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How often does google update chrome

The browser with the most refreshes in 2017? That would be Chrome. The fewest? Apple’s Safari.

Senior Reporter, Computerworld |

All browsers are equal, but some are more equal than others.

That’s true for a whole host of characteristics, whether it’s their affect on notebook batteries or the size of the extension library, the speed with which engineers address security vulnerabilities or how well the browser deals with ad trackers.

It’s also true of how fresh each browser is at any given moment.

Because the Big Four browser makers – Google, Mozilla, Microsoft and Apple – upgrade their wares (Chrome, Firefox, Edge and Safari, respectively) at different rhythms, some are usually fresher than others.

That’s fresher, as in they have new features and tools, under-the-hood functionality or easily-visible UI (user interface) changes.

Which browsers get refreshed the most? Which the least? We’ve done the calculations for you.

Google’s Chrome

Google updated Chrome eight times in 2017, the most of any of the Big Four browsers.

From Chrome 56 (Jan. 25) to Chrome 63 (Dec. 6), Google refreshed the browser on an average tempo of 45 days, the shortest interval of the big four. The shortest stretch between updates was 41 days (Chrome 57 to Chrome 58, the latter in April), while the longest was 50 days (a two-version tie in July and December).

So far this year, Google has upgraded Chrome four times, with an average interval of 43.5 days, or slightly shorter than in 2017 as a whole.

Firefox

Mozilla refreshed Firefox seven times in 2017, coming in second behind Google and Chrome in the frequency sweepstakes.

Last year, Mozilla upgraded Firefox 51 (Jan. 24) through Firefox 57 (Nov. 14) on an average cadence of 49 days, a span about 10% longer than Google’s Chrome. The shortest interval between updates was 42 days (Firefox 51 to 52, the latter in March), while the longest was 56 days (Firefox 55 to 56, in September).

So far in 2018, Mozilla has updated Firefox three times, with an average span of nearly 60 days, considerably longer than in 2017.

Microsoft upgraded its Edge browser, the default for Windows 10, only twice in 2017.

Although the Redmond, Wash. company was reportedly considering cutting ties between its Windows 10 upgrade tempo and that of Edge by offering the latter in its online app market, it has not done so. Splitting Windows 10 and Edge, of course, would let Microsoft refresh Edge more often than twice each year, the frequency of its operating system feature upgrades.

In 2017, Microsoft rolled out Edge 15 (April 5) and Edge 16 (Oct. 17) 195 days apart, the second-longest period between upgrades. In that same period, Google released more than four Chrome updates, while Mozilla launched nearly as many.

Microsoft has upgraded Edge just once this year, on April 30, when it issued Windows 10 version 1803; Edge 17 was part of that operating system update.

Note: The company does push out security fixes for Edge throughout the year as part of its monthly patching efforts.

Safari

Apple retooled Safari just once last year, when it upgraded macOS from 10.12 (Sierra) to 10.13 (High Sierra) .

Like Microsoft, Apple weds its browser upgrades to its operating system refreshes, so it has just the one opportunity to add significant features and functionality, the reason why its annual list of additions and improvements is extremely long by the standards of Chrome or Firefox.

Apple has yet to upgrade Safari this year, although it plans to deliver Safari 12 this fall as part of macOS Mojave, and as a separate download for users of the two prior editions, High Sierra (2017) and Sierra (2016).

Note: The company does update Safari with security fixes throughout the year as part of the patches it releases five or six times annually.

IDG Communications/Gregg Keizer

The Big Four browsers – Chrome, Firefox, Edge and Safari – upgraded at varying velocities in 2017.

Senior Reporter Gregg Keizer covers Windows, Office, Apple/enterprise, web browsers and web apps for Computerworld.

@Summerson
April 23, 2019, 8:00am EDT

How often does google update chrome

Google updates Chrome regularly with new features, security updates, and more. Chrome downloads those updates and installs them automatically. But how often does that happen? It depends—turns out the Chrome update process is pretty complicated.

Major Stable Versions Every Six Weeks

Chrome is developed in the open and anyone can install the unstable versions. But, when it comes to the Stable branch, builds are released roughly every six weeks. For example, Chrome 73 was released on March 12, and Chrome 74 was released on April 23rd—six weeks to the day.

While it hasn’t always been like this—originally, Chrome updates were pretty sporadic—the Chrome team committed to six-week release intervals back in 2010 and has been relatively consistent since then. Sometimes releases come in four weeks, other times in eight. But generally speaking, it’s always somewhere right around the six-week mark.

It’s also worth noting that Google can adjust the stable release schedule around Chrome “no meeting weeks” and holidays.

Security and Bug Fixes When Necessary

How often does google update chrome

While you can pretty much count on major version releases coming out regularly, bug fix and security updates are much less predictable. Just combing through the Stable release update changelogs shows that there have been three updates since Chrome 73 was released on March 12th, and there’s no discernable interval between each release. That’s pretty much par for the course for these types of updates.

But at the very least you can count on Chrome getting a few bug fix and/or security updates in between major releases.

Chrome will install both major stable updates and smaller updates automatically when they’re available. You can always open the menu and head to Help > About Google Chrome to check for and install any updates immediately, too.

When Is the Next Version Arriving?

If you’re curious when the next major version of Chrome will be released to the stable channel, check the Chrome Platform Status website. This also shows you when the current stable version became stable, as well as information about the unstable versions of Chrome being tested in the Beta and Dev channels.

Chrome OS Also Updates Every Six Weeks

How often does google update chrome

Like the major browser releases, Chrome OS is updated roughly every six weeks. While the version numbers and features generally mirror that of their browser counterpart, Chrome OS releases usually happen a week after the browser update.

So, for example, Chrome 73 was released on March 12, but Chrome OS 73 didn’t land on the stable channel until March 19th.

Otherwise, Chrome OS follows the same basic release process as the Chrome OS browser. The primary exception here is that the rollout schedule may vary depending on the particular Chrome OS device—it may take a few weeks to hit some devices, as each one is slightly different.

How Chrome Update Channels Work

There are four branches of Chrome development: Canary, Dev, Beta, and Stable. Those are in order from least stable (Canary) to most stable (um, Stable).

Eventually, the features that first show up in Canary should make their way to the stable channel—that’s why a lot of users who want to get a glimpse into the future run multiple version of Chrome on their computers. It’s also really cool to see features progress as they make their way through the release channels.

How often does google update chromeChrome Release Cycle

Every six weeks, a Canary build is set as the new milestone stabilization branch. This is where new features and enhancements are designed and implemented. It remains here for two more weeks, at which point it’s pushed into the first beta release. After two more weeks in the beta channel, a feature freeze is put in place—that means all features destined for the stable channel should be code-complete. This is also the reason why we see some features that were initially planned for a particular stable release get pushed back to the next major build.

For the remaining four weeks of the beta stage, new builds are released weekly up until the stable release. The Thursday before the stable version is pushed out (which generally happens on Tuesdays), the latest beta build becomes the release candidate. At that point, all stable features are finalized and merged with the stable branch.

For testing bug fixes, Google also has another build called a “Stable Refresh.” That’s a stable release falling outside of the regular release schedule and is used to fix critical issues that just can’t wait.

Stable Releases Roll Out Slowly

All stable Chrome releases follow a staged release schedule (save for Linux, which is pushed to 100% at the time of release). The desktop versions—Mac and Windows—are released in four states: 5%, 15%, 50%, and 100%. That’s why different users get updates at different times.

Android follows a similar schedule, albeit with one additional step: 1%, 5%, 15%, 50%, and 100%.

iOS follows a different pattern than the other two, with the update rolling out to all users over a seven-day period: Day 1: 1%; Day 2: 2%; Day 3: 5%; Day 4: 10%; Day 5: 20%, Day 6: 50%; and Day 7: 100%.

These staged rollouts allow Google to pinpoint issues before they reach all users, thus stopping the rollout and resuming it once the problem is corrected.

How often does google update chrome

Google Chrome automatically updates itself. There’s no easy way to turn off automatic updates, but you can do it in several ways—by stopping the Google Update Service that handles automatic updates, for example. Here’s why you shouldn’t do it.

Chrome’s Updates Haven’t Been Buggy

Google has a good track record with security updates for Chrome. Google Chrome was originally released in 2008. Now, more than a decade later, it’s hard to point to even one example of a catastrophic update bug that caused problems. (Meanwhile, the Windows 10 operating system has had several notable update bugs in the last few years.)

Chrome’s updates come and go automatically. Google normally updates Chrome with major new versions every six weeks, and smaller updates that fix security holes and other problems arrive more often than that. Chrome is constantly automatically updating itself and keeping you safe. Most people will almost never notice these updates.

These browser updates aren’t inconvenient, either. Unlike Windows Update on Windows 10, Chrome doesn’t get in your way by forcing you to restart. Chrome automatically updates itself in the background. If you leave Chrome open for a while, Chrome may ask you to restart your browser when you have a chance, but it won’t automatically restart itself and interrupt you.

Google Chrome did once have a data corruption bug on a handful of Macs where people went out of the way to disable System Integrity Protection, which is an important security feature. That’s the worst thing that’s ever happened, and nothing similar has ever happened on Windows.

Browser Security Holes Are the Real Concern

How often does google update chrome

So, is Chrome perfect? Of course not! Like all web browsers, Chrome is full of bugs you need to worry about. But these aren’t update-related problems. They’re security holes.

Modern browsers are complex, and security holes are regularly found in them. Google and other browser developers regularly release updates to patch holes found by researchers, or to block new zero-day exploits found in the wild.

Without these regular security patches, you’ll end up using a Google Chrome browser that’s vulnerable to attack. A malicious website you open in Chrome could potentially compromise your browser and install malware on your PC—just by opening the website.

Security patches protect you from this, and Chrome regularly installs them. Disabling automatic updates prevents Chrome from installing these security patches, putting you at serious risk.

There’s no way to get prompted when Chrome updates are available and manually install them. It’s automatic updates or nothing.

If You Don’t Want Chrome’s Automatic Updates

How often does google update chrome

Okay, let’s say you really don’t want Chrome’s automatic updates anyway. For whatever reason, you want to manually approve updates, get fewer big updates, or just remove the Google Updater from your computer.

If this describes you, we recommend switching to another browser. Here are some good alternatives that are more flexible than Chrome:

  • To manually approve browser updates, you could switch to Mozilla Firefox. Firefox automatically installs updates by default, but you can choose to have Firefox prompt you when updates are available so you can manually agree to them. In Firefox, head to menu > Options > General. Under “Allow Firefox to,” select “Check for updates but let you choose to install them”.
  • For less frequent new features and interface updates, you could instead pick Mozilla Firefox ESR. The Extended Support Release gets major updates every 42 weeks instead of every 6 weeks, but Mozilla keeps it up-to-date with security updates.
  • If you’re looking for a Chrome-like browser without using Google’s Updater, try the new Microsoft Edge. It’s based on the same open-source Chromium code that forms the basis of Chrome, and it’s even available for Mac and Linux. Edge automatically updates itself just like Chrome, but it uses Microsoft’s updater rather than Google’s. Other browsers are based on Chrome, including the Brave Browser. As far as we know, they all use Chrome-style automatic updates to keep people safe.

Whatever browser you choose, be sure to keep it updated with the latest security patches. It’s dangerous to keep using an outdated browser full of security holes.

How often does google update chrome

Google updates Chrome regularly with new features, security updates, and more. Chrome downloads the updates and installs them automatically. But how often does it happen? That’s because the Chrome update process is quite complicated.

Large Stable Versions Every Six Weeks

Chrome is developed in the open and everyone can install the unstable versions. But when it comes to the stable branch, buildings are released about every six weeks. For example, Chrome 73 was released on March 1

While not always here-originally, Chrome updates were quite sporadic – the Chrome team engaged in six-week trigger intervals back in 2010 and has been relatively consistent ever since. Sometimes, editions come in four weeks, other times in eight. But in general, there is always somewhere right around the six week mark.

It is also worth noting that Google can adjust the stable release schedule around Chrome “no meeting weeks” and holidays.

Security and bug fixes when needed [19659004] How often does google update chrome

While you can pretty much expect large versions to come out regularly, bug fixes and security updates are much less predictable. Just crawling through the update release update update shows that there have been three updates since Chrome 73 was released on March 12, and there is no noticeable interval between each release. It’s pretty much for the course for these types of updates.

But in any case, you can expect Chrome to get some bug fixes and / or security updates between large versions.

Chrome installs both large stable updates and minor updates automatically when they are available. You can always open the menu and go to Help> About Google Chrome to search and install updates immediately as well.

When will the next version come?

If you are curious when the next large version of Chrome will be released to the stable channel, check out the Chrome Platform Status website. This also shows when the current stable version became stable and information about the unstable versions of Chrome being tested in the Beta and Dev channels.

Chrome OS also updates every six weeks

How often does google update chrome

Like the major browser versions, Chrome OS is updated about every six weeks. While the version numbers and features generally reflect the one corresponding to their browser, the Chrome OS edition usually corresponds to a week after the browser update.

For example, Chrome 73 was released on March 12, but Chrome OS 73 did not land on the stable channel until March 19.

Otherwise, Chrome OS follows the same basic release as the Chrome OS browser. The primary exception here is that the expansion time may vary depending on any Chrome OS device. It may take a few weeks to hit some units, because each one is slightly different.

How Chrome Update Channels Work

There are four branches of Chrome development: Canary, Dev, Beta and Stable. They are in order from least stable (Canary Islands) to the most stable (um, Stable).

Eventually, the features that first appear in the Canary Islands should get to the stable channel, which is why many users who want to get a glimpse of the future run multiple versions of Chrome on their computers. It is also really cool to see the functions ahead as they go through the trigger channels.

How often does google update chromeChrome Release Cycle

Every six weeks, a canary building is set as the new milestone stabilization branch. Here are new features and improvements designed and implemented. It remains here for another two weeks, and at that time it is being driven into the first beta version. After another two weeks in the beta channel, a function freeze is put in place – this means that all functions intended for the stable channel must be coded. This is also why we see that some functions that were originally planned for a certain stable trip are driven back to the next large building.

For the remaining four weeks of the beta scene, new buildings are released weekly until the stable is released. Thursday before the stable version is launched (which usually happens on Tuesdays), the latest beta building becomes the release candidate. At that time, all stable functions were completed and merged with the stable branch.

To test bug fixes, Google also has another design called “Stable Refresh.” It is a stable release that falls outside the regular release and is used

Stable releases roll out slowly

All stable Chrome releases follow a scheduled release schedule (save for Linux, which is 100% printed at the time of release). Desktop versions, Mac and Windows, are released in four states: 5%, 15%, 50% and 100%. This is why different users receive updates at different times.

Android follows a similar schedule, though with a further step: 1%, 5%, 15%, 50% and 100%.

iOS follows a different pattern from the other two, with the update rolling out to all users during a seven day period: Day 1: 1%; Day 2: 2%; Day 3: 5%; Day 4: 10%; Day 5: 20%, Day 6: 50%; and day 7: 100%.

These staged rollouts allow Google to identify problems before they reach all users, thus stopping the rollout and resuming it when the problem is corrected.

Google Chrome has a functionality to automatically update to the latest version. Unless you are using the stable version, updates are rolled out quite frequently. The new version may not always have a new feature, and but possibly have some security or stability issues.

If you wish to prevent Google Chrome Browser from updating automatically, here’s how to do it on Windows, Mac and Linux.

Windows

There are two ways to disable automatic updates on Windows, using Group Policy Editor or Registry Editor.

Group Policy Editor

  1. Download Google Update Administrative Template.
  2. Launch Group Policy Editor (Start > Run: gpedit.msc)
  3. Navigate to Local Computer Policy > Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates
  4. Right-click on Administrative Templates, and select Add/Remove Templates
  5. Now add the downloaded GoogleUpdate.adm template.
  6. Once complete, navigate to Administrative Templates > Google > Google Update > Preferences.
  7. There modify the Auto-update check period override property.

Registry Editor

Disable Google Chrome Automatic Updates:
Open Registry Editor(Start > Run: regedit)and navigate to:

In the right pane, add a new DWORD value DisableAutoUpdateChecksCheckboxValue and set it to 1 to disable automatic updates. If later you wish to re-enable updates, change the value to 0 .

Change Update Check Frequency:
Add a new DWORD value AutoUpdateCheckPeriodMinutes and set to desired minutes. Ex. to check for update once a day set 1440 or for once a week set 10080 minutes.

Mac OS

EnableDisable Google Chrome Automatic Updates
To disable updates, enter the following command in the Terminal application:

To re-enable updates, enter the following command:

Terminal “defaults write com.google.Keystone.Agent checkInterval 0” is executed (one automatic updates enabled, specify the interval in seconds.)

Change Update Check Frequency

Check for updates once a day:
$ defaults write com.google.Keystone.Agent checkInterval 86400

Here the frequency is in seconds, so for once a week enter the same command with value as 604800.

Linux

Don’t click on notifications asking for automatic updates in the standard package management system.

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Chrome is the most popular browser on the web by a huge margin, so it should come as no surprise that hackers are trying to crack it again.

They’re relying on a zero-day flaw found in the desktop and Android versions of Chrome this time. This comes just days after Google’s Project Zero team discovered a critical flaw in the browser’s sandbox mode. Tap or click here to see how to patch that bug.

Unlike with previous security flaws, Google is unusually tight-lipped about how this exploit works. What they are saying, though, is that hackers are abusing the bug right now. If you use Chrome for desktop or Android, you need to update it immediately.

We don’t know what this bug does, but we do know it’s dangerous

Google announced an emergency update for Chrome to fix a critical security flaw that hackers are already exploiting. As of now, there are two new versions of Chrome for users to download: Version 86.0.4240.183 for desktop and version 86.0.4240.185 for Android.

Google isn’t saying how this bug works or what hackers can do with it, but the update comes on the heels of a separate patch that fixed a problem with Chrome’s FreeType font library. Tap or click here to see how hackers could attack you through a malicious font file.

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If you update to the latest Chrome version, you won’t have to worry about getting the FreeType patch. This new version contains fixes from the previous update and additional security enhancements, and the new zero-day patch.

Desktop Chrome users can get the patch now as a free update. Android users, on the other hand, have a tougher situation.

Because there are so many different kinds of Android devices, Google isn’t rolling out the Chrome patch to every device at once. If no update is available, you may need to use an alternative browser for a while.

How can I protect myself and get the patch?

Updating the desktop version of Chrome is easy. If you don’t see the update just yet, you may have to wait a few days for it to reach your device. You’re also safe to update if Google releases a newer version in the meantime.

Follow these steps to update your browser:

  1. Click the three-dot icon in the upper-right corner of the Chrome browser window.
  2. Click Settings.
  3. Click About Chrome from the bottom of the left-hand sidebar.
  4. If an update is available for you, it will appear under the Chrome logo. You will be asked to install and relaunch your browser to complete the update.

Android users will need to update their browser to get the latest version of Chrome.

  • On your device, open the Google PlayStore.
  • At the top left, tap Menu And then My apps & games.
  • Under Updates, look for Chrome Chrome.
  • Next to Chrome, tap Update.

The new update will be version 86.0.4240.185. If you don’t see it, Google hasn’t pushed it for your device yet.

Because Google said getting updates to every Android device may take some time, it’s a good idea to switch to another browser for now. We’d recommend using Firefox due to its enhanced security features.

Once you’ve installed Firefox, tap the three-dot icon followed by Settings. Then, tap Set as default browser to change Firefox to your default web browser. This will prevent Chrome from opening up when you tap on links.

Check your updates regularly to see if the new version of Chrome is available. It may be a few weeks before it reaches your device, but you’ll be better off if you stay on the safe side and avoid using the browser.

Google explicitly warns that hackers exploit this bug against Android users, so use caution when browsing the web. It’s easy enough to get hacked on Android as it is.

04/26 Update below. This post was originally published on April 23

Google is always improving Chrome and it recently issued a brilliant (if long overdue) upgrade . Unfortunately, now Google has detailed a serious new problem in Chrome which cannot be fixed, and it’s all down to Windows 10.

How often does google update chrome

Google researchers have revealed a flaw in Chrome which cannot be fixed

Edit: James Forshaw has clarified that Firefox is impacted the same way because it uses the Chromium sandbox which Mozilla confirms. The result is Forshaw’s research exposes a vulnerability for the sandbox of all major browsers to updates in Windows 10. I have followed this up with Firefox, Opera, Brave and Microsoft and will update when I have more information.

04/25 Update: More information about this issue has today been provided by Opera Product Security Manager Cezary Cerekwicki. “Opera is a Chromium-powered browser and uses its sandboxing mechanisms. The browser security sandboxing is dependent on the operating system’s features and security,” he explained, confirming that Opera was affected. “Kernel-level bugs can impact every application running on the operating system. Chromium sandboxing is considered state-of-the-art, however, similar to any sandboxing, it relies on the lower levels of stacks to work properly. It’s important for every user to keep their operating system and application up to date in order to keep their computer environment as safe as possible.” Of course, the challenge for any Windows 10 user, right now, is tracking which updates cause more problems than they fix. The ball is in your court, Microsoft.

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04/26 Update: There is further information on this exploit which Firefox users need to take seriously. Expanding on his report, Forshaw states reiterates that “the same flaw because FF uses the Chromium sandbox,” but notes that: “If anything FF is in a worse position as they process more untrusted content inside that sandbox than Chrome does.”

Explaining his decision not to focus more centrally on Firefox in his initial report, Forshaw explains: “I wasn’t trying to throw them under a bus, it’s not their fault that Windows is broken. However, I wouldn’t mention them flippantly, without having the knowledge to back it up.” I have put Forshaw’s points to Firefox for a response.

In a fascinating post titled ‘You Won’t Believe what this One Line Change Did to the Chrome Sandbox’, Google’s Project Zero researcher James Forshaw revealed that Chrome is entirely reliant on the code of Windows 10 to stay secure. Moreover, Forshaw explains a new Windows 10 update recently broke through Chrome’s security with just a single line of misplaced code. Given Windows 10’s appalling recent update record , that’s not reassuring for either browser or platform.

“The Chromium sandbox [a security mechanism to stop failures from spreading to other software] on Windows has stood the test of time,” Forshaw explains. “It’s considered one of the better sandboxing mechanisms deployed at scale without requiring elevated privileges to function. For all the good, it does have its weaknesses. The main one being the sandbox’s implementation is reliant on the security of the Windows OS. Changing the behavior of Windows is out of the control of the Chromium development team. If a bug is found in the security enforcement mechanisms of Windows then the sandbox can break.”

And that’s exactly what happened. Forshaw states that Microsoft introduced a Windows 10 1903 update that enables online attacks conducted in the Chrome browser to break its security and spread into Windows itself. He subsequently found multiple ways to escape Chrome’s security. In outlining the different options, he warned: “I hope this gives an insight into how such a small change in the Windows kernel can have a disproportionate impact on the security of a sandbox environment.”

The good news is Forshaw alerted Microsoft to the problem and the company issued a patch ( CVE-2020-0981 ) to fix it. That said, the fundamental flaw Forshaw identified remains: the security of Google Chrome on Windows 10 depends on Microsoft and that cannot be changed.

It’s important to point out that other Chromium-based browsers suffer the same risk (Opera, Brave, Microsoft’s new Edge browser), and that means you may be tempted to quit Windows 10 if you are more wedded to your browser than your operating system.

If you prefer to stay put, one ray of light is a recent tip-off that Microsoft might be making fundamental changes to Windows 10 updates but, for now, users have a decision to make.

I am an experienced freelance technology journalist. I have written for Wired, The Next Web, TrustedReviews, The Guardian and the BBC in addition to Forbes. I began in

I am an experienced freelance technology journalist. I have written for Wired, The Next Web, TrustedReviews, The Guardian and the BBC in addition to Forbes. I began in b2b print journalism covering tech companies at the height of the dot com boom and switched to covering consumer technology as the iPod began to take off. A career highlight for me was being a founding member of TrustedReviews. It started in 2003 and we were repeatedly told websites could not compete with print! Within four years we were purchased by IPC Media (Time Warner’s publishing division) to become its flagship tech title. What fascinates me are the machinations of technology’s biggest companies. Got a pitch, tip or leak? Contact me on my professional Facebook page. I don’t bite.

How often does google update chrome

Google Chrome is the most popular web browser in the world by a long shot. Not only is Chrome fast and highly customizable, it’s also tracking you as you surf the internet.

Of course, Chrome isn’t the only browser or web service that tracks you. Many of them do. The good thing is that Chrome allows you to easily put in a request to disable tracking.

Google Chrome is spying on you: Here’s what it sees

The main way Google Chrome spies on you is by “cookie tracking.”

Chrome and countless other internet services use cookies to track metrics to customize the web experience for you, as well as track ad performance.

When you use the web, you send data about your activity and location back to Google and other sites. Aside from cookies, Chrome tracks you through a number of identifiers. These include:

  • IP address
  • Log-in information
  • Browser user agents and more

The good news is that Google Chrome has a “Do Not Track” setting that lets you request that they stop monitoring your every move online.

However, Google’s attitude about tracking your browser data is not as transparent as it might appear on the surface.

Here’s what Google says on its Chrome settings page about how websites respond to a request to stop tracking:

“Most websites and web services, including Google’s, don’t change their behavior when they receive a Do Not Track request. Chrome doesn’t provide details of which websites and web services respect Do Not Track requests and how websites interpret them.”

Internet Explorer has similar language on its site. Still, “Do Not Track” is a request you should make if you want to increase your level of privacy. It’s turned off by default. Here’s how to turn it on:

How to request that Google Chrome stop tracking you

On your computer

On Android

If you’re wondering where the instructions are for iPhone and iPad, there aren’t any. Google says “Do Not Track” isn’t available for those Apple devices at this time.

If you’re looking for browsers that are a little less invasive, there are alternatives.

Here are 4 Google Chrome alternatives

  • Mozilla Firefox: This popular browser uses “Enhanced tracking protection” which blocks cookies from “cross-site tracking,” i. e. following you around the web. Download Mozilla Firefox here.
  • Safari: The default web browser of the iPhone and iPad, Safari is considered the best browser when it comes to usability and functionality. It has cool features like Reader View, which removes the ads, and iCloud tab browsing. Download Safari here.
  • Internet Explorer: This web browser comes standard on all Windows operating systems. It is known for its reliability and compatibility. Download Internet Explorer here or switch to the faster Microsoft Edge.
  • Opera: While not as popular as the other browsers mentioned, Opera has a number of exclusive features like the ability to stack tabs and create your own keyboard shortcuts. Download Opera here.

After you’ve sent a request for Chrome not to track your activity, you might be interested in wiping your web activity from the browser. Here’s how to do that:

How to delete your web activity on Google Chrome

If you go to myaccount.google.com and click on the Web & App Activity link, you can choose to delete your data automatically or manually.

How often does google update chrome

By clicking the “Choose to delete automatically” button, you’ll have the option to have your web activity deleted every three months or 18 months.

You might also be interested in the search engine DuckDuckGo and even how to control what Google shares about you.

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Google Chrome is infamous for how much it can bog down your device’s performance. The app is a resource hog, but users are getting a major reprieve thanks to the browser’s latest update.

Google Chrome version 87.0.4280.6 has completely changed how it handles your tabs to speed up the browser and reduce its bloat. It also fixes several critical security issues that can put you in danger. Tap or click to see Chrome’s last major security update.

The new update doesn’t just improve Chrome’s performance and security. It also includes new features that make browsing the web more comfortable and more productive. Here’s what you can expect when you update your browser.

Google updates Chrome with better performance and tab searching

Google promises a significant speed boost to Chrome users with the release of its latest update. The company outlined its plans in a new blog post, calling it “the largest gain in Chrome performance in years.”

The biggest change happens under the hood, thanks to Google’s reworking of browser tabs. Previously, Chrome treated tabs like individual system processes rather than part of a single program. The new update eliminates this feature.

Instead, Chrome will prioritize performance in your active tab and keep the rest running in the background. Google claims that most of the work will be handled by JavaScript timers and once-per-minute refreshes. This should improve Chrome’s resource demands on your system.

According to Google, the new way that Chrome handles tabs reduces CPU use up to five times. Plus, laptop users will see a battery boost of up to 1.25 hours, and the browser opens 25% faster and loads pages 7% faster.

Mobile Chrome users on Android will see an even larger boost in performance thanks to how the operating system integrates Chrome into its processes. Pages will supposedly load even faster than before.

Tab searches come to Chrome

Chrome 87.0.4280.66 fixes 33 security flaws among other improvements, but the most notable comes in the form of tab searches — a new way to find what you’re looking for in the pages you have open.

Click the downward-pointing arrow in the upper-right corner of the browser to access tab searching. This won’t close any of your existing tabs or interrupt what you’re doing. It’s just an easy new way to navigate the browser.

You can also try out “Chrome Actions,” a new feature in the browser’s Address Bar. Rather than searching through settings menus to change your password or adjust your privacy, you can type out keywords from this list into the Address Bar. Chrome will take care of the rest.

How do I get these new features and enhancements?

You can get the latest version of Google Chrome by updating your browser, but it may have already installed the update automatically. You can check if you’re using the latest Chrome version on your PC or laptop by clicking on the three-dot icon in the upper right corner and selecting Settings.

From there, tap About Chrome in the menu on the left side of your screen. If your browser is up to date, you’ll see that confirmation. If you need an update, version 87.0.4280.66 will download automatically.

If you want to check whether Chrome is up to date on your smartphone, open the Google Play Store or App Store from your device and look for app updates. If one is available for Chrome, select update. If you don’t have the Google Chrome app, you can download it by clicking the links below.

Если вы недавно изменяли свой сайт, то можете запросить повторное индексирование страниц перечисленными ниже способами.

Общие рекомендации

  • Сканирование может занять как несколько дней, так и несколько недель. О его ходе можно узнавать с помощью специального отчета или инструмента проверки URL.
  • Сроки обработки запросов, поданных любым из перечисленных способов, практически одинаковы.
  • Для запросов сканирования отдельных URL существуют квоты.
  • Если запросить повторное сканирование одного и того же URL или файла Sitemap много раз, оно не будет выполнено быстрее.

Способы отправки запросов на сканирование

Используйте инструмент проверки URL (если URL мало)

Чтобы запросить сканирование одной страницы, используйте инструмент проверки URL. Если же необходимо просканировать большое количество URL, отправьте файл Sitemap.

Чтобы запросить сканирование URL, выполните следующие действия:

  1. Ознакомьтесь с общей информацией, приведенной выше.
  2. Проверьте URL с помощью этого инструмента.
  3. Выберите Запросить индексирование. Инструмент проверит страницу на наличие проблем с индексированием. Если таковые не обнаружатся, страница будет добавлена в очередь на индексирование. Если инструмент выявит проблемы, постарайтесь их решить.

Примечание. Отправка запроса не гарантирует, что страница сразу попадет в индекс и что это вообще произойдет. Прежде всего мы включаем в индекс качественный и полезный контент.

Отправьте файл Sitemap (если URL много)

Файл Sitemap – это средство, помогающее Google находить страницы на вашем сайте. Файл Sitemap может содержать дополнительные метаданные о версиях ресурса на других языках, а также о страницах с видео, изображениями и новостями. Подробнее…

Повторная отправка файла Sitemap, который не был изменен со времени его последнего сканирования, не улучшит результат. Если вы обновляли страницы, включенные в такой файл, отметьте их с помощью тега .

Есть несколько способов сообщить Google о вашем файле Sitemap:

  • Отправьте файл через интерфейс специального отчета.
  • Выполните запрос ping. В браузере или командной строке отправьте запрос GET на приведенный ниже адрес, указав полный URL файла Sitemap и убедившись, что этот файл доступен:
    http://www.google.com/ping?sitemap=
    Пример:
    http://www.google.com/ping?sitemap=https://example.com/sitemap.xml
  • Вставьте в любом месте файла robots.txt , строку с путем к файлу Sitemap (она будет обнаружена при следующем сканировании). Пример:
    Sitemap: http://example.com/my_sitemap.xml

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