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How to cook new potatoes

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Learn about the different varieties of new potatoes, when they are in season, and tips to help you select, store, prepare and cook them.

What are new potatoes?

New potatoes have thin, wispy skins and a crisp, waxy texture. They are young potatoes and unlike their fully grown counterparts, they keep their shape once cooked and cut. They are also sweeter because their sugar has not yet converted into starch, and are therefore particularly suited to salads.

Jersey Royals are the best known variety, and their appearance in late April heralds the beginning of the summer. Other varieties include Pentland Javelin and salad potatoes, which are best eaten cold.

How to prepare new potatoes

You don’t need to peel new potatoes; just scrub gently with a soft brush or cloth, then rinse to remove any dirt and cook whole. To boil, put the potatoes into a pan of lightly salted water, bring to the boil, simmer until tender (about 10 minutes) and drain. Dress new potatoes as soon as they are cooked to help them absorb the flavour of the butter or oil (this way you will also use less).

How to cook new potatoes

New potatoes can be boiled whole and served as a side dressed in a little olive oil or butter, but they also work well in curries and stews as they hold their shape well. Try bulking out a Thai curry, a summer chicken stew, or using them cooked and sliced in a frittata.

Roasted new potatoes are a delight – their thin skins become slightly crisp and they turn soft and sweet in the middle. Try them roasted with a mustard glaze, or in a chicken & new potato traybake.

How to store new potatoes

Store new potatoes in a cool, dark, well-ventilated place. They should be used within a few days of purchase.

When are new potatoes in season?

New potatoes are in season from April to July.

Choose the best new potatoes

Choose new potatoes that are firm, dry and blemish-free. Unwashed potatoes last longer as the dirt protects them from bruising and general deterioration.

Buying, Cooking, and Recipes

How to Cook New Potatoes

James A. Guilliam / Getty Images

Perhaps you’ve seen them at farmers markets or on restaurant menus and wondered what new potatoes are and what makes them special. These freshly harvested young and small spuds are sweet, waxy, and loaded with moisture. They grow anywhere potatoes thrive and are harvested in spring and early summer, depending on your climate. In potato salads or boiled with a bit of butter and herbs, they are pure perfection.

What Are New Potatoes?

New potatoes are not a variety, per se; any potato that is harvested early in the season can be called a new one. Eaten in warmer weather, they feel special, maybe a bit of a novelty, as we tend to identify this veggie with winter. They’re dug up on purpose before they get bigger, so they can be enjoyed for their delicate thin skins, high moisture content, and sweet flavor. They are lower in starch compared to their mature counterparts and keep their shape well when cooked, which makes them especially well suited to room temperature preparations.

Potatoes are typically one of the most economical foods you can buy, and the same goes for new potatoes. They don’t require any extensive preparation. After all, these are potatoes—one of the most humble, versatile, and nutritious vegetables nature offers.

How to Cook With New Potatoes

All these tubers need is a gentle washing to remove excess dirt, which may also remove some of the skin. That’s OK; the skins are thin and don’t need peeling, but it’s also fine if they come off a bit. These potatoes beg for simplicity and to be served with the best of the spring/early summer offerings. They’re delicious when boiled simply and tossed with butter and fresh herbs such as chives or parsley, and hold up beautifully in picnic potato salads.

It’s hard to go wrong. Any way you prep them, they’re delicious, but are ideal alongside spring lamb or a simple roast chicken, with bright green spring asparagus, of course.

What Do They Taste Like?

Much in the same way that freshly picked corn is so much sweeter than cobs that have been sitting around for a few days, new potatoes are sweeter than potatoes that have been sitting in storage for a while.

New Potato Recipes

If you are lucky enough to find them during the short time in which they are harvested and available, eating these potatoes is a treat. It’s no accident that the methods that best suit them are easy and won’t overheat your house as things warm up outside. That being said, any small potato will work in a recipe that calls for new potatoes, but red and fingerlings share the most similar characteristics with new ones. They become creamy if you boil them and are delicious when drizzled with an herb-infused olive oil. When you roast them, their thin skins become pleasantly crispy.

That same tendency to keep their shape means that new potatoes don’t make great mashed potatoes, but you can use them to make “smashed” potatoes, which can best be described as a lazy, halfway approach to mashed potatoes. The skins stay on and the potatoes don’t get completely mashed, which keeps some of their texture.

  • Roasted New Potatoes With Thyme and Garlic
  • Creamed New Potatoes With Green Onions
  • New Potatoes With Garlic Cream and Chives

Where to Buy New Potatoes

Farmers markets and specialty grocers are bound to sell them loose/in bulk or in dry pints in late spring or early summer, depending on your climate. Look for smooth, undamaged, and unblemished skins. The potatoes should be dry and feel firm. Avoid potatoes that have soft spots, bruising, or seem damp. Skin that is starting to flake away from the potato is fine—that’s the price of such youth and delicacy.

New potatoes are freshly harvested, and a bit of dirt demonstrates that they really are new ones and not just small potatoes that have been sitting in storage. If you’ve got a green thumb, you can certainly grow them yourself; they should be ready to be plucked them from the vine about 2 to 3 weeks after the plants stop flowering.

Storage

Because they have such thin skins and high moisture levels, new potatoes don’t store quite as well as more mature potatoes. Keep them in a paper bag or loosely wrapped plastic and use them within a few days of buying.

Don’t be tempted to wash them before storing them. That bit of dirt clinging to their skins will help keep them fresh, and any water on the outside will hasten bruising and softening. They need a little extra TLC.

Nutrition and Benefits

The potato is a nutritionally dense vegetable, and new potatoes are no exception. Potassium, fiber, vitamins C and B-6, along with protein, will keep you satiated.

How to Cook New Potatoes

Method

Discover how to cook boiled new potatoes with this easy to follow method. Once you’ve mastered the method, you can apply it to a number of dishes including our creamy new potato salad or new potatoes and cod en papillote.

  1. Place the salad potatoes in a pan and boiling water to cover the potatoes.
  2. Cover with a lid and simmer gently for approximately 15-20 minutes until just tender.
  3. Once cooked drain immediately.
  1. Place the potatoes in a microwaveable dish with 2 tablespoons of water.
  2. Cover and cook on full power (800w) for 7-8 minutes.
  3. Carefully remove and allow to stand for 1-2 minutes before serving.

Salad potatoes taste great on their own, in their skins, but if you would like to add butter, here are some interesting twists:

  • Citrus Butter: 25g softened butter mixed with the zest of an orange and half a lemon
  • Herb Butter: 25g softened butter mixed with 2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh herbs (parsley, mint, chives etc)
  • Pesto Butter: 25g softened butter mixed with 1 teaspoon red pesto
  • Garlic Butter: 25g softened butter mixed with 1-2 crushed garlic cloves

Tip: You don’t need to add butter to salad potatoes, a handful of freshly chopped herbs, like parsley, adds flavour without the calories.

How to Cook New Potatoes

How to Cook New Potatoes

Potatoes may seem like the sort of year-round staple that doesn’t have a particular season, but when spring comes, it’s definitely new potato time. Out with chips and heavy mash, these little beauties bring a huge variety of new dishes to the table. Potatoes get a bad rep when it comes to health and are often the first to go when dieting, but new potatoes are naturally low in fat and surprisingly high in vitamin C, so don’t write them off.

New, early or baby potatoes are exactly that – the same variety as the regular potato but not fully grown. The season therefore starts in April and lasts through the summer until they start getting bigger. As the sugar in new potatoes has not yet turned into starch, they are a little sweeter than their fully grown counterparts.

New potatoes come in many different varieties; Anya, Charlotte, the Welsh Pembrokeshire Early and the Scottish Ayrshire, but perhaps the most famous and well-loved is the Jersey Royal. The unique flavour comes from the rich and fertile soil on the island of Jersey. Like Champagne, Parmigiano-Reggiano and Melton Mowbray pork pies, Jersey Royals have PDO status.

When buying new potatoes, they often come covered in soil – although it may be a time-consuming prospect, unwashed potatoes often last longer as the soil protects them from bruising.

Cooking potatoes in boiling water is a first step for making mashed potatoes, potato salad, or many simple side dishes. We’ll show you how to prep your potatoes for cooking and how long to boil potatoes for perfect spuds every time.

There’s nothing complicated about boiling potatoes, but as far as basic cooking skills go, it’s a good one to master because you’ll likely use it often. Potatoes are one of the most versatile and widely loved foods out there, largely because you can turn them into so many delicious dishes. Whether you’re planning to boil potatoes for mashed potatoes or for a potato salad, there are a few tips and tricks that will ensure you’re happy with the finished results.

How to Boil Potatoes on the Stove

The most common way to boil potatoes is on the stove in a pot of water. However, if you want even more flavorful potatoes, consider boiling them in broth or a mixture of broth and water.

  1. Prep your potatoes. Start by scrubbing the potatoes with a clean produce brush to remove any dirt, then rinse. If desired, peel the potatoes with a vegetable peeler or paring knife, cutting away from your hand. Remove any sprouts and any green areas with the tip of a potato peeler.There’s lots of debate about whether or not you should peel potatoes before boiling them but neither way is really wrong. While leaving the peel on during the boiling process can help the potato hold on to some of the vitamins and nutrients found in the peel, it really just comes down to personal preference. (Psst: Check out our trick for making quick work of peeling potatoes.)
  2. Cut into smaller pieces. Cut the potatoes into quarters or cubes to speed up cooking time. Leave small new potatoes whole and halve larger ones. To cube potatoes, slice them to the desired thickness, then stack several slices and cut crosswise several times in both directions.BH&G Test Kitchen Tip: If you’re doing your prep in advance and won’t be cooking for a while, submerge the peeled and cut potatoes in water and store in the refrigerator. Potatoes left out at room temperature and uncovered with brown. You can keep them in water for up to 24 hours before you cook them.
  3. Place potatoes in a large saucepan or pot. Add enough cold water to cover the tops of the potatoes. Add 1/2 to 1 teaspoon salt to the water. Turn the burner on high and bring water to boiling. Reduce the heat to medium low or low. Cover the pot with a lid. Cook the potatoes in gently boiling water until tender, about 15 minutes for small Red Potatoes, New Potatoes or cubed potatoes large potatoes, and 20 to 25 minutes for quartered potatoes. You can use a fork to test to see if they are tender enough. Your work should effortlessly slide through the potato.
  4. Drain potatoes in a colander. Pour cubed potatoes into a colander or use a slotted spoon to remove large pieces of potato from the hot water and place in bowl. If your recipe calls for cooled potatoes, run them under cold water or submerge in an ice bath to speed up the cooling process.

Test Kitchen Tip: You can boil potatoes ahead of time for use later as long as you cover and refrigerate them. They’ll last for up to three days in the fridge.

How to Boil Potatoes in the Microwave

If you want to boil potatoes quickly, try using your microwave. It’s the perfect solution for small batches of spuds.

  1. Prep potatoes per the directions above.
  2. Place the cut potatoes in a microwave-safe bowl. Add enough water to cover the potatoes and a dash of salt. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap, poking holes in the wrap to vent.
  3. Microwave on high for 5 minutes. Stir; cover again with the plastic wrap and cook for 5 more minutes or until tender.
  4. Drain into a colander.

How to Boil Potatoes in a Slow Cooker

For the ultimate in easy solutions, use your slow cooker to boil potatoes. It’s perfect for times when you want to be able to work on other dishes do other housekeeping tasks, or see a movie! Your slow cooker doesn’t actually “boil” the liquid, but the effect is the same, and if you’re planning to use the cooked spuds for mashed potatoes, you can mash and even serve right from your slow cooker.

  1. Place your cut potatoes in your slow cooker. Add a cup of cooking liquid like water or broth. Most of the liquid will cook off or be absorbed by the potatoes during the cooking process, making draining unnecessary.
  2. Cover and cook on low for 6 to 8 hours or until tender.

How to Serve Boiled Potatoes

There are tons of ways you can use cooked potatoes. Whip up a Classic Potato Salad for your next potluck or family grill out or try our popular Fried Smashed Potatoes, which is a rustic take on a mashed potato with the skins on. If mashed potatoes are your favorite, you can’t go wrong with our Classic Mashed Potatoes, but for a delicious twist on the traditional, try our Gruyere-Garlic Mashed Potatoes. And, for a twist on mashers, try these Duchess Potatoes. They’re as pretty to look at as they are tasty.

New potatoes give an instant summery twist to your meals – and you don’t even have to peel them! Available all year round, new potatoes are cheaper when they’re in season (April – July) and are the basis for lots of lovely meals.

We’ve got lots of ideas and new potato recipes for you to try! Toss them in a salad, try them as a buttery side dish or add them to your favourite curry – new potatoes can be used in so many different ways. We’ve rounded up some of our favourite ways to make the most out of this delicious root veg.

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There are lots of different ways you can cook new potatoes. How about boiling them, baking them or frying them in a pan with some garlic? New potatoes are very versatile and are a lighter option during the summer months.

So if you’ve picked up a bag of the mini spuds and don’t know what to do with them, take a look at our 10 different new potato recipes for new ways to cook with new potatoes…

How to Cook New Potatoes

Crushed new potatoes

One of our favourite ways to serve them is to keep it simple and crush them lightly. After boiling, you can crush the potatoes using a fork or potato masher, the choice is yours! Most of the potassium found in potatoes is found in their skin, so using the whole vegetable is also a healthy alternative to classic mash. Try them warm in salads or hot with roast dinners.

Try them in:

Fried new potatoes

Leaving the skin on new potatoes as you fry them will help to keep their shape, and add a wonderful crunchy texture. It will will also ensure they don’t fall apart when you fry them. The versatility of this way of cooking knows no bounds and we’d be happy to see them on the table at breakfast, lunch or dinner. They’re also a great addition to a stir-fry in place of the traditional noodles.

Try them in:

Pastry

Wrapped in a buttery pastry case with other veggies, meat or fish, new potatoes make a satisfying meal when baked in a quiche or a tart. Thanks to their tasty flesh, these little potatoes add a delicious taste and an interesting texture to your quiche. You can pre-boil them before adding to your quiche to make them extra soft. Try with classic flavour combinations like bacon or smoked salmon.

Try them in:

New potatoes in curry

Forget the rice, bulk up your curries with the addition of small and flavoursome new potatoes for a filling one-pot meal. Some larger varieties of potatoes are floury and will fall apart when cooked slowly, but new potatoes keep their shape and absorb all those lovely fragrant spices. Simply throw them in with the rest of your veg and let simmer until tender.

Try them in:

Roasted new potatoes

Needing very little prep (just a quick rinse),new potatoes make a delicious side to a Sunday roast. Chuck them in beside the meat, skins and all, for a roast ready in no time. They’ll brown quickly and have a delicious crunchy outer shell and soft, buttery texture inside.

Try them in:

New potato salads

Boiled or steamed till tender, new potatoes make a substantial addition
to any salad. As they’re best when in season, during the summer, a salad
is the obvious way to use these little beauties. Boil whole and toss in
the dressing while still warm, the potatoes will then soak up whichever
flavours you have chosen to use with them while they cool. Packed up in
lunchboxes or served up with barbecued meat, new potatoes make
delicious salads.

Try them in:

Stewed new potatoes

Cooked slowly in a stew’s gravy, new potatoes become soft and full of meaty flavour. Waxy varieties will hold their shape better and have a smooth and soft texture. Try them in casseroles, hotpots and stews to make your dinner a one-pot wonder. Add to the cooking liquid straight away and simmer slowly with the meat for soft and tender spuds.

Try them in:

Omelettes and frittatas

New potatoes add an extra-filling element to omelettes and frittatas for
a speedy meal. Thinly sliced and pre-boiled, the mini potatoes cook
quickly giving you delicious results in minutes. Once cooked, they will
hold their shape, allowing you to cut the perfect wedge of filling
frittata – ideal hot for dinner or cold for lunch the next day.

Try them in:

Barbecued new potatoes

In the summer, when new potatoes are at their best, there’s nothing as
nice as making and eating your meal outdoors. New potatoes are perfect
to pop on the barbecue as they cook quickly and evenly, even with a
temperamental barbecue to deal with. Simply rubbed with sea salt and
olive oil, they make a delicious crunchy, grilled treat. Thanks to their
firm texture, they are also perfect to thread onto skewers.

Try them in:

How to Cook New Potatoes

Baked new potatoes

It isn’t just big fat jacket potatoes that are good baked, spare a thought for their little baby sibling – the new potato. Simply baked as you would a larger one, these potatoes make a speedier and sweeter alternative to the typical spud. With just a hint of imagination you can also turn them into a whole variety of baked dishes, from thinly sliced chips to layers with cheese and beside your favourite ingredients in a tray bake.

Try them in:

  • Buttery baby potatoes
  • Garlic and rosemary potato slices
  • Pommes Anna with eggs
  • Sausage bake


Where to next?

Leaving the skin on new potatoes as you fry them willhelp to keep their shape, and add a wonderful crunch. The often waxy texturemeans that they won?t fall apart when you fry them. They colour well toowhether fried in oil or rich butter. The versatility of this way of cookingknows no bounds and we?d be happy to see them on the table at breakfast, lunchor dinner.

How to Cook New Potatoes

How to Cook New Potatoes

Potatoes may seem like the sort of year-round staple that doesn’t have a particular season, but when spring comes, it’s definitely new potato time. Out with chips and heavy mash, these little beauties bring a huge variety of new dishes to the table. Potatoes get a bad rep when it comes to health and are often the first to go when dieting, but new potatoes are naturally low in fat and surprisingly high in vitamin C, so don’t write them off.

New, early or baby potatoes are exactly that – the same variety as the regular potato but not fully grown. The season therefore starts in April and lasts through the summer until they start getting bigger. As the sugar in new potatoes has not yet turned into starch, they are a little sweeter than their fully grown counterparts.

New potatoes come in many different varieties; Anya, Charlotte, the Welsh Pembrokeshire Early and the Scottish Ayrshire, but perhaps the most famous and well-loved is the Jersey Royal. The unique flavour comes from the rich and fertile soil on the island of Jersey. Like Champagne, Parmigiano-Reggiano and Melton Mowbray pork pies, Jersey Royals have PDO status.

When buying new potatoes, they often come covered in soil – although it may be a time-consuming prospect, unwashed potatoes often last longer as the soil protects them from bruising.

Home » Recipes » How to Cook Canned New Potatoes

How to Cook New Potatoes

EASY, FAST and convenient! You’ll be a kitchen rock star in minutes flat with this recipe for how to cook canned new Potatoes!

How to Cook New Potatoes

How to Cook Canned New Potatoes Photo by Tatyana Grigoryan

WHAT IS A CANNED NEW POTATO?

Canned new potatoes are simply small baby potatoes dug from the field and peeled before being canned. You Can eat straight from the can because they have already been cooked through. You’ll notice they taste better if you add a few ingredients for seasoning (see the recipe at the bottom of the page)

ARE CANNED NEW POTATOES HEALTHY?

As usual, canned new potatoes are healthy, depending on what you are looking for in your diet. Potatoes are part of a healthy balanced diet. That said, if you are on a low carb diet or a diabetic diet, then these white potatoes might not be the perfect thing for you.

How to Cook New Potatoes

How to Cook Canned New Potatoes Photo by Tatyana Grigoryan

WHAT ABOUT CANNED NEW POTATOES WITH GREEN BEANS?

Yes, in fact, you CAN use canned new potatoes with green beans. The best option for that recipe can be found here in my post GREEN BEANS AND NEW POTATOES. Simply substitute the fresh new potatoes for the canned ones and you’ll be on the right road. Heat through

CAN YOU MASH CANNED NEW POTATOES?

Yes, YOU CAN! Check out THIS recipe to find out how!

CAN YOU BAKE NEW POTATOES?

Yes, you can bake new potatoes, simply use the recipe below and do NOT add the water. Instead, sprinkle the new potatoes with the spices and rub with oil/butter then place on aluminum foil on a baking sheet and bake at 350 for 20-30 minutes until heated through.

How to Cook New Potatoes

How to Cook Canned New Potatoes Photo by Tatyana Grigoryan

WHAT’S THE BEST WAY TO PREPARE CANNED NEW POTATOES?

The very best way to prepare canned new potatoes is to follow the recipe found at the bottom of this post. They are delicious, satisfying and affordable!

TIPS AND TRICKS FOR CANNED NEW POTATOES

  • Make sure to drain the water from the canned potatoes and use fresh tap water in the recipe.
  • Some canned foods can be more salty than others, taste before adding salt and pepper and also be careful if you have any issues with salt in your diet.
  • Try your potatoes with some other spices, you may find you might like things like cumin, thyme, rosemary or other delicious spices! Potatoes are like a blank canvas!
  • Do not give whole canned potatoes to a toddler as the small round potatoes could pose a choking hazard. Cut them or mash them up first.

Want to TRY Something REALLY Delicious?

Slather Some of THESE Gravies over the top of these potatoes!

YOU WON’T BE SORRY!

TRY These OTHER Potato Recipes by Loaves and Dishes!

YA’LL HELP ME OUT

Please leave me a 5 star 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟 comment below in the comment section, all right? I would LOVE to know if you made this recipe or even if you are planning to! Of course, head on over to Pinterest, Facebook and Instagram and tag me with some photos of your creation!

There are several delicious ways to cook new potatoes, roasted, boiled or mashed come to mind, even smashed. What makes them so great is the speed and ease of cooking new potatoes.

What is a New Potato?

A new potato can be white or red, it merely means that it is freshly harvested and/or harvested before reaching maturity. You can tell a new potato by rubbing your thumb gently across the skin, it should start to peel away. This is because new potatoes have not been cured.

Most mature potatoes are stored for a week or two to set the skin and heal any blemishes, new potatoes skip this curing step. Because the new potatoes are freshly harvested they will be more moist and sweeter than say an Idaho Russet potato. But this also means that they will spoil sooner, usually within a few days versus weeks. If you visit a farmers market, don’t be alarmed if dirt is still clinging to your new potatoes, the dirt actually acts as a protective barrier against bruises and allowing for a little longer storage time.

Because of the spoilage factor you will typically find small variety, fully mature potatoes at the grocery store as opposed to true new potatoes. These still have thin skins and can be substituted for new potatoes. I’ll always encourage a visit to the farmers market for the nutrient quality, taste and to support your local farmers. But there is no shame in purchasing small potatoes at the grocery store, that’s typically where most people have the availability. Whatever kind of variety you get, there are several ways to cook new potatoes that are interchangeable whether the potatoes are red, white, new or just plain small.

New potatoes, as well as small varieties, typically have a thin skin so don’t need to be peeled and they hold their shape when cooked. They are also sweeter because their sugar hasn’t converted to starch yet.

How to Cook Roasted New Potatoes

This is the way we typically cook new potatoes at my house. If I can’t get to the farmers market to buy true new potatoes then I will buy small as possible potatoes at the grocery store, typically Yukon gold for the buttery flavor. If they are larger than an inch then I will either halve or quarter the potatoes. Place the potatoes on a cooking sheet, drizzle some extra virgin olive oil over them and mix to distribute the oil evenly. Then add some kosher salt and a few grinds of freshly ground pepper. Throw in the oven and roast at 400 degrees for about 20 minutes. They should turn a beautiful golden color. There is nothing like roasted new potatoes with a slight crunch on the outside and a creamy interior.

How to Cook New Potatoes – Boiled

Boiled new potatoes are easy and take little hands on time. Sauté minced garlic with some butter over medium heat. Add some parsley, rosemary or other fresh herb to butter once it is melted. Place potatoes in pot and cover with water by about 2” above the potatoes. Bring to a boil and boil for 10-15 minutes until tender. A fork should easily pierce the potatoes and the skins may be releasing. Drain and immediately dress the potatoes with the garlic herb butter.

How to Store New Potatoes

Store in a cool, dry, well ventilated place. There are ceramic crocks with ventilation holes available or a decorative wicker basket serves the purpose well too.

  1. How Long Do You Roast Potatoes & at What Temp?
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  4. How to Cook Roast & Potatoes in a Slow Cooker
  5. How to Cook a Really Tender Beef Roast With Vegetables

The finesse factor — that “magic touch” that cooks who can turn the ordinary into the extraordinary seem to have — really shines when cooking the basics, such as a roast chicken or classic roast beef and potatoes. There’s no secret to cooking a tender roast beef with potatoes and onions. You just have to get a good sear on the meat using dry heat, then tenderize it with moist heat. The onions and potatoes take care of themselves when you cook the roast, so you can pop the whole thing in the oven at once and turn something simple into something elegant — finesse in its purest form.

Step 1

Remove the roast from the refrigerator and let it reach room temperature. If thawing a frozen roast, place it in a shallow pan lined with paper towels and place it on the bottom shelf of the fridge. Allow about 2 hours of thawing for every pound of beef.

Step 2

Place an oven rack in the middle position of the oven and remove any other trays or racks. Heat the oven to 400 degrees Fahrenheit and turn the fan on, if using a convection oven.

Step 3

Place the roast on a cutting board and remove any loose, hanging pieces of fat from it using a kitchen knife. Also remove any 1- to 2-inch-thick layers of surface fat, referred to as fat caps, from the roast.

Step 4

Rinse 4 or 5 new potatoes and peel 1 or 2 onions for every pound of roast and place them on a cutting board. Cut new potatoes larger in diameter than a walnut in half. Cut the onions in quarters or halves with a kitchen knife so they’re roughly the size of the potatoes.

Step 5

Spread the potatoes and onions in an even layer on a wire rack set over a pan that measures at least 3 inches deep. You can use an aluminum roasting pan if you don’t have a drip pan. Drizzle the potatoes and onions liberally with vegetable oil or regular olive oil.

Step 6

Season the potatoes to taste, or follow a guideline of 1/2 teaspoon of kosher salt and 1/4 teaspoon of freshly ground black pepper for every 5 potatoes. Place the roast on top of the vegetables.

Step 7

Drizzle vegetable oil or regular olive oil over the roast and season it to taste. If you’re unsure of how to season it, keep it simple. Use about 1/2 tablespoon of kosher salt and 1/4 tablespoon of freshly ground black pepper per pound. Rub the seasoning and oil all over the outside of the roast.

Step 8

Place the roast and veggies in the oven and cook until the outside of the beef develops a golden-brown color, or the color you want it at when you remove it after cooking. You’ll lower the temperature and cook the roast in moist heat after you sear it, so the roast won’t get darker on the outside during cooking. You get a good sear on a roast after about 12 to 15 minutes in an oven set to 400 F.

Step 9

Lower the heat to 300 F after your sear the roast. Open the door and pull the rack out so you have access to the roast without removing it from the oven.

Step 10

Pour about 2 inches of liquid through the rack the roast sits on and into the pan underneath it. The liquid creates steam during cooking, so you can use just about any liquid. Water, wine, beer and stock all work with a beef roast.

Step 11

Cover the roast and veg with a large piece of aluminum foil and mold it around the edges of the pan to seal it. Wear oven mitts when covering the pan with aluminum foil, which lets the moist heat rising from the pan of liquid underneath to collect around the roast.

Step 12

Check the temperature of the roast after 30 minutes of cooking with a meat thermometer. Insert thermometer in the center of the roast as deep as you can when checking. Medium-rare, which takes about 30 to 40 minutes depending on the oven, measures about 130 F. Medium, which takes about 40 to 50 minutes, measures around 150 F. Well-done, which takes about 1 to 1 1/2 hours, measures about 160 F.

Step 13

Open the oven door and pull the rack the roast sits on all the way out. Remove the pan and place it on a waiting cooling rack or cooling pad. Remove a corner of the foil from the pan to let the steam out, and let the roast sit for about 10 minutes before cutting into it.

How to Cook New Potatoes

  • Total: 22 mins
  • Prep: 10 mins
  • Cook: 12 mins
  • Servings: 4 to 6 servings
Nutritional Guidelines (per serving)
264 Calories
10g Fat
38g Carbs
6g Protein

×

Nutrition Facts
Servings: 4 to 6
Amount per serving
Calories 264
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 10g 13%
Saturated Fat 6g 29%
Cholesterol 24mg 8%
Sodium 323mg 14%
Total Carbohydrate 38g 14%
Dietary Fiber 4g 15%
Protein 6g
Calcium 93mg 7%
*The % Daily Value (DV) tells you how much a nutrient in a food serving contributes to a daily diet. 2,000 calories a day is used for general nutrition advice.

Creamed new potatoes are an easy preparation and a fabulous way to enjoy seasonal new potatoes. If new potatoes aren’t in season, use small round potatoes or fingerlings in the dish.

The classic, lightly seasoned white sauce makes a tasty sauce for the new potatoes, and it doesn’t distract from their natural flavor.

New potatoes should be scrubbed just enough to remove dirt and some of their thin, peeling skin. If your potatoes don’t have a very thin skin, you might choose to peel them.

The recipe is very simple and versatile. Add some chopped fresh parsley, dill, or chives to the sauce, or add steamed peas or green beans to the dish.

Published: Apr 8, 2020 by Andrea

You can’t go wrong with these quick roasted potatoes -Ready in just 20 minutes with simple cupboard ingredients, they’re the perfect side dish for any meal!

Crispy on the outside, and delightfully fluffy on the inside, these quick roast potatoes make a tasty and versatile side dish that goes well with just about anything.

Made with just 6 simple ingredients (including salt & pepper!), these quick roasted potatoes are ready in just 20 minutes from start to finish, and completely gluten-free, dairy-free and vegan.

Super easy to prepare and cook with minimal tools. All you need is a pot, a large baking tray or dish, and a super hot oven. That’s it!

Serve them with grilled fish, meat, chicken, or anything else you like. They’re awesomely quick to prepare on busy weeknights, or you can batch cook and enjoy them all week long.

6 Basic IngredientsHow to Cook New Potatoes

This is the most basic recipe for roasted potatoes. Once you’ve mastered the basics, start playing around with your favourite seasoning combos!

Seasoning: The flavours of garlic and rosemary combine to add extra zing to tender potatoes. You can add thyme sprigs or freshly-dried oregano too.

Potatoes: You could virtually use any potato for this recipe, but you might need to adjust baking timing. Red or baby potatoes, Russet or Yukon gold are some favourite options (more on that below).

Extra-virgin Olive Oil: High quality extra-virgin olive oil is your best friend here. It’s perfect for roasting and infusing the potatoes with great flavour.

Salt & Pepper: Sea salt it’s a must. If you’re feeling fancy, add a pinch of sea salt flakes or Maldon salt right before serving. Freshly-grated black pepper is optional but it will bring even more flavour to the dish.

Best Potatoes For Roasting

How to Cook New Potatoes

What are the best potatoes for roasting? The short answer is, most potatoes are fine for roasting. But for best results, use the best potatoes, which include:

Russet potatoes: they are very starchy, and usually best for frying, however they work just fine in this recipe, and they still turn nice and crispy outside but soft and fluffy on the inside.

Baby potatoes: I love roasted new potatoes, because they’re super quick to prepare since you can leave the skin on and there’s no chopping involved.

They’re less starchy than Yukon or Russet potatoes, but my simple double-cooking technique (more on this below) will still give you deliciously crisp and creamy potatoes.

Yukon gold: The most common potato on the market, it’s also the best option!

Somewhere in the middle between starchy and waxy potatoes, Yukon gold potatoes come with consistent size and shape, which means you can easily cut them and cook them evenly.

They get crispy outside but keep a creamy, fluffy center, making them the best potatoes for roasting.

How to Make Roast Potatoes

How to Cook New Potatoes

The secret for quick oven roasted potatoes lies in a simple double cooking technique.

Parboiling the potatoes for a few minutes, and finishing them off in the oven, is truly the best way to cook roasted potatoes in a very short time, and it’s totally easy and fuss-free.

Partially cook the potatoes in boiling water, then season with sea salt, extra-virgin olive oil, and seasoning. Arrange them on a large hot baking tray to roast in the oven for about 10 minutes.

That’s just about it!

These super-simple steps deliver crispy and fluffy potatoes in a fraction of the time:

Dice: Cut each potato into chunks (small potatoes in half, medium potatoes into 4 chunks and very large ones into 6). Skip this step if you’re using baby potatoes.

Parboil: Pop the potatoes into boiling water and cook for 5-7 minutes, until they’re just tender.

Note: Parboiling potatoes is optional, if you want to skip this step, just roast the potatoes for 35 – 40 minutes.

Heat: Heat oven to 200°C, 180°C fan, gas 7, and place a baking tray or a baking dish inside to heat up for a couple of minutes.

Season: Transfer the potatoes into the hot baking dish. Season with extra-virgin olive oil, garlic, rosemary, sea salt and black pepper, and spread out the potatoes in a nice even layer.

Bake until crispy: Transfer the potatoes into the oven and bake for 10-15 minutes, until crispy and golden. Remove the pan and flip the potatoes halfway through cooking time.

Let cool: Remove the baking tray from the oven, sprinkle the potatoes extra sea salt and pepper if you like, and let rest for 5 more minutes before serving.

What to serve roasted potatoes with

These crispy potatoes make such a versatile side dish that goes with pretty much anything.

Try them with Beer Chicken Skewers for a summery meal, or with hearty meatballs for a cozy dinner.

Serve them with this 15-minute Chicken Piccata or with Italian Prosciutto-wrapped Cod Fillets for a super quick meal the whole family will love.

New Potatoes are quintessentially the flavour of spring and summer. Whether your favourite is a Jersey Royal or an Ayrshire tattie their earthy nutty flavoured is fantastic in salads or as a side dish to your roast dinner.This gentle cooking method also allows the full flavour of the potatoes to come through. Yes, you could boil them for 20mns on the hob or in the microwave (but I don’t have one) but on hot summer days that’s not ideal -who wants a hot, steamy kitchen.? so this was the better option imo. This means I can do lots at the one time and use some for dinner and some for potato salad during the week. It also means it can free up space on the hob if your cooking other dishes. Try out this method for yourself and let us know what you think

How to Cook New Potatoes

Wash the potatoes and place them in the Slow Cooker

How to Cook New Potatoes

Finely chop the garlic and add it to the potatoes.
Crumble over the stock cube.
Sprinkle over the Rosemary or mixed herbs,

How to Cook New Potatoes

Cook on high (lid on) for 1hr 15mns- 1hr 30mns or until potatoes are soft.
No liquid is needed as the heat from the cooker will produce steam which will settle in the bottom of the cooker.

Serve warm with a drizzle of butter.
Great with a salad or chopped & mixed with your favourite salad cream , mayonnaise or dressing.

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New potatoes and carrots not only complement each other well, but also cook quickly together in the microwave. You can steam them in a little bit of water to create an easy and nutritious side dish that pairs well with beef, roasted chicken, fish and a variety of other main courses. The addition of a few herbs and spices can dramatically change the flavor of the carrots and potatoes. Use baby carrots and chunked potatoes and you’ll have dinner on the table in no time.

Pour rinsed baby carrots into a microwave-safe dish.

Wash your new potatoes under running water to remove dirt and debris. Chop your potatoes into rough 2-inch chunks. Leave very small new potatoes whole. Aim for a mix of potato chunks that are roughly the same size, whether chopped or whole, as the size of new potatoes varies.

Add the potatoes to the dish with the carrots. Toss the carrots and potatoes together with your hands or a spoon until mixed.

Add a small amount of water to the dish. Avoid adding more than 3 tablespoons per pound of vegetables as you just want to steam them, not boil them.

Stir in fresh herbs, spices, salt, pepper or other flavors.

Cover tightly with plastic wrap. Poke a tiny hole in the center of the plastic wrap to let steam escape.

Microwave on high for 4 to 5 minutes. Check the potatoes and carrots for tenderness with a fork. Give them a quick stir and re-cover with plastic wrap. Cook on high at 2- to 3-minute intervals, checking after each interval for tenderness.

Let the dish rest, covered, for 3 to 4 minutes.

A Jill-of-all-trades, Lillian Downey is a certified Responsible Sexuality Educator, certified clinical phlebotomist and a certified non-profit administrator. She’s also written extensively on gardening and cooking. She also authors blogs on nail art blog and women’s self esteem.

Food editor Russ Parsons shares the deliciousness of new potatoes.

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Almost any little spud can and will call itself a “new potato” these days. But they’re just pretending. A truly new potato is something special, and one of the great treats of spring.

To understand new potatoes, you need to know something about old potatoes. About 99% of all the potatoes you’ll ever eat have been grown to maturity, dug from the ground and then “cured” – stored for a period of 10 days to 2 weeks in a climate-controlled environment. This toughens up the peel and reduces the amount of moisture in the potato to help it last longer without spoiling.

Truly new potatoes are sold right after harvest, without any curing. They’re higher in moisture so have a little bit different texture, and their flavor has, to my taste, a slight bitterness that complements the earthy flavor.

Oddly enough, though “new potato” is usually used to describe small potatoes, truly new potatoes can be any size, ranging from marbles to bakers.

Because these true new potatoes are such a special ingredient, treat them simply, at least the first time you serve them. One of my favorite things is just to steam them until tender, then toss them into softened butter you’ve whipped with fresh herbs and shallots. Stir just until the potatoes are evenly coated, sprinkle with coarse salt and serve.

How to choose: The best way to tell truly new potatoes is to rub the skin with your thumb — it should be delicate enough to scrape clean.

How to store: New potatoes can be stored at room temperature, but because they have not been cured, they won’t last as long as regular potatoes — several days instead of several weeks. When refrigerated, the starch will begin to convert to sugar, so if they’re chilled for very long they’ll taste sweet.

How to Cook New Potatoes

I can think of a thousand reasons why boiling potatoes is the worst. Actually, I can just think of one right now: It takes too damn long. Also, watching and waiting for water to boil is a surefire way to take the joy out of cooking. And unless you want to waste your time (and your stove’s energy) bringing a massive cauldron of water to a boil, there’s no need to rely on bubbling water to cook your potatoes. Fact is, there are several alternate methods for how to cook potatoes fast that not only cut down on time, but actually make your potatoes taste better.

So I spoke with the Epi Test Kitchen, and they gave me four quickest ways to cook potatoes—no boiling necessary.

1. Steam the potatoes instead of boiling

Steaming has all the benefits of boiling—no cooking oils, not much clean up—at a fraction of the time. Why? You’re only waiting for a small amount of water to boil, not a whole pot. So the next time you’re prepping potatoes for another dish or just softening them on their own, try steaming them instead of boiling. Another advantage? Unlike a big pot of boiling water, steam won’t dilute the flavor of the potatoes substantially.

Here’s how to do it: Epi’s Rhoda Boone recommends using 1/2 inch of water (add a few more splashes if the pot starts to dry out) in the bottom of the pot or pan under the steamer.

2. Cut Them Smaller

It seems obvious, but cutting a potato into smaller pieces helps it cook faster—a must if you’re skillet-frying some hash and want to keep the potatoes on roughly the same timeline as the onions and peppers. Just be sure to cut the potatoes into evenly sized pieces so that

Rhoda suggests cutting smaller varieties like new potatoes in halves or quarters before cooking to use in salads like a green bean Niçoise or dressed potato salad. Another bonus of taking a minute or two to cut up those potatoes? Once sliced and cooked, the potatoes will absorb dressings and toppings better, making everything from potato salads to pan-fried spuds even more flavorful.

How to Cook New Potatoes

Potato Salad with 7-Minute Eggs and Mustard Vinaigrette

3. Parcook in the Microwave

You can’t count on the microwave to adequately cook a potato (trust me, I tried), but you can count on it to soften the potato, making it ready for the next step, whether that’s smashing and roasting it or baking it in the oven.

Here’s how to do it: Just prick a few holes in a few potatoes with a fork, and microwave on high for 3-4 minutes, turning over once. There you go—super-fast par-cooked potatoes.

How to Cook New Potatoes

Panfried Smashed Potatoes

4. Use a Bigger Pan (or roast on a wire rack)

The more space your potatoes have, the more air can circulate around them, and the more heat gets into each piece of potato. The result? Faster cooking. Another way to speed up cooking? Pile your cut-up, seasoned and oiled potatoes on a wire rack set over a rimmed baking sheet for maximum hot-air circulation, and if your oven has a convection setting, that will shave off a few minutes, too.

EASY, FAST and convenient! You’ll be a kitchen rock star in minutes flat with this recipe for how to cook canned new Potatoes!

How to Cook New Potatoes

How to Cook Canned New Potatoes Photo by Tatyana Grigoryan

WHAT IS A CANNED NEW POTATO?

Canned new potatoes are simply small baby potatoes dug from the field and peeled before being canned. You Can eat straight from the can because they have already been cooked through. You’ll notice they taste better if you add a few ingredients for seasoning (see the recipe at the bottom of the page)

ARE CANNED NEW POTATOES HEALTHY?

As usual, canned new potatoes are healthy, depending on what you are looking for in your diet. Potatoes are part of a healthy balanced diet. That said, if you are on a low carb diet or a diabetic diet, then these white potatoes might not be the perfect thing for you.

How to Cook New Potatoes

How to Cook Canned New Potatoes Photo by Tatyana Grigoryan

WHAT ABOUT CANNED NEW POTATOES WITH GREEN BEANS?

Yes, in fact, you CAN use canned new potatoes with green beans. The best option for that recipe can be found here in my post GREEN BEANS AND NEW POTATOES. Simply substitute the fresh new potatoes for the canned ones and you’ll be on the right road. Heat through

CAN YOU MASH CANNED NEW POTATOES?

Yes, YOU CAN! Check out THIS recipe to find out how!

CAN YOU BAKE NEW POTATOES?

Yes, you can bake new potatoes, simply use the recipe below and do NOT add the water. Instead, sprinkle the new potatoes with the spices and rub with oil/butter then place on aluminum foil on a baking sheet and bake at 350 for 20-30 minutes until heated through.

How to Cook New Potatoes

How to Cook Canned New Potatoes Photo by Tatyana Grigoryan

WHAT’S THE BEST WAY TO PREPARE CANNED NEW POTATOES?

The very best way to prepare canned new potatoes is to follow the recipe found at the bottom of this post. They are delicious, satisfying and affordable!

TIPS AND TRICKS FOR CANNED NEW POTATOES

  • Make sure to drain the water from the canned potatoes and use fresh tap water in the recipe.
  • Some canned foods can be more salty than others, taste before adding salt and pepper and also be careful if you have any issues with salt in your diet.
  • Try your potatoes with some other spices, you may find you might like things like cumin, thyme, rosemary or other delicious spices! Potatoes are like a blank canvas!
  • Do not give whole canned potatoes to a toddler as the small round potatoes could pose a choking hazard. Cut them or mash them up first.

Want to TRY Something REALLY Delicious?

Slather Some of THESE Gravies over the top of these potatoes!

Southern Tomato Gravy!

YOU WON’T BE SORRY!

TRY These OTHER Potato Recipes by Loaves and Dishes!

Southern Fried Potatoes and Onions!

Classic Mashed Potatoes

Grandma’s Stewed Potatoes

The Secret to Au Gratin Potatoes

Baked Potato Casserole

YA’LL HELP ME OUT

Please leave me a 5 star 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟 comment below in the comment section, all right? I would LOVE to know if you made this recipe or even if you are planning to! Of course, head on over to Pinterest, Facebook and Instagram and tag me with some photos of your creation!

Ya’ll know I love your comments!! ❤

A VERSE TO SHARE

This past weekend, Mr. Loaves and Dishes and I went to the movies to see “Won’t you be my neighbor”. Something really struck me as I sat in the theater in tears. There are a LOT of people in the world who don’t feel loved.

How to Cook New Potatoes

Whether you’re boiling some up for a salad or serving as a simple side-dish with garlic butter, you’ll want to make sure you get them just right!

There are actually a few things to keep in mind to get the texture and taste spot on, so here are some simple tips on how to boil a potato.

Which ones should you choose?

Boiling potatoes is usually the first step towards another meal, such as turning them into roasts or mash, so the type you choose will affect this. If you’re making mash, or cooking them in a sauce, Desiree are the ones for you, but when making a salad you’ll want to use salad potatoes with lower levels of starch such as Charlotte, Maris Peer or Baby Gem.

The prep

This part is easy! Just give them a good rinse to remove any dirt and cut out any blemishes you see. Some people may prefer to peel the potatoes before boiling, but we would recommend you leave the skins on. This ensures that the nutrients and flavours are not lost during cooking and you get all those lovely vitamins too. Cooking times can be reduced if you cut the potatoes into smaller chunks, but if you do want to peel them, this will be more difficult the smaller the pieces.

The boiling point

So your spuds are ready to hit the pot. The most important part here is that you use cold water instead of boiled – if you boil the water first, the outside will cook faster than the inside resulting in an uneven texture. Cubed spuds will take around 15 minutes where larger chunks or whole new potatoes will be 20-25 minutes. To check when they are done, pierce the potatoes with the tip of a knife to see how much resistance there is. If it goes in easily, you’re done!

Alternatively, if time is of the essence, pop the kettle on to boil whilst you peel your potatoes, transfer into a large saucepan, add the potatoes and boil as required.

Draining

Make sure to drain your boiled spuds immediately to prevent them becoming too soggy. Don’t worry about them getting cold as they can retain their heat quite well if left in the pot with the lid on.

Inspiration

So there you have it! Your boiled potatoes should have just the right texture and consistency to be added to a dish. Here are a few ideas you can try…

ABOUT THE REVIEWER

Lindsey Elizabeth Pfau, MS, RD, CSSD

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Lacey Bourassa

The spud family is full of various shapes, sizes and colors. In addition to the sweet potato, russet potato and other common types of potato, baby potatoes are a root vegetable worth adding to your grocery list. An easy way to incorporate them into your diet is to microwave baby potatoes.

Baby potatoes are also referred to as mini potatoes, immature potatoes, small potatoes and sometimes fingerling potatoes. Whatever you call them, these starch-based foods complement a variety of main dishes and can be prepared in several ways. While roasting and baking are popular cooking methods, you can also steam or microwave mini potatoes.

Potatoes Nutrition Facts and Benefits

The different types of potatoes offer unique flavors and nutrition profiles, though the healthiest potatoes tend to be deep in color. For this reason, opt for red or purple mini potatoes if possible. The most common mini potatoes are yellow and red.

According to the USDA, a ¾ cup serving of baby red potatoes contains the following nutrients:

  • 131 calories
  • 3 grams of protein
  • 31 grams of carbohydrates
  • 4 grams of fiber
  • 0 grams of fat
  • 56 percent daily value (DV) of vitamin C
  • 7 percent DV of iron

Since baby potatoes are low in fat and naturally free of dietary cholesterol, they are often recommended as part of heart-healthy eating plans. For example, the DASH diet allows for multiple servings of potatoes per day.

According to a December 2016 study published in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture, potatoes have antioxidant, hypocholesterolemic, anti-inflammatory, antiobesity, anticancer and antidiabetic effects. Reseachers urge for a long-term study on the health effects of potatoes while controlling for fat intake.

How to Microwave Baby Potatoes

To microwave mini potatoes, you will need a fork, microwave-safe container, the desired amount of baby potatoes and optional herbs.

According to the American Heart Association, here is how to microwave mini potatoes:

  1. Rinse the baby potatoes thoroughly.
  2. Pierce each potato with a fork.
  3. Transfer to a microwave-safe container.
  4. Microwave mini potatoes on high for approximately 10 minutes or until tender.
  5. Toss the potatoes halfway.

The time needed to microwave baby potatoes varies depending on the amount of potatoes and power of the microwave. Cutting the potatoes into smaller sizes, such as potato cubes, can also encourage them to cook faster.

Cooking smaller batches of potatoes in the microwave can also encourage faster cooking. For a quick snack or side dish, spread the potatoes out in a glass baking dish.

Some people worry about the safety of microwaves, but they are a preferred cooking method for potatoes. According to a November 2018 study published in Nutrients, microwaved potatoes contain 50% more vitamin C compared to boiling and baking. Microwaving potatoes also retains more resistant starch than boiling.

Baby Potatoes Recipes

You can use baby potatoes in place of other types of potatoes in many recipes. To incorporate mini potatoes into your diet, use them to make mashed potatoes, baked potatoes and potato casseroles.

The easiest and most convenient method is to microwave baby potatoes, but you can also roast or boil them. The Mayo Clinic offers a roasted baby potato recipe with garlic and herbs. The Cleveland Clinic recommends boiling Peruvian baby potatoes with various vegetables.

The range of vegetables that show up in the springtime is downright staggering—from bountiful piles of sugar snap peas and spiky globe artichokes to pointy bunches of asparagus. But the real star of the season that doesn’t get enough credit? Small, smooth-skinned new potatoes.

“Wait,” you say. “It’s not winter anymore—I’m done with potatoes.” And, look, we totally hear you. We put away the our braising pot, forgot about tough cuts of stew meat, and started avoiding bags of russet potatoes weeks ago. But new potatoes are different.

First of all, new potatoes pack a slightly sweeter flavor than older potatoes. But, most crucially, new potatoes sport much thinner skins. Whether they’re roasted with chicken, boiled, or quickly sautéd a handful with fresh herbs and oil, the new potato’s tender outer layer will firm up and get crispy—and the skin is delicate enough that you’ll actually want to eat it.

How to Cook New Potatoes

New Potatoes with Dill Butter

And those insides! They hold an incredible amount of moisture, meaning that crispy skin will give way to a creamy center. One of the best way to take advantage of that textural greatness is to quickly boil the potatoes, smash them with a fork, and pan-fry them up in a skillet with a few glugs of good olive oil under they turn golden brown.

How to Cook New Potatoes

Panfried Smashed Potatoes

New potatoes are also the perfect candidate for one the most iconic outdoor cooking dishes: Potato salad. The waxy flesh ensures that the potato slices holds their shape when cooked, meaning your potato salad won’t be a mushy, crumbly mess.

How to Cook New Potatoes

Lemony Potato Salad

The process of buying new potatoes is pretty similar to any old potato—look for ones that don’t have any signs of bruisings or soft spots. The perfect new potato is both dry and firm to the touch, with delicate, papery skins. Once you get them home, store them in a paper bag in the refrigerator and use them within a few days, since they don’t keep for quite as long as Russets or Yukon Golds. When it comes time to cook, remember that they’re delicate and be gentle when cleaning them—scrub too hard and the skin might start coming off.

Sold yet? Good. You’ve got the rest of spring and most of summer to get in on one unsung heroes of the farmer’s market.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Nicole Adams

Red potatoes are the most common variety of potatoes in the United States and sometimes are referred to as new potatoes. A baby red potato is harvested when the potato is still small. It has red skin, is typically very smooth and is full of flavor. The baby red potato absorbs the flavors you cook it with effectively and is also tasty standing on its own. Baby red potatoes do well boiled or sauteed and can accompany a variety of dishes, such as meat or fish and vegetables.

Preparation

Step 1

How to Cook New Potatoes

Wash the baby red potatoes under cool running water using a vegetable brush to remove any dirt.

Step 2

How to Cook New Potatoes

Remove any visible bad spots with a vegetable peeler.

Step 3

How to Cook New Potatoes

Dry the potatoes with paper towels and set them aside.

Step 1

How to Cook New Potatoes

Place a large pot three-fourths full of water on the stove over high heat. Put the potatoes in the pot and bring the water to a boil.

Step 2

How to Cook New Potatoes

Boil the potatoes for 10 to 15 minutes or until they reach the tenderness you desire.

Step 3

How to Cook New Potatoes

Drain the water from the pot using a colander and transfer the potatoes back to the empty pot.

Step 4

How to Cook New Potatoes

Drizzle the boiled baby red potatoes with olive oil and sprinkle the potatoes with salt and pepper to taste.

Step 5

How to Cook New Potatoes

Season the potatoes with 1 tsp. of dried herbs of your choosing, such as basil, rosemary, dill, parsley or thyme, for every dozen potatoes or 2 tsp. of fresh, chopped herbs. Toss the baby red potatoes to distribute the oil and seasonings.

Saute

Step 1

How to Cook New Potatoes

Preheat a large skillet with 1 tbsp. of olive oil over medium heat. Slice the baby red potatoes into even thirds.

Step 2

How to Cook New Potatoes

Add 1 tsp. of minced garlic and ¼ cup of chopped onions to the skillet, if desired. Saute the garlic and onions for 3 to 4 minutes.

Step 3

How to Cook New Potatoes

Add the sliced potatoes to the skillet and sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste.

Step 4

How to Cook New Potatoes

Season the baby red potatoes with 2 tsp. of dried herbs or spices, such as parsley, basil, rosemary or paprika, and toss the potatoes well to coat them.

Step 5

How to Cook New Potatoes

Saute the potatoes and onions for about 30 minutes, stirring them occasionally and adding 2 tsp. of olive oil as needed to keep the potatoes from sticking to the skillet.

Things You’ll Need

Baby red potatoes

Salt and pepper

Herbs and spices

1 tsp. minced garlic

¼ cup chopped onions

Cut the potatoes in half before boiling them.

Sprinkle the cooked potatoes with grated Parmesan or Romano cheese.

To peel or not to peel? This is a much-debated question and I have given it a great deal of thought and consideration. My conclusions are these: yes, it’s best to leave the skins on, and I never scrape new potatoes, but with main-crop potatoes – and it’s a big but – if you’re not going to peel them you must then have evenly sized potatoes so they all cook in the same amount of time. The idea of leaving the skins on is to protect the flesh from the water or steam, which rob the potatoes of flavour. Once you start cutting them into even-sized pieces, that protection is lost. Also, if skins are left on for cooking, I would say that you should then serve the potatoes with their skins on, as peeling hot potatoes while holding them in a cloth is okay if it’s for one or two people, but for six servings it’s quite awkward and hazardous.

How to Cook New Potatoes

If you are going to peel the potatoes, then please, please use a potato peeler. All the best of the flavour is near the skin, so you need to pare it off as thinly as possible. Pare off the skins as thinly as possible, then cut the potatoes into even-sized chunks – not too small; if they are large, quarter them, and if they are small, halve them. The number one rule here is, if you are peeling potatoes, don’t let them sit around in water for hours before they’re needed. If you peel them then try to do so just before you need them.

How to Cook New Potatoes

For cooking, the best way I have found to retain the flavour of the potatoes is not to boil them at all but to steam them. Firstly pour boiling water from the kettle into a pan fitted with a fan steamer, then place the potatoes in the steamer, sprinkle with salt – about 1 rounded teaspoon per 1 lb (450 g) – and if they’re new potatoes tuck in a few sprigs of mint. Then put a tight lid on and let them steam over a lowish heat, which is just needed to keep the water gently boiling until the potatoes are tender. This will take 20-25 minutes, or 15-20 minutes for small new potatoes.

How to Cook New Potatoes

The way to tell whether they are ready is to pierce them with a thin skewer in the thickest part: they should not be hard in the centre, and you need to be careful here, because if they are slightly underdone you do get lumps.

How to Cook New Potatoes

When the potatoes are cooked, remove them from the steamer, drain off any water beneath the steamer, return the potatoes to the saucepan and cover with a clean tea cloth for about 4-5 minutes to absorb some of the excess steam that tends to cling to the potatoes and make them soggy.

How to Cook Sweet Potatoes

How to Cook Sweet Potatoes The humble sweet potato is packed with nutrition; is simple to bake in an oven, microwave, or cook on a grill; and can be seasoned with a variety of your favorite toppings as well as paired with other vegetables

You will need Sweet potatoes Cooking oil Assorted toppings and rimmed baking pan Step 1 Select fresh, firm, smooth, and plump sweet pota to es and wash them as you would other vegetables Cook sweet potatoes whole to benefit from nutrients found next to the skin Step 2

Pierce your dry sweet pota to es a few times with a fork before baking or microwaving Step 3 Place the sweet pota to es on a rimmed pan and bake at 375 degrees for about 45 minutes or until they are tender Step 4 Quick- cook sweet potatoes by placing two clean, pierced pota to es in a microwave oven for five to nine minutes, or four sweet pota to es for 10 to 13 minutes

Sweet potatoes rank high among the healthiest of vegetables, providing vitamins A and C, potassium, and fiber Step 5 Grill sweet potatoes by first boiling them, letting them cool, and then slicing them lengthwise into eighths, oiling the slices, and grilling all sides until they’re golden brown Step 6 Slit your sweet potatoes and top them with sour cream, butter, cinnamon, brown sugar, maple syrup, applesauce, pecans, or anything else that tickles your taste buds to make a delightful dining experience

Did you know Christopher Columbus found sweet potatoes growing on islands in the West Indies and brought the vegetable plant to Spain in the early 1500s, where it was cultivated

How to Cook New Potatoes

How to Pressure Cook Green Beans and New Potatoes

How to Cook New Potatoes

Folks, there’s nothing hard or scary about using a pressure cooker. I’ve heard others (folks that have never cooked with a pressure cooker) carry on urban legends about exploding pots. I say, “bah humbug!” Pressure cookers are no different than any other appliance you properly use and care for in your kitchen. Once you’ve read through the owner’s manual, nothing can stop you from creating meals in half or a third of the cooking time.

Take fresh greens for instance. In a regular cooking pot, they have to cook up to an hour before their country-style tender. In a pressure cooker, it only takes 1 to 3-minutes, depending on whether they’re whole or pieces. The quantity of vegetables does not change pressure cooking times. Although, more mature vegetables may require a longer pressure cooking time.

Now cooking green beans with red potatoes in a pressure cooker can be tricky. Mature whole green beans take a maximum of 4 minutes to cook, while the average 2 1/2-inch size red potato cooking time starts at 15 minutes. If not don’t right, you can end up with mushy greens beans and tender potatoes or tender green beans and hard potatoes.

The solution: whole red potatoes must be no bigger than 1-inch in diameter or cut into 1/2-inch thick slices and the green beans should be whole.

HERE’S ALL IT TAKES

  • fresh whole green beans
  • red potatoes, 1-inch in diameter or cut into 1/2-inch slices
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 to 2 garlic cloves, peeled, left whole
  • 2 teaspoons bacon drippings or olive oil
  • salt and pepper to taste

The amount of vegetables does not change the cooking time. However,
DO NOT fill the pressure cooker over 2/3 full!

When mixing our vegetables, it’s good to use the cooking rack to keep them out of the cooking liquid. Each vegetable will retain its own distinctive flavor and appearance. If you wish to blend the flavors, omit the rack and place them in the cooking liquid.

Pour 1 cup water into cooker. Place the remaining ingredients in cooker, with or without rack. Close cover securely. Place pressure regulator on vent pipe. Using a medium to high heat setting, heat the pressure cooker until the pressure regulator attains a gentle rocking motion.

NOTE: The air vent/cover lock may move up and down a few times when cooking first begins. Steam will be noticeable. This is normal. Air is being vented out of the cooker. Once the cooker has sealed, the air vent/cover lock will rise up and remain in the up position until pressure is released. The overpressure plug will rise slightly and seal as well.

Cooking time begins when the pressure regulator begins to rock gently. Gradually lower the heat as necessary to maintain a slow steady rocking motion and COOK FOR 4 MINUTES. CAREFULLY lift pressure cooker to remove from burner and place in kitchen sink. Cool the pressure cooker under running water faucet until pressure is completely reduced. Pressure is completely reduced when the air vent/cover lock has dropped.

If the air vent/cover lock remains in its raised position, there is still pressure inside the cooker. Continue to cool until air vent/cover lock drops.

Remove the pressure regulator BEFORE opening the cover. Lift the cover toward you to keep any steam away from you. If the cover turns hard, there still may be some pressure in the cooker. Do not force the cover off. Continue to cool the cooker until steam no longer is escaping from the vent pipe, the air vent/cover lock has dropped, and the cover turns easily.

Food is ready to serve.

Like I’ve said, once you know how to properly use a pressure cooker, you can cook anything. Trust me. It takes longer to type these instructions than it takes to learn to cook with a pressure cooker.

I have had the Presto 6 Quart Stainless Steel Pressure Cooker w/ Bimetal Clad Base for last five years and I use it regularly. Its perfect for a family of four. My first pressure cooker was a hand-me-down from Memaw and served me well until the manufacturer stopped making its particular overpressure plug. That’s the only reason why I had to replace it.

Do you own a pressure cooker?

November 6, 2019 | Share:
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Looking for an incredibly simple side dish for a weeknight meal or a special occasion? Boiled baby (or small) potatoes take very little time to cook and only a few ingredients to look stunning and please everyone at the table.

How to Cook New Potatoes

Video Tutorial: How to Prepare Boiled Baby Potatoes

Tips for Making Delicious Boiled Baby Potatoes

Start by selecting the smallest potatoes you can find. If they are not bite-sized, you may want to cut them in half. Make sure they are all roughly the same size, so that they boil at the same rate.

How to Cook New Potatoes

The key to making these baby potatoes look appetizing and festive is finding an assortment of blue, red, and yellow baby potatoes. I see these all over the place now, even at Aldi and Walmart. The fresh or dried parsley flakes you’ll add at the end lends a little pop of color that add to the holiday feel.

How to Cook New Potatoes

I’ve given a range on the seasonings, so you will have to taste and adjust to your liking. Our family really enjoys a sprinkling of grated Parmesan on the potatoes at the end, but it’s totally optional.

How Long Should I Boil Baby Potatoes?

Add enough water to your pot to cover your baby potatoes by at least 1 inch of water. Bring it to a boil and salt the water liberally. Boil the baby (or small) potatoes until they are fork tender, about 10 minutes depending on the size of your potatoes.

What Main Dishes Go Well with Boiled Baby Potatoes?

Here are some of my favorite main dishes to make that go with Boiled Baby Potatoes:

Oven Fried Parmesan Chicken Tenders

How to Cook New Potatoes

Slow Cooker Balsamic Shredded Beef

How to Cook New Potatoes

Roasted Pork Tenderloin with Seasoned Rub

How to Cook New Potatoes

Mini Meatloaf Muffins

How to Cook New Potatoes

You won’t believe how easy and delicious these Boiled Baby Potatoes are! It’s hard to mess these up. You can even make extras and save them in the fridge for leftovers for lunch or dinner another day.

Simple and Delicious Boiled Baby Potatoes

  • Author: Thriving Home
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 10 minutes
  • Total Time: 15 minutes
  • Yield: 4 – 6 servings 1 x
  • Category: Side Dish
  • Method: Boil
  • Cuisine: American

Description

Boiled (or small) baby potatoes take very little time to boil, yet this side dish looks stunning and will please everyone at the table.

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 pounds small baby potatoes (preferably an assortment of red, blue, and yellow)
  • 2 tablespoons butter, plus more as needed
  • Kosher salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper, plus more to taste
  • 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder, plus more to taste
  • 1 tablespoon minced fresh parsley, or 1/2 teaspoon dried parsley flakes
  • Optional: 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese

Instructions

  1. If your potatoes are not bite-sized, then cut them in half.
  2. In a large pot, add enough water to cover your baby potatoes by at least 1 inch of water. Bring to a boil over high heat (put on the lid to help it boil faster). Then, salt the water liberally once it’s boiling.
  3. Boil the baby (or small) potatoes until they are fork tender, about 10 minutes depending on the size of your potatoes.
  4. Drain the potatoes in a colander over the sink and then return them to the pot.
  5. Gently toss the potatoes with the butter, 1 teaspoon Kosher salt, the pepper, the garlic powder, and the parsley. Taste and add more salt, pepper, or garlic powder, as desired. Stir in Parmesan, if desired.
  6. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Notes

Dairy-Free Option: Use ghee (lactose-free clarified butter) or olive oil instead of butter. Leave out the Parmesan cheese.

Kosher Salt Substitute: If subbing table salt for the Kosher salt in this recipe, use about half as much.

Did you make this recipe?

Tag @thrivinghome on Instagram and hashtag it #tastyrecipes

How to Cook New Potatoes

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You can be wondering why you have such a detailed article for just boiling potato. Well, as any cooking experience it has its own rules and peculiarities. Whether you need to use boiled potato as an ingredient for a salad or just simple and at the same time delicious side dish, these tips will help you to cook the beast boiled potatoes with skin on. We will teach you all the tricks that can help you to prepare whole potatoes on the stove, how you can cook whole unskinned potatoes in a cooker or even you will learn a recipe for whole potatoes in the microwave.

If your are intersted in weight yield of potatoes, then follow this link.

How long do you boil whole potatoes?

When you cook potatoes, you do not want to overcook them (except if you are boiling it for mashed potatoes) and at the same time peeled off easily. Boiling time for whole unskinned potatoes depends on the way you decided to cook it, here is a list:

  • How long do you boil potatoes with the skin on? If you want to use potato as a garnish, boil it in a pan for 20 minutes, if you have potatoes boiled for a salad – set the timer for 15-18 minutes for small to medium sized potatoes. If you have large potatoes let them boil for additional 10 minutes. You can always check for their readiness.
  • How long do you boil whole unskinned potatoes in a cooker? It will take you 25-30 minutes to get whole potatoes boiled in a rice cooker/multi-cooker.
  • How long do you cook whole unskinned potatoes in the microwave? You need to microwave whole unskinned potatoes for 10 minutes.

How to boil whole potatoes on the stove?

If it is old, it does not mean that it is bad. This method of cooking whole potatoes is as old as the time. You can’t find more classic recipe than this one. Here is step-by-step guide how you can cook whole potatoes in the boiling water.

Boiled Whole Potatoes Recipe:

Ingredients for the recipe: 4 whole potatoes, unskinned; salt to taste; water for boiling. Type: Side dish/Ingredient Cuisine: International Calories: 79 kcal Yield: 2 servings Prep Time: 5 min Cook Time: 25 min Ready in 30 min

  • Clean thoroughly potatoes: rinse them under running water, scrub them clean. You do not want to skip this step.
  • Now take a pot or a large saucepan, place cleaned potatoes in it and pour cold water to cover the whole potatoes. Add salt (1 teaspoon for 1 liter of water): stir salt in the water until it dissolves.

When do you add salt while boiling potatoes? You need to add salt at this first step, when you have potatoes in cold water.

Do you need to put salt in water for cooking potatoes? Yes, you need to add salt before boiling potatoes. This will help to season potatoes from the inside, as they will be cooking gradually and evenly while water boils. Salt also helps to keep skin intact while cooking.

  • Set the pot over high heat and let the water boil. When water boils lower the heat down for water to simmer. If you want your potatoes cooked mushy, then cover the pot with a lid; if not, then cook potatoes without covering. As we told you, earlier small potatoes will be ready earlier than larger potatoes. You can start checking whole potatoes after 15 minutes of cooking: take a fork, knife or a skewer and poke potatoes. If you can pierce right through then boiled potatoes are ready.
  • When potatoes are cooked, take them out with tongs or a just spoon and let them cool down. If you have time, let them cool down by themselves. To make cooling process quicker, leave them in a bowl with iced water or simply run them under cold water.

If you have a choice to peel or not to peel, please we strongly advise you to boil potatoes unskinned, as all the nutrients are kept inside a potato while cooking in such a way. Moreover, if you do not mind, eat potatoes together with skin, as they will be good for your health.

How to boil potatoes to peel them easily? Here is a tip for an easy way to peel potatoes. After boiling, put them at once into cold water to cool down.

How long to boil whole potatoes for a potato salad? You need to boil potatoes for 15-17 minutes to make salads with them. Before cutting potatoes into cubes or slices, do not forget to cool it down. You can burn yourself.

Here is a compilation of my favorite salads where you use boiled potatoes with skin on as an ingredient:

How do you cook whole potatoes in a cooker?

If you have no time or resources to watch over cooking potatoes on the stove, you can use any cooker you have (rice cooker or multi-cooker) to make perfect boiled potatoes. Here is a simple recipe to follow:

  • Always clean potatoes’ skin thoroughly, as it can turn out you will eat potato with its skin on in the end.
  • Place cleaned potatoes in a cooker, and then fill it with cold water to cover whole potatoes. Add salt (1 teaspoon of salt for 1 liter of water).
  • Close the lead and set the timer for 25-30 minutes.
  • Do not keep cooked potatoes for additional time in a cooker on a setting “WARM” you can overcook it and make it mushy. Before serving take carefully out of the cooker and let it cool down for several minutes.

How to make whole potatoes in the microwave?

In this recipe, we will explain how you can cook whole unskinned potatoes in the microwave. It is, for sure, the easiest, quickest way in which you can cook potatoes. The first tip will be no to take large potatoes; take smaller ones, as it will be easier to cook them through. Here is how you can microwave potatoes:

  • The first step will be to scrub potatoes thoroughly, clean them in the water and then dry potatoes with paper towels.
  • Make some holes in the skin of the potato with the help of fork.
  • Place potatoes in a microwave safe dish.
  • Set the microwave to 600-watt and microwave potatoes for 5-10 minutes. Time depend on the microwave itself and the size of the potato. First cook for 5 minutes, check the potato for readiness, if not, continue microwaving by adding 2 minutes every time.
  • Let potato to cool down for several minutes before serving.

If you liked our recipes, please share with your friends! As you see, there always are some special details that you need to pay attention to while cooking, in this case boiling potatoes. If you have any good tips or advises, leave them in the comment section below.