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How to clean a projector screen

How to Clean a Projector Screen

The projection screen is undoubtedly, the most visible of your two-piece projection system. The screen is vulnerable and regularly exposed to dirt, dust, damage, and grime. Now, if you want to extend the life of your projector screen, it is absolutely essential for you to clean it frequently. Frequent cleaning prevents the buildup of dust, grime and dirt, ensuring that your picture quality remains top-notch. For added protection, you should also make a habit of retracting the projector screen into its case when not using it. However, there are proper techniques that should be followed and proper materials that should be used to clean the projector. If you fail to use the proper cleaning materials, you could end up damaging your screen.

Before starting the cleaning process, it is essential for you to wear a pair of latex gloves. It would be a shame to get fingernail scratches and fingerprints on the viewing surface now, wouldn´t it?

First step

First and foremost, you should attempt to dust off the screen with a dry rag. You shouldn´t be harsh when you do that; try to be as gentle as possible. You should run the rag over the entire projector screen. If there´s an area on the screen that has built-up dust on them, you can increase the pressure slightly. However, you should avoid scrubbing with the rag at all costs.

Second step

Now, we would advise you to fill a spray bottle with warm water. There is no need for you to add any sort of cleansers or detergents to the solution. Those ingredients can play an atrocious role in causing your screen to fade. You should attempt to use the water before it cools down.

Third step

You will need a clean rag for this process. After you get it, you should spray the warm water on the clean rag. Then, you need to run the rag gently over the entire projector screen. We would advise you to not change your cleaning method at this point. Doing so can affect the quality of the picture in the long run. Since you are using a moist rag to clean the screen, you should continue using the same rag to clean all the different parts. And, as we mentioned earlier, you can add pressure on the areas and spots that have built-up dirt. The moisture should lift the dirt right off. You can change your rag if it gets too dirty.

Fourth step

Once you are done cleaning the screen, you should now dry the screen with a clean rag. You should avoid letting the moisture air-dry. If you do that, you can end up with a ripple effect on your screen. In worst cases, the excess water can also completely damage your screen. Hence, it is imperative for you to wipe the screen as soon as possible with a soft, clean rag. After following the aforementioned processes, your screen should be as good as new.

You might also want check these guides:

The best way to get the longest life and the most use out of your projector screen is to clean it regularly. However, many people actually end up damaging their screens by following this very rule because they do not realize how important it is to clean a projector screen with the proper materials. Cleaning your projector screen regularly will prevent dust and dirt buildup that will interfere with picture quality and require harsher cleaning efforts. Just make sure you are using the right materials and your projector screen could actually last a lifetime.

How to Clean a Projector Screen

Step 1

Dust off the screen with a dry rag. If you clean your screen regularly, this will nearly always be sufficient. Be gentle and run the rag over the entire screen. If there are portions that have built-up dust on them, increase the pressure slightly, but do not scrub with the rag.

Step 2

Fill the spray bottle with warm water. Do not add any detergents or cleansers; these will fade your screen. Simply fill up the spray bottle with hot or warm water and then get right back to cleaning before the water cools.

Step 3

Spray a clean rag with the warm water. Run the rag gently over the entire screen. Once you have started cleaning with a moist rag, you need to clean the whole screen with it. Cleaning different parts using different methods can affect picture quality over time. Use gentle pressure on the spots of built-up dirt and the moisture should lift the dirt right off. If your rag becomes too dirty, switch to a new one so that you are not just smearing dirt around on the screen.

Step 4

Dry the screen with a clean rag. Do not let the moisture air-dry or you may end up with a ripple effect and water damage to your screen. Wipe it down immediately using a soft, clean rag. Now your screen should be as good as new and ready for the next big show.

How to Clean a Projector Screen

Over time, the lens of your projector can accumulate dust. This creates a murky cloud across your image, reducing both the brightness and the sharpness. Knowing how to clean a projector inside lens safely can make sure you’re always getting the best image quality. It will also prevent the need for more expensive repairs in the future.

The good news is, cleaning a projector lens isn’t difficult. While you do have to be careful not to damage or scratch the lens, it’s a relatively quick and easy maintenance task that can extend the life of both your lamp and your projector.

What you’ll need:

  • Compressed air
  • Microfiber cloth
  • Lens cleaning solution
  • Tissue

Step 1: Turn off the projector and unplug it from the wall.

If you’ve been using your projector recently, give it a few hours to cool. The lens gets very hot after use and this makes it more brittle. A cool lens will be less likely to break while cleaning it.

Step 2: Open the projector.

How to Clean a Projector ScreenEvery model is different, so look at your manual to find out how to get inside. Usually, there’s a latch or button on the projector housing.

Step 3: Clean the inside of the projector with compressed air.

Use short bursts, holding the can roughly 3-4 inches from your projector. Move the nozzle around to target dust you see. Continue this around the fan and throughout the housing to eliminate all the dust from inside your projector.

How to Clean a Projector Screen

Step 4: Remove all the dust.

You want to make sure you’re not just blowing the dust back into your projector. Wipe away any visible dirt or dust with a microfiber cloth before you introduce any moisture into the cleaning process.

Step 5: Clean the housing exterior.

A moistened cloth can remove any last traces of dust and dirt from the projector’s case. Do this after you’ve cleaned the inside—dust sticks easily to moisture, and your projector can end up just as dirty as it started. Pay special attention to the fan vent and surrounding area.

Step 6: Clean the lens.

Now that everything’s clean, you can put the finishing touches on your lens. Remove the lens cap. Put a drop or two of the lens cleaner on a tissue and gently wipe the lens in a circular motion. The cleaner dries quickly, so there’s no need to dry it. Once you’re finished, replace the lens cap.

Can a dusty lens be prevented?

Even the best-maintained projector needs to be cleaned periodically, but there are a few easy steps you can take to reduce the amount of dust that gets into your projector.

  • Keep the fan clean. The fan is a necessary part of your projector’s system, helping to alleviate the heat produced by the lamp. It’s also the main reason dust ends up inside your projector, sucking in everything that’s floating in your air. Check the vent every time you turn on your projector. If you see accumulated dust, wipe it away with a damp cloth.
  • Use an air purifier. The more particulates are in your air, the more dust will end up in your projector. Positioning an air purifier close to the projector can serve as an extra line of defense, cleaning the air before it reaches the fan. (Some great options of air purifiers can be found here)
  • Cover the lens when you’re not using it. Both the outside and the inside of your lens can get dusty, but the outside is easier to protect. Replacing the lens cap when you’re not using the projector also protects it from damage.

How to Clean a Projector Screen

Related Articles

In the days before digital projectors and liquid crystal display (LCD) TVs, small businesses turned to old-style slides and roll-up Radiant projection screens to display presentations. If light from a projector hits a dirty Radiant screen, you see unsavory splotches and residue covering your images. The screen can be wiped down for optimal viewing in a matter of minutes, but because Radiant screens aren’t as tough as modern-day equipment, they require greater care when cleaning.

Step 1

Brush the screen with a soft-bristled brush or lint-free cloth to remove surface debris and dust.

Step 2

Add one or two drops of non-moisturizing dish detergent to a bucket of water.

Step 3

Dip a cellulose sponge into the cleaning solution. Squeeze the sponge out to remove excess water. Wipe down the entire screen with the wet sponge.

Step 4

Dry the screen with a chamois. Continue to wipe the surface until it’s completely dry to avoid water spot formation.

  • Do not spot clean the Radiant projection screen. If you see dirt, wipe the whole screen down. Use a light touch when cleaning to avoid scratches. Regular cleaning extends the life of the screen.
  • Avoid using solvents and abrasive cleaners on the screen. Stains such as nicotine or paint may not come off. Scrubbing the screen can scratch the delicate surface of the projection screen.

Writing since 1999, Darla Ferrara is an award-winning author who specializes in health, diet, fitness and computer technology. She has been published in “Mezzo Magazine” and Diet Spotlight, as well as various online magazines. Ferrara studied biology and emergency medical technology at the University of Nebraska and Southeast Community College.

Cleaning the projector screen will help to keep it safe and last longer. But, most people damage their screens through cleaning. They don’t know how important it is to clean the screen with the right materials.

How to Clean a Projector Screen

Cleaning the projector regularly helps to prevent dirt buildup and dust that may interfere with image quality and require hard cleaning efforts. If you want to keep the projector screen safe, ensure that you use the right materials when cleaning. It can even last a lifetime.

How to clean the projector screen

  1. Use a dry rag to dust off the screen. This can be sufficient if you clean the screen regularly. Ensure that you are gentle and run the dry rag through the whole screen. You can increase the pressure slightly if there are some areas with built-up dirt or dust. Don’t scrub with the rug.
  2. Fill a spray bottle with warm water and do not add any cleansers or detergents. The detergents will make the screen fade. Clean the screen immediately before the water cools.
  3. Spray a clean rag with the hot or warm water and run the rag over the screen gently. Clean the whole screen with the moist rag. Using different methods when cleaning may affect the image quality after some time.
  4. Apply gentle pressure when cleaning areas with built-up dirt and the warm moisture will help to lift the dirt off. If the rag becomes too dirty, use another clean rag so that you don’t smear dirt around the screen.
  5. Use a clean, dry rag to dry the screen. Don’t allow the moisture to air-dry. This may cause a ripple effect and damage the screen. Wipe the screen immediately, and the screen should be clean and new for the next show.

Tips for cleaning a projector screen

The screen is the most visible part of the two-piece projection. It is also the most vulnerable to grime and damage. To avoid dirt and dust, it is important to keep the screen clean and retracted in its case when not in use. The following are some of the tips that can help you when cleaning the screen.

1. Wear gloves

It is possible to find fingernail scratches and fingerprints on the screen surface that you are trying to clean. So, wear gloves when cleaning or adjusting the screen. Latex works well, no scratchy fibers or lint left behind.

2. Don’t let it wait

Keep the projection surface free of dirt and dust. Don’t let dirt build-up for several days or months. Take action immediately when you see the foreign matter, dirt, fingerprints, or some stains.

3. Soft rag

Ensure that you don’t use a scrubbing sponge or something scratchy, hard cleaning rag. The screen can be damaged easily if you use a rough material to clean. A soft, lint-free cloth is ideal for cleaning. Ensure that you are gentle.

4. No chemical cleaning solutions

Don’t use any cleaner that contains wax, abrasives, or harsh chemicals. It is recommended to use simply water. If it doesn’t clean well, try dishwashing liquid and warm water.

5. Don’t use Armor All

Using armor all can end up damaging the projector screen surface. Even though most proctor screens are vinyl, there is a more flexible projection screen than vinyl. The coating over the vinyl does the projection work.

Projector screens are not the same

Different projection surfaces require different cleaning and handling. For the old projector screens like Matt White vinyl screen, water, soap, and a soft clean work well. A tough stain can be wiped with a little pressure. The premium screens like TecVision line, they need gentle blotting. You can use a mixture of warm water and Clorox formula 409; a dry cloth is used.

If you don’t know the kind of screen you have, it is important to consult the manufacturer to ensure that you are not damaging it.

Dusting and spot cleaning a projector screen will ensure that performance remains optimum and can preserve it for a long period. You can seek guidance from experts or manufacturers before you attempt to spot cleaning the screen. The screens are prone to damage if cleaned inappropriately. If it is used in a clean, dust-free environment, the screen may not require regular cleaning. If it is made of high quality materials, there is minimal degradation.

Various sources of dust and dirt will cause contamination of the screen surface. It is important to consider eliminating the sources of dirt and dust to reduce the need for screen cleaning. Some of the sources include handprints, air condition, and popcorn blowers. Cleaning the projector regularly helps to prevent dirt buildup and dust that may interfere with image quality and require hard cleaning efforts. If you want to keep the projector screen safe, ensure that you use the right materials when cleaning and use the above tips.

Updated on January 22, 2020

When you hit the power button on your projector’s remote, in short order you have a vibrant image projected in front of you. It is easy to forget all of the steps that happened in between the image entering your projector and it being beamed onto your wall or screen.

A number of digital signals, zeros and ones, traveled through your HDMI cable. Light reflects off of specially designed mirrors and then goes through the interpolation process where it is translated from binary to pixels.

White light ricochets off of a number of specially designed mirrors, which in turn forces the light to travel through pixels that are the building blocks of the image.

This newly illuminated image is adjusted for color via LCD screens or a dichroic prism. However, this entire unique process can be negated if your projector lens is dirty, smudged, or dusty.

The projector’s lens is the end stage of the process. The lens is responsible for:

  • Sharpening the image
  • Properly magnifying the image
  • Illuminating the image
  • Adjusting image colors properly

When the lens is dirty, it needs to be cleaned. However, you cannot just go about cleaning the lens as you would a mirror or a glass window. In this guide we are going to discuss the proper way to clean a dirty lens before your next classroom presentation.

A dirty projector screen can ruin your view. These tips help you clean the right way.

How to Clean a Projector Screen

Your projector screen is an integral part of your projector set up. A dirty projector screen can affect your viewing experience. A build up of dust particles, grime and other marks affects a screen’s reflective properties. Regular cleaning and maintenance will give you the best possible picture all the time.

Regular cleaning is important but equally important is the method of cleaning. How you clean your screen will depend on the screen service. Be sure to follow the specific instructions for your screen type.

Universal tips

  • Avoid touching the screen since oil from your hands can build up over time and leave marks. Handle your screen using gloves to minimize the marks.
  • Keep your projector closed up to reduce the amount of dust and grime is accumulates
  • Every one to three days lightly dust your screen off with a clean, dry micro-rag.

Uncoated screens

Uncoated vinyl fabrics screen can be high contrast grey, matte or white. They should be dusted regularly every few days. When there is grim build up, spray a soft microfiber cloth with warm water. Make sure the cloth is free of any abrasive cleaners or detergents. Chemicals can leave marks or fade the screen.

With medium pressure, gently wipe the damp with an up and down motion. Don’t scrub or clean only on one area. When the cloth becomes very dirty, switch to a new one so you are not smearing dust around. Be sure to shake off the cloth after each stroke.

Don’t leave excessive water on the screen as this can dry into stains on the screen. You can end up with a ripple if water is left to dry on the screen. Dry the screen off with a separate rag. Once the screen is dry, check for any missed spots.

Glass or acrylic screens

Special care must be taken with glass or acrylic projector screens as they are easily scratched. Dust these screens daily to minimize build up of grime. For rigid rear screens, use a mixture of ¼ mild soap to ¾ water to clean the screen. Make sure the cloth used soft, lint-free and very damp.

Isopropanol 70% or 99% is easily available at most drug stores in the first aid section.

As flabdablet points out, do a spot test somewhere innocuous, but 2-prop’s pretty mild.

You can apply with cotton balls, but a paper towel should be fine.

“Soaking” it (leaving on for a little while before wiping dry) can also help re-solublize the pigment.
posted by porpoise at 1:51 PM on February 1, 2018 [1 favorite]

Screens are usually vinyl, yeah, but most have a coating that helps reflect the image back at the audience, and that’s what you’re in danger of damaging.

Da-Lite, a company that makes a lot of screens, suggests:

1) mix of distilled water and dish detergent

2) Clorox Green Works or Formula 409

3) Isopropyl alcohol as a last resort

From personal experience, you should use a soft cotton rag, like an old T-shirt (you can buy bags of “old T-shirt rags” in most big-box hardware stores); rub in one direction, not in circles; don’t scrub hard, be fairly gentle; because you’re not scrubbing hard, you’re gonna want to do a LOT of passes across the screen – don’t just swipe it a few times and then give up, give yourself at least fifteen minutes of regular wiping to see if you’re having an effect. You need to put some “elbow grease” into it, but that’s in terms of time, not effort, if you see what I mean.
posted by soundguy99 at 4:34 PM on February 1, 2018 [1 favorite]

Yeah. It pains me to say that goatdog is right.

But a sheet of legal paper and four small pieces of tape does the trick for now.
posted by donpardo at 6:11 AM on February 2, 2018

Things You’ll Need

ReMarkable Whiteboard Cleaner

Mr. Clean Magic Eraser

How to Clean a Projector Screen

Forget that that projection screen wasn’t a white board? It’s a common mistake, and, while removing those marks may be difficult, it’s not impossible. Stain removal largely depends on the material from which the screen is made and how long the stain has been allowed to sit on the screen. Your success is more likely the sooner the stain is addressed.

Step 1

Try using ReMarkable Whiteboard Cleaner. This product is designed specifically to remove dry erase ink. Be sure to hold a cloth under the area that is being sprayed to catch any drips and prevent the stain from spreading to other parts of the screen. Spray the cleaner and wipe the ink away. Repeat until the stain is removed. Do not let the screen get so wet that it gets damaged; allow it to dry between applications if necessary. When the stain is removed, wipe off residue with water and a soft cloth.

Step 2

If the ReMarkable Whiteboard Cleaner fails to remove the stain, try the Mr. Clean Magic Eraser. This product has proven successful at removing a variety of stains, whether you’re worried about dry erase ink or any scuff marks on the screen. Simply moisten the sponge and gently rub over the stain. Continue rubbing until the stain is removed. Once the stain has been removed, wipe away any residue with a little water and a soft cloth.

Step 3

Try pre-treating the stain. If the Magic Eraser is not successful, the screen may need to be treated with something first. Try wetting a cotton swab with rubbing alcohol and rubbing the swab over the area first, then try using the Magic Eraser again. If the rubbing alcohol does not help, try the same method with Simple Green. When finished removing the stain, wipe away any residue with a little water and a soft cloth.

If you want to get the most use and longest life out of your projection screen fabric, you must clean it on a regular basis. This will ensure that you keep off any build up of dirt, oils, and other debris so that you get the best possible picture all the time.

But itЎЇs not enough to just clean your projection screen regularly. You must do it the right way. Many owners actually do clean their projection screens regularly, but they do it the wrong way and end up damaging the fabric, which ultimately causes the diminished picture quality which they were trying to avoid in the first place.

Use the following guide to clean and maintain your projection screen fabric the proper way.

First you want to avoid touching the screen with your bare hands. At any given moment, your hands have oil and dirt on them. Although, this amount of dirt and oil is usually minute, it can and will build up on the screen if you touch your projector screen with bare hands enough times. Always handle your projection screen fabric with dusting gloves. It is also very helpful to invest in appliances that will keep your projector screen closed off from the open area or retracted.

With a soft, clean, dry micro-fiber rag, you will want to lightly dust off your projector screen every one to three days. Doing this will almost certainly ensure that you are keeping off any extreme build up. If you can dust consistently, this should be all you need to do to keep your screen clean. If you allow several days or weeks to pass between dustings, use the following instructions.

For all vinyl based projector screen fabric, such as matte white and high contrast grey, dust the surface with a clean, dry micro-fiber rag. Next, spray another dry and clean rag with warm water. At this point do not use any detergents, abrasives or solvents as many of these chemical solutions can fade your screen. Gently run your moist rag over the entire surface. Do not spot clean and do not scrub. Doing so will diminish image quality by creating unevenness in the projections. If you have a particularly dirty screen, you will want to switch to a new rag every quarter of the way so that you are not smearing dirty water all over your screen. Try to work quickly and do not allow the moisture to air dry on the screen. This can cause staining. Thoroughly dry your projector screen fabric with yet another clean, dry micro-fiber rag.

Once your projection screen is completely dry, check for any soiled areas which you might have missed. If you find any, do the above mentioned steps all over again, but with a fifty / fifty mixture of water and mild dish soap or all purpose cleaner. We recommend products from Seven Generation or Simple Green.

More care has to be given in the maintenance of glass and acrylic based projector screens. Glass bead projector screens must be dusted gently with a clean, dry micro-fiber rag on a daily basis without exception. Unfortunately you cannot use any cleaning solutions to clean glass bead screens as these will certainly damage the delicate surface. Rigid rear screen projectors made out of glass or acrylic can be cleaned with a 75 / 25 mixture of water and very mild soap, but you must ensure that you use a lint free clothe and wring out any excess moisture from the clothe before you apply it to the surface.

How to Clean Your Projection Screen
By Dave Rodgers (Marketing Manager of Elite Screens Inc.)

How to Clean a Projector Screen

In some high-end installations, there may be better-than-average protection for audio-visual gear against mishaps. However, in most cases, there is an apparent risk that should always be considered and a “what-to-do” plan for when it does. When it comes to messes, a large projection screen surface is a hard target to miss. Fortunately, there is a process to clean most projector screen materials. Step 1 is to check your user guide, call the manufacturer or visit the manufacturer’s website to get their recommendation on cleaning your screen.

Some cleaning solvents may actually destroy your screen material or leave it permanently stained so it’s very important to know your “cans and cant’s” before starting. Here are the basic “dirty screen” complaints and what should be done about it.

Screen appears stained, streaked, or otherwise soiled – Check with the screen manufacturer on the proper cleaning process. It typically involves the use of a microfiber cloth and maybe a mild soap and water solution.

For Matte White, Matte Grey, Rear-Projection or Acoustically Transparent Materials

  • A dry (preferably white) “lint-free” microfiber cloth is the first choice in trying to clean a film screen. It is ideal for textured matte white materials as well as specialty materials.
  • Normally, you may use a damp microfiber cloth with warm soapy water to clean the material. Don’t be too firm when applying the cloth but it will clean out. Follow this up with a second microfiber cloth that is dry to remove all the moisture from the screen.
  • Always wipe in a left-to-right motion. Never make circular-wipes. “Wax-on, wax-off” circular strokes are a really bad ideal.
  • Use the moistened cloth first and follow up with a dry cloth.
  • Spot cleaning tough stains can often be done using a Q-tip with alcohol making gentle strokes.

For Ambient Light/Ceiling Light Rejecting (ALR-CLR®) Materials

  • Gently blot with a damp (with distilled water) microfiber cloth. Do not rub.
  • Wiping can be done gently in an up-down motion. Never wipe in a circular motion.
  • Heavily soiled or “sticky” parts can be removed using a solution of equal parts Formula 409 and water.
  • Never spray Formula 409 directly onto the screen material.
  • Never use other solvents on the material.
  • For any material, if this is a “roll-up” screen, never roll it up wet.

Screen is wrinkled – This is more typical with portable screens and usually results from improper storage. A combination of gravity and heat can usually fix it.

  • If it is a retractable or “roll-up” material, put it in the open position for the natural effects of gravity
  • If it is either a wall of portable “free-standing” frame screen, make sure that it is fully assembled so that the natural stretch of the canvas on the frame will aid in flattening out the material.
  • Heat should be applied sparingly. If it’s too hot for your skin to comfortably bear it, then it’s certainly too hot for the material.
  • Do not use a steamer. They are usually too hot and often will irreparably damage the screen material.
  • Use a hair dryer on a medium setting instead. Make light passes, going side-to-side about 10 to 15 seconds just enough to warm up the material and you may repeat this about 3 times or so. There is no exact number here. It’s something you need to feel through.
  • There are some specialty materials that are very delicate. These include many of the ALR (ambient light rejecting) and CLR® (ceiling light rejecting) materials that utilize a network of reflective microstructures. If these become wrinkled, they may very well likely be ruined. If this is the case, consult your manufacturer’s warranty policy and service team for options.

Screen is scratched, cut, or punctured – This is essentially a “mortal wound” to the product. Consult your warranty policy for options

It may be possible for someone with the requisite skills to patch the material but it will never look perfect and such alterations likely void any further warranty coverage so this advice is to be used as a last resort.

How to Clean a Photocopier Drum

Sanyo projectors come in a variety of models including ones with ports for connecting a television tuner, DVD player, VCR and other electronics. The projectors also interface with your computer for displaying presentations, multimedia projects, slideshows and Internet websites. Sanyo projectors, like other electronics, contain a fan and a filter that regulate the devices’ internal temperature and capture debris. The filter, and other parts including the lens and external casing, needs regular cleaning to remove dust, dirt and debris.

Filters

Turn off your Sanyo projector by flipping the “On/Off” switch on the back of the device. Unplug the projector’s power cord.

Turn the projector upside down. Locate and remove the two filters on the device’s bottom by pulling the filters up from the slots the filters are in.

Use a computer vacuum cleaner, available at computer and electronic stores, or a stiff brush to clean the filters.

Re-insert the filters into the projector. Turn the projector upright, plug in its power cord and turn on the device.

Press the “Menu” button to access the “On-Screen Menu.” Use the “Point” button to scroll down to the “Setting Menu,” then press the “Select” button.

Scroll to “Filter Counter” then press the “Select” button. Scroll to “Filter Counter Reset” then press the “Select” button. When prompted with “Filter Counter Reset?,” click “Yes.” Click “Yes” again to confirm that you want to reset the filter counter.

Projection Lens

Turn off your Sanyo projector by flipping the “On/Off” switch on the back of the device. Unplug the projector’s power cord.

Spray a teaspoon of non-abrasive camera lens cleaner on a lens cleaning cloth.

Wipe the projector’s lens gently with the lens cleaning cloth. Do not use an excessive amount of lens cleaner—this can lead to scratches on your projector’s lens.

Projector’s Cabinet

Turn off your Sanyo projector by flipping the “On/Off” switch on the back of the device. Unplug the projector’s power cord.

Wipe your Sanyo projector’s cabinet, including all sides, with a soft, non-abrasive cloth or rag.

Mix 1 tsp. of mild dishwashing detergent and 1/2 cup of warm water in a bowl. Dip the soft, non-abrasive cloth or rag in the soap mixture. Wring out excess.

Wipe any heavy debris on your Sanyo projector’s cabinet with the mixture-soaked cloth or rag.

Dry the projector with a dry, non-abrasive cloth or rag.

Your Sanyo projector contains a “Filter warning” that illuminates an icon on your projector’s screen when the device’s filters are dirty. If the icon appears, clean the filters immediately.

Warnings

Do not use abrasive cleaners or solvents to clean your Sanyo projector’s cabinet, lens or filters. These substances can damage your projector’s components.

sleepwalker3

Registered


attempting to clean a line with a cloth and water, however delicately applied, has created a large dark smudge in that area.

any solution to this? it seems that this screen is unable to be cleaned without causing bigger problems

its the high gain draper radiant

on this note, is there any high-gain paint that can be used instead of a screen? i mean 2.5-3.0 gain

ben38

Registered

My friend had the same problem with his Da-lite high power screen. He followed Da-lite’s cleaning instructions to the letter and still made matters worse.

After a very angry phone call, Da-Lite sent him a new screen.

sleepwalker3

Registered

ben38

Registered

airscapes

Registered

Dalite high power screen can be cleaned with Denatured Alcohol and a couple of microfiber rags. You have to be careful and sometimes the marks do not come off.. If you use to much mechanical force you can damage the surface. The new 2.4 HPs are not s smooth as the 2.8 and more difficult to clean. Draper, I “think” is the same as the 2.4. I have had good luck removing bug muck from the 2.8 with hydrogen peroxide.. Water on the microbeads take a very long time to dry, sometime more than a few days. If you have a dark circle where it was wet, try placing a small fan in the room with the screen for a few days and see if it fades. If it has been a few years since the entire screen was cleaned, it is best to do a complete cleaning.. then it will be of an even shade rather than a big old round spot.

Good luck and tread lightly! Search Cleaning Dailte or Cleaning HP there are a couple of detailed treads on what people have done with good results

How to Clean a Projector Screen

Cleaning your projection screen

Over time, it is normal for dust and grime to accumulate on a screen surface and affect its reflective properties.

It is important to limit contaminants in the area where your screen is installed and to regularly remove any accumulation on the screen surface by following the recommendations below. Proper maintenance will not only extend your screen’s life, it will also ensure optimal screen performance.

Because screen surfaces vary, it is important that you follow the correct instructions for your screen type. Coated screens are particularly vulnerable to damage and require careful attention.

If your screen is uncoated:

Wipe lightly with a damp cloth. If grime is difficult to remove with only water, you may use a small amount of mild liquid soap. Make sure the cloth you use is very soft to avoid scratching the surface. Rinse the cloth often with clean water.

If your screen is coated:

Coated screens include our silver 3D and white gain surfaces. These projection screens are coated with sophisticated finishes that are easier to damage than non-coated surfaces. Harsh products may strip the coating and permanently affect the screen’s reflective properties. Delicate care is required for these types of screens. To remove any contaminants on the surface, brush lightly with a clean microfiber cloth. We find those attached to a telescopic pole particularly practical for large surfaces. Using a telescopic pole also limits the risk of scratching the screen with nails and/or jewelry. Using moderate pressure, wipe the surface with an up and down motion. Be sure to shake off the cloth after each stroke. Never wipe the screen with a dirty cloth, change it as soon as it is slightly dirty.

With adequate care, your screen will retain its viewing properties for several years. Give us a call if you need further instructions.

How to Clean a Projector Screen

Cleaning your projection screen

How to Clean a Projector Screen

Over time, it is normal for dust and grime to accumulate on a screen surface and affect its reflective properties.

It is important to limit contaminants in the area where your screen is installed and to regularly remove any accumulation on the screen surface by following the recommendations below. Proper maintenance will not only extend your screen’s life, it will also ensure optimal screen performance.

Because screen surfaces vary, it is important that you follow the correct instructions for your screen type. Coated screens are particularly vulnerable to damage and require careful attention.

If your screen is uncoated:

Wipe lightly with a damp cloth. If grime is difficult to remove with only water, you may use a small amount of mild liquid soap. Make sure the cloth you use is very soft to avoid scratching the surface. Rinse the cloth often with clean water.

If your screen is coated:

Coated screens include our silver 3D and white gain surfaces. These projection screens are coated with sophisticated finishes that are easier to damage than non-coated surfaces. Harsh products may strip the coating and permanently affect the screen’s reflective properties. Delicate care is required for these types of screens. To remove any contaminants on the surface, brush lightly with a clean microfiber cloth. We find those attached to a telescopic pole particularly practical for large surfaces. Using a telescopic pole also limits the risk of scratching the screen with nails and/or jewelry. Using moderate pressure, wipe the surface with an up and down motion. Be sure to shake off the cloth after each stroke. Never wipe the screen with a dirty cloth, change it as soon as it is slightly dirty.

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  • Last Updated: 17th May, 2020

    1. Step 1: Turn off the projector and unplug it from the wall. If you’ve been using your projector recently, give it a few hours to cool.
    2. Step 2: Open the projector.
    3. Step 3: Clean the inside of the projector with compressed air.
    4. Step 4: Remove all the dust.
    5. Step 5: Clean the housing exterior.
    6. Step 6: Clean the lens.

    In this way, how do you clean dust off a projector lens?

    Clean the projector’s lens periodically, or whenever you notice dust or smudges on the surface.

    1. To remove dust or smudges, gently wipe the lens with lens-cleaning paper.
    2. To remove stubborn smudges, moisten a soft, lint-free cloth with lens cleaner and gently wipe the lens. Do not spray any liquid directly on the lens.

    Secondly, how do you clean the outside of a projector lens? Cleaning a Dirty Lens

    1. Get rid of a build up of dirt by using a non-abrasive lens cleaning solution.
    2. Avoid alcohol to clean the projector lens.
    3. NEVER apply the cleansing solution directly to the lens.
    4. Apply the cleaning solution to a soft, dry and lint-free cloth bought at a camera or photography shop.

    Besides, how do you clean a polarizer on a projector?

    To remove dust, dirt, or smudges from the polarizing filters, use a soft, dry, lint-free cloth.

    Why is it necessary to clean the air filter of an LCD projector?

    Prevent clogs Air filters that are not cleaned on a regular basis become clogged and prevent the cool air from being drawn inside. This can cause the projector to overheat and even shut down. You also want clean air filters to prevent dust from settling onto the projector lens.

    How to clean ink off of a projection screen?

    How to clean ink off of a projection screen?

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    Dave FR PD130

    Novice Member

    I have recently acquired a 2nd hand screen and have managed to clean it up really nicely and repair the mechanism so it locks in place etc.

    The only snag, is there is a 3 inch long vertical blue pen mark, pretty much in the centre of the screen.

    I have tried lots of different solutions to try and remove it, but alas I am having a nightmare trying to shift it! (e.g. mentholated spirits, alcohol, acetone, vanish stick and other cosmetic cleaning products including nail varnish remover etc)

    Any ideas or advice would be greatly appreciated.

    Thanks in advance.

    dannius

    Well-known Member

    Is it permanent marker?

    Sounds bizarre but I have found that deodorant (lynx etc) is very effective at removing permanent marker.

    Not a very technical reply I know (not sure what ingredient it is that does this exactly) but worth a try I reckon.

    Fred Flintstone4

    Novice Member

    Hi Dave, do you know what type of screen material it is or what made the blue mark? Is the screen vinyl (smooth) or is it woven fibreglass (you can see the warp and weft in the material, i.e. when you look at the back of the material through a magnifying glass you can see individual fibres)? It seems that you’ve tried all the obvious cleaning agents and a couple I wouldn’t recommend because they might damage the surface.

    Without knowing what caused the mark and what material is involved I can’t suggest anything other than disguising the mark rather than removing it. BTW, the screen material manufacturers only recommend mild soapy water!

    KelvinS1965

    Distinguished Member

    This might sound bizarre, but we had a biro mark on our cream coloured leather sofa and hairspray and gentle rubbing with a damp cloth helped remove it. I think the missus searched to web to find that one. Obviously try it on an inconspicous part of the screen first.

    Dave FR PD130

    Novice Member

    Thanks for then replies guys! Sorry i havn’t posted back sooner (i was expecting to be emailed to be told some1 had replied to my post. o well lol).

    I got this screen 2nd hand for free and it came to me broken and rather dirty, so i fixed the mechanism and cleaned it up so it’s really nice and clean now.

    However this means, i have no i idea what type of pen caused the mark.

    The screen appears to be fibre glass and has a label on the top right hand corner saying “Busy Board” if that helps at all?

    I certainly have tried a lot of chemicals. and like one of you said, some i probably shouldn’t have, however the service hasn’t suffered any damage as of yet.

    So at the moment i now have Lynx and Hair spray to try from your posts. Both of which i never thought of lol.

    Any more suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    Today I’m going to show you how to fix the DLP projector flickering colors on the screen error.

    And today, I’m taking apart of my Acer X1230P projector as an example to show you the steps:

    If your DLP projector is flashing colors like this case, you may check these fixing steps out.

    And hope this guide will have some value for you.

    Above all, we have to exclude other reasons and confirm the flickering color is caused by the dirty projector color wheel.

    First of all, check the cable connected to the external device. And confirm it isn’t intermittent.

    If the external cable’s plug is not firmly enough, just plug it tight. Moreover, you can replace another cable to try.

    Press the AUTO POSITION button on the remote control.

    Some computers output out-of-spec signals on rare occasion. Adjust the Signal menu.

    When the input signal is a WXGA video signal, confirm the setting selected in WXGA in the options menu.

    When the input signal is other than a WXGA video signal, select OFF in WXGA in the Options menu.

    Confirm it caused by the dead lamp.

    If your projector flickering brightness on and off, the broken projector lamp lead to this error.

    The solution to fix this is replacing a new spare lamp to check.

    Up to the present time, if the projector flickering on the screen is not fixed, after checking the above situation, you may consider taking out of the projector and cleaning the projector color wheel and its sensor.

    But before diving it the process, we should know how does the projector color wheel look like and why is it flickering.

    What Is The Projector Color Wheel

    The projector color wheel in DLP projector plays the role of color separation and processing. The color wheel is only designed in single-chip DLP and two-chip DLP projectors. And the three-chip DLP projectors aren’t built with a color wheel.

    How does the projector color wheel look like:

    How to Clean a Projector Screen

    There is a very thin metal layer vacuum-coated in the surface of the projector color wheel. With different projector technology, the color wheel is coated with red, green, blue, white and even yellow.

    There is a variable speed motor in the color wheel.

    The motor drives the rotation of the color wheel to achieve separation and filtration. Therefore, with the effect of the color mixing, the projected image appears with a different color.

    Nowadays’ projector color wheel is not only including the color red, green and blue panel.

    The projector manufacturer, in order to improve the color and sharpness, also add the white yellow and pink color panel to the color wheel.

    What Causes Your Projector Image Color Flickering

    The projector color wheel is the main part that the light shines through and gives you the color on the screen. As the canal point of the light path of the projector bulb, the temperature here will reach as high as 80-90 degrees.

    Over times passed, the dust builds up inside of the projector, and the color wheel will be aging. Specifically in the dusty and wet projecting environment.

    That is the main reason to stop the projector color wheel working properly. Finally, you will see the flashing color on the screen or even shut down automatically.

    In order to get it to work correctly again, you have to clean the dust from as many places as you can, particularly the projector color wheel and its sensor.

    Or even have to replace a new projector wheel when the old one is corroded.

    ABOUT THE AUTHOR

    Mason Howard

    Whether they are in a Hollywood movie, a business presentation or a home video, moving images on a projection screen are theatrical, dynamic and attention-grabbing. However, dirty or stained screens bear flecks and spots that distract the viewer. Discoloration and yellowing can also impair the true colors of the imagery. You can restore an old screen to pure neutrality and guarantee clean, clear images, using paint designed for projection surfaces.

    How to Clean a Projector Screen

    Things You’ll Need

    Soft-nap paint roller

    Projection screen paint

    Step 1

    Sweep the screen with the brush to remove loose detritus.

    Step 2

    Mix one part of detergent with five parts of hot water. Dip the sponge into the solution, and use it to blot away the stains. Let the screen dry.

    Step 3

    Stir the primer thoroughly. Paint the primer on the screen, using a soft-nap roller to avoid bristle lines that brushes can leave. If you plan to roll up the screen for storage, ensure that the primer is also flexible. Let the primer dry.

    Step 4

    Roll a light coat of paint on the screen. Let the first coat dry. Apply a second thin coat. Let it dry.

    Latex screen paint offers the best flexibility.

    Warning

    As projection screens are typically made from vinyl, they must be primed with a product designed for use on plastics.

    How to Clean a Projector Screen

    By Dave Rodgers (Marketing Manager of Elite Screens Inc.)

    In some high-end installations, there may be better-than-average protection for audio-visual gear against mishaps. However, in most cases, there is an apparent risk that should always be considered and a “what-to-do” plan for when it does. When it comes to messes, a large projection screen surface is a hard target to miss. Fortunately, there is a process to clean most projector screen materials. Step 1 is to check your user guide, call the manufacturer or visit the manufacturer’s website to get their recommendation on cleaning your screen.

    Some cleaning solvents may actually destroy your screen material or leave it permanently stained so it’s very important to know your “cans and cant’s” before starting. Here are the basic “dirty screen” complaints and what should be done about it.

    How to Clean a Projector Screen

    Screen appears stained, streaked, or otherwise soiled

    – Check with the screen manufacturer on the proper cleaning process. It typically involves the use of a microfiber cloth and maybe a mild soap and water solution.

    For Matte White, Matte Grey, Rear-Projection or Acoustically Transparent Materials

    • A dry (preferably white) “lint-free” microfiber cloth is the first choice in trying to clean a film screen. It is ideal for textured matte white materials as well as specialty materials.
    • Normally, you may use a damp microfiber cloth with warm soapy water to clean the material. Don’t be too firm when applying the cloth but it will clean out. Follow this up with a second microfiber cloth that is dry to remove all the moisture from the screen.
    • Always wipe in a left-to-right motion. Never make circular-wipes. “Wax-on, wax-off” circular strokes are a really bad ideal.
    • Use the moistened cloth first and follow up with a dry cloth.
    • Spot cleaning tough stains can often be done using a Q-tip with alcohol making gentle strokes.

    For Ambient Light/Ceiling Light Rejecting (ALR-CLR®) Materials

    • Gently blot with a damp (with distilled water) microfiber cloth. Do not rub.
    • Wiping can be done gently in an up-down motion. Never wipe in a circular motion.
    • Heavily soiled or “sticky” parts can be removed using a solution of equal parts Formula 409 and water.
    • Never spray Formula 409 directly onto the screen material.
    • Never use other solvents on the material.
    • For any material, if this is a “roll-up” screen, never roll it up wet.

    Screen is wrinkled

    – This is more typical with portable screens and usually results from improper storage. A combination of gravity and heat can usually fix it.

    • If it is a retractable or “roll-up” material, put it in the open position for the natural effects of gravity
    • If it is either a wall of portable “free-standing” frame screen, make sure that it is fully assembled so that the natural stretch of the canvas on the frame will aid in flattening out the material.
    • Heat should be applied sparingly. If it’s too hot for your skin to comfortably bear it, then it’s certainly too hot for the material.
    • Do not use a steamer. They are usually too hot and often will irreparably damage the screen material.
    • Use a hair dryer on a medium setting instead. Make light passes, going side-to-side about 10 to 15 seconds just enough to warm up the material and you may repeat this about 3 times or so. There is no exact number here. It’s something you need to feel through.
    • There are some specialty materials that are very delicate. These include many of the ALR (ambient light rejecting) and CLR® (ceiling light rejecting) materials that utilize a network of reflective microstructures. If these become wrinkled, they may very well likely be ruined. If this is the case, consult your manufacturer’s warranty policy and service team for options.

    Screen is scratched, cut, or punctured

    – This is essentially a “mortal wound” to the product. Consult your warranty policy for options

    It may be possible for someone with the requisite skills to patch the material but it will never look perfect and such alterations likely void any further warranty coverage so this advice is to be used as a last resort.

    Coopson

    Active Member

    Hi whats the best way to remove stains form a projector screen I rolled up my Grandview Cyber Manual screen the other day and a bug must have gotten squashed on it.

    I managed to wipe most of it up with water and a cloth but there’s still a little blood left over and its not shifting with warm water at all.

    Attachments

    Sandra51

    Active Member

    noiseboy72

    Distinguished Member

    Pecker

    Distinguished Member

    I hope the above works.

    If it fails, here’s a last resort.

    Get a scourer – the sort you clean pans with, a rectangle of sponge with a course scourer on one side.

    Warm, soapy water, lots of elbow grease, scrub very small areas at once.

    Use the white ones (non-stick) first, then the dark green (heavy duty) if that doesn’t work.

    If you have to resort to the latter you may find a green ‘patch’ where you’ve scrubbed. Clean this with the sponge, or failing that, the white non-stick scourer.

    Eventually every projector lens gets dirty or dusty.

    How to Clean a Projector Screen

    Here are some tips on how to clean your projector lens without damaging it.

    Before cleaning:

    • Turn off the projector
    • Unplug the power cable
    • Let the projector cool down. It should be cool to the touch.

    How to Clean a Projector Screen

    Avoid:

    • Abrasive cleaners, solvents or other harsh cleaning chemicals – they can damage the lens.
    • Paper towels or tissues as the hard fibers in this material can scratch the lens while leaving particles behind.

    How to Clean a Projector ScreenCleaning a Dirty Lens

    • Get rid of a build up of dirt by using a non-abrasive lens cleaning solution.
    • Avoid alcohol to clean the projector lens.
    • NEVER apply the cleansing solution directly to the lens.
    • Apply the cleaning solution to a soft, dry and lint-free cloth bought at a camera or photography shop. You can also use a proper photographic lens brush to gently wipe the lens surface.
    • Wipe the cloth gently in circular motion.
    • NEVER touch the lens with your finger since oil from your skin can leave a mark.
    • Replace the lens caps in you are not planning on using the projector immediately afterwards.

    How to Clean a Projector ScreenGetting rid of dust

    • Use a can of compressed air to remove dust from the lens.
    • Purchase the right type of compressed air that is suitable for lens. Check at your local photography store.
    • Be sure to stand at least seven inches away from the lens before spraying the compressed air to avoid cracking the lens.
    • Avoid dusty areas with excessive dirt and your projector will last longer.

    Read more about maintaining your projector:

    8 comments on “ Clean your projector lens properly ”

    We have a projector at our school where the image is blurred and it looks like someone stuck a sticky label on the lens and the glue from the lens has now burned on!! What would you suggest to try before we scrap the projector!

    Hi Ann,
    Try picking up some lens tissue and lens cleaning fluid from a camera shop. That should remove the glue and the projector will work. You can also see about getting a replacement lens which may be cheaper than buying a new projector.
    Cheers,
    Shelagh

    We use our projector outside, a part of a moth wing is stuck to the lens. How should i clean it?

    Hi Ken,
    If this is on the outside then it’s simple:
    Proper steps

    Step 1: Used compressed air or a small blower brush to remove any dust or debris from the lens. Don’t try cleaning the lens before using the compressed air or you can scratch the lens. Be sure to stand at least seven inches away from the lens . Purchase the right type of compressed air that is suitable for lens.

    Step 2: If the lens is still dirty, use a camera microfiber cloth to gently wipe the lens in a circular motion staring from the center. If the lens is sticky, then put one or two drop of lens cleaning solution onto lens tissue and gently wipe the lens – again in a circular motion. You can also use a carbon-based lens using its soft brush pen to clean the lens. Avoid using rags that will leave any lint. Paper towels or tissues as the hard fibers in this material can scratch the lens while leaving particles behind.

    Step 3: Let the lens dry if you have used the solution. Give another blast to compressed air to remove any dust from the cloth. Avoid touching the lens directly. Oil from your fingers will leave a mark.

    If it’s on the inside of the lens, then you will need to refer to your user manual to remove the lens and clean it — much the same way as on the to outside.
    Read more in our article: http://www.fixyourdlp.com/2017/05/10/clean-projector-lens/

    Hope this helps.
    regards,
    Shelagh

    Hi how can I shorten the image on my screen with my projector as it’s screening of the screen and I don’t know how to bring in can you help best regards thank you

    Hi Gavin,
    You need to adjust the aspect ratio on the projector and that will stop the image from bleeding off the screen.
    Regards,
    Shelagh

    How can I remove the scratched in the lens of my projector. The image of the projector was a little bit blurry because of the scratched.

    Hi Lawrence,
    Sadly once the lense has been as badly scratched as yours is, there is nothing left to do buy buy a replacement lens for the projector. Check out this store for a replacement; https://www.projectorsuperstore.com/lenses/.
    Regards,
    Shelagh

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    If you love enjoying the ultimate big-screen experience, then you must have considered getting a projector screen. With the highly advanced projectors and accompanying screens, your viewership is set to change forever. However, for you to get the full experience, you should learn how to clean a pull-down projector screen as buildup distorts clarity. Cleaning the screen is quite simple, but it is essential to be attentive to the products you use.

    Clean a Projector Screen in These Easy Steps

    What you use in removing stains from a projector screen affects how well you do it and the results. Remember to avoid using harsh products as this may damage the screen. You will need the following items before you start cleaning:

    • Three lint-free cloths.
    • Warm, clean water.
    • Latex gloves.
    • Q-tips.
    • A bowl.
    • Dishwashing soap (optional)

    Step one: Before you start cleaning a vinyl projector screen, wear the latex gloves to avoid having fingerprints all over the screen. Use one of the lint-free cloths to wipe the loose dust off the surface. Remember that screens are different and sensitive to pressure that is applied to them. It’s crucial to clean either up and down or side to side, as opposed to circular motion.

    Step two: Add warm water to a bowl and soak one of the clothes in it. Squeeze off excess water and use it to wipe down the screen. Do not use a circular motion. For sensitive screens, gently dub on the surface, and this should lift the dirt right off. Repeat this until you cover the whole surface.

    Step three: Dip a Q-tip in the water, squeeze off excess, and use it to clean corners and other difficult to reach areas.

    Step four: Examine the screen and, if not completely clean, use a little dishwashing soap in any places with grease or stains. Don’t forget to rinse the cloth in clean plain water, squeeze off excess liquid, and wipe down any soap on the screen.

    Step Five: once you are satisfied that you have gotten rid of the dirt, use the clean, dry cloth to wipe down the screen one more time.

    Pay close attention to what to use when cleaning a projector screen as many products, including alcohol that may damage some types of projector screens. To avoid any issues, make a point of dry wiping the screen at least once a week to get rid of any dirt. Clean any spillage immediately and try to keep your screen as clean as possible.

    Many people and companies are using LCD projectors nowadays. In different universities, classes use LCD projectors in discussions and the same for business meetings and presentations as they are used by many corporations. People now also use the projectors as part of their home entertainment systems.

    What is an LCD Projector?

    LCD projector refers to a kind of video projector that is used to display or “project” an image, video, and computer data on a flat exterior or simply a screen. In order to project images and other similar presentations, light is projected from the Metal halide lamp to a prism placed in between the three poly silicone panels. Despite the advancement of an LCD projector, there are times that it simply malfunctions. There are different kinds of LDC problems and for every faulty LCD projector, there is a corresponding solution.

    Materials Needed

    Basically, the main thing to do in fixing a faulty projector is to test and then replace or change the specifications. For image distortions, it’s the setting of the projector and the computer that should be changed. For faulty images the following might be needed:

    • Screwdriver
    • Lamp replacement
    • Mirror replacement
    • Pliers or tweezers

    Fixing LCD Projector that do not Display Computer Images

    If the projector shows DVD, CCTV, and VHS but will not project the image from the computer, the following steps should be done.

    1. Using the manual from the manufacturer, check the computer’s refresh rate. Adjust the settings of the refresh rate.
    2. Go to start, click Control Panel then proceed to Appearance and Themes then go to Display.
    3. Go to Settings Tab then proceed to the Advanced Option. There should be the Monitor options.
    4. Checking the refresh rate in the manual of the projector, adjust the settings accordingly.

    Repairing Projector with Yellowish Image

    Step 1: Check the LCD Panel

    A yellow image from the projector is usually the result of a broken LCD panel. To see which panel is broken, pop the cover of the projector using the screwdriver. Make sure to refer first to the manual before opening the projector. Inside the projector, mirrors are positioned to separate each colored LCD panel: red, blue and green. The panels are placed around a prism that mixes the three colors together to display an image.

    Step 2: Test Each LCD Panel

    In order to test each panel, the projector has to be turned on. Make sure that no sensitive parts are touched to avoid problems. Cover each panel with a paper or cardboard and see which panel does not reflect the color well. The malfunctioning panel will not be able to respond to a signal. It will also show which panel does not reflect the right form of the image.

    Step 3: Replace the Malfunctioning Part

    Using pliers or tweezers, take out the malfunctioning panel. This step may not be applicable to all projectors so check with the manual how to detach the panels. Once the malfunction part is taken out, position the replacement.

    Step 4: Check the Panels Again

    Check the panel by shielding it again. See if it already reflects the right color and the correct image quality.

    If you love enjoying the ultimate big-screen experience, then you must have considered getting a projector screen. With the highly advanced projectors and accompanying screens, your viewership is set to change forever. However, for you to get the full experience, you should learn how to clean a pull-down projector screen as buildup distorts clarity. Cleaning the screen is quite simple, but it is essential to be attentive to the products you use.

    Clean a Projector Screen in These Easy Steps

    What you use in removing stains from a projector screen affects how well you do it and the results. Remember to avoid using harsh products as this may damage the screen. You will need the following items before you start cleaning:

    • Three lint-free cloths.
    • Warm, clean water.
    • Latex gloves.
    • Q-tips.
    • A bowl.
    • Dishwashing soap (optional)

    Step one: Before you start cleaning a vinyl projector screen, wear the latex gloves to avoid having fingerprints all over the screen. Use one of the lint-free cloths to wipe the loose dust off the surface. Remember that screens are different and sensitive to pressure that is applied to them. It’s crucial to clean either up and down or side to side, as opposed to circular motion.

    Step two: Add warm water to a bowl and soak one of the clothes in it. Squeeze off excess water and use it to wipe down the screen. Do not use a circular motion. For sensitive screens, gently dub on the surface, and this should lift the dirt right off. Repeat this until you cover the whole surface.

    Step three: Dip a Q-tip in the water, squeeze off excess, and use it to clean corners and other difficult to reach areas.

    Step four: Examine the screen and, if not completely clean, use a little dishwashing soap in any places with grease or stains. Don’t forget to rinse the cloth in clean plain water, squeeze off excess liquid, and wipe down any soap on the screen.

    Step Five: once you are satisfied that you have gotten rid of the dirt, use the clean, dry cloth to wipe down the screen one more time.

    Pay close attention to what to use when cleaning a projector screen as many products, including alcohol that may damage some types of projector screens. To avoid any issues, make a point of dry wiping the screen at least once a week to get rid of any dirt. Clean any spillage immediately and try to keep your screen as clean as possible.

    Hello! I have a 12′ wide Da-Lite Tensioned Advantage Electrol Screen with DualVision material used for rear projection in my terrace/outdoor home theater. This screen is about 12 years old and it has never been cleaned. As you can imagine, it is no longer pristine since it has been exposed to the humidity of the outdoor terrace. I live in the Caribbean so there is no damage from cold weather whatsoever.

    I’d like to receive your advise on how best to clean this screen to make it as even as possible and to remove the humidity spots I see.

    In addition to the cleaning, I also see some wrinkling waviness towards the bottom of the screen. Should I assume this cannot be fixed?

    I have attached a couple images to illustrate my questions.

    I am grateful there are no off-color (dark) stains on the screen. I have a powerful 5200 color/white lumens projector that overpowers most of the stains at a throw distance of 9′. Thank you in advance for sharing your knowledge with me!

    Attachments:


    3264 × 2448 pixels (182.18 KB)

    3264 × 2448 pixels (198.76 KB)

    Typically you may use mild soap and water. This is described on their website, and you may call them.

    But, a screen that’s been outside for over a decade very likely may have some serious staining issues that can’t be corrected.

    Wrinkling in a non-tab-tensioned screen is normal. It’s amazing it hasn’t been pretty bad for many years.

    Quote (AV_Integrated on Jul 23, 2015 7:04 PM):

    Typically you may use mild soap and water. This is described on their website, and you may call them.

    But, a screen that’s been outside for over a decade very likely may have some serious staining issues that can’t be corrected.

    Wrinkling in a non-tab-tensioned screen is normal. It’s amazing it hasn’t been pretty bad for many years.


    Thank you. I’ll try that this weekend.

    Da-Lite provided me with detailed instructions and a link to YouTube on how to clean the screen. I’ll try this tonight!

    Here are the instructions:

    CARE OF PROJECTION SCREEN SURFACES
    Da-Lite has developed cleaning methods that we know from experience will not damage your screen.
    The steps as outlined below follow a progression of cleaning methods from general maintenance and
    care to deep stains. If you follow these steps in order, you can expect to maintain the optical properties
    of your Da-Lite screen throughout its life cycle.
    GENERAL MAINTENANCE AND CARE:
    ? Keep your screen rolled up in its protective case or housing when not in use.
    ? Clean your screen frequently with a feather duster or cleaning cloth to avoid accumulation of dirt
    or dust.
    ? DO NOT place the screen surface in direct sunlight or areas of excessive moisture or heat.
    ? DO NOT place the screen surface in the path of direct airflow or in a “dirty” environment.
    ? DO NOT scrub the screen or use abrasive or petroleum based cleaners.
    GENERAL CLEANING:
    ? Use a soft, clean, lint free cloth or sponge when applying cleaning methods.
    ? Use a blotting action when applying cleaning methods rather than a wiping action to avoid
    damage to the surface.
    ? Use gentle compressed air to remove particles or specks.
    ? Use gentle pressure with masking tape to remove small marks of around ¾” or 2cm in size.
    ? Use distilled water with a mild detergent to clean larger areas of the surface.
    ? DO NOT proceed to further cleaning methods if you are using a High Power®, High Contrast High
    Power®, Silver Lite 2.5 or Silver Matte surface from Da-Lite.
    PERSISTENT MARKS OR SPOTS:
    ? Remove marks or spots in small areas with a melamine foam cleaning pad or rubber eraser using
    light pressure only to avoid damage to the surface.
    ? Remove marks or spots in large areas with an all-purpose spray cleaner. Da-Lite’s recommended
    cleaners are Clorox® Green Works and Formula 409®.
    DEEP STAINS:
    ? Remove deep stains with ethyl, isopropyl or denatured alcohol. If streaking occurs, revert to the
    cleaning methods for Persistent Marks or Spots.
    If marks, spots or stains still occur after applying these cleaning methods, please contact your sales
    representative or Da-Lite Customer Service with the following information:
    1. The type and size of stain.
    2. The surface type or name.
    3. The total surface size.
    4. The approximate date of purchase.

    Written by: Richard Kalinowski

    Written on: July 14, 2020

    Charlie Schuck/Photodisc/Getty Images

    Digital Light Processing (DLP) projectors provide 1080p resolution for home theatres and business presentations. These projectors are equipped with air intake filters designed to trap dust. However, occasionally dust can slip through the filter, and you’ll need to clean out the dust blobs inside a DLP projector.

    If left uncleaned, dust can clog the exhaust fan, leading to poor performance and possible overheating.

    Remove the air intake filters on your DLP projector. As explained by InFocus, a manufacturer of LCD and DLP projectors, each DLP model will house the air filters in a different location. However, for most DLP projector products, the filters are accessible by unclipping a simple plastic latch.

    • Digital Light Processing (DLP) projectors provide 1080p resolution for home theatres and business presentations.
    • However, for most DLP projector products, the filters are accessible by unclipping a simple plastic latch.

    Wipe the air filters with a small cloth dipped in rubbing alcohol.

    Blow compressed air into the unit’s vents. This will force some internal dust out of the DLP projector, but you may still need to open up the unit for additional dust removal.

    Unsnap the main cover from your DLP projector. Because DLP projectors need periodic lamp replacement, the main cover is rarely secured with screws or bolts. However, if the DLP projector’s cover does not snap off, then you’ll want to inspect the unit for possible screws or an alternate release latch.

    Reach in and remove visible dust globs with a paper towel. Be careful to avoid touching the lens, as fingerprint smudges can diminish DLP projector image quality. If you accidentally smudge the lens while picking out dust blobs, wipe the lens with a dry, lint-free microfiber cloth.

    • Wipe the air filters with a small cloth dipped in rubbing alcohol.
    • However, if the DLP projector’s cover does not snap off, then you’ll want to inspect the unit for possible screws or an alternate release latch.

    Spray compressed air into your DLP projector to remove any lingering dust particles.

    Close up the projector and reattach the filters.

    Can you show a picture of the blemish? Is there a test/calibration screen you can access that lights up just the red, green, and blue pixels?

    Or, perhaps, make a slide deck with three pages: one all pure red, one pure blue, and one pure green? Is the blemish visible on each of those pages?
    posted by JoeZydeco at 2:45 PM on January 20, 2016 [1 favorite]

    Once upon a time, I ended up with 3 old Proxima LCD projectors which had blemishes on the projected images, which as best I can figure was caused by the users turning them off without letting them cool down first. Make sure your users are turning off the projector with the power button and not just pulling the plug. After the light goes out, the fan should run for a few seconds to a minute; only after the fan shuts off is it safe to unplug.

    If this is the case with your projector, it’s probably done permanent damage to an LCD module. The projectors I had had separate red, blue, and green LCD modules, and between the 3 projectors I managed to find one of each color which was undamaged so I could get one projector properly working. Those modules were replaceable without digging too far into the projector, which is good because you don’t want to mess with the rest of the optics if you can help it, their alignment is critical.

    What’s the exact model of the projector?
    posted by MoTLD at 4:05 PM on January 20, 2016 [1 favorite]

    What’s that faint red glow on the movie theater screen.

    . . . I attended a showing of Star Wars The Force Awakens recently at a small-chain theater and was shocked to see a faint red glow in the center of the screen. While it was there during the entire movie, it was most noticable during the dark scenes . I approached the manager who first complimented me on being the first person to ever notice the glow, then he tells me that it’s a byproduct of their digital projectors and that all of their auditoriums have it. . . .

    Well, I was able to find very little about this projector, but apparently someone else is having the same problem with a similar model here: “The Canon Realis SX50 service manual does not seem to exist on the net. Trying to clean out “dust blobs” that create pink spots on the screen. Apparently, it is very difficult to take apart (and put back together), with “pros” needing 4+hours to do it. Canon won’t even hazard a guess nor give an estimate for cleaning the projector. Ugh.”

    If you’re handy with taking things apart and putting them back together successfully, you might try it yourself, in which case my advice would be not to take out any screws that seem to hold lenses or mirrors in place and don’t touch any lenses or especially mirrors with anything except compressed air. If you’re not handy with such things, only do this if you’re willing to sacrifice this projector as a learning experience.

    I was unable to come up with any free repair manuals or parts breakdowns, nor any manuals at all specifically for the mark II, but I did find service manuals for the SX80 here and here for $9.95 and $12.99, respectively. I have never used either site before so I can’t vouch for them.

    Finally, there is an air filter behind a panel underneath the projector which should be cleaned or replaced frequently to prevent overheating. If you aren’t going to dismantle the unit, I’d try taking out that air filter and carefully applying the most powerful vacuum you can get your hands on to the air intake under the filter, as well as any and every vent on the unit. You might get lucky and dislodge whatever speck of dust is causing the problem, if that’s all it is.

    Best of luck!
    posted by MoTLD at 7:54 PM on January 21, 2016

    How to Build a Portable Cyclorama Wall

    Things You’ll Need

    • Measuring tape
    • PVC pipe
    • White fabric
    • String
    • Thread
    • Sewing machine or needle
    • Scissors
    • Hot glue gun
    • Ceiling hooks (optional)
    • Drill

    If you have looked into setting up a projector theater for your home, you have probably noticed that projectors are not cheap. Spending even more money buying a screen might not be possible for many people. Fortunately, it is not very difficult to build your own, and the price is a lot more wallet-pleasing. The steps below outline how to make a simple roll-up projection screen.

    Measure the fabric you have selected to your desired screen size. Then measure about an extra 6 inches at the top and bottom. Carefully cut out the fabric.

    Cut two pieces of PVC pipe to about 1 inch longer than the length of the screen. Place one pipe at the top of the fabric. Pull the top end of the fabric over the pipe so that it is completely covered, leaving a little extra room for stitching. Using either a sewing machine or by hand-stitching, make a seam that sews the pipe inside the fabric. So in essence, you should now have a tube in your fabric that the pipe can be slid into. Repeat this on the bottom of the fabric.

    Take the ends of the fabric on each side of the pipe, and use hot glue to glue the fabric and the pipe together. Do this to the top and the bottom. This will prevent the fabric from sliding off of the PVC pipe.

    Drill a small hole on each side of the top PVC pipe that is big enough for the string to fit through. Put the string through each hole, and tie a knot at the ends so that it will stay. This will allow you to hang the screen.

    Place two ceiling hooks in the ceiling, spaced apart the width of the screen. You can use the string to hang the screen from the hooks. The screen can be taken down and rolled up for easy storage.

    Use a fabric that is bright, stiff and smooth. This will allow images to show up better. Seamless paper can be used in place of fabric for a more temporary solution.

    Warnings

    Don’t drill the holes for your string too large, or the string may slip through, even after the knot is tied. Avoid using colored fabrics, as this will dull the image that is projected.

    I don’t want it dusted, I want fingerprints off of it.

    49 Answers

    Be more specific about what kind of projection TV. LCD, DLP, CRT, what? What specific model? How old is it? What parts do you think are dirty?

    Don’t use Windex or anything else with ammonia on the plastic screen. Windex is meant for glass only. I simply dust my CRT RPTV’s screen with a feather duster and that’s sufficient. RPTVs don’t build up static charges and attract dust to the screen the way direct view CRTs do.

    That said, the innards of your TV can certainly get coated with dust over time. Without knowing your exact model of TV, I can’t give you specific instructions on cleaning the internals. But in general, an RPTV has something shining up and reflecting off a mirror. The something (LCD, DLP, or 3 CRTs) need to be dusted occasionally. This involves partially or completely removing the screen. Again, how difficult this is depends on what TV you have.

    How to Clean a Projector Screen

    Projection Screen Tv

    I hope you get this answer in time. I have found that using the vacuum hose with the brush attachment works GREAT. Then take a duster and brush off the rest. This is the #1 way to clean your television of the dust. This is what I do for my big screen. definitely don’t spay anything directly to the TV. If you feel you must polish any part of the TV spray on a paper-towel first. Otherwise small holes could get clogged. And when the dust settles in other places you can attack that. I hope this helped you and wish I could have helped you sooner. Happy Dusting!- Lauren

    How to Clean a Projector Screen

    Because the screen is sensitive there is a special solution you use to wipe the screen with, it usually comes with a special type of cloth or applicator. You should never use window cleaner or regular cloths, this would only damage the screen if not right away over time. I have made this mistake. The rest of it you can dust the regular way or use can air to push the dust from the crevices in the back.

    The first thing you need to do when cleaning a television, be it a LCD, DLP or a CRT, you need to cut all power to the set. That includes unplugging the power supply. As this will prevent the chance of the set shorting out to the circuit board(s) in the set. Next using a MICRO fiber towel, gently wipe the dust away from the screen and the body of the set. Next use a can of air, you can get this at any office supply store, and slowly blow the remaining dust away and out of any cracks that the towel can not get into. Does this by holding the nozzle just above The hard th reach area parallel to the surface of the set.

    I have been repairing television and circuit boards for more than 10 yrs and the most common thing I see is people shorting out the circuit boards on their sets and end up paying major dollars to repair and/or replacing them. Another tip would be take the set in at least once a year for a thorough check up.

    How to Clean a Projector Screen

    Every week, when it’s time to dust, I clean the TV screen with a lint free cloth. Nothing else – just the cloth. I’ve done this for over 5 years with my projection TV & it works great!

    You can go to many different electronic stores and ask for a tv cleaner. Just be sure you explain what kind of tv it is. If you don’t want to go out of your way and spend the money, just use a cloth similar to the glasses cleaning kind if you can but if not just use a feather duster. Don’t get the TV wet and be sure to dust or clean lightly and gently with soft up and down or circular motions.

    How to Clean a Projector Screen

    I use to sell these things so this is one thing I do know about.

    Get a container and put in a few drops of dish soap like dawn or something gentle then add warm water. Get a very soft rag like from a old undershirt. Wipe the tv but only in the same direction as the lines.Run your finger across it and you will feel what I am talking about. Never wipe against these lines always with them or you will scratch it. Let it air dry.

    How to Clean a Projector Screen

    For an LCD, I was told you can use a damp, soft cloth, or a special cleaner made for that purpose from the store who sells the TV. Windex has ammonia & will give the screen a rainbow affect. Ask where you got your TV. It may be different for a projection.

    How to Clean a Projector Screen

    How to calibrate a front projector? Front projectors are physically limited in some disciplines, like color gamut and contrast. To get neutral grays and best possible details in shadows and highlights, you need to profile your front projector as good as you did with your monitor. But there is something special calibrating a front projector.

    General points about calibrating a projector

    How to Clean a Projector Screen How to Clean a Projector Screen

    • Perform the front projector calibration in an entirely dark room.
      Keep in mind that black on your projector’s screen is only as dark as the walls beside or around your screen.
    • A tripod to mount the SpyderXELITE is required.
      The SpyderX sensor has a tripod mount included in its housing. It is the same size your camera has on its bottom, so any camera tripod will work.

    How to Clean a Projector Screen

    Projector Screen Calibration

    • Launch the SpyderX ELITE and select “Projector” via the “Display Type” menu.
    • In the Calibration Settings window select Gamma 2.2, native White Point (Do Not Adjust – Recommended) and for the Brightness also “Do Not Adjust – Recommended”.
      Alternatively you can also select a White Point of 6500 Kelvin, but be aware that this will reduce your front projector’s brightness, because one or two color channels will be clipped after the white point correction.
    • In the “Advanced Settings” select the Gray Balance Calibration “Off – Recommended”, which is required for front projectors that uses the DLP technology. On front projectors that using a different technology you can also select the option “Faster”.
    • Mount your SpyderX ELITE at your tripod and place the sensor at a distance of 30 cm / 12 inches in front of the screen. The sensor’s lens has to face towards the screen. The SpyderX ELITE software compensates the shadow the SpyderX ELITE create now on the screen.
    • The SpyderX Elite sensor measures a very focused spot. Aim the sensor slightly to the left or right so the sensor does not measure the shadow it creates on the screen
    • Keep your room pitch dark during the projector calibration process to get the best results.

    FAQ About Projector Calibrations

    Should I calibrate a projector in a dark room?

    You should have your room as dark as possible during the projector calibration process.

    Does your projector seem to be working properly without light showing?

    Take the lamp out of the projector to make sure it hasn’t blown and ensure that it isn’t cracked or has a dark appearance.

    Do I need a tripod to mount the SpyderX for calibration?

    A tripod to mount the SpyderXELITE is required but not provided with the hardware. Not to worry though! The SpyderX sensor has a tripod mount included in its housing. The mount is the same size your camera has on its bottom, so any camera tripod will work conveniently for you. Just place the SpyderX on the tripod and follow the directions indicated above to calibrate your front projector.

    Datacolor offers a product that will calibrate your projector for you in the SpyderX

    With SpyderX, you can be sure that what you see on screen is the most accurate representation of the image. When you start editing and you know the color on your projector is accurate, you can confidently control every aspect of your image. Your output will match what you are seeing on screen and better reflect your creative vision.

    Here are some SpyderX testimonials from customers after calibration with our projector calibration product

    “Datacolor I salute you, the SpyderX Pro is the new benchmark and an absolute game changer.” -Daniel Wretham, Landscape Photographer

    “It’s dead accurate and it’s quick. I think that SpyderX comes as close to getting it right as you can. I was impressed – so simple, so easy, so reliable.” -Robert Smith

    “I want something straightforward – I want to plug it in and know it’s been calibrated, so I can expect great results.” -Glenn Kujansuu

    Who is Datacolor?

    Datacolor has an American heart, a Swiss soul and an international vision. Based in Lawrenceville, New Jersey (USA), our company is listed on the Swiss stock exchange with facilities and representatives in over 100 countries. Our color management solutions are created and supported by passionate employees and certified to multiple industry standards.

    Our mission is to empower our customers to make objective, cost-effective and smart color decisions that perfectly suit individual workflows. Over a million customers working in Textile & Apparel, Paint & Coatings, Plastics, Photography, Design and many other industries trust Datacolor solutions:

    • Over 1 million photographers and creative specialists use Datacolor SpyderX products.
    • Over 80 of the top 100 Textile and Apparel brands selected Datacolor solutions.
    • More than 10,000 business customers rely on Datacolor instruments and software daily.

    Your school’s projectors play a critical role in the education of students. When a classroom’s projector malfunctions, it not only impacts lesson plans but also impacts the ability of pupils to absorb pertinent information. If your school has a projector that is on the fritz, try these hacks to remediate the five most common projector issues.

    How to Fix Common Projector Issues

    If you’re desperately trying to fix projector problems in your school, try some of the following tips from the experts at K-12 Tech.

    1. Projector Not Turning On

    There are a number of reasons that a projector may not be turning on. If your projector doesn’t power on, try the following:

    • Ensure the projector is properly plugged into a working outlet.
    • Check the temperature lights to make sure the device hasn’t overheated and shut down.
    • If you are using a remote control to turn on the projector, check the batteries.
    • Be sure all of the projector latches are closed.
    • Try resetting the lamp timer.
    • Ensure the projector is not in standby mode.

    If after trying all of the above tips the projector is still not turning on, the issue could be something more complex like damage to internal components.

    2. Projector is Overheating

    How to Clean a Projector Screen

    It is natural for projectors to become hot as they are in use, but sometimes projectors overheat when they need cleaning, maintenance or better air circulation. If your projector is randomly shutting down or displaying a warning message, utilize the following tips to resolve the overheating:

    • Clear the area around the projector.
    • Ensure there is nothing blocking the projector vents.
    • Clean the filter and vent of any dust.

    3. Light On Projector is Blinking

    There are countless makes and models of projectors –all with different parts and pieces– so it’s generally best to refer to the owner’s manual to determine the meaning of a blinking projector light. However, these are the most common reasons and solutions to blinking lights on your projector:

    • Power Light: If the power button light is green or flashing green, the projector is likely on or warming up. If the power light is orange or flashing orange, the projector might be in standby mode or turning off.
    • Lamp Light: If the lamp light is flashing orange or red, this usually means the lamp light is going to burn out soon or needs to be replaced.
    • Temperature Light: If the temperature light is flashing orange or red, this typically means your projector is overheating or in need of cleaning. Be sure to clear any clutter from around the projector and to remove any items that may be blocking its vents.

    4. Projector Image is Discolored

    Projector discoloration can occur for a number of reasons. Below are several of the most common reasons for discoloration and how to fix them.

    • Inspect the condition of your VGA cable. If you notice any bent prongs, the VGA cable likely needs to be replaced.
    • Optimize the display and color settings for the lighting in the classroom.
    • Check if your projector is in need of a lamp replacement.

    If none of the above suggestions help with the discoloration, the problem could be more serious. Contact a professional projector repair service to inspect the color wheel or polarizing plates.

    5. Projector Lamp is Burnt Out

    Although lamp life varies from projector to projector, all lamps need to be replaced at some point making this one of the most common projector issues. Signs of a burnt out lamp include:

    • Inspect the lamp light. If the light is flashing red or orange, you need to replace the lamp.
    • If the projector turns on, but the image doesn’t appear, your lamp may be burnt out.
    • If the image being projected is discolored or dim, the lamp may burn out soon.

    If you are experiencing any of the above common projector problems or are in need of additional assistance, contact the professionals at K-12 Tech. We specialize in maintenance and repair of school technology ranging from computer and tablets to projectors and more. Through our projector repair services, we can provide onsite repairs, mail-in repairs, and pickup repairs. We look forward to serving your school’s technology needs with unmatched repair turnaround time and superior customer service.

    Bring All of Your School’s Technology Needs Under One Roof!

    With professional electronics repair technicians and a comprehensive approach to school technology, our service centers are able to to bring all of your technology needs under one roof!

    How to Clean a Projector Screen

    Zachary Marvel

    Zachary Marvel joined the team in 2017 with the goal of growing K-12 Tech on a national level. While studying economics at Ball State University, Zach observed the increasing demand for local electronics repair services. In 2012, Zach started his first electronics repair company, expanding to three walk-in repair locations and working with a handful of the surrounding school districts to repair their student devices. Upon graduating, Zach commissioned as a finance officer in the Army National Guard. Zach continued to grow both his walk-in repair businesses as well as his school focused operations, and within three years time, the business was servicing over 30 school districts. His vision for K-12 Tech is to create the first full-service electronics repair company in the K-12 industry.

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    How to Clean a Projector Screen

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    Contact Us

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    Projectors have evolved in recent years, adding features like 3D and support for higher-resolution input. Here’s an overview of our latest lab tests, designed with today’s projector innovations in mind.

    How to Clean a Projector Screen

    Our goal for projector testing is to create a test script that, first, lets us report meaningful information based on objective results (in the form of quantitative measurements and qualitative observations), and, second, to define a consistent test procedure to ensure that our results are fully comparable from one review to the next.

    The Projector Test Procedure

    When testing projectors, it’s important to let the equipment first warm up thoroughly to ensure stable performance. Our first step in testing is to turn on the projector and make sure it will stay on continuously by disabling any settings that might turn it off or put it in an idle (or sleep) mode.

    During the 30-minute warm-up time, we run through preliminary setup steps. This includes connecting cables and positioning the projector at the right distance from the screen to get the image size we need for testing. We test all projectors that include a zoom control for image size (as opposed to a digital zoom, which enlarges only part of an image) at maximum zoom, then adjust the image to the right size by moving the projector closer to or further from the screen.

    For most projectors, we set the image size to 2 meters across. (The height varies, depending on the projector’s aspect ratio.) For projectors than can’t throw (read: project) a bright enough image to be usable at that size, we adjust the size as necessary, usually to a 1-meter-wide image.

    More Preliminaries & Setup

    We also use the warm-up time to browse through the onscreen menu system to get familiar with the menus and the controls on both the projector itself and the remote control, assuming one is bundled.

    Another reason for browsing through the menus is to take note of any settings that might require testing beyond what we normally do (with a given setting both on and off, for example). We make sure that any features that might affect our results are set properly. In particular, we turn off digital keystoning, which can introduce artifacts on some images. (We also test automatic keystone control with the feature on, to make sure it does what it claims to do.)

    Finally, we set our image sources—computer, Blu-ray player, or both—to the appropriate resolutions for testing. We set the computer to match the native resolution of the projector, which avoids artifacts introduced from the projector scaling the image up or down, and we run our video tests with the Blu-ray player set to the highest-resolution input for video that the projector supports, which in most cases is 1080p.

    Once the projector is warmed up, we take advantage of a series of setup screens in the DisplayMate program we use for testing to confirm that the projector is properly focused; that it’s set to show the entire image without losing any pixels on the outer edge; and, for analog connections, that it’s synched as well as possible to the incoming signal.

    The Tests

    Because there is no fundamental difference between data projectors, home entertainment projectors, and home theater projectors (and a great deal of overlap in capability between these categories), we run all projectors through both our data projector and core video projector tests, if at all possible (with a couple of exceptions).

    We have no choice but to skip tests for a given projector if it lacks an appropriate connector or lacks support for a given input resolution. For example, some pico projectors offer neither a VGA connector nor a digital connector for a computer, which prevents running the data projector tests. Similarly, some projectors may lack support for 1080p resolution for video tests, in which case we test with the highest input resolution that will work with the projector.

    For both data and video tests, we use the simplest screen possible: a white screen (gray screens effectively increase contrast ratio) with a 1.0 gain (higher gains concentrate the reflected light into a narrow cone, making the image brighter within that cone than it would otherwise be), and without any ability to absorb ambient light. The point is to make sure our observations are based strictly on the projector’s abilities, as opposed to the screen we’re using.

    For our data projector tests, we use DisplayMate, which consists of a set of images designed to bring out any problems that a projector (or other display) may have. Each image is designed to test a specific aspect of a projector’s imaging capability. The full set of tests constitutes a thorough vetting of any given projector’s abilities as a data projector.

    Our video tests center around the three video resolutions that are currently most relevant to real world use: 480p, 1080i, and 1080p.

    The 480p resolution is typical for connection to a cable, FIOS, or similar set-top box when watching non-HD channels, even using an HDMI or component video connection. It’s also the resolution for DVD playback with an older DVD player, although most current models will let you upscale the output to a higher resolution.

    The 1080i resolution is the typical resolution for connection to a set-top box when watching HD channels and using an HDMI or component video connection.

    Lastly, 1080p is the resolution for a Blu-ray player over an HDMI connection, as well as the most commonly used upscaling setting for DVDs when using an HDMI connection.

    For all projectors, we view clips from both DVD and Blu-ray discs. The clips are chosen to highlight how well the projector handles motion, facial colors, and challenging lighting conditions. We report on each of these issues, as well as any other relevant observations.

    We run these tests at the highest resolution the projector can accept as input, letting the Blu-ray player upscale the DVD images, which is what most people typically do. What this translates to is that for any projector that can accept 1080p input, which includes the overwhelming majority of projectors today, we set the video source to 1080p. For a projector that can’t accept 1080p, we use the highest resolution it can accept.

    For home theater and home entertainment projectors, we also connect the projector to a FIOS box to view input at 480p and 1080i. Recorded clips from sports, taped shows, and movies ensure that we’re looking at the same selection of video for each projector.

    Stereoscopic 3D is available today on almost all DLP projectors and even most recent LCD home theater and home entertainment models. In many cases with DLP projectors, however, it works only with input from computers, which limits its usefulness. In other cases, it supports 3D over an HDMI 1.4a port, which means you can use it with 3D-capable Blu-ray discs as well.

    We run our 3D tests using a Blu-ray player for all projectors that support 3D over an HDMI 1.4a port. The clips are chosen to highlight how well the projector handles the same issues we examine for 2D video, plus the 3D-specific issues of crosstalk and 3D-related motion artifacts.

    How to Clean a Projector Screen

    Suggestions to clean my 133″ Dalite HP 2.4 projector screen

    How to Clean a Projector Screen

    I have 133″ Dalite HP 2.4 projector. I thought it was looking somewhat dusty and unclear. So I tried to clean up the projector screen with a cotton cloth and water. I applied very delicately but I found some black spots in that area. After that I scared to clean that. I left it like that.
    Could I did anything wrong here? Can somebody suggest me how to remove those black stains and tell me how to clean the projector screen without spoil the screen?

    Your suggestions and comments will be highly appreciated. Thank you all guys!

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    Suggestions to clean my 133″ Dalite HP 2.4 projector screen

    How to Clean a Projector Screen

    There are a variety of specialized cleaning products you could use. Here’s a good example.

    Whatever brand you use, it should be anti-static and gel-based, so it doesn’t run. Squeegee applicators are great as well to make sure you don’t apply to much force on any one point. As for price, anything over 10 USD is probably unnecessary.