Categories
Self-organization

How does wireless fast charging work

Most major phone releases nowadays come with improved charging speeds. How do fast chargers work, and how are they getting even faster? Find out here.

The Rise of Fast Charging

Nearly every recent flagship phone on the market offers some type of fast charging. Manufacturers often throw out numbers like “80% in 30 minutes” or “a full charge in under an hour” in the marketing of their latest devices.

The widespread adoption of fast charging is a response to increasing phone usage, with many people having to recharge their phones more than once per day. It’s also a necessity. As phone sizes are getting bigger each year, they need bigger batteries to keep up with the added power consumption. Without fast charging, we’d have to wait hours for our phones to top up.

At the most basic level, fast charging is simply increasing the number of watts (W) that are delivered to a phone’s battery. A basic USB port sends 2.5W to the connected device, and faster chargers raise this amount. Current-generation devices typically have 15W power bricks right out of the box. Some manufacturers have 50W, 80W, and 100W chargers available.

For the end user, it’s as simple as using a compatible fast-charger for their phone. However, for manufacturers, it’s not as straightforward as using a higher-watt power brick.

The Fast Charging Process

Before we go further, you should take note of a simple formula. Wattage, or power, is computed as a result of current (A, or amperes) multiplied by voltage (V, or volts). Current is the amount of electric current being transported, while voltage is the force that drives this current forward. Therefore, 3A/5V charging will deliver 15W of power.

One thing you’ll notice is that many manufacturers tout their ability to do a quick partial charge, such as being able to charge 50-80% of the battery within half an hour. This is because of the way that the rechargeable lithium-ion battery inside phones receives power. If you’ve ever monitored the way that a battery is filled up, you’ll notice that the speed of charging gets progressively slower over time.

The charging process can be divided into three parts. Take a look at the “Figure 1: Charge stages of lithium-ion” chart in this article by Battery University for more technical details. Briefly, here’s what it shows:

  • Stage 1 – Constant Current: Voltage increases towards its peak, while current stays constant at a high level. This is the phase where a lot of power is quickly delivered to the device.
  • Stage 2 – Saturation: This is the phase where the voltage has reached its peak and current drops down.
  • Stage 3 – Trickle/Topping: The battery is fully charged. In this phase, the power will either slowly trickle in, or will periodically charge a low “topping” amount as the phone consumes battery.

The amount of power and length of each process depends on the fast-charging standard. A standard is an established charging process that corresponds to a particular device, charger, and power output. Different manufacturers develop various charging standards that are capable of varying outputs and charge times.

Fast-Charging Standards

Here are the various fast-charging standards that have been implemented in mobile phones:

  • USB Power Delivery: Every mobile phone has a charging cable that uses USB—even the Lightning cables for Apple’s iPhones have a USB connection on the other end. USB 2.0, which has been a common specification for two decades, has a maximum power output of 2.5W. Because there’s a requirement for USB ports to deliver more power, the USB-PD standard was created. USB-PD has a maximum output of 100W and is used for a wide array of devices, including most flagship mobile phones. All USB 4 devices will include USB-PD technology, which will hopefully help standardize this.
  • Qualcomm Quick Charge: Qualcomm is the most widely used chipset for flagship Android devices, and their latest processors have built-in compatibility with their proprietary Quick Charge standard. The newest Quick Charge 4+ has a max power output of 100W.
  • Samsung Adaptive Fast Charging: This standard is used by Samsung devices, particularly their Galaxy line. This standard has a maximum power output of 18W and automatically changes charging speeds to preserve the battery’s longevity.
  • OnePlus Warp Charging:OnePlus uses the proprietary Warp Charging standard, which charges their devices up to 30W. Instead of increasing voltage like most other standards, Unlike other options on this list, full-speed 30W charging is also available.
  • Oppo Super VOOC Charging: Oppo uses a proprietary standard that charges their devices up to 50W.

Most companies that don’t have their own charging technology use USB-PD or Qualcomm Quick Charge, or adapt it to their specific device. Companies like Apple, LG, Samsung, and Google use these standards for their flagship phones.

Most of these solutions raise charging speeds by increasing the voltage of their adaptors. The outlier is Oppo and OnePlus’ solutions, which significantly increase the current rather than the voltage. Fast-charging with these devices requires the use of their proprietary cables.

The Future of Charging

Charging technology is continuously getting better and better, as manufacturers continue to raise charging speeds. In the next few years, more companies will experiment with charging technology, and new standards will emerge in the industry. However, it’s likely that most of these standards will still use USB-PD as their backbone.

There’s also the emergence of wireless fast charging. Transmitting large amounts of power wirelessly can become dangerous without proper thermal management. Wireless charging is still significantly slower than wired because technology companies are still figuring out how to manage the heat. That’s why companies like OnePlus have released 30W wireless charges that have large fans to provide sufficient airflow.

@vannvicente
October 8, 2020, 8:00am EDT

As more devices adopt wireless charging, how much will the technology improve? Here’s how wireless fast charging works, and how it’ll likely become even faster in the future.

How Wireless Charging Works

Many of the most popular electronic gadgets today—from high-end mobile phones to wireless earbuds—feature wireless charging. Apple, Samsung, and LG have implemented this feature across a wide range of their devices.

Wireless charging allows people to place their device on a pad that’s plugged into the wall, and then it just starts charging—no cables necessary.

How does wireless fast charging workSamsung

Most modern wireless chargers use a process called magnetic induction. This involves transforming magnetic energy from the charging pad to electrical power via a coil inside the device. This energy is then used to charge the battery. This is also why more devices are being made of glass instead of metal—glass is much more advantageous for induction.

Wireless is one of the most standardized forms of charging. Unlike wired chargers, which require a variety of standards and connectors, most wireless-charging devices use the Qi standard established by the Wireless Power Consortium (WPC). This means a single standard charging pad will work with both an Apple Airpods case and a Galaxy Note.

Speeding Up Wireless Charging Delivery

Fast charging works by increasing the number of watts delivered to a phone’s battery. However, this has to work both ways. Manufacturers also have to design their receiving devices to handle fast charging. Plus, accessory manufacturers have to increase the potential output of their chargers or transmitters.

In the past, wireless charging was slow, clunky, and offered little flexibility when it came to positioning. The earliest iterations could only charge 5 watts or less, which was significantly less than wired charging.

Now, regular wireless chargers using the Qi standard can charge up to 15 watts on compatible devices. This faster charging speed is called the Extended Power Profile (EPP).

Wireless charging uses a method similar to wired for power delivery. This involves powering a device at full speed, and then scaling back toward the end of the charging cycle.

It follows this process:

  • Detection: The transmitter detects if a Qi-compatible device is on top of it.
  • Full power: If the receiver is on the latest version of Qi, it will obtain up to 15 watts of power from the compatible transmitter.
  • Heat detection: Transmitters have a thermal test, which allows them to detect if a device is getting hot. If it is, the transmitter will slow its power output.
  • Completion: When the battery in the receiver is full, the Qi pad stops charging the device.

This process ensures the safety of your devices and prevents them from getting too hot or their batteries from being damaged. It also ensures a device won’t be overcharged from the transmitter, so you can safely leave your phone on a charging pad overnight.

Customized Wireless Standards

The base Qi standard was last updated in 2015, which brought the EPP and improved heat sensitivity. Since then, the EPP Power Class 0 was released, which enables transmitters to provide power up to 30 watts, depending on the receiving device.

While this charging speed hasn’t been standardized across the board, many manufacturers have implemented modified versions of the Qi EPP standard capable of delivering higher speeds. One such company is OnePlus, which released a 30-watt Wireless Warp Charger with its flagship 8 Pro. The company claims it can support charging a device to 50% in just 29 minutes.

The charging pad also has a built-in fan that allows it to achieve higher charging speeds, as well as protections for overvoltages and overcurrents. However, it’s only compatible with specific OnePlus devices. Other companies, like Xiaomi, have also released 30-watt Qi wireless chargers.

The Future of Wireless Charging

Wireless charging will only continue to get faster. The WPC has already teased its next step will be a 60-watt wireless charging standard. This speed would be comparable to, or even higher than, many manufacturers’ wired charging speeds today.

As transmitters continue to increase in power output, they’ll also be able to charge a wider range of devices. In addition to the rising speeds to charge mobile phones, this means electronics with significantly larger batteries, like laptops, will also be Qi-compatible in the future.

Wireless charging is getting increasingly popular and more and more branches are realizing its potential and value. It is the future and answers to the fast growing demand for power and being able to charge everywhere. As the demand for non-stop power grows, so does the demand for charging mobile devices faster and faster.

How does wireless fast charging work

Before getting deeper into fast wireless charging, you may want to review how wireless charging works . Also, please keep in mind that when ‘charging’ is mentioned, this refers to ‘wireless charging’.

As a wireless charging expert, we would like to explain more about fast wireless charging. What is fast charging? Does your phone support fast charging? What is Samsung Fast Charge and Apple Fast Charge? What kind of adapter do you need to use fast charging?

What is fast wireless charging?

Fast charging basically charges the battery faster by increasing the charging power resulting in shorter charging times. In order to use fast charging, you need a:

  • Mobile device that supports fast wireless charging
  • Wireless charger that supports fast charge with an adapter that can deliver the required power

For example, the Apple iPhone X supports both normal (wireless) charging and fast wireless charging. To quickly charge this phone, you need a wireless charger with Apple Fast Charge . Wireless chargers with fast charge also work with mobile devices that do not support fast charge and the other way around. The mobile device is then charged at its normal charging speed.

How does fast wireless charging work?

With fast charging, the charger transfers more energy to your phone while charging. Transferring more energy means it takes less time to charge your phone. This is especially effective when your battery is almost empty. The charging speed decreases slightly as your battery gets fuller to protect your device. Therefore, fast charging is mainly suitable to quickly charge an almost empty battery so you can go some additional hours with power.

How much faster will my battery charge?

Fast charging is faster than normal charging . It is difficult to say exactly how much faster as it depends on several factors, such as the state of charge of your battery, the manufacturer or temperature.

Do you want to charge your phone as fast as possible? Make sure you place your phone in the middle of the wireless charger and plug the charger into the wall outlet rather than a USB port.

Samsung Fast Charge and Apple Fast Charge

Samsung and Apple use different methods for fast charging. Consequently, a Samsung fast charger works with a Samsung device, but it may not always work with an Apple iPhone or vice versa. Therefore, it is important to check if a wireless charger supports Samsung Fast Charge or Apple Fast Charge. ZENS has developed wireless chargers that support both Apple and Samsung Fast Charge .

Will fast charging damage your device?

Similar to normal charging , fast charging is safe and will not damage your device or its battery more than cable charging does. Smart technologies ensure that the charger passes on the appropriate amount of energy to your phone. This ensures that your phone will not receive more energy than it can absorb.

More information about wireless charging?

As a wireless charging expert, we at ZENS are continuously looking for new wireless charging applications for consumers and business solutions . If you are thinking about applying the technology to your business environment, please do not hesitate to contact us .

Check out our:

Want more?

Stay up to date with our latest product releases and get early access to exclusive offers and new products.

Most phone makers offer Qi, but what makes this standard so special?

How does wireless fast charging work

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • LinkedIn

How does wireless fast charging work

Justin Sullivan / Getty Images

  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Email

Qi is a wireless charging standard, and the only one currently adopted by most major phone manufacturers. Qi is pronounced “chee.”

Qi is not the only wireless charging method available, but it’s the first one that is supported by two of the largest and most-influential smartphone makers: Samsung and Apple.

What Is Wireless Charging?

Wireless charging allows you to charge a device, like your smartphone, without use of a charging cable. The concept, known as inductive charging, allows electricity to be transmitted through the air by means of a magnetic field. A transmitter (in this case, a charging pad plugged into a power outlet) creates an oscillating magnetic field with a receiver (a phone). The receiver gathers current through a special antenna, which can then be stored in the device’s battery. While the basic technology has been around for over a century, it has gained more attention with the advent of mobile technology.

How Does Qi Wireless Charging Work?

While the inner workings of wireless charging technology are quite complex, the basic concept is simple. In order to charge something wirelessly, you need to have two components called induction coils. These coils are loops of copper wire that are built into wireless charging stations and compatible phones.

When a compatible device is placed on a charging station, the two coils are able to temporarily act as a different component known as a transformer. This means that when an electromagnetic field is generated by the charging station, it creates an electrical current in the coil located in the device. That current flows into the battery, charging it just like a cable charger.

If you have an electric toothbrush, there’s a good chance you’ve already used wireless charging. Some rechargeable toothbrushes will actually charge when placed on a Qi wireless charging pad.

What Is the Qi Standard?

While all wireless charging technologies work according to the same principle, there are two competing types. They are referred to as magnetic inductive and magnetic resonance charging.

The Qi standard was first published in 2010, and it described an inductive method for wirelessly charging devices. In addition to specifying three different power ranges for wireless chargers, it laid out the way that devices would communicate with charging stations to ensure safe and efficient charging.

Why Do Phone Makers Prefer Qi?

Phone makers embraced Qi over alternative standards for a handful of different reasons. The first, and probably most important, is that Qi had a major head start. Since the Qi standard was initially published in 2010, chipmakers were able to design chips that would act as a shortcut for charging station manufacturers and phone makers.

Using these off-the-shelf components, phone manufacturers were able to implement wireless charging in a cost-effective manner without spending a lot of research and development. Qi’s inductive charging tech is also more energy-efficient than resonant charging, and it usually involves smaller components. That means inductive Qi chargers can be more compact than competing devices.

The availability of off-the-shelf chips and compact components encouraged early adoption by many Android manufacturers, including Nokia, LG, and HTC in 2012. Eventually, others got on board, and within the next few years, nearly every major Android phone maker will be Qi-compatible.

Resonant charging specifications were added to the Qi 1.2 standard in 2014. This made Qi the only standard with specifications for both inductive and resonant charging, which attracted phone manufacturers concerned about backward compatibility.

Apple and Qi Wireless Charging

While some Android manufacturers jumped on the Qi bandwagon as early as 2012, Apple didn’t join the Wireless Power Consortium (WPC), which is the organization behind the Qi standard, until the release of the iPhone 8 in 2017.

With the Apple Watch, Apple actually modified a system based on the Qi standard much earlier than it joined the WPC. However, that implementation was tweaked enough to prevent the Apple Watch from working with Qi charging stations.

Starting with the iPhone 8 and iPhone X, Apple ditched the tweaked version in favor of the Qi standard. That decision allowed both Apple and Android users to take advantage of the same charging hardware.

How to Use Qi Wireless Charging

The major disadvantage with inductive charging pads is that they can be finicky with regards to the distance and alignment of a receiver device. While resonant charging allows for a lot more leeway, devices that use Qi have to be placed in a rather precise manner.

Some charging station manufacturers get around this by including multiple charging coils in a single station. However, your phone still has to be lined up properly with one of them or it won’t charge. This is usually addressed by including guide marks on the charging station to show how and where to place your phone.

Aside from that, using Qi to wirelessly charge a phone is simple. You plug the charging station into the wall, or into the accessory outlet in your car, and then place your phone on top of it. As long as the phone remains in place, it will charge.

Where Can You Charge a Phone With Qi?

In addition to desktop charging mats and cradles designed for cars, you can also find Qi chargers built into furniture. There’s even an app that will show you where to find a public charging station in your area.

If your phone doesn’t have Qi technology built-in, you can add wireless charging with a case. Alternatively, you can even get a thin charging unit that fits between your phone and your existing case.

How does wireless fast charging work

– Most flagship phones now support the Qi wireless charging standard

(Pocket-lint) – Wireless charging has been around for a good while now, but it’s only in the last couple of years that it’s started to take off. More and more manufacturers have been getting on board with the ubiquitous Qi wireless charging standard and the tech is now inside virtually every flagship phone.

So what exactly is wireless charging, how does it work and does your phone even support it? Allow us to answer all these questions and more.

Samsung has supported wireless charging since the Galaxy S6 and Huawei introduced it with the excellent Mate 20 Pro.

Apple adopted wireless charging with the iPhone X and iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus. Since then it’s appeared in the iPhone XS and XS Max as well as in the new iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro as well as iPhone XR and new-generation iPhone SE.

An increasing number of phones also support reverse wireless charging where you can charge other devices from the phone – for more information on this, check out What is reverse wireless charging and which phones have it?

What is wireless charging?

Wireless charging is the transfer of power from a power outlet to your device, without the need for a connecting cable.

It involves a power transmitting pad and a receiver, sometimes in the form of a case attached to a mobile device or built into the phone itself. When we said it was cable-free, it isn’t quite, because the pad will have a cable going from the outlet into it.

How does wireless charging work?

Wireless charging is based on inductive charging, whereby power is created by passing an electrical current through two coils to create an electromagnetic field.

When the receiving magnetic plate on the mobile device comes into contact with the transmitter – or at least within the specified range – the magnetic field generates an electrical current within the device.

This current is then converted into direct current (DC), which in turn charges the built-in battery.

What is the standard for wireless charging?

The main wireless standard is Qi (pronounced “chee”). Qi is a standard that has been developed by the Wireless Power Consortium (WPC) for inductive charging over distances of up to 40mm.

Qi wireless charging has been adopted by many of the major smartphone manufacturers: Samsung, Apple, Sony, LG, HTC, Huawei, Nokia (HMD), Motorola and Blackberry. It’s also being incorporated inside numerous vehicles now too – see below.

Another wireless charging standard was Powermat. It was used by some retailers such as Starbucks to enable customers to charge their phones. But it lost the format war if you like, so Powermat said in 2018 that it would develop commercial wireless charging technology compatible with Qi.

Qi has three separate power specifications, beginning with low power, which is primarily what we’re talking about here, for charging mobile devices. At the moment there are several wattages that can be applied to this. 5W is a minimum, while some handsets support 7.5W, 10W and up to 15W and then onto 30W in a later version of the standard. However, individual companies can develop their own technologies to deliver faster wireless charging speeds.

How does wireless fast charging work

Who sells wireless charging mats and stands?

Many peripheral manufacturers now have their own wireless chargers including Anker, Belkin, Logitech, Moshi and Mophie. Some of these look like mats or pads, others like desk stands.

Wireless charging is now appearing in a variety of places; Swedish flat-pack extraordinaire Ikea has a number of pieces of furniture, mainly side tables and lamps, that have Qi wireless charging built into them. The furniture chain sells standalone wireless charging pads too, as well as a range of cases for different phones.

Apple’s own wireless charging mat – called AirPower – never actually launched but there are many third-party versions that wil charge your iPhone, Apple Watch and the latest AirPods which have a wireless charging case. AirUnleashed is one of these, while Belkin has an AirPower-style mat.

How does wireless fast charging work

Can I get wireless charging in my car?

Many car manufacturers have wireless charging in certain models, but even then it often isn’t as standard and tends to be on models further up the range. The manufacturers using it include Audi (and the rest of the WV group), BMW, Ford, Honda, Mercedes-Benz, Peugeot, Toyota, and Volvo.

As much more equipment undertake wireless charging, how substantially will the technological innovation improve? Here’s how wireless rapidly charging works, and how it’ll most likely come to be even speedier in the future.

Table of Contents

How Wireless Charging Works

Many of the most well-known digital devices today—from high-finish cell phones to wireless earbuds—feature wi-fi charging. Apple, Samsung, and LG have carried out this feature across a wide variety of their devices.

Wi-fi charging enables people to put their product on a pad which is plugged into the wall, and then it just commences charging—no cables important.

How does wireless fast charging workSamsung

Most modern day wi-fi chargers use a process called magnetic induction. This entails reworking magnetic energy from the charging pad to electrical electrical power by using a coil within the machine. This vitality is then made use of to demand the battery. This is also why additional gadgets are getting built of glass as a substitute of metal—glass is much more useful for induction.

Wi-fi is 1 of the most standardized kinds of charging. Contrary to wired chargers, which involve a wide variety of requirements and connectors, most wi-fi-charging products use the Qi typical proven by the Wireless Ability Consortium (WPC). This usually means a single normal charging pad will get the job done with the two an Apple Airpods circumstance and a Galaxy Be aware.

Speeding Up Wi-fi Charging Delivery

Quickly charging performs by raising the number of watts sent to a phone’s battery. Having said that, this has to operate the two techniques. Makers also have to design and style their obtaining products to handle rapid charging. As well as, accent manufacturers have to boost the opportunity output of their chargers or transmitters.

In the earlier, wi-fi charging was slow, clunky, and available very little overall flexibility when it came to positioning. The earliest iterations could only demand 5 watts or fewer, which was considerably significantly less than wired charging.

Now, frequent wireless chargers using the Qi common can demand up to 15 watts on suitable units. This more quickly charging speed is referred to as the Prolonged Electric power Profile (EPP).

Wi-fi charging utilizes a approach similar to wired for power supply. This entails powering a machine at total velocity, and then scaling back toward the end of the charging cycle.

It follows this procedure:

  • Detection: The transmitter detects if a Qi-suitable machine is on top of it.
  • Total electrical power: If the receiver is on the newest edition of Qi, it will acquire up to 15 watts of electric power from the appropriate transmitter.
  • Heat detection: Transmitters have a thermal examination, which enables them to detect if a machine is finding warm. If it is, the transmitter will slow its energy output.
  • Completion: When the battery in the receiver is total, the Qi pad stops charging the gadget.

This approach ensures the basic safety of your products and helps prevent them from receiving also hot or their batteries from getting destroyed. It also makes sure a machine won’t be overcharged from the transmitter, so you can properly depart your cellphone on a charging pad right away.

Custom-made Wi-fi Criteria

The foundation Qi standard was very last up to date in 2015, which introduced the EPP and improved warmth sensitivity. Considering that then, the EPP Power Class was released, which enables transmitters to present power up to 30 watts, dependent on the getting gadget.

When this charging velocity has not been standardized throughout the board, numerous producers have executed modified versions of the Qi EPP common able of delivering larger speeds. A person these types of corporation is OnePlus, which introduced a 30-watt Wi-fi Warp Charger with its flagship 8 Pro. The business statements it can aid charging a machine to 50% in just 29 minutes.

The charging pad also has a built-in enthusiast that enables it to obtain increased charging speeds, as effectively as protections for overvoltages and overcurrents. Nevertheless, it is only compatible with precise OnePlus products. Other businesses, like Xiaomi, have also released 30-watt Qi wi-fi chargers.

The Upcoming of Wi-fi Charging

Wireless charging will only go on to get more rapidly. The WPC has presently teased its future step will be a 60-watt wireless charging normal. This velocity would be equivalent to, or even larger than, numerous manufacturers’ wired charging speeds right now.

As transmitters carry on to improve in electrical power output, they’ll also be able to charge a wider selection of gadgets. In addition to the mounting speeds to demand cell telephones, this signifies electronics with appreciably bigger batteries, like laptops, will also be Qi-compatible in the upcoming.

As more devices adopt wireless charging, how much will the technology improve? Here’s how wireless fast charging works, and how it’ll likely become even faster in the future.

How Wireless Charging Works

Many of the most popular electronic gadgets today—from high-end mobile phones to wireless earbuds—feature wireless charging. Apple, Samsung, and LG have implemented this feature across a wide range of their devices.

Wireless charging allows people to place their device on a pad that’s plugged into the wall, and then it just starts charging—no cables necessary.

How does wireless fast charging workSamsung

Most modern wireless chargers use a process called magnetic induction. This involves transforming magnetic energy from the charging pad to electrical power via a coil inside the device. This energy is then used to charge the battery. This is also why more devices are being made of glass instead of metal—glass is much more advantageous for induction.

Wireless is one of the most standardized forms of charging. Unlike wired chargers, which require a variety of standards and connectors, most wireless-charging devices use the Qi standard established by the Wireless Power Consortium (WPC). This means a single standard charging pad will work with both an Apple Airpods case and a Galaxy Note.

Speeding Up Wireless Charging Delivery

Fast charging works by increasing the number of watts delivered to a phone’s battery. However, this has to work both ways. Manufacturers also have to design their receiving devices to handle fast charging. Plus, accessory manufacturers have to increase the potential output of their chargers or transmitters.

In the past, wireless charging was slow, clunky, and offered little flexibility when it came to positioning. The earliest iterations could only charge 5 watts or less, which was significantly less than wired charging.

Now, regular wireless chargers using the Qi standard can charge up to 15 watts on compatible devices. This faster charging speed is called the Extended Power Profile (EPP).

Wireless charging uses a method similar to wired for power delivery. This involves powering a device at full speed, and then scaling back toward the end of the charging cycle.

It follows this process:

  • Detection: The transmitter detects if a Qi-compatible device is on top of it.
  • Full power: If the receiver is on the latest version of Qi, it will obtain up to 15 watts of power from the compatible transmitter.
  • Heat detection: Transmitters have a thermal test, which allows them to detect if a device is getting hot. If it is, the transmitter will slow its power output.
  • Completion: When the battery in the receiver is full, the Qi pad stops charging the device.

This process ensures the safety of your devices and prevents them from getting too hot or their batteries from being damaged. It also ensures a device won’t be overcharged from the transmitter, so you can safely leave your phone on a charging pad overnight.

Customized Wireless Standards

The base Qi standard was last updated in 2015, which brought the EPP and improved heat sensitivity. Since then, the EPP Power Class 0 was released, which enables transmitters to provide power up to 30 watts, depending on the receiving device.

While this charging speed hasn’t been standardized across the board, many manufacturers have implemented modified versions of the Qi EPP standard capable of delivering higher speeds. One such company is OnePlus, which released a 30-watt Wireless Warp Charger with its flagship 8 Pro. The company claims it can support charging a device to 50% in just 29 minutes.

The charging pad also has a built-in fan that allows it to achieve higher charging speeds, as well as protections for overvoltages and overcurrents. However, it’s only compatible with specific OnePlus devices. Other companies, like Xiaomi, have also released 30-watt Qi wireless chargers.

The Future of Wireless Charging

Wireless charging will only continue to get faster. The WPC has already teased its next step will be a 60-watt wireless charging standard. This speed would be comparable to, or even higher than, many manufacturers’ wired charging speeds today.

As transmitters continue to increase in power output, they’ll also be able to charge a wider range of devices. In addition to the rising speeds to charge mobile phones, this means electronics with significantly larger batteries, like laptops, will also be Qi-compatible in the future.

How much will technology improve as more devices adopt wireless charging? Here&#821

This is how wireless charging works

Many of today’s most popular electronic devices – from high-end cell phones to wireless earbuds – have wireless charging. Apple, Samsung, and LG have implemented this feature on a variety of their devices.

Wireless charging allows users to place their device on a pad that is attached to the wall and then it starts charging – no cables are required.

How does wireless fast charging workSamsung

Most modern wireless chargers use a process called magnetic induction. Magnetic energy is converted from the charging pad into electrical current via a coil in the device. This energy is then used to charge the battery. This is also why more devices are made of glass instead of metal – glass is much more beneficial for induction.

Wireless is one of the most standardized forms of charging. Unlike wired chargers, which require a variety of standards and connections, most wireless chargers use the Qi standard established by the Wireless Power Consortium (WPC). This means that a single standard charging pad works with both an Apple Airpods case and a Galaxy Note.

CONNECTED: What is fast charge and how does it work?

Accelerate wireless charge delivery

Fast charging increases the number of watts that are delivered to a phone’s battery. However, this has to work both ways. Manufacturers must also design their receiving devices so that they can be charged quickly. Also, accessory manufacturers need to increase the potential performance of their chargers or transmitters.

In the past, wireless charging was slow, cumbersome, and offered little flexibility in positioning. The earliest iterations could only charge 5 watts or less, which was significantly less than wired charging.

Now normal wireless chargers that use the Qi standard can charge up to 15 watts on compatible devices. This faster charging speed is known as the Extended Power Profile (EPP).

Wireless charging uses a similar method to wired power supply. To do this, a device is supplied with power at full speed and is pulled back towards the end of the charging cycle.

It follows this process:

  • Recognition: The transmitter detects whether a Qi-compatible device is on it.
  • Full Power: If the receiver is in the latest version of Qi, it receives an output of up to 15 watts from the compatible transmitter.
  • Heat detector: Transmitters have a thermal test that allows them to tell if a device is getting hot. If this is the case, the transmitter will slow down its output power.
  • Completion: If the battery in the receiver is full, the Qi-Pad no longer charges the device.

This process ensures the safety of your devices and prevents them from becoming too hot or damaging the batteries. It also ensures that a device is not overcharged by the transmitter, so you can safely leave your phone on a charger overnight.

CONNECTED: Don’t worry about your smartphone’s battery, just use it

Custom wireless standards

The basic Qi standard was last updated in 2015, which brought the EVP and improved heat sensitivity. Since then, EPP Power Class 0 has been published, with which transmitters can deliver a power of up to 30 watts, depending on the receiving device.

Although this charging speed has not been widely standardized, many manufacturers have implemented modified versions of the Qi EPP standard that can deliver higher speeds. One such company is OnePlus, which has released a 30 watt wireless warp charger with its flagship 8 Pro. The company claims it can support charging a device 50% in just 29 minutes.

The charging pad also has a built-in fan, with which higher charging speeds can be achieved, as well as protection against overvoltages and overcurrents. However, it is only compatible with certain OnePlus devices. Other companies like Xiaomi have also released 30 watt Qi wireless chargers.

The future of wireless charging

Wireless charging is getting faster and faster. The WPC has already teased, its next move will be a 60 watt wireless charging standard. This speed would be comparable or even higher than the wired charging speeds of many manufacturers today.

As the power of the transmitters continues to increase, they can also charge a wider range of devices. In addition to increasing charging speeds for cell phones, this means that electronics with significantly larger batteries such as laptops will continue to be Qi-compatible in the future.

Since more and more devices are adopting wireless charging, how much will the technology improve? See how wireless charging works and how it will become even faster in the future.

How wireless charging works

Many of the most popular electronic gadgets today – from state-of-the-art mobile phones to cordless headphones – have wireless charging. Apple, the Samsung and LG have implemented this feature on many of their devices.

Wireless charging allows users to place their device on a wall-mounted pad and then start charging – no cables needed.

Most modern wireless chargers use a procedure called magnetic induction. This involves converting the magnetic energy from the charging panel to electric power through a coil inside the device. This energy is then used to charge it battery. This is why more appliances are made of glass instead of metal – glass has better induction.

Wireless is one of the most standard forms of charging. Unlike wired chargers, which require a variety of standards and connectors, most wireless chargers use the Qi standard established by the Wireless Power Consortium (WPC). This means that a standard charging pad will work well with their case Apple Airpods as well as with one Galaxy Note.

How does wireless fast charging work

Accelerate wireless charging delivery

Fast charging works by increasing the number of watts delivered to a phone battery. However, this must work for both. Manufacturers must design their devices in such a way that they can handle fast charging.

In the past, wireless charging was slow and did not offer much flexibility in installation. The first options could only charge 5 watts or less, which was significantly less than wired charging.

Now, wireless chargers using the Qi standard can charge up to 15 Watts on compatible devices. This charging speed is called the Extended Power Profile (EPP).

Wireless charging uses a method similar to wired for power supply. Follows the following procedure:

  • Detection: The transmitter detects if a Qi compatible device is on it.
  • Full power: If the receiver is in the latest version of Qi, it will receive up to 15 Watts of power from the compatible transmitter.
  • Heat Detection: Transmitters have a heat test, which allows them to detect if a device is warming up. If yes, the transmitter will slow down the power output.
  • Completion: When the receiver battery is full, the Qi pad stops charging the device.

This process ensures the safety of your devices and prevents them from overheating or damaging their batteries. It also ensures that a device will not be overloaded by the transmitter, so you can let your phone charge overnight safely.

The new iPhone can access 15W wireless charging, but you need an Apple-approved accessory

Share this story

  • Share this on Facebook
  • Share this on Twitter

Share All sharing options for: Apple’s iPhone 12 can wirelessly charge twice as fast, but only with a MagSafe charger

How does wireless fast charging work

Apple’s new iPhone 12 line will be able to access faster wireless charging speeds of 15W in line with the most up-to-date Qi standard, but there’s a catch: you’ll have to use Apple’s new MagSafe brand of charger or a MagSafe-compatible one from a third-party accessory maker.

Apple reintroduced its MagSafe branding for the iPhone with the announcement of its new smartphone line on Tuesday, and the company now touts a new feature in which “magnets align themselves perfectly every time for faster wireless charging” on its product page. But what Apple didn’t explicitly mention is that only its proprietary MagSafe brand, and not chargers using the general Qi charging standard it’s based on, can use those faster speeds.

Noted on the tech specs page for the new iPhone 12 line is a clearer breakdown that lists 15W for MagSafe charging and 7.5W for standard Qi wireless charging. Every iPhone since the iPhone 8 in 2017 has been capable of wireless charging in accordance with the Qi open standard, but the iPhone has never been able to tap into charging speeds up to 15W — until Apple revived MagSafe, that is.

It’s not clear why this is the case or whether there is a technical limitation or something unique about MagSafe chargers that allows for this. But it does mean that if you want to take advantage of the faster wireless charging in the iPhone 12 line, you’ll need to stick to an Apple-approved charger and not one from a non-MagSafe third party.

The only available option right now is the $39 MagSafe charger Apple is selling on its online store. Belkin and Griffin will have MagSafe chargers, too, but it seems likely that any other third-party accessory maker will need to work with Apple — presumably through its MFi licensing program — to do the same. It’s worth noting that any brand could in theory make a magnetic Qi charger for the iPhone 12. But if the company wants access to the faster charging speeds and the NFC identification system for recognizing accessories, it’ll need to work with Apple.

That ensures Apple maintains hardware control over MagSafe and this faster wireless charging option while also suggesting the company will get a cut of profits on MagSafe products.