purpose. You’ll want a router that can do WiFi-to-WiFi routing. In other words, the router needs to be able to connect to a Wi-Fi hotspot and create its own Wi-Fi network at the same time.

Be sure to purchase a router designed for the purpose of sharing a Wi-Fi connection, not a pocket-sized router designed for connecting to an Ethernet port and creating a single Wi-Fi network.

Plug the router in and it’ll create its own Wi-Fi hotspot. You can then connect to it and use the interface to connect the router to your hotel’s Wi-Fi connection and sign in via their captive portal to give every device connected to your Wi-Fi hotspot access to the Internet.

And if none of these solutions fit your needs and you have a smartphone with a decent data plan, you could always use tethering to share your smartphone’s data connection with your other devices. That way, you don’t need to rely on your hotel’s painfully slow and obnoxious Internet connection at all.

Often times, you find yourself at a hotel that charges a certain amount for Wi-Fi access per each device you want to connect. And there are some prices for which just getting your laptop and phone online for a few days will be an exorbitant added cost to your trip, never mind if you’ve got the family iPad and other devices to contend with.

With Connectify Hotspot, you’ve always got a fully-functional virtual router right inside your PC. Just get on the hotel Wi-Fi with one laptop, give your Connectify Hotspot a name (SSID) and password that other devices will use to connect, and you’re instantly sharing the hotel Wi-Fi as a new, secure wireless access point at the click-of-a-button.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

While the free version of Connectify Hotspot can be a lifesaver at hotels and airports, upgrading to Hotspot PRO or MAX offers travelers a host of added benefits:

  • Share 3G and 4G USB Devices as Wi-Fi – Do you travel with a 3G/4G USB dongle to stay connected on-the-road? Upgrade to Connectify Hotspot PRO or MAX, and share your laptop’s mobile broadband connection with any Wi-Fi-enabled device.
  • You’re in Control – With Connectify Hotspot PRO & MAX per device firewall settings, you control when the kids can and can’t access the Internet on their laptops and mobile devices. You can thank us later!
  • Chromecast and Connectify – Sure, you like using your Google Chromecast streaming media device to wirelessly “throw” Netflix, YouTube, and any other sites in your Chrome browser onto your TV at home, but as it stands, it’s just too much of a hassle to set this device up on every new hotel Wi-Fi network you encounter. With Chromecast set to sniff out your Connectify Hotspot MAX, watching the best web content on the hotel’s 50” flat-screen is as easy as firing up your laptop.

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How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

Many hotels still limit you to one or two Wi-Fi devices per room–a frustrating limitation, especially when traveling with someone else. Connection restrictions can apply anywhere you have to log into a Wi-Fi network via a portal instead of a standard passphrase. Here are some ways to get around that limitation.

Connect to the Wi-Fi with Your Laptop and Share the Connection

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

If you’re carrying your Windows or Mac laptop with you, it’s fairly easy to share your hotel’s Wi-Fi connection with other wireless devices–especially if you do a little bit of planning ahead of time.

RELATED ARTICLES How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devicesHow to Turn Your Windows PC Into a Wi-Fi HotspotHow to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devicesHow to Turn Your Mac Into a Wi-Fi Hotspot

How you turn your Windows laptop into a Mobile Wi-Fi Hotspot depends on which version of Windows you’re running. With Windows 10, it’s as simple as flipping a single switch that you can find at Settings > Network & Internet > Mobile Hotspot. In Windows 7 or 8, you’ll need to install a free tool named Virtual Router to get the job done. Macs, on the other hand are not able to share a single Wi-Fi adapter. Each adapter can either be connected to a Wi-Fi network or hosting its own network, but not both. To turn your Mac into a mobile Wi-Fi hotspot, you’ll need to purchase an inexpensive USB Wi-Fi adapter. After that, though, all the tool you need to share your Mac’s Wi-Fi connection are built right in.

Create a Bluetooth PAN

If the devices you want to connect have Bluetooth hardware, you could potentially use Bluetooth to share the connection with them. This requires creating a Bluetooth “PAN”, or “Personal Area Network.”

For example, on a Mac you can open the Sharing interface in the System Services window and enable Internet sharing over “Bluetooth PAN.” Pair your other devices to the Mac via Bluetooth to take advantage of the PAN and the Mac’s Internet connection. This could be a decent option if all you have available to you is a Mac — as long as your other devices have Bluetooth hardware and support the PAN profile, you’re good to go.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

Purchase a WiFi-to-WiFi Router

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

If you’re thinking in advance, you can purchase a router designed specifically for this purpose. You’ll want a router that can do WiFi-to-WiFi routing. In other words, the router needs to be able to connect to a Wi-Fi hotspot and create its own Wi-Fi network at the same time.

Be sure to purchase a router designed for the purpose of sharing a Wi-Fi connection, not a pocket-sized router designed for connecting to an Ethernet port and creating a single Wi-Fi network.

Plug the router in and it’ll create its own Wi-Fi hotspot. You can then connect to it and use the interface to connect the router to your hotel’s Wi-Fi connection and sign in via their captive portal to give every device connected to your Wi-Fi hotspot access to the Internet.

And if none of these solutions fit your needs and you have a smartphone with a decent data plan, you could always use tethering to share your smartphone’s data connection with your other devices. That way, you don’t need to rely on your hotel’s painfully slow and obnoxious Internet connection at all.

Image Credit: Nicolas Vigier on Flickr

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Let’s see how to connect multiple smartphones or PCs to the public Wi-Fi network of a hotel for free with a shared connection

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devicesMore and more hotels and B & Bs offer the possibility of using a dedicated Wi-Fi connection in our room. In many structures, there is a maximum limit of devices that we can connect or the connection is offered only via Ethernet cable, thus becoming impractical if we have many devices to connect during the stay.
In this guide, we will show you how to (legally) bypass any limits placed by the hotelier on the Internet connection, by showing you how to share hotel Wi-Fi on multiple devices for free. The methods that we will illustrate are valid both if we have Wi-Fi access (limited) and if we only have an Ethernet socket to be used for the connection.

How to share the hotel’s Wi-Fi connection on smartphones and PCs

We see below all the methods that we can use to share the hotel’s Wi-Fi connection or cable connection so that you can connect multiple devices at the same time without having to configure access data or pay extras.

Enable hotspot mode on a laptop with Windows or Mac

The easiest method to share the hotel’s Wi-Fi connection is to use our trusted laptop, on which we will have to start hotspot mode.
First, connect the notebook to the Wi-Fi network offered by the hotel or the place where we are staying (also inserting the credentials provided or the special access codes), we install on the system the Free WiFi Hotspot app, available for both Windows and for Mac.
How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

Before opening the program though we connect a new Wi-Fi adapter to the laptop, choosing a small and versatile model to connect to a USB port, such as the TP-Link TL-WN823N (€ 9).
How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

Once the program is open, we choose a name for the Hotspot network, we also choose a fairly secure password, we select the Wi-Fi network card already present inside the notebook in the field Share From, then press the button Start.
We will thus be able to manage the new Wi-Fi network from the new adapter connected to the USB socket, to which we can connect all our devices for Internet access without having to repeat all the steps and without having to pay to get access to new devices, just leave the notebook or MacBook on during the entire connection period.
To learn more and test other similar programs, please read our guide on how to create a WiFi hotspot on Windows PC.

Use a travel Wi-Fi repeater

The Wi-Fi repeaters can also be used inside hotels or public places to create our own personal sub-network to connect our devices to; obviously we will have to focus only on models that have routing functionality and not just Range Extender functionality (since the expansion of the network will not bring us any real advantage if the same limits are active).
One of the devices that we can use for the purpose is the RAVPower FileHub WiFi Router (38 €).
How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

This small Wi-Fi repeater-router is small, compact and equipped with an internal battery, so you can immediately configure it for access to the hotel’s wireless network and create our personal Wi-Fi network, complete with routing rules. To do this, simply place the device in mode Router Mode, connect to the network as already seen for the creation of the hotspot on notebooks.
Currently, this is one of the most practical ways to share the hotel’s Wi-Fi connection on multiple devices, especially if we don’t have a laptop with us to set up for the hotspot.

Convert cable connection to Wi-Fi connection

In some hotels, there is no Wi-Fi connection but only an Ethernet cable connection, present in the room we have booked. In order to convert this connection into a wireless connection, we will have to use a travel router such as the TP-Link TL-WR902AC (35 €).

By connecting the Ethernet cable to the WAN / LAN port of this small device and configuring the router mode we will be able to surf the Internet with a dedicated Wi-Fi network, choosing the name and password to be assigned.
We will thus be able to surf wirelessly at maximum speed on smartphones, tablets or any other device with connection support 2.4 GHz or 5 GHz Wi-Fi.

Conclusions

What we have shown you are the safe and legal methods to share the limited Internet connection offered by many large hotels that, to avoid overloading, often provide the connection with personal credentials only from a single device, with often also a limitation in terms of data or connection time.
Using a notebook or a small portable router we will be able to overcome most of the limits, so we can create “on-site” a new Wi-Fi network to connect all the devices in our possession (only one device will always be connected to the hotel, even if not).
If instead, we find a hotel with a single Ethernet socket in the room assigned for our stay, just connect a small portable router to obtain a good wireless connection that can cover our entire room.

To increase security when browsing from public networks, we recommend that you read our guide on Best services and free VPN programs for safe and free surfing is Connect to the wifi of hotels, bars or public networks without problems of internet access.
If, on the other hand, we want to find a new faster public hotspot network immediately, we can find it with the apps indicated in our guide Hotspot app, for better internet connection management (Android and iPhone).

Firmware Version : 4.18.114 Build 130314 Rel.39604n

Firmware Version : 4.18.114 Build 130314 Rel.39604n

How to share payed Hotel internet connections to multiple devices.

As airline crew I bought the TP-link TL-WR702N to share my payed hotel internet connection to multiple devices i.e. MacBook, iPhone & iPad and colleagues. because usually Hotel internet only allows one device per account to be connected.

1st my respect for the TP-Link engineers for making this very usefull nifty little gadget for a price that is hard to beat. THX guys and gals.

The set up to do it requires some computer skills to achieve and has ONE LIMITATION to start with.

It only works @ hotels with BOTH LAN internet cables in your room AND WIFI anywhere in the hotel.

1) Access your router via LAN in AP mode and configure the WAN (SSID, WPA_PSK, 8011n and channels used etc) so you can acces your WR702N later by WIFI and test it.

2) Select “Router” mode on your WR702N and reboot it. From this moment on you can only acces it via WIFI or hard reset it.

3) The trick is that the hotel router assigns you an IP lease by your mac address and it does not care whether it does that via LAN or WIFI as long as it sees the right mac adress from either your computer or. yes, your WR702N. Now connect with your computer WIFI to the hotel WIFI. Do NOT log in yet. You may have to walk to the hotel lobby for a good WIFI signal and note & jot down: the WIFI IPv4 address assigned, subnet mask and (hotel) router IPv4 address.

4) Connect again to your WR702N via WIFI and go to the Network MAC clone page. The PC’s mac address you see is your computer WIFI card its mac address CLONE it.

5) Go to Network WAN page and SELECT “Static IP”, enter your jotted down IP address in “IP adress” box, same with the subnet mask and the hotel router address in the “default gateway” box. Enter for primary DNS 8.8.8.8 and secondary DNS 8.8.4.4 (both Google DNS server’s usually better and faster anyway than the local providers DNS servers let alone censorship. ). SAVE.

6) Connect your WR702N to hotel LAN cable in your room and while being connected with your computer by WIFI to your WR702N open any page in your browser. And Voila. Your hotel internet log in page appears for you to log in an purchase internet acces with a smile. 🙂 The hotel router thinks it sees your computer WIFI but now you can also make with any other device an internet WIFI connection with your WR702N and share hotel internet.

7) If you want to share only WIFI availible in your room than you will have to purchase a second WR702N and connect it in client mode via LAN to the first WR702N ( see other posts on this forum) -or- , if you have Apple OS-X running connect WR702N in client mode via LAN to your Apple laptop and and share LAN internet via your Apple WIFI (Google it for more instructions)

Have fun and stay connected with the world while enroute ! 🙂

Device Sharing On Hotel WiFi

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

For the average travel most hotels allow 4 to 6 devices at a time to access your free room WiFi. This also is generally true for paid WiFi or upgraded WiFi. For most users this is plenty.

Some hotels though limit you to 1 or 2 devices. Also, unlike hotels, cruise ships often require you to pay per device. Even most devices like travel routers do not let you share your internet connection.

Accessing Your Paid or Free Hotel WiFi from Other Devices

You can add additional devices in pretty much the same way you connected your initial device. Unless you are traveling with a large family, or have a large number of devices, you are rarely going to hit the device limit.

In order to connect additional devices simply go to the appropriate hotel WiFi on the other devices. Simply connect and select “Add Another Device”.

You likely will need to re-enter the hotel provided code, or room number and last name, for each additional device. These screens, known as captive portals, act like a login for free WiFi. While not a terrible amount of work, those who travel with kids who have their own devices and/or a number of streaming sticks, this quickly turns into quite the project.

A suggestion to speed the process along is to get a travel router. Most travel routers will only need to connect once. After that, any device that is already setup for your travel router will automatically connect without needing to re-enter a hotel WiFi password, code or enter a room number/last name.

Handling More Than The Included Allotment Of Devices

While rare, a few of us more device heavy travelers have run across the problem where the included allotment isn’t enough. It’s easy to hit that number when you think of 2 parents phones + 2 kids phones or tablets + laptop. If you take a streaming stick or other TV device you’ve easily hit the limit. What happens if you have 3 or 4 kids?

There are a few ways to deal with this

  • Many hotels offer you additional connections for a fee. Sometimes the “upgraded” internet comes with additional or unlimited connections. These premium hotel internet fees can be substantial though – easily $10 a day or more.
  • Use a travel router – Travel routers appear as “one device” to the hotel. However, not all travel routers can handle all of the traffic (see below)
  • Use cellular networks more – this is an easy option, and many phones have “hot spots” which can share the internet to some of the devices without needing to use up a limited slot. But even “unlimited” data plans throttle the connection, so using cellular data when there is WiFi available can certainly have an impact down the road.

Lots Of Devices Mean Traffic Crowding

Another thing to note is not all travel routers are as good at dealing with lots of devices. Most travel routers only can talk a single device at a time. Most communications happen in milliseconds, so most experiences with a a few devices you won’t notice. Think of it like traffic lanes merging. 1 car, or a few cars doesn’t generally cause a slow down.

However, as you get to 5, 6, 7+ devices the traffic lanes get crowded as the cars backup waiting for the cars in front of it. Then it becomes like rush hour on the highway. You may experience slower internet and in a place like a hotel where internet speeds are already slow, it can start to feel REALLY slow.

You may also notice streaming services struggling. With a few streams this may not be a problem, but when there are multiple devices those delays start to become noticeable.

While some travel routers may help with this, most are lower end technology that may actually make the problem worse. If you use a large number of devices (over 4) regularly, consider a premium travel router. It’s easy to hit that number when you think of 2 parents phones + 2 kids phones or tablets + laptop.

Cruise Ships and Other Places That Charge Per Device

Cruise Ships, hotels in certain markets or some premium hotels charge per device. These locations in particular make traveling with a large number of devices both difficult and expensive.

Some travel routers can help by appearing as a single device. However, because cruise ships and hotels see this as a revenue opportunity, the may go a lot further than the typical hotel to try to limit the use of routers to bypass paying for internet.

Also, internet on a cruise ship is a LOT more sensitive to speed and load than even the worst on land hotels in major markets. Cruise ship WiFi is generally seemed via satellite. So every bit of data matters for you and your fellow cruisers.

A few tips on how to get the most out of your cruise ship WiFi and minimize per device costs:

  • Use a travel router that specifically works with cruise ships and intelligence handles multiple devices
  • Make sure your travel router can enhance WiFi to get the most out of slow cruise ship speeds
  • Minimize travel data usage – concepts such as offline stream downloads, downloaded maps and other techniques can help you limit the number of devices you need to connect.

Connect to your hotel’s Wi-Fi on any device

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

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What to Know

  • Obtain the hotel’s wireless network name and password when you check in.
  • Open your device’s Wi-Fi settings, choose the hotel’s network, and select Connect. Enter the password.
  • Open a browser and enter the requested information to complete the connection.

This article explains how to get wireless internet access in a hotel on any computer or mobile device capable of connecting to a wireless network.

How to Connect to a Hotel’s Wi-Fi

Access your hotel’s internet in much the same way you connect to any Wi-Fi network:

Ask at the front desk for the hotel’s wireless network name and password. You might also find the information in your check-in documents or on your key card sleeve.

Make sure that Wi-Fi is turned on on your device.

Most modern devices have them, but if you don’t have a built-in wireless device on your laptop, purchase a USB wireless adapter.

Open the Wi-Fi settings to view the available wireless networks.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

Select your hotel’s network and click Connect.

On some devices, you will connect to Wi-Fi automatically when you select a network. If this step takes more than a minute, restart the connection process.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

Enter the required password if prompted.

Open a web browser if it doesn’t automatically open. Provide your credit card information if the Wi-Fi isn’t free, enter an authorization code, or accept the terms and conditions for using the service. In many cases, your room number, last name, or a combination of the two, make up the password for complimentary Wi-Fi.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

After you submit your authorization information, you gain full guest access to the hotel’s Wi-Fi network. You’ll likely see a confirmation screen showing how much time you have to use the internet. Keep an eye out for any time limitations so that you can schedule your work and take advantage of the Wi-Fi service.

Share the Hotel Wi-Fi Signal With Other Devices

If your hotel’s wireless service isn’t free, you may only be able to access the internet from one device. A travel wireless router, such as the ZuniConnect Travel IV, extends the Wi-Fi signal to several devices.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

Secure Your Information Over Hotel Wi-Fi

Most hotel wireless networks are password-protected and encrypted with strong WPA2. If your hotel’s network is not protected, be aware of the security risks of using an unsecured network. Set up a firewall and install the latest updates for your operating system and antivirus. For extra security, consider subscribing to a VPN service.

For answers to the most common questions, search the ITS Knowledge Base!

Removing a WiFI network from a mobile device is easy.

You will need to do this immediately following our StarID transition to erase the old connection settings.

After you remove the old connection info, you’ll want to refresh and connect to the new StarID-credentialed network. Please see our other articles about adding a WiFI network to Android, iOS, and Windows Mobile phones .

For Android (general instruction using Google Marshmallow):

  1. OpenSettings on your device, and tap on the WiFI icon to access WiFi network options.How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices
  2. Tap and hold the WiFi network you want to delete, then selectForget Network from the menu that appears.How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

For iOS (using iOS 9.2.1):

  1. OpenSettings on your device, and tap on the WiFI icon to access WiFi network optionsHow to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices
  2. From the list of WiFi networks, select the one you want to delete, and tapForget This Network from the details page.How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

For Windows 10 Mobile:

  1. From Settings, tapNetwork and Wireless, then WiFI to access wireless network options.How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices
  2. Tap and hold the WiFi network you want to delete, then selectDelete from the menu that appearsHow to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

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How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

Get online free

Enjoy free Wi-Fi throughout your stay at Premier Inn. Simply select ‘Premier Inn Free Wi-Fi’ from the list of available networks and get connected. Check your emails, post Facebook updates, search and browse the web. It’s all on us.

Upgrade to Ultimate Wi-Fi

If you want an enhanced Wi-Fi experience with the ability to download larger files and stream more music, upgrade to our Ultimate Wi-Fi for £5 for 24 hours. To do this, select ‘Premier Inn Ultimate Wi-Fi’ from your list of available networks and either buy a voucher available from reception (where available) or pay by credit card, debit card, Premier Inn business account card or PayPal.

Wi-Fi terms & conditions

Device exclusions apply. Only devices with a web browser and the ability to connect to a public service are able to access the network, please check your device for compatibility. Connect up to three devices to Ultimate Wi-Fi – please check compatibility prior to purchase. Service terms and conditions apply, please see free Wi-Fi or Ultimate Wi-Fi for full details. Download speeds depend on location and number of users. Ultimate Wi-Fi may not be available in some hotels, please check the hotel details page.

If you’re having trouble connecting to our Wi-Fi, please call Virgin Wi-Fi on +44 (0) 330 660 1136.

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There are so many exciting things to do in the UK, so whether it’s last-minute weekend breaks or fun filled family holidays, we’ve got it all. No matter where your next adventure takes you, you can rest easy knowing you’ll get the same great-value rooms and friendly service at any of our 800+ hotels across the UK.

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What better way to treat a loved one than with a romantic weekend in the UK? Whether you fancy escaping to the countryside to enjoy some peace and quiet or exploring somewhere new on scenic UK city breaks, our great-value Premier Inn hotels are an ideal base for romantic days out on last-minute weekend getaways.

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Get more out of your wonderful winter getaways with family and friends when you book great-value rooms at our UK hotels. From Christmas shopping breaks to New Year’s Eve parties, we’re wherever you need to be this winter. Our cosiest spots for winter staycations are ready and waiting – all that’s left to do is book!

David Johnston

Whether you’re on a business trip, stuck in hotel quarantine or away on holidays, there are times where you need a hotel internet connection you can rely on.

Unfortunately, the Wi-Fi coverage in some hotels can be lacklustre or just will not work with the layout of their rooms. Wi-Fi really is the kind of hotel amenity you only notice when it’s flaky or inconsistent.

While annoying, it is often possible to stand at one end of the room to get a decent signal on a phone or tablet. But that’s hardly an option if you’re trying to get work done on a laptop. What’s the use of a hotel room having a desk in this day and age, if it barely gets any Wi-Fi signal?

Luckily, there is a way to boost the hotel Wi-Fi signal so you can work at the desk in your room (or stream your favourite Netflix series) without frustrating connectivity issues.

A hotspot without cellular data

In a nutshell, the trick is to use a well-placed mobile phone to extend the Wi-Fi in your room, allowing you to sit and use the internet wherever you like.

Many mobile phone users will be familiar with the concept of creating a mobile hotspot or tethering. If not, a mobile hotspot is a setting that allows you to share your phone’s internet connection with other devices so that they too can access the internet.

Traditionally, mobile hotspots have been used to share a phone’s cellular data connection (3G, 4G or 5G). Modern Android features now make it possible to share the Wi-Fi connection of some phones with other devices.

How to set up Wi-Fi sharing on your phone

While there are other, simpler ways to get around poor Wi-Fi connections like local SIM cards and data roaming, they too come with the potential for problems. At least with hotel Wi-Fi, it’s usually free nowadays (you’d hope).

It’s important to note that this solution only works for Android phones. As of yet, there is no simple way to hotspot an iPhone without a cellular connection.

For Android users, here is a step by step guide:

  1. Connect your mobile to Wi-Fi as normal.
  2. Swipe down on your phone to access the Quick Menu settings.
  3. Select the Mobile Hotspot Settings
  4. Turn on Wi-Fi Sharing and then Mobile Hotspot.
  5. On your laptop, connect to the new mobile Wi-Fi hotspot using the network name and password provided on the mobile hotspot settings page.
  6. An alternative for connecting other mobile devices and tablets is to use the QR code option and scan the QR code using the device you wish to connect.

When you no longer need to extend the Wi-Fi, just turn off the mobile hotspot. You may find that using your mobile as a hotspot like this uses more battery than usual, so charge it at the same time if you can.

In future, when you want to use your mobile for this purpose your laptop should connect to the hotspot automatically.

Finding the strongest signal

The key to all this though is finding a spot in your hotel room where the hotel Wi-Fi is at its strongest. Solid places to try placing your phone include:

  • Near the room door, as corridors are usually where hotels position their routers or extenders.
  • By the wall closest to reception when staying in smaller hotels or guest accommodation like B&Bs.

It may take some trial and error to work out where your phone gets the best signal for the hotel Wi-Fi. Once you find a good spot, just place your mobile on the ground or a raised surface and head back to your laptop or device.

Really, the only downside to doing all this is that your phone is out of reach should you need it.

To see how your internet speed compares as you place your phone in different spots, run a speed test from your laptop or device using a service like Speedtest by Ookla or the option provided by Google.

Another benefit of using this Wi-Fi sharing technique is that you can theoretically connect multiple devices to the internet through your phone. That option might sound quite tempting if your hotel or accommodation only provides unique internet login details for a single device.

With your internet woes sorted you can get back to work (or binge-watching shows) and actually focus on the more important things.

Expert advice for whole-home Wi-Fi

Nov 11, 2021 | Share
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Nothing’s worse than a Wi-Fi dead zone. If you have issues with spotty Wi-Fi, there are tons of options for boosting your signals, including mesh routers, Wi-Fi extenders, access points, and powerline network adapters.

Our home networking experts compiled this simple list of solutions to make sure you stay connected in every nook and cranny of your home.

Looking for a new internet provider to fill your home with Wi-Fi? Enter your zip below to find every option in your area.

Optimize your wireless router

Your Wi-Fi router is the heart of your home network. It manages all the data and makes sure everything gets to the right devices. It also creates your Wi-Fi network.

Different routers have different Wi-Fi ranges depending on their hardware and the tech used to direct signals to specific devices—like beamforming, MU-MIMO, and OFDMA. Most routers are good for an apartment or home under 2,000 square feet. And some long-range routers can boost Wi-Fi signals even further.

The location of your router can also make a big difference. Wi-Fi signals are just radio waves, and if you’ve ever tried to adjust the rabbit ear antennas on an old TV, you know how big of a difference a slight adjustment can make.

To get your Wi-Fi signal to every room in the house, try to put your router in a location where you can draw the shortest, straightest line to it from every room. Wi-Fi signals can be absorbed or deflected by large obstructions but do a good job of passing through walls and floors, especially if they hit them straight on.

You’re often somewhat limited in your router locations based on where your internet connection enters your house, but if you find you have a dead space in a nearby room, moving your router just a few feet might make all the difference.

How to get the most out of your router’s Wi-Fi signal

  • Put your router in a central location.
  • Position your antennas up and down to get wide coverage and sideways to get vertical coverage.
  • Periodically reset and update your router to keep it running efficiently.
  • Make sure it has up to date technology—anything older than AC1200 Wi-Fi is old tech.
  • Keep it away from electronics that can interrupt Wi-Fi signals—like Bluetooth speakers, cordless phones, or microwaves.

Pro tip:

An old, out-of-date router can cause poor Wi-Fi performance—especially at the edges of your network. If you’ve had the same router for more than five years and notice issues like your network going down frequently, it’s time for an upgrade. Check out our list of the best Wi-Fi 6 routers to get your network up to date.

Mesh Wi-Fi

Mesh routers and Wi-Fi systems are specifically designed to cover your whole home with a consistent Wi-Fi signal. A mesh system is made up of one primary router and one or more mesh extenders. All the mesh devices in the network communicate to create one cohesive Wi-Fi network with customizable coverage.

Mesh routers work in any situation, but they work best in certain situations:

  • Covering very large homes
  • Customizing coverage for homes with complex layouts
  • Extending Wi-Fi to a garage or patio area

Another factor in favor of mesh Wi-Fi is that most mesh systems—particularly the Google Nest Wi-Fi system—are really easy to set up and manage via app.

Wi-Fi extenders

If you don’t want to upgrade to a mesh system because you have only one or two weak Wi-Fi spots, a network extender is a good option. These come in two forms:

  • Wi-Fi extenders
  • Powerline extenders

Wi-Fi extenders capture your existing Wi-Fi signals and rebroadcast them to extend your Wi-Fi range. Buying a Wi-Fi extender is way cheaper than getting a whole new mesh system—but still stretches your network to cover dead zones. However, Wi-Fi extenders can use only the signal you already have, so there’s a chance that you’ll just end up extending a weak Wi-Fi signal.

Powerline extenders use your home’s electrical wiring to carry internet signals from one adapter near your router to another in a different part of your home. Not all powerline adapters have native Wi-Fi compatibility, but many do—like the inexpensive TP-Link AV600.

Ethernet cables

Wired internet connections are inherently faster and more reliable than Wi-Fi, so using wired connections can improve your internet experience—especially for high-traffic devices like PCs, gaming consoles, or smart TVs.

If you’re looking for some hardcore internet coverage in your home, you can run Ethernet cables through your walls. Then you’ll have Ethernet jacks throughout your home so you can plug in computers, gaming consoles, Wi-Fi access points, or whatever else into a wired connection.

When purchasing Ethernet cables, you should look at the category, especially for distances longer than 150 feet. Anything labeled Cat 3 through Cat 5 are obsolete at this point.

Cat 6 Ethernet cables are relatively inexpensive and can handle internet speeds up to 10 Gbps. So that’s what we’d recommend for most people—although, Etherent categories now go up to Cat 8, which can transfer speeds up to 40 Gbps.

Most new phone owners quickly learn that Wi-Fi is preferable when it comes to conserving your data, but did you know that you can access the internet via Wi-Fi practically anywhere you go? In fact, we may be approaching a future in which universal Wi-Fi connects all mobile device users from around the world.

In the meantime, how can you get Wi-Fi access on the go? This guide will provide information on the various ways and tools you can use to access the internet, no matter where your travels take you.

Turn your smartphone into a Wi-Fi hotspot.

Most smartphones can be turned into an internet access point that your other devices, such as tablets or other phones, can connect to. These are called Wi-Fi hotspots, and they can be indispensable when you need to access the internet with other devices.

The process to set up a personal hotspot depends on the type of phone you have:

On iOS devices, go to Settings, then toggle “Personal Hotspot” on. Once you do, you’ll be given a Wi-Fi password. Other devices will be able to connect to your phone via Wi-Fi and Bluetooth under the name of the phone, and they’ll need this password to access the hotspot.

On Android devices, the process can differ a little depending on your phone’s model. Go to Settings, then look for a menu for networks or connections. On Samsung devices, for example, you’ll need to navigate to “Connections,” then “Mobile Hotspot and Tethering.” On Google Pixels, you must go to “Network & Internet,” then “Hotspot & Tethering.” After turning the hotspot on, you’ll be given a Wi-Fi password. Other devices will be able to connect to the hotspot by selecting your device name and entering this password.

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To keep unauthorized individuals from accessing your hotspot, you’ll need to follow a couple of security best practices:

Be sure to change your hotspot’s SSID and password! The above instructions allow you to start a hotspot with your phone’s default settings, but these are not ideal for security. Hackers can use tools to automatically detect and attempt to enter networks with common SSIDs. You can customize your hotspot’s name and password to help prevent this.

Take a moment to enable WPA2 encryption in your settings, if it is not enabled by default. This will “scramble” any data sent or received from devices on the network, protecting that information from potential fraudsters.

Keep in mind that your ability to set up and use a Wi-Fi hotspot effectively will depend on your service plan — particularly in regard to data allowance. Some carriers may require an additional fee each month for the ability to create mobile hotspots. Further, if you only have a few gigabytes of data each month, you’ll find that creating a Wi-Fi hotspot for multiple devices to use may drain your data allotment fairly quickly. On the other hand, if you have an unlimited plan, you’ll be able to stream and download videos, music, and games much more freely with a variety of devices.

A final limitation of Wi-Fi hotspots to consider is that they can increase your phone’s battery consumption. For this reason, it’s smart to have a battery or charger handy for prolonged hotspot use. If there is an area where you’ll be regularly using this function, consider plugging in a wireless charger at that location as a matter of convenience.

Buy a portable router.

Whether your phone is not hotspot-enabled or your data plan is not sufficient for your needs, an alternative is to purchase a portable router. These generally allow up to 10 devices to access the internet. Like your smartphone, these require inserting a SIM card for connectivity. While using a portable router will incur an upfront fee and an additional charge for internet access, there are plenty of service providers from which you can rent them — and often at a reasonable rate.

These routers are typically powered by USB, and most models come with an extension cable to plug them in. Just remember that binging on Netflix during your travels can be a serious drain on your battery, so don’t forget to bring a travel adapter! As a plus, many models allow you to plug devices into the router, which can be an effective way of charging your mobile devices on the go.

There are many benefits to using a portable Wi-Fi router. They are substantially more secure than public Wi-Fi. Further, they are highly convenient while traveling. Unless you have a connected car with built-in internet access, a portable router may be necessary. While they may incur some additional costs, they are a great way of getting reliable internet access without savaging your cellular data plan.

Satellite internet.

One option for getting Wi-Fi anywhere is satellite internet. Much like satellite cable on your TV, this involves sending a signal through a modem to a satellite dish, then to an orbiting satellite. The signal is then bounced back to your dish, your modem, and your connected device.

Satellite internet routers are generally not as reliable or fast as a standard Wi-Fi router or broadband, but they can give you internet access in areas without Wi-Fi coverage. Given how satellite internet works, there may be interference with your connection from time to time, and this can result in unexpected latency or outages. Nevertheless, they are an effective way of getting online while traveling without putting a dent into your cellular data.

Visit locations that offer free Wi-Fi.

A variety of community locations and businesses in your area may offer free Wi-Fi. Many businesses (such as hotels and airlines) that offer coupons, special promotions, and loyalty programs may provide free Wi-Fi to consumers under specific circumstances.

These give visitors an added convenience and enable more consumers to take advantage of in-store internet features. Libraries, bookstores, public plazas, McDonald’s and Starbucks franchises — the chances are pretty high that you’ll encounter some free sources of internet access in your day-to-day routine.

This can be a boon to individuals with limited data plans. Understand, however, that your access to public networks may come with some restrictions. Certain websites may be blocked, and the connection speed may not be sufficient for intensive streaming or downloading.

There are also some security concerns with using public Wi-Fi. Unscrupulous individuals can intercept data being transmitted to and from devices connected to public networks, potentially allowing them to glean enough information to commit fraud. Unless you’re using a virtual private network, it’s not advisable to access sensitive information while on a public network.

If you have concerns about mobile pay transmitting your credit card information over a public network, have no fear; most mobile pay platforms use NFC technology, so your information is not being transmitted over any public networks.

Use a hotspot database.

Many apps can help you find hotspots for free Wi-Fi in your area. Some apps have extra features that can help you find them. The Facebook app, for example, has an option for finding nearby Wi-Fi hotspots. Some websites and apps are designed with the sole purpose of providing a database of free Wi-Fi hotspots. A couple of examples are NetSpot and WiFi Map.

Again, be sure to use cybersecurity best practices when accessing free Wi-Fi networks. Be cautious about transmitting personal or financial information while on any network you find on one of these apps.

This content is provided for information purposes only. All information included herein is subject to change without notice. Verizon is not responsible for any direct or indirect damages, arising from or related to use or reliance of the above content.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

Connectivity is an essential part of modern travel. And portable technology makes connectivity possible around the globe. A lot of hotels have limitations in connectivity, and that can be a hassle. So, if you’re a frequent traveler, using your router for a lengthy hotel stay is wise. We will teach you how to connect router to hotel WiFi because it’s better to be prepared than sorry.

Three Ways To Connect A Router To Hotel WiFi

There are several reasons why it’s useful to connect a router to the hotel WiFi:

  • To get better connectivity and increase signal and range- Have you ever wondered why some hotels have slow WiFi? It could be your room location or the number of users. Whatever the reason, a router amplifies the signal and increases the range, so you can have better access.
  • To use WiFi on more than one device- Some hotels allow only one device per room to connect to their WiFi, and nowadays, we don’t travel with one device anymore. A router enables you to connect more than one device because it creates a separate network. Knowing how to connect router to hotel WiFi, makes this possible.
  • Use WiFi credentials only once- Entering your credentials more than once is a hassle. Some hotels require this from you every time you connect to their WiFi, but a router bypasses the process after logging into it once on your phone.

It seems sensible to use a router every time you travel, but there’s one significant downside: You need to have your laptop with you. And unless you’re traveling for work, it may not be practical to carry something so bulky during a supposedly relaxing hotel stay.

If you’ve weighed the advantages and think it’s worth it, here’s how to connect router to hotel WiFi:

Option 1 – Use a WiFi to WiFi router

This type of router needs to connect to an ethernet cable, and it usually comes with antennas. It’s bulky, but the antennas allow better signal amplification. The prompts on other models may vary, but it is generally similar.

  1. Locate your hotel room’s ethernet slot. Most hotels have an ethernet slot by the desk.
  2. Connect the router to the cable and slot.
  3. Switch on your router.
  4. Use your laptop to access the router’s page.
  5. Use an easily recognizable name as your SSID.
  6. Create a password.
  7. Leave other options on default.
  8. Continue to follow prompts and finish.
  9. Connect your devices on your router’s SSID and not the hotel WiFi.

Option 2 – Use a Wireless router and access point

This type of router is small, compact, and charges using a USB cable. You won’t have to bring bulky power cords and cables anymore, but you still need to bring a laptop for configuration. These models have options for hardwiring and wireless access but have internal antennas that are not as effective as external ones.

  1. Switch the mode to AP (access point).
  2. Hardwire the connection using an ethernet cable or go wireless.
  3. Access the router’s page using your laptop.
  4. Follow the prompts for setup.
  5. When you finish setting up, you can keep this attached to your laptop using a USB cable, so it’s powered continuously.

Option 3 – Use a touchscreen router and access point

These routers make everything light and easy. Because it has a touchscreen interface, the setup can be done on the router itself, ridding the need for a laptop. Some models come with a stylus, and some models have external antennas. We prefer this type of router when learning how to connect router to hotel WiFi.

  1. Turn on your touchscreen router.
  2. Scan for the hotel WiFi and connect.
  3. Enter the credential provided by the hotel.
  4. Verify the connection.
  5. Create your own network.
  6. Modify the SSID, so it’s easy for you to remember.
  7. Create a complex password.
  8. Finish the setup.
  9. Connect to your WiFi network by using the router’s SSID and password

What To Look For In A Travel Router

There are many travel routers available. If you haven’t purchased one, here are some things to consider:

  • Your travel router should be small and lightweight so they can fit inside your carry-on.
  • Your travel router should be USB powered, so it’s easy for you to plug it to your laptop or your phone’s adapter.
  • Your travel router should be simple and easy to use.
  • Your travel router should not run on batteries, so you won’t have issues with airline regulations.
  • Your travel router should be able to connect to a WiFi network.

Tips When Using A Router In The Hotel

The steps to connecting a router in the hotel are fairly simple, and the prompts make the setup process even faster. But here are some things to remember when using a router in the hotel.

  • An antenna makes a difference. Compared to routers with internal antennas, routers that have antennas amplify signal better.
  • You will only maximize the WiFi signal that the hotel is giving out. The antennas on your router make the most out of this.
  • It is recommended that you reboot your router before connecting to the hotel WiFi to start configuration on a clean slate.
  • Don’t register your device on the hotel WiFi. Before you jump in and connect to the hotel WiFi, configure your router first, so the hotel identifies your router as the only connecting device in the room.

Tips for finding wi-fi, speeding up your connection and using a smart phone abroad (without sky-high bills).

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Give your guests a high-speed internet connection and add value to your property with hospitality Wi-Fi! Learn more about how to install a network at your hotel or resort.

Introduction to Hospitality Wi-Fi

How do you bring in more business to your hotel? Offer specials on room rates? Add valet parking services? Advertise local discounts for holidays? Wi-Fi can actually be the answer! Wi-Fi networks and connectivity can be one of the most attractive amenities to offer at your property.

Keep reading to learn more about hospitality Wi-Fi, how it works and how to install a network at your hotel.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

What Is Hospitality Wi-Fi?

Hospitality Wi-Fi is a way for you as a property owner or general manager to enhance the offerings at your hotel and for your guests. Connectivity is increasingly important in a word with so many Wi-Fi-enabled devices. From virtual assistants to Wi-Fi-connected TVs, if your rooms offer a multitude of devices with connectivity needs, Wi-Fi is an essential. Having Wi-Fi at your hotel is a simple but effective way to give your guests the convenience of connectivity while adding value to your property.

How Is Wi-Fi for Hotels Different Than Home Wi-Fi?

One of the key differences between the Wi-Fi you use at home and the Wi-Fi you use at a hotel is its usability. Even if your household has multiple streaming devices connected to the internet at the same time, a home Wi-Fi network is meant to support the needs of fewer people than a network at a hotel.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devicesAt home, you might just have one modem and one router to provide coverage for your entire home. That local area network connects you to the internet, but you’re most likely getting your internet from a service provider (ISP). If you live in an apartment building or other multi-dwelling unit, you may share a network with your neighbors if your landlord provides Wi-Fi for you. In the case of multi-dwelling unit Wi-Fi, you still have your own local network for your devices separate from your neighbor’s.

A hotel or any multi-dwelling unit with Wi-Fi will need a network that can support the needs of hundreds or potentially thousands of people. This is especially true if your property hosts conventions or other public events. If you have a large resort that needs to support a multitude of staff and guests, you want a network that provides coverage throughout your entire property. Each building should have the same high-speed, secure coverage.

Parts of a Wireless Network

A wireless network relies on both software and equipment in order to work properly. With a large property, you may need to think where the access points will be for guests who’d like to connect to the internet. Here are a few terms you should know to understand the different parts of a wireless network.

Posted on March 30th, 2021 by Kirk McElhearn

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

If you travel regularly with your Mac or iOS device, you likely find yourself connecting to new Wi-Fi networks: at airports, in train stations, in hotels, restaurants, pubs, or at clients’ offices. Whether you connect to these networks with your Mac, iPhone, or iPad, miraculously, your devices will remember these networks and sync them via iCloud — so your other Apple products can access them too, if you use iCloud Keychain.

Your Apple device’s ability to remember previously connected to networks can be both good and bad. While it means you don’t have to search for or remember login credentials when you connect to a known Wi-Fi network on a different device, it can lead to a surfeit of Wi-Fi networks stored in your keychain and potentially allow you to unknowingly connect to a Wi-Fi network that might not be secure. You can cull these Wi-Fi networks, but you can only really clean them out on a Mac.

In this article, I’ll show you how to remove these Wi-Fi networks so your Macs and iOS devices forget them.

How to Remove Wi-Fi Networks from iPhone or iPad

You can remove wi-fi networks on an iPhone or an iPad, but only if you are near enough to those networks for your device to detect them. If you go to Settings > Wi-Fi, you’ll see some available wi-fi networks. Tap the i button next to a network that you have previously joined, then tap Forget this Network. The device will remove that network.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

If you want to remove all saved wi-fi networks on your iOS device, there is a nuclear option. If you tap Settings > General > Reset > Reset Network Settings, the iOS device deletes all your Wi-Fi networks and passwords, along with other network settings. However, this does not carry over to iCloud Keychain if you are using it, and the only way to fully delete these saved networks is on a Mac.

How to View and Remove Saved Wi-Fi Networks via Network Preferences

There are two ways you can view (and remove) saved Wi-Fi networks on a Mac. The first way is in the Mac’s Network preferences.

To do this, open System Preferences, and then click Network. Select Wi-Fi in the sidebar, and then click Advanced. In the Wi-Fi tab, you will see a list of networks.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

This list is mainly there so you can choose an order of preference for joining networks. You can drag the networks in the list so the preferred networks are at the top, but you can also delete networks by selecting it and then clicking the ‘‘ (minus) button.

When you do this, your iCloud Keychain will update, and they will be eventually removed from all your devices that sync to the same iCloud account.

In some cases, you may not be able to remove Wi-Fi networks from the Network preferences, but you will be able to delete them from Keychain Access (see below for the second method to remove Wi-Fi networks).

From the image above, note the checkbox in the pane that lets you “Remember networks this computer has joined.” If you don’t want a Wi-Fi network to be saved to your Mac, and subsequently to iCloud Keychain, uncheck this setting.

How to View and Remove Saved Wi-Fi Networks via Keychain Access

The second way to remove saved networks is via Keychain Access. This app is located in the Utilities folder in your Applications folder, and it stores passwords, certificates, encryption/decryption keys, secure notes and more. One of the items it stores as “passwords” is the credentials you use to log into Wi-Fi networks; specifically, they are recorded as “AirPort network password.”

To find these, click the search box at the top right of your Keychain Access window and type “AirPort.” You’ll see a number of items, and the Kind column shows them as AirPort base station password, AirPort Disk password, and AirPort network password. (You may not have items in all three categories.) The latter are your Wi-Fi network credentials.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

Interestingly, when I look at my AirPort network passwords, I see many of those that are in the Network preferences, but not all. And some show as being in the iCloud keychain, while others are in the System keychain, even though they sync to and from my other devices. (For example, some of the networks I see on my Mac are those that I only connected to with my iPhone.) To delete any of these networks, click them, then press Delete, and click Delete in the confirmation dialog.

Note that any changes you make on your Mac will take time to propagate to other Macs, and to iOS devices.

It’s a good idea to go through these networks from time to time. You may have connected to a network when you were traveling and not want to automatically connect to it again. Clearing out these networks will also prevent your Mac from automatically connecting to networks masquerading as legitimate, since the only identifying information for a Wi-Fi network is its SSID (or the name you see) and anyone can use the same network name, potentially leading you to connect to an insecure network.

How can I learn more?

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devicesEach week on the Intego Mac Podcast, Intego’s Mac security experts discuss the latest Apple news, security and privacy stories, and offer practical advice on getting the most out of your Apple devices. Be sure to follow the podcast to make sure you don’t miss any episodes.

You can also subscribe to our e-mail newsletter and keep an eye here on Mac Security Blog for the latest Apple security and privacy news. And don’t forget to follow Intego on your favorite social media channels: Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and YouTube.

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I am at a hotel for an extended period of time. Every time I connect to the hotel wifi then try to connect my Roku it automatically disconnects the wifi. I’ve tried on my phone and computer. How can I be connected to both at the same time?

Can’t connect to network

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How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

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Some hotels won’t allow more than one connection from the same guest. All depends on the hotel.

I stayed at a hotel for four months several years ago for a work project. What I did was use a Windows PC with a wired and wireless network connection. I connected it to the hotel wireless, then shared that connection using Windows Internet Connection sharing. I connected a router that I had configured as a wireless access point, and used that to connect all my remaining devices. This included a Roku Stick and Ultra, a Roku TV, my phone, iPad and computer (work and personal). The hotel only saw a single connection, and my devices could all see each other on my private wireless network. A bit technical to set up, but worked fabulously for the four months I was there.

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Some hotels won’t allow more than one connection from the same guest. All depends on the hotel.

I stayed at a hotel for four months several years ago for a work project. What I did was use a Windows PC with a wired and wireless network connection. I connected it to the hotel wireless, then shared that connection using Windows Internet Connection sharing. I connected a router that I had configured as a wireless access point, and used that to connect all my remaining devices. This included a Roku Stick and Ultra, a Roku TV, my phone, iPad and computer (work and personal). The hotel only saw a single connection, and my devices could all see each other on my private wireless network. A bit technical to set up, but worked fabulously for the four months I was there.

Roku Community Streaming Expert

Help others find this answer and click “Accept as Solution.”
If you appreciate my answer, maybe give me a Kudo.

I am not a Roku employee, just another user.

  • Mark as New
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I am at a hotel for an extended period of time. Every time I connect to the hotel wifi then try to connect my Roku it automatically disconnects the wifi. I’ve tried on my phone and computer. How can I be connected to both at the same time?

Make sure your roku has the dorm/hotel function. I know the Express and Ultra do. To connect, try to get on the wifi signal you want and it should ask you if you’re in a hotel or dorm. Click yes and it’ll show a new wifi signal with “direct-roku” in the name. You take your phone or computer and get it on the direct roku wifi and enter the password on the screen.

The hotel’s login page should open and you sign in like normal from your phone. If the page doesn’t refresh and show you’re connected (or the roku show it’s connected), open Google or anything that uses internet and it should force that page to come up. If it doesn’t work, hit the back button to go back to the sign in page and try again. I have to restart my phone and roku when it’s bad, and I often have to try many times. The roku will then be on hotel wifi. Hotspot is much easier.

Another option: Most hotels only let you have 1 device on wifi at a time and there’s a way around it. Get a wifi extender and you set it up to connect to the hotel wifi and set your own password. Then all of your other devices can use the extended wifi signal you created with your password.

If you can’t access the hotel’s router, many extenders and travel routers can’t be set up. I tried 3 before getting one to work, the Rockspace AC1200 wifi extender. It’s about the size of a cell phone but thicker and has 2 antennas and plugs into the wall outlet. You set it up with their app or by typing in a wifi address they give you.

Tip- the password you choose must be the one you use for the hotel or it won’t work. The hotel will only see 1 device online and it’s another layer of protection.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

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There are countless benefits to having access to the Internet on the go. Whether you’re looking for internet for laptop on the go, or Internet on the go in general, users are able to stay connected so they never miss an important conversation, a favorite TV show or that “had to see it to believe it” sports moment. Internet on the go makes it easier than ever to stream live TV, movies and TV shows as well as video chat with friends, play online games, send emails, post photos and more. By using WiFi, hotspots, and 4G or 5G connections, individuals can connect to the Internet from almost anywhere. Read on to learn more about the convenience of staying connected with Internet while on the go.

How Hotspots and WiFi Work

Hotspots are sites that offer an Internet connection (or, Internet access) over a wireless local area network (WLAN) by way of a router that then connects to an Internet service provider. Hotspots can be found at many coffee shops, universities, libraries, airports, restaurants, hotels, hospitals, department stores, campgrounds and other public locations. Also known as “WiFi hotspots,” these sites primarily utilize WiFi technology, which allows electronic devices to connect to the Internet or exchange data wirelessly through radio waves (so you can browse your favorite site, catch up on work, and more on the go).

Types of Hotspots

Hotspots can be phone-based or free-standing, commercial or free to the public. The total number of global hotspots is expected to increase every year. The phone-based option—known as a “mobile hotspot”—is a compact 4G LTE or 5G wireless router on one’s mobile device that can connect any WiFi-enabled device within approximately 30 feet. Wireless Internet hotspots let users connect any WiFi enabled device to the cellular network of their choice. These particular hotspots work without any wires because they are connected via 4G LTE (or soon, 5G) coverage. Mobile hotspots are fittingly designed to be used while individuals are traveling away from their home or office.

Users can either turn their mobile phones into WiFi on the go hotspots or can alternately use dedicated free-standing options. Free hotspots are created when owners of wireless routers turn off their authentication requirements. By opening up their connection to anyone in range, they have successfully created a free WiFi hotspot. Commercial hotspots require users to sign in through a login screen that redirects to an authentication page and in some cases may require payment.

Access to Over 8,000,000 WiFi Hotspots Nationwide

Xfinity WiFi has the fastest hotspots with the most coverage on the go, even if you’re away from your home WiFi network. These benefits are included with Xfinity Internet service at no extra cost. A compatible WiFi-enabled laptop or mobile device is required to access Xfinity WiFi. Internet customers can stay connected with access to over 8,000,000+ hotspot locations around the country.

To enjoy the benefits of Xfinity WiFi, use your WiFi device to search for “Xfinity WiFi” or “Cable WiFi®” in your list of available networks. Sign in using your Comcast Xfinity ID and password. You only need to sign in one time, because Xfinity WiFi will automatically remember your device. Download the Xfinity WiFi App to your smart phone (like your iPhone) or tablet so you can easily locate thousands of Xfinity WiFi hotspots in cities across the country, including Washington D.C., Philadelphia, Boston, Chicago and New York City. This app also provides directions to WiFi hotspots near you and creates a list of your favorite hotspot locations.

Whether you are a frequent or casual Internet user, or simply looking for wireless internet service for your laptop on the go, you will want to utilize a service that includes offers a reliably fast WiFi connection and hotspots. There’s no need to purchase separate wireless coverage for every device in your home when Comcast offers a comprehensive service with Xfinity Internet.

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Whenever I travel I always hate paying for WiFi in my hotel room. It always seems to be free in the cheap hostels and more expensive in nicer places ( I guess they think we can afford it). What really gets me is when the hotel wants you to pay for every device you connect. This means you have to pick between your smart phone, laptop, tablet (if you happen to carry all 3), and your traveling partners gear as well. Why can’t one WiFi password just connect all of your devices. It is not too much to ask.

Luckily there is a way to turn your laptop into a Wifi Hotspot which will save you money.

Here is what you need:

  • Laptop with ethernet port (this kills me with my MacBook Air)
  • A hotel room with an ethernet port (most hotels that charge this fee tend to have this connection)

You will be using your laptop’s wireless card to send, rather than receive, the internet signal. This is easy to set for Mac and PC users.

Mac Directions:

  • Go to System Preferences
  • Go to “Sharing”
  • Check “Internet Sharing” on the left and select how you will connect which is most likely “Ethernet” on the right

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

Be sure to set a password for the WiFi if you don’t want anyone leaching off your newly created hotspot. Click the “WiFi” button to set this up as well.

PC Directions:

This can be done using Windows 7, Vista, and XP. Windows 7 is the easiest way to set-up but XP only requires a few more steps. First, make sure you are not connected to a network before you begin.

  • Go to Network and Sharing Center in the Control Panel
  • Find “Set-up a new connection or network”
  • Create a new ad hoc wireless network when the wizard automatically pops up
  • Give your network a name and choose the security options
  • Choose a good size key for WPA2
  • On the next page be sure to “Save this network”

You will now notice that the ad hoc network is on the list of quick-select WiFi networks. When you disconnect from it, it will stop and when you reconnect it will start again.

Now you need to enable the connection sharing through your network card which allows other devices to connect to your newly created network.

Go to Network and Sharing Center again and click on “Change adapter settings” link. Find the newly created network from the list and select “Allow other network users to connect through this computer’s Internet connection” and “Allow other network users to control or disable the shared Internet connection.”

Now you should be able to connect any wireless device to your new ad hoc network.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

What is an Access Point? An access point is a wireless network device that acts as a portal for devices to connect to a local area network. Access points are used for extending the wireless coverage of an existing network and for increasing the number of users that can connect to it.
A high-speed Ethernet cable runs from a router to an access point, which transforms the wired signal into a wireless one. Wireless connectivity is typically the only available option for access points, establishing links with end-devices using Wi-Fi.

Other Functions. Other than providing a platform for various devices to communicate amongst each other, routers also have firewall and password protection functionality. This ensures that the connected wireless devices are protected against any threats that may arise from outside of the local area network.

Main Differences. The router acts as a hub that sets up a local area network and manages all of the devices and communication in it. An access point, on the other hand, is a sub-device within the local area network that provides another location for devices to connect from and enables more devices to be on the network.
Wireless routers can function as access points, but not all access points can work as routers. While routers manage local area networks, communicate with outside network systems, acquire, distribute, and dispatch data in multiple directions, establish a point of connectivity, and ensure security, access points typically only provide access to the router’s established network.

Which is Better? The answer to the question which one is better? is that it depends on the needs. For homes and small business, routers may be the optimum (if not the best) solution, while medium to large enterprises and organizations will certainly require a network of access points and switches.

Access Points in Action. A few years ago, LigoWave devices were deployed by Enter Srl., a leading professional software solutions company and Internet services provider in Italy, for the purpose of setting up Internet access using access points at Festival ICT–B2B. The annual event brings in more than 15,000 tech enthusiasts and professionals from Italy and abroad.
It was estimated that more than 20,000 devices might need a steady and reliable Internet connection during the event. What is more, limited channel availability and RF-intense environments posed a challenge to setting up an effective network of access points that would be capable of providing a quality service to large amounts of people.

Hotel WiFi is on the same infrastructure as we use in the office and one in-home, with asking you for a password to access the internet. Hotel WiFi is used by multiple people at the same time who come to use hotel rooms for only instant time.

Thus having connected to Hotel Wi-Fi is not that secure than any other public Wi-Fi, one single name Wi-Fi is installed with multiple access points so that customers in Hotel do get good bandwidth.

Most of the time Hotel Wi-Fi is provided without a password, so that management doesn’t need to reset the password or provide one to the customer every time.

To get connected to Hotel WiFi, you need to perform some basic steps. Make sure you follow these steps to get the WiFi connection to your device in the Hotel you are renting.

How to Login to Hotel Wi-Fi

  • Go to your device setting > Turn off the 3rd party DNS server (This setting should be disabled while connecting to Hotel Wi-Fi)
  • Open the Router Default page and provide login details
  • Open a non-HTTPS site in incognito mode
  • Create a New Network Location from the Wi-Fi Settings
  • Restart the Wi-Fi by turn it on & Off
  • That’s it, You will now be able to connect to Hotel Wi-Fi and it is better to clear your browser cache to connect to the open network directly from your Wi-Fi page.

Can Hotel See, Which website do you visit?

Yes, the Hotel does use a special kind of software to track the logs of every customer while using the Hotel WiFi, thus every customer who uses the Hotel Wi-Fi does get a record of the log file of what they are using their network.

Why is a Hotel Wi-Fi Bad?

Usually, the Hotel Wi-Fi is bad in speed, as there are multiple users using the open network, Hotels don’t include much hardware and specification in their equipment, so the connectivity of Hotel WiFi is always weak, Hotel Wi-Fi is also not secure, as anyone can hack into your device with a Wi-Fi connection.

Can I use a Wi-Fi booster in a Hotel Wi-Fi?

If your PC doesn’t support wireless connection, then you use a wired LAN connection, and else you can find any repeats that can be placed between the hotel wireless system and your room so that you can connect to your device to enjoy the internet.

Is Hotel Wi-Fi Private?

No, mostly the Hotel Wi-Fi is completely open and does require your room number or any easy code to access the internet data, and this leak in encryption is always vulnerable to spoofing from others sharing your network, and thus to provide an open network for the customers, hotels do give an open network rather than private.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

When it comes to travelling, a safe data connection is essential. While you can generally depend on your mobile phone carrier’s service to be safe from prying eyes, the same can’t be said for a hotel, or even a relative’s home connection. The odds of these places being compromised by hackers or malware are generally pretty low, but there’s no reason to take chances if you’re handling sensitive personal data.

But you still want to stay connected on the go, especially if you’ve brought along a tablet or laptop. You’ve got a couple of choices for the sake of safety: using a VPN service, or connecting to your phone’s mobile connection wirelessly. Both have advantages and drawbacks.

VPN: The secure option

A virtual private network, usually shortened to VPN, is like a tunnel that goes through another tunnel. VPNs offer an encrypted connection to a remote server, which handles all of the data going to and from your computer or phone. This lets it keep any other traffic or users away from your data, even if you’re using an unfamiliar (or unsecured) connection. VPNs can be used on laptops, desktops, smartphones, and tablets, running just about any operating system.

Buying access to a VPN requires a small fee, usually under $15 for a single month or significantly less for longer-term subscriptions. While there are free choices, they tend to lack advanced security, and sometimes sell your data in aggregate to third parties. Well-established paid options are the way to go if you’re concerned about security.

To use a VPN, first connect to the local network (like a hotel’s Wi-Fi or a direct connection via Ethernet), then start and activate the VPN program. This creates a secure connection within the local network and wider internet. Once the VPN is running, you can use the internet just like you do at home to browse any site, including those that have access to your personal information.

Park Terrace Hotel Wireless Network Terms of Use

THESE TERMS GOVERN YOUR USE OF THE PARK TERRACE HOTEL WIRELESS NETWORK (“WIRELESS NETWORK”).

BY CLICKING THE “AGREE” BUTTON OR USING THE WIRELESS NETWORK, YOU AGREE TO BE BOUND BY THESE TERMS OF USE (“TERMS”). IF YOU DO NOT AGREE TO BE BOUND BY THESE TERMS, DO NOT USE THE WIRELESS NETWORK.

The Wireless Network is the property of the Park Terrace Hotel. Only Park Terrace Hotel guests and meeting attendees are authorized to access the Wireless Network. The Wireless Network may not be used by Park Terrace Hotel personnel to conduct Park Terrace Hotel business. By accessing the Wireless Network, you are responsible for the activity and conduct of anyone that you permit to use the Wireless Network, such as through a computer or mobile device connected to the Wireless Network. If you are a parent or legal guardian of a minor who accesses the Wireless Network, you agree to these Terms on behalf of the minor, and agree to supervise the minor’s use of the Wireless Network.

You acknowledge and agree that we may monitor your access to, and use of, the Wireless Network without further notice and authorize others to do so. Monitoring may be performed to the extent that the Park Terrace Hotel deems such monitoring appropriate to ensure compliance with company policies and procedures or legal requirements, and to protect the rights of the Park Terrace Hotel or the public. Such monitoring may also include intercepting, reviewing, analyzing, copying and retaining any materials or communications transmitted though the Wireless Network. Please see the Park Terrace Hotel Privacy Notice for further information on how we process your personal information.

The Park Terrace Hotel may, at its sole discretion, suspend or terminate your access to the Wireless Network at any time, for any reason without notice.

Persons are prohibited from using the Wireless Network to:

  • Engage in any activity that is illegal, tortious, fraudulent or deceptive;
  • Harm or attempt to harm any person or property;
  • Access or transmit any material that is offensive, indecent, defamatory, abusive or objectionable (in the sole judgment of the Park Terrace Hotel);
  • Transmit junk mail, spam or similar content;
  • Infringe, misappropriate or violate the intellectual property rights of any person or third party;
  • Breach the security or otherwise obtain access improperly or illegally to any network or service (for instance, through hacking, cracking or spoofing);
  • Spread viruses, malware or other similar harmful content;
  • Modify, adapt or reverse engineer any portion of the Wireless Network;
  • Monitor data transmissions or communications of other persons sent through the Wireless Network;
  • Transmit content that falsely claims or implies that the content originates from, is sponsored by, or endorsed by the Park Terrace Hotel;
  • Promote illegal or harmful activities or discrimination and/or harassment against any individual or group;
  • Connect a device (such as a router or repeater) that makes the Wireless Network available to devices other than the one that connects directly to the Wireless Network;
  • Transmit sensitive information over the Wireless Network (including, without limitation, financial information and passwords).

The Wireless Network may not be not secured or encrypted, and is provided on an “as is” basis, without warranties or assurances of any kind. The Park Terrace Hotel disclaims all warranties, express or implied, including warranties of fitness for a particular purpose, merchantability, quiet enjoyment, system integration, and freedom from computer virus. The Park Terrace Hotel is under no obligation to offer technical assistance in connection with the Wireless Network. Your use of this Wireless Network is at your own risk.

To the fullest extent permitted by applicable law, in no event shall the Park Terrace Hotel, its parent entities, subsidiaries, and affiliates (including, without limitation, Shared Mutual Services, LLC), and their respective employees, officers, managers, partners, members, shareholders, directors, agents, representatives, contractors and service providers (collectively, the “Hotel Parties”) assume any responsibility for your use of the Wireless Network and any material transmitted through the Wireless Network or be liable to you or any other person for any loss or damages of any kind (including, without limitation, indirect, incidental, special, consequential, punitive, or exemplary damages), arising out of or in connection with your use of the Wireless Network (including, without limitation, any loss of profits, goodwill, data, or other intangibles; any interruption or slowdown of the device used to access the Wireless Network; any damage to a device used to access the Wireless Network; any unauthorized access to any device, service, information, or communications contained on or accessible by or through the device used to access the Wireless Network; costs of procurement of a replacement device, software, or service; or the loss or corruption of any data).

You agree to indemnify, defend and hold harmless the Hotel Parties from and against any and all claims, damages, liabilities and costs (including attorneys’ fees) that directly or indirectly arise from your breach of these Terms, your use of the Wireless Network (including information or material transmitted through your device when connected to the Wireless Network), and your violation of any law.

The Park Terrace Hotel, in its sole discretion, may modify or change these Terms at any time. Your continued use after posting of changes to the Terms shall constitute your acceptance of the new Terms.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

Back when hotels offered business travelers wired Ethernet access in rooms, travelers could simply connect a standard travel router for reliable and secure Wi-Fi access. Finding an Ethernet jack in a modern hotel is now a fairly rare occurrence, and many business travelers only have the option to use Wi-Fi provided by the hotel.

A pain point for a business traveler carrying multiple devices is going through the process of sign-in, entering a password, and accepting the terms of service agreement every 24 hours for each device using Wi-Fi. More importantly, security-aware business travelers can never be sure how safe hotel Wi-Fi really is for their data.

Solution: NETGEAR Trek N300 Travel Router

The NETGEAR Trek N300 Travel Router allows you to connect to a hotel Wi-Fi network and share that Wi-Fi connection with other devices and guests. It essentially acts as its own secure Wi-Fi hotspot. It is inexpensive and compact, easily fitting inside a laptop case or carryall.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

How It Works

Business travelers will want to unbox the Trek N300 at work or at home. Initial setup involves going online and entering a manufacturer code to set up the unique administrator password that will protect your Wi-Fi network. Instructions for this are stuck to the side of device.

The Trek powers up with an AC cable or USB connection into a powered device should a wall outlet be unavailable. Note that a multi-port high-speed desktop USB charger (Anker makes a good one) is a good companion for any business traveler.

Power up the Trek N300 and simply connect to it from whichever device you prefer to use for browser-based configuration. Do this by entering the address of the Trek N300 that is provided with the device. Enter the administrator password as determined in the initial setup, and you will see a list of public Wi-Fi networks appear. Choose the one for the hotel and log on.

Once connected, you will see the universal NETGEAR Genie pop up to configure the network.

How to share a hotel’s single wi-fi connection with all your devices

Now simply log on the Trek N300 network with your other devices. This will get around device limitations hotels sometimes have, and alleviate having to sign in each day with every device that accesses the Wi-Fi.

The internal firewall built into the Trek N300 provides business users an extra layer of security that gives them assurance that their data and network is protected from outside intrusions.

The Trek N300 has additional uses. It can work as a traditional travel router when there is a live Ethernet cable present. It can be also used as a network range extender for a home network.

Video: Trek N300 for a streamlined and secure hotel Wi-Fi network.