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How to cook sago

Sago is the starch extracted from piths of tropical palm stems and is commercially produced and commonly sold in the form of pearls. They are usually cooked in water or choice of liquid and widely used in beverages and desserts. These spheres are really easy to prepare, requiring only for the most part boiling in water until translucent. But if you want them chewy or what I describe as “a bite with a fight”, I follow a certain technique on how to cook sago.

How to Cook Sago

I usually keep freshly-prepared sago in a bowl of cold water until ready to use but if I plan to keep the batch longer than a few days, I store the sago in a sterilized bottle with simple syrup to prolong shelf life. I included a recipe for packing syrup using brown sugar. Here are a few delicious things you can use sago:

Ginataang Bilo Bilo-a delicious concoction of palm fruits, tubers, banana, glutinous rice balls, jackfruit and sago stewed in coconut milk
Sago at Gulaman-a refreshing summer cooler made with gulaman cubes, sago and simple syrup
Ginumis-a shaved ice dessert much like the classic Filipino halo-halo but uses gulaman cubes, sago, pinipig and coconut milk
Buko Salad Drink-a must try! a rich and creamy drink filled with gulaman cubes, young coconut strips, nata de coco, sago, condensed milk and coconut milk

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4.6 from 5 votes
How to Cook Sago
Prep Time
5 mins
Cook Time
1 hr
Total Time
1 hr 5 mins
Author: Lalaine Manalo
Ingredients
waterwater
1 package 14 ounces uncooked sago pearls1 package 14 ounces uncooked sago pearls
For the Simple Syrup
2 cups brown sugar2 cups brown sugar
2 cups water2 cups water
Get IngredientsPowered by Chicory
Instructions
In a pot over medium heat, bring enough water to cover sago pearls to a boil. Add sago pearls, stir gently and cook for about 10 minutes or until translucent. Remove from heat, rinse well and drain.
In a pot over medium heat, bring enough water to cover sago pearls to a boil. Add sago pearls, stir gently and cook for about 10 minutes or until translucent. Remove from heat, rinse well and drain.
In the pot, add boiled sago and enough cold water to cover. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, and bring to a gentle boil. When water has boiled for about 6 to 10 minutes, remove from heat, rinse well and drain.
In the pot, add boiled sago and enough cold water to cover. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, and bring to a gentle boil. When water has boiled for about 6 to 10 minutes, remove from heat, rinse well and drain.
In the pot, add enough cold water to cover sago and again, bring to a gentle boil. Repeat process until pearls are tender but chewy and translucent with no white in center. Under cold, running water, rinse sago a few times to remove excess starch. Allow to cool. Use as needed or store in simple syrup until ready to use.
In the pot, add enough cold water to cover sago and again, bring to a gentle boil. Repeat process until pearls are tender but chewy and translucent with no white in center. Under cold, running water, rinse sago a few times to remove excess starch. Allow to cool. Use as needed or store in simple syrup until ready to use.
For the Simple Syrup
In a sauce pot over medium heat, combine sugar and water. Cook, stirring regularly, until sugar has dissolved. Allow to slightly cool. Transfer sago into a clean bottle and pour in syrup.
In a sauce pot over medium heat, combine sugar and water. Cook, stirring regularly, until sugar has dissolved. Allow to slightly cool. Transfer sago into a clean bottle and pour in syrup.

by Lalaine Manalo last updated April 5, 2020 posted May 27, 2013 5 Comments

Sago is the starch extracted from piths of tropical palm stems and is commercially produced and commonly sold in the form of pearls. They are usually cooked in water or choice of liquid and widely used in beverages and desserts. These spheres are really easy to prepare, requiring only for the most part boiling in water until translucent. But if you want them chewy or what I describe as “a bite with a fight”, I follow a certain technique on how to cook sago.

How to Cook Sago

I usually keep freshly-prepared sago in a bowl of cold water until ready to use but if I plan to keep the batch longer than a few days, I store the sago in a sterilized bottle with simple syrup to prolong shelf life. I included a recipe for packing syrup using brown sugar. Here are a few delicious things you can use sago:

  • Ginataang Bilo Bilo-a delicious concoction of palm fruits, tubers, banana, glutinous rice balls, jackfruit and sago stewed in coconut milk
  • Sago at Gulaman-a refreshing summer cooler made with gulaman cubes, sago and simple syrup
  • Ginumis-a shaved ice dessert much like the classic Filipino halo-halo but uses gulaman cubes, sago, pinipig and coconut milk
  • Buko Salad Drink-a must try! a rich and creamy drink filled with gulaman cubes, young coconut strips, nata de coco, sago, condensed milk and coconut milk

Chinese Recipes and Eating Culture

How to make famous Hong Kong style sago dessert at home with easy steps and two serving ways. Sago (西米) is made from sago palm tree stem starch. Although not native to China, we love to cook this as a dessert. Raw sago has a pure and lovely white color and cooked sago presents a lovely transparent color. Unlike the chewy boba balls made from tapioca starch, sago is much softer.

How to Cook Sago

In China, a dessert shop originated from Hong Kong has bought sago into our attention. One of their top popular dessert is mango sago (Chinese Name: 杨枝甘露). Traditional Hong Kong style mango sago use mango, coconut milk, cream, grapefruit or pomelo. Now, those yummy, soft and transparent pearls are served with other popular dessert ingredients (grassy jelly, tofu pudding, taro balls) in lots of restaurants as a basic dessert for form a great combination of flavors and texture. Cook a sago dessert at home is easy and can be quite enjoyable in warm days.

How to Cook Sago

Cook’s Note

  1. Cooking sago with a larger amount of water and higher fire (keep the liquid boiling) can save your time of stirring and watching. By the way, do not wash the sago pearls.
  2. Never cook sago along with your dessert. They can turn your dessert soup cloudy and starchy.
  3. Sago should be rinsed before adding to desserts for a clean texture and soaked in liquid after cooked.

How to cook sago

  • 1/2 cup sago
  • water

Bring a large pot of water to a boiling on medium to high fire. Place sago in.

How to Cook Sago

Use high fire to re-boil the liquid and then use medium fire and keep the liquid boiling during the whole process. Give several stirs to make sure the pearls not sticky to the bottom.

Cook for 20 minutes and cover the lid and let it stay for another 15 to 20 minutes. Check whether the peals are completely transparent. In most cases, they should be well cooked and transparent. If not, continue cooking with high fire for several minutes until well cooked.How to Cook Sago

Strain and rinse under running cold water to remove residual starch.How to Cook Sago

How to Cook Sago

During the time of cooking sago, blend the mango smoothie and tune the coconut milk. Once the sago is well rinsed, assemble as soon as possible.

This is a step-by-step recipe for cooking sago pearls. Sago is largely tasteless in my opinion, but when added to Chinese desserts such as green bean soup and mango sago, the sago takes on a life on its own. The sago has a nice jelly-like and refreshing texture, and very cute to look at too because they are translucent.

See Also: Easy Chinese Desserts

The first time I cooked sago, I was totally clueless about how to prepare it. If there is one important lesson I learnt, that will be to always cook it separately from the dessert and to rinse it through a sieve, before adding to the dessert. Otherwise, the dessert will become too thick and gluey, as sago is essentially extracted starch.

Printable Recipe

Related Posts

Red Bean Soup

Mango Sago Pomelo

47 comments on “How to Cook Sago”

How to Cook Sago

Great instruction, very helpful. Thanks for taking the trouble.

How to Cook Sago

Don’t try to cook this. I tried to cook it for half an hour, the sago pearls were still white and hard. Some turned translucent indeed but most did not. Left a slimy mess in my pot that took me 10 minutes to scrub it away. I did simmer this and stir it occasionally btw. To think I’ve finally found the treasure in my local asian grocery store but no, Worst ingredient I’ve ever seen.

How to Cook Sago

you will need a extra big pot for cooking sago. because it will thicken so maybe try a bigger pot?

How to Cook Sago

Where can you buy sago pearls, I can only find the tapiaco pearls but not the sago pearls.

How to Cook Sago

I am in South Africa. I learnt about sago when I had loose stools. I soaked it in water for 3 hours and then drank the water and my stools have stiffened. Now I eat a small portion of sago everyday. The best way to cook sago is put it in cold water in a pot. About 2 tablespoonfuls are enough and a half cup of cold water. bring it to a boil for 10 minutes stirring once in a while then boil it again for another 10 minutes. This should be in a medium heat. 20 minutes is enough to get the sago to be translucent. I add a tiny bit of salt and chillies and eat it.

How to Cook Sago

Should cook longer ==

How to Cook Sago

Needs a higher ratio of water to sago as sago expands and absorb water. This recipe works. Simmering 10 mins is an approximate depending on your flame .. adjust accordingly as not to “melt” the sago to blobs of starch. Glad for the tips given

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How to Cook Sago

How to Cook Sago

You can add sago to many Chinese dessert sweet soups, giving the dessert an additional boost of texture.

Serves: 4

Cook Time: 10 mins

Ingredients:

  • 50g sago (adjust the amount of sago to your needs)
  • water

You also need

  • Pot
  • Sieve

Directions:

  1. Boil a small pot of water. When the water is boiling, add the sago. Reduce heat and simmer for 10 minutes. Occasionally stir the sides and bottom of the pot to prevent sticking.
  2. After 10 minutes, the sago had turned partially translucent. Turn off the flame, cover the pot with lid and let it stand for 10 minutes. The sago will continue cooking by itself and turn fully translucent.
  3. Rinse the cooked sago through a sieve and running water to remove the excess starch.
  4. Keep sago in a bowl of water until ready to use. Add prepared sago, drained, to your favourite Chinese dessert soups.

Related Posts

Mango Sago Pomelo

Red Bean Soup

47 comments on “How to Cook Sago”

How to Cook Sago

Great instruction, very helpful. Thanks for taking the trouble.

How to Cook Sago

Don’t try to cook this. I tried to cook it for half an hour, the sago pearls were still white and hard. Some turned translucent indeed but most did not. Left a slimy mess in my pot that took me 10 minutes to scrub it away. I did simmer this and stir it occasionally btw. To think I’ve finally found the treasure in my local asian grocery store but no, Worst ingredient I’ve ever seen.

How to Cook Sago

you will need a extra big pot for cooking sago. because it will thicken so maybe try a bigger pot?

How to Cook Sago

Where can you buy sago pearls, I can only find the tapiaco pearls but not the sago pearls.

How to Cook Sago

I am in South Africa. I learnt about sago when I had loose stools. I soaked it in water for 3 hours and then drank the water and my stools have stiffened. Now I eat a small portion of sago everyday. The best way to cook sago is put it in cold water in a pot. About 2 tablespoonfuls are enough and a half cup of cold water. bring it to a boil for 10 minutes stirring once in a while then boil it again for another 10 minutes. This should be in a medium heat. 20 minutes is enough to get the sago to be translucent. I add a tiny bit of salt and chillies and eat it.

How to Cook Sago

Should cook longer ==

How to Cook Sago

Needs a higher ratio of water to sago as sago expands and absorb water. This recipe works. Simmering 10 mins is an approximate depending on your flame .. adjust accordingly as not to “melt” the sago to blobs of starch. Glad for the tips given

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

Welcome to Noob Cook

Thanks for visiting!! Do check out the recipes gallery for cooking inspiration. (Read more about . )

Tried a recipe from Noob Cook? Post a photo on instagram & tag @noobcook + #noobcookrecipe!

Don’t Miss a Recipe!

Receive new recipes updates in your email box:

S a g o, is a type of starch that are extracted from tropical palms such as Metroxylon sagu, atrue sago palm. The palm tree is a native to most tropical southeast Asian countries. Sago palms are the most well known and used more often type of cycads. If you’re wondering how Sago is extracted. The pith is extracted by cutting from the roots, steam as well the seeds of the cycads (seed plants).

Sago can be acquired in two forms in a flour or pearls. The main difference between the two is that the flour is purely starch while the pearls are neither small nor big in size that are made by combining water and the starch and heating it.

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN SAGO PEARLS AND TAPIOCA PEARLS

How pearls are acquired:

These two may appear alike, but both are acquired quite differently. As mentioned, Sago is made and extracted from pith of the sago palms. Tapioca Pearl on the other hand comes from Cassava, a long root crop of a vegetable. Other than that, both are similar and acts the same. In terms of their sizes, you cannot easily tell the difference between these two.

Since Sago and pearl tapioca are both sold in different sizes, colors and flavor, the only way to know for sure if you’re either buying a tapioca pearls or a sago is to check the ingredients at the back of the packaging of the item.

Color and Flavor:

In terms of color and flavor, Sago Pearls are usually white while Tapioca Pearls have a wide variety of colors. Though the colors are just artificial and does not really relate to its flavor per se. You can opt to go for white Tapioca Pearls if its colors are somewhat looks weird for you.

Sago Pearls are used mostly in dishes that are sweet and savory while Tapioca Pearls is popularly used for bubble teas and pudding.

Cook Sago and Tapioca Pearls:

Sago and Tapioca can be cook the same way, using the same principle. Both can be cook by simply adding to the boil water and allowing it to become more translucent. One thing to keep in mind when you cook sago is that do not soak sago on a cold water before you boil it

Some of the Delicious things you can make use of Cooked Sago Pearls:

  1. Sago At Gulaman: In the Philippines, Sago at Gulaman refers to a Filipino beverage that is sweet and chilled. It usually includes a jelly like ingredient. They usually comes in a wide range of flavors that are commonly sold as refreshments in the streets. It consists of gulaman cubes, sago and syrup, and of course lots and lots of ice, either crushed or block ice.
  2. Ginumis: This is a traditional dessert in the Philippines that is more like the same as the popular refreshment Halo Halo. But with Ginumis, it is made up of gulaman cubes, sago , pinipig, coconut milk and crushed or shaved ice.
  3. Ginataang Bilo Bilo: they call it Tangyuan in Chinese, but in the Philippines we call it Bilo-Bilo. It is made up of palm fuits, banana, rice balls that is made from rice flour and cold water, jackfruit, and sago that are stewed in coconut milk.
  4. Buko Salad Drink: A popular drink in the Philippines that is made from coconut (preferably young coconut), sago , palm fruits, and gelatin. It is actually considered to be one the best refreshments during hot season.

Here’s how to cook Sago Pearls:

Sago Pearls is considered to be the most popular ingredients to desserts and refreshments here and abroad. Although cooking it may seemed easy, the proper way to cook Sago it is still an important factor to consider.

Despite its small size, preparing it can take a while that is why if are planning to add Sago Pearls to your dish, you have to make sure to prepare it beforehand. Some say that a total time of at least 60 minutes is required to cook sago and prepare it, but the finished product will not be considered as yet to be the best because most likely some of its components will still be left uncooked.

In my own personal experience, whenever I am planning to add Sago pearl to my list of ingredients I usually prepare and cook sago the day before. To make sure that I am using the best sago pearls. This means, cook sago for an hour will completely cook the sago however its core will still be thick. What I usually do is that after I boil and cook it for an hour, I usually let it stay in the covered cooking pot for at least 180 minutes or 3 hours to 360 minutes or 6 hours, of course the fire is already turned off, thereby allowing it to absorb water for a more crystalline Sago Pearls that are soft and chewy in texture.

Cook Sago Pearls:

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup uncooked Sago or Tapioca pearls
  • 6 cups of water

Time Needed : 60 minutes

How to cook Sago Pearls is pretty simple, as simple as just you boil it. So today, I am going to teach you how to make it. A simple and straight forward steps on how to do it.
Prep time: 10 minutes
Cooking time: 50 minutes

In a regular size pot, bring water to boil over medium heat.

Add Sago or Tapioca pearls

Add Sago or Tapioca pearls to the boiling water. Gently stir to mix Sago or Tapioca pearls and water. Boil and Cook sago for 50 minutes while stirring every 10 minutes.If more water is needed or if water has evaporated, you can add another cold water to the cooking pot.
How to Cook Sago

Allow the cooked pearls to remain in the cooking pot while at the same time covering it. Some of the pearls are never cooked all at the same time, stirring continuously to evenly distribute the heat and to prevent overcooking. Wait for at least 180 minutes (3 hours or more) or until it reaches room temperature.

Rinse the cooked pearls over cold water.

Finally, rinse the cooked pearls over cold water. Then, remove excess water using a strainer. Add to recipe then serve.
How to Cook Sago

Cooked Pearls Storage:

If at some point you we’re not able to measure correctly the amount of cooked sago or tapioca pearls needed for your dish and there’s some left overs, you can store them in a Tupperware and place in the refrigerator ,not in the freezer. Ideally, these cooked sago should be consumed within the next 8-10 hours.

Try this Recipe and let me know what you think. If you have other versions, let us know so that we can also share it here.

Interested in other recipe? Feel free to comment name below. Also, let me know your experience along the way. I look forward to hearing from you.

Posted by Mykitchen101en Team | Jun 28, 2016

Small sago is tasteless on its own. However, when added to hot dessert soups or cold desserts, it will add a chewy texture to the desserts and make them tastier. If you want to add sago to hot desserts (e.g. Red Bean Black Glutinous Rice with Coconut Milk Dessert), just cook until it is semi-translucent (with a white spot in the center). If it is for cold desserts (e.g. Honeydew Sago Dessert), then you will need a fully cooked sago which is fully translucent.

How to Cook Sago

How to Cook Small Sago Pearls-Translucent & Chewy | MyKitchen101en

Yields: 240 g cooked small sago

  • 60 g small sago
  • 1.5 Liter + 150 ml + 1 Liter water

1 Bring 1.5 liter of water to the boil, add in 150 ml of water, add in sago.

How to Cook Sago

2 Bring to the boil again, turn to medium heat, cook without cover for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally.

How to Cook Sago

3 Off the heat, cover, let sago soaks for 10 minutes.

How to Cook Sago

4 After soaking for 10 minutes, the sago is partially cooked (semi-translucent with white spot in the center).

How to Cook Sago

5 Drain and rinse sago with running water until it is cooled. (Cook until this stage if sago is added to hot desserts.)

How to Cook Sago

6 Bring another 1 liter of water to the boil, add in sago.

How to Cook Sago

7 Bring to the boil again, off the heat, cover and soak for 5-7 minutes.

How to Cook Sago

8 After 7 minutes, sago is fully translucent.

How to Cook Sago

9 Drain and rinse the fully cooked sago with running water until completely cooled before adding to cold desserts.

I used to boil sago together with my tong sui until I discovered the correct way to do it was to boil it separately. Sago is essentially extracted starch from the centre of sago palm tree stems. So if it is boiled together with your dessert it would cause the liquid to turn starchy and cloudy.

Sago pearls look similar to tapioca pearls but tapioca pearls are made from the root of cassava trees. The texture is also different. Sago pearls are soft and more delicate whereas tapioca pearls are denser, chewy and commonly used in bubble tea drinks. Below is a pictorial guide on preparing sago pearls.

This is the sago that I’m cooking today. I used the small sago. You can find these and bigger sago from Asian dried goods shop or the Asian section of your local supermarket.

How to Cook Sago

1. Bring a small pot of water to a boil. I used my Happycall alumite ceramic pot. Read the review here. Pour in sago seeds and lower heat. Let it simmer for around 10 minutes. Stir gently occasionally to prevent the sago pearls from clumping and sticking to the pot.

How to Cook Sago

2. After 5 minutes of simmering. Notice that the water has turned slightly cloudy. Keep stirring gently.

How to Cook Sago

3. After 10 minutes of simmering, turn off the heat. The water has turned all starchy now caused by the starch from the sago seeds. You will see that the sago still has a tiny white dot in the middle. The sago is not fully cooked yet.

How to Cook Sago

4. Keep the pot covered for about 5-10 minutes and let the remaining heat finish cooking the sago. After 10 minutes, open the lid and check. It is fully cooked when the sago is all translucent and has no white in center.

How to Cook Sago

5. Remove cooked sago from the pot. Strain and rinse them under cold running water a few times to remove any residual starch.

How to Cook Sago

Keep freshly cooked sago in enough water to cover it until ready to use. Best to use it within 2 to 3 days.

How to Cook Sago
Spoon some of these delicate orbs into your favourite dessert for added texture. I like to add them in classic Chinese desserts such as Green Bean Soup and Red Bean Soup . Enjoy!

If you found this post helpful, please click on the share buttons. Thanks for reading and happy cooking! 🙂

How to prepare a perfect and well-cooked tapioca, sago all the time.

How to Cook Big Sago. Sago is also known as Tapioca; it is a very versatile condiment mainly used by Filipinos for their kakanin, drinks, and other dessert recipes. It is made from tapioca flour, sugar syrup and form into tiny balls and dried until it hardens and become sago. Sago is boiled and water until it becomes transparent and soaked in water for several hours before using. Cooked Sago looks transparent, bland and has a gelatinous and chewable texture.

Yield: 2½ cups of cooked sago

How to Cook Sago

Ingredients:

  • ½ cup raw big Sago
  • 1 liter boiling water

Check out Video Recipe:

Procedure:

  • In a large pot, boil 1 liter of water. When it reaches the boiling stage add big sago. Cook for 20-25 minutes, stirring constantly to prevent from sticking together. Fire off, cover with a lid and leave it for another 20 minutes.
  • Rinse with tap water, several times. Let it cool down and soak half cooked sago with cold water and keep refrigerated for at least 8 hours.
  • After several hours in the fridge, drain water from sago. In a large pot boil the sago again, over boiling water and reduce time by 10 minutes only. Stir constantly to prevent from sticking at the bottom of the pot. Fire off, and cover with a lid and leave it for 30 minutes.
  • Rinse Sago with tap water for the last time, and transfer in a bowl with water and keep refrigerated until white parts disappear. Drain water, your well-cooked, and transparent sago is ready to use.

Here’s Our Simple Ingredients: Raw big Sago and Water that’s it looks so easy yet so complicated when you don’t know how to cook it properly. You can use any brand and any size of sago pearls, but always try to follow the instructions and procedures. It is always written at the back of the package or box.

How to Cook Sago

When it comes to cooking Sago, be mindful ‘coz size matters… LOL. Time varies the bigger the sago is, the longer cooking time needed and of course for the small sago cooking time is lesser. Always, keep an eye of your sago and occasionally stir to avoid sticking together and at the bottom of your pan.

Now that we know the right way of cooking sago, we’re going to make some cold drinks with sago in it.

How to Cook Sago

Ok guys, what is your favorite summer drink or any dessert with sago? Please write in the comment section below and let me know 🙂 Ok, that’s it for now guys, I need to cook gulaman for our next cold drink recipe. Have a beautiful day and see you on my next post. xo

Not every day is good, but there is something good in every day.

About pingskie

Hello, I’m Ping Joven welcome to Pinoy Desserts the home of Filipino Dessert Recipes, I love sweets and I love to share my goodies with my family and friends. I’ve spent so much time in our kitchen even though I don’t have formal cooking education, but I cook and bake a lot. I have a large collection of cookbooks. I love watching Foodnetwork Channel & YouTube cooking videos it helps me develop my skills. To my fellow home cooks and home-bakers we should keep doing what we love and enjoy being creative in the kitchen. I also love taking photos of my food but, I’m not a good photographer, so I just hope and pray that my food will make you hungry, so you won’t notice my bad composition LOL. And lastly, please have mercy on my poor writing skills, English subject has always giving me a headache and as I compose this bio I can feel a migraine starts to kick in LOL.

Thanks for visiting, have a nice day and may the blessings chase you today!

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Comments

For me, I love Taho especially sa umaga at Ginataang Bilo-Bilo with Sago at langka pang merienda. Sarap 🙂

Sago is the starch extracted from piths of tropical palm stems and is commercially produced and commonly sold in the form of pearls. They are usually cooked in water or choice of liquid and widely used in beverages and desserts. These spheres are really easy to prepare, requiring only for the most part boiling in water until translucent. But if you want them chewy or what I describe as “a bite with a fight”, I follow a certain technique on how to cook sago.

How to Cook Sago

I usually keep freshly-prepared sago in a bowl of cold water until ready to use but if I plan to keep the batch longer than a few days, I store the sago in a sterilized bottle with simple syrup to prolong shelf life. I included a recipe for packing syrup using brown sugar. Here are a few delicious things you can use sago:

  • Ginataang Bilo Bilo-a delicious concoction of palm fruits, tubers, banana, glutinous rice balls, jackfruit and sago stewed in coconut milk
  • Sago at Gulaman-a refreshing summer cooler made with gulaman cubes, sago and simple syrup
  • Ginumis-a shaved ice dessert much like the classic Filipino halo-halo but uses gulaman cubes, sago, pinipig and coconut milk
  • Buko Salad Drink-a must try! a rich and creamy drink filled with gulaman cubes, young coconut strips, nata de coco, sago, condensed milk and coconut milk

23Sago is the starch extracted from piths of tropical palm stems and is commercially produced and commonly sold in the form of pearls. They are usually cooked in water or choice of liquid and widely used in beverages and desserts. These spheres are really easy to prepare, requiring only for the most part boiling in water until translucent. But if you want them chewy or what I describe as “a bite with a fight”, I follow a certain technique on how to cook sago.

How to Cook Sago182

I usually keep freshly-prepared sago in a bowl of cold water until ready to use but if I plan to keep the batch longer than a few days, I store the sago in a sterilized bottle with simple syrup to prolong shelf life. I included a recipe for packing syrup using brown sugar. Here are a few delicious things you can use sago:

  • Ginataang Bilo Bilo-a delicious concoction of palm fruits, tubers, banana, glutinous rice balls, jackfruit and sago stewed in coconut milk
  • Sago at Gulaman-a refreshing summer cooler made with gulaman cubes, sago and simple syrup
  • Ginumis-a shaved ice dessert much like the classic Filipino halo-halo but uses gulaman cubes, sago, pinipig and coconut milk
  • Buko Salad Drink-a must try! a rich and creamy drink filled with gulaman cubes, young coconut strips, nata de coco, sago, condensed milk and coconut milk.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Ramona French

Sago pearls are made from the inner pith of the sago palm tree. The inner pith of the trunk is scraped out, pounded into fine particles and then soaked in water, which dissolves the starch from the fiber. The starchy water is strained through a sieve and dried. The starch that remains after the water evaporates is shaped into pearls. Sago pearls are similar to tapioca, and indeed they can often be used interchangeably, but tapioca is made from cassava root. Once sago pearls are cooked, they are used in desserts and drinks in Asia.

Step 1

Bring the water to a boil in a large pot.

Step 2

Add the sago pearls and reduce the heat to low. Simmer them for 15 minutes. Stir constantly at first, and then stir often to prevent the sago pearls from settling to the bottom where they easily burn.

Step 3

Remove the pot from the heat. Cover the pot and allow the pearls to sit for 15 minutes or until they look translucent rather than starchy.

Step 4

Rinse the pearls under running water in a sieve. Use your fingers to break up any clumps and to make sure all excess starch is rinsed away.

Step 5

Spoon the sago into small molds or custard cups. Chill them in the refrigerator for at least an hour.

Step 6

Combine the palm sugar and water in a medium saucepan. Bring the mixture to a boil and simmer until it thickens slightly. Add the pandan flavoring and stir to mix it well into the syrup.

Step 7

Unmold the sago pearls into dessert bowls. Pour the palm sugar syrup and coconut milk over the pearls. Eat with a spoon.

Things You’ll Need

8 oz. pearl sago

Molds or custard cups

7 oz. palm sugar roughly chopped or 2 cups sugar

1 or 2 drops pandan leaf flavoring

3/4 cup coconut milk

Cooking sago pearls in a lot of water helps to prevent burning.

Find sago pearls, pandan flavoring and palm sugar in Asian grocery stores.

Warning

Cooked sago is completely translucent. If the sago pearls still look starchy inside after resting for 15 minutes in the pot, they aren’t done. Simmer them a little longer, stirring constantly.

How to Cook Sago

Sago is the starch extracted from piths of tropical palm stems and is commercially produced and commonly sold in the form of pearls. They are usually cooked in water or choice of liquid and widely used in beverages and desserts. These spheres are really easy to prepare, requiring only for the most part boiling in water until translucent. But if you want them chewy or what I describe as “a bite with a fight”, I follow a certain technique on how to cook sago.

How to Cook Sago

I usually keep freshly-prepared sago in a bowl of cold water until ready to use but if I plan to keep the batch longer than a few days, I store the sago in a sterilized bottle with simple syrup to prolong shelf life. I included a recipe for packing syrup using brown sugar. Here are a few delicious things you can use sago:

Ginataang Bilo Bilo-a delicious concoction of palm fruits, tubers, banana, glutinous rice balls, jackfruit and sago stewed in coconut milk
Sago at Gulaman-a refreshing summer cooler made with gulaman cubes, sago and simple syrup
Ginumis-a shaved ice dessert much like the classic Filipino halo-halo but uses gulaman cubes, sago, pinipig and coconut milk
Buko Salad Drink-a must try! a rich and creamy drink filled with gulaman cubes, young coconut strips, nata de coco, sago, condensed milk and coconut milk

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4 from 1 vote
How to Cook Sago
Prep Time
5 mins
Cook Time
1 hr
Total Time
1 hr 5 mins
Author: Lalaine Manalo
Ingredients
water
1 package 14 ounces uncooked sago pearls
For the Simple Syrup
2 cups brown sugar
2 cups water
Get IngredientsPowered by Chicory
Instructions
In a pot over medium heat, bring enough water to cover sago pearls to a boil. Add sago pearls, stir gently and cook for about 10 minutes or until translucent. Remove from heat, rinse well and drain.
In the pot, add boiled sago and enough cold water to cover. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, and bring to a gentle boil. When water has boiled for about 6 to 10 minutes, remove from heat, rinse well and drain.
In the pot, add enough cold water to cover sago and again, bring to a gentle boil. Repeat process until pearls are tender but chewy and translucent with no white in center. Under cold, running water, rinse sago a few times to remove excess starch. Allow to cool. Use as needed or store in simple syrup until ready to use.
For the Simple Syrup
In a sauce pot over medium heat, combine sugar and water. Cook, stirring regularly, until sugar has dissolved. Allow to slightly cool. Transfer sago into a clean bottle and pour in syrup.

It’s easy using these simple steps.

How to Cook Sago

How to Cook Sago

Sago is not the same as the black pearls you love in your milk tea. The black pearls are actually made from tapioca or cassava starch. That’s why these need to be cooked, usually in a brown sugar syrup until these are tender and soft to the bite all the way through.

Sago meanwhile is made of edible starch from the pith of a palm. Just like cassava, these are carefully harvested because the tree does contain toxins. Starch is heated, activating the gelatin in it, and formed into little balls. These are then dried and packaged for longer storage.

These hard sago pearls are what we find in the supermarkets and palengkes.

If you have a package of sago pearls in the kitchen and are not sure what to do with it, you’re not alone. These sago pearls, especially the bigger ones, need time to become soft and edible. There’s a reason why the palengke has these already cooked and almost ready to use in recipes, and you can prepare your sago in two different ways: cooked and not cooked.

How to Cook Sago

There are two ways to prepare sago.

To cook sago until softened, here’s what you do:

  1. 1. In a medium pot, pour in 1/2 cup small sago pearls or 1 cup large sago pearls.
  2. 2. Pour in enough water to cover the sago pearls at least 1 inch or around 4 cups (1 liter) water.
  3. 3. Bring to a boil then simmer the sago until the pearls are tender, stirring regularly to prevent the sago from sticking to the bottom of the pot and burning.
  4. 4. Once cooked until the pearls are tender, drain and rinse in cold water. Use as needed.

Did you know that you don’t have to cook sago at all? In fact, this is the no-cook, no-fail, almost no effort way of “cooking” sago. It just takes time to do it this way. The reason why this is a no-fail method is that you cannot overcook the sago pearls using this method. This still results in the same soft pearls as if you cooked it.

It should be noted that this no-cook method is best used for small pearls since the larger pearls will take even more time than the small pearls.

To soften small sago pearls into edible ones, here’s what you do:

  1. 1. Place about 1/2 cup small sago in a large heat-proof bowl.
  2. 2. Pour enough boiled water into the bowl with the sago to cover the pearls about 1 inch.
  3. 3. Set aside until the water is just warm to the touch or around 1 hour.
  4. 4. Drain and discard the water. Pour in more boiled water, again enough to cover the pearls about 1 inch. Alternatively, to reuse the water, boil the water again and pour this over the soaked sago.
  5. 5. Set this aside again until warm to the touch.
  6. 6. Repeat the hot water treatment at least two more times until the sago are softened to the bite.

Now that you have your softened sago, here are recipes you can use with it:

How to Cook Sago

MielPhotos2008 / Getty Images

  • Total: 12 mins
  • Prep: 6 mins
  • Cook: 6 mins
  • Pre-soaking Sago: 4 mins
  • Servings: 4 servings

Sago is a starch that is extracted from the pith, or spongy center, of a variety of tropical palm plants, including the sago palm. It is then processed into either flour, meal, or pearl sago (this form is similar to tapioca). Although low in calories, sago does not have any health benefits.

It is one of the staple food products in New Guinea and the Maluku Islands in Indonesia where it is referred to as saksak, sagu, and rabia. Southeast Asia is the largest producer of sago and exports the starch to Europe and North America.

Sago is used in a few different ways, including as a thickener, for baking, and in desserts such as puddings. The preparation can range from forming it into a pancake, making into a glue-like paste, or forming the starch into balls. Commercially, it is most often made into pearls. The pearls are boiled until they are translucent and then are sweetened with milk and sugar. Cinnamon is the spice flavoring of choice but cardamom works great, too; and it goes well with various toppings. The bubbles at the bottom of the bowl or cup make for a delightful surprise as they slide down your throat.

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How to Cook Sago

Ang Sa Iyo Ay Akin September 28 2020 Replay Today Episode

How to Cook Sago

Ang Probinsyano September 28 2020 Replay Today Episode

How to Cook Sago

PRIMA DONNAS SEPTEMBER 28 2020 REPLAY FULL EPISODE

How to Cook Sago

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How to Cook Sago

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How to Cook Sago

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How to Cook Sago

The Spruce / Cara Cormack

Sago is an edible starch that is made from the pith of an array of tropical palm trees. It’s a staple food in parts of the tropics. Tapioca pearls, on the other hand, are made with tapioca or the starch from cassava, a root crop. Using either starch is not always interchangeable.

Size Doesn’t Always Matter

Tapioca balls are the chewy balls that are in the ever-popular bubble tea drinks. Although some claim that sago balls are larger than tapioca pearls, it just isn’t true. You cannot easily tell the difference between sago and tapioca pearls by their size alone.

Both are sold in different sizes, colors, and flavors. To determine whether you’re buying sago or tapioca pearls, check the ingredients list in the packaging. In most parts of Southeast Asia, tapioca pearls can be bought already cooked and ready for use. For the rest of the world, tapioca pearls are sold in dried form and require boiling before use.

Color and Flavor Connections

Sago pearls are often white while tapioca pearls can be found in a multitude of colors. The color of the product does not always relate to its flavor. In most cases, the coloring is artificial and only meant for visual excitement. If artificial food color is something that scares you, go for the white tapioca pearls. White is their natural color because they are made from starch. Both types of pearls are neutral-tasting as well because starch, although it has a distinct sensation in the mouth, does not really have any memorable flavor.

How to Cook Sago

Tips for Cooking the Pearls

Both sago and tapioca pearls can be cooked in the same manner. Sago pearls are much less common in the U.S., but if you come across them, follow the same cooking directions as tapioca pearls.

In its dried form, a tapioca pearl is white and opaque. After cooking, the sphere swells to almost twice its original size and becomes translucent. Some cooks insist that tapioca pearls must be soaked in cold water before boiling. But this seems counterproductive because the starch starts to dissolve in cold water immediately upon contact and the pearls lose their shape even before they reach the stove.

It’s the same principle when using tapioca starch in powder form. Add a teaspoon of tapioca starch to room-temperature water and the starch mixes into the water. But drop a teaspoon of tapioca starch into hot water and it will form into a lump.

So, unless you’re making a pudding with your tapioca pearls, skip the soaking part. Add them to the water only AFTER the water has reached the boiling point. Make sure the tapioca pearls boil in plenty of water. Four cups of water for every cup of dried tapioca pearls is a good starting point. More won’t hurt but less water is not recommended.

Basic Recipe

Follow these steps to make tapioca pearls for any recipe:

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How to Cook Sago

Sago, often referred to as sago pearls, is a substance with a consistency similar to tapioca particles that is frequently used in desserts and other dishes in Asia. It is formed out of the starch from the inner pith of sago palm trees, and resembles small hard beads in its uncooked state. To cook sago before adding it to a recipe, it needs to be boiled until it becomes translucent. The sago should be should be handled with care during and after the cooking process in order to achieve the best results. Sago has very little taste of its own, so it absorbs the flavor of other ingredients in the dishes in which it is used.

How to Cook SagoChef

In some parts of Asia, sago is a very popular, commonly-used ingredient in a variety of desserts and drinks. It’s often called sago pearls because, once it is cooked, the globular sago particles take on a translucent, shimmering appearance that resembles pearls. The texture of sago pearls is slightly firm on the outside with a yielding, gelatinous interior consistency. Sago pearls are formed out of the starch that is left behind when the fiber from the inner pith of the sago palm tree is soaked in water. The particles that remain once the starchy water evaporates are dried and shaped into the rounded pearls.

Before it can be added to any recipe, sago must be prepared and cooked. To cook sago is a relatively simple process, but it can be time consuming and requires care and attentiveness for the best results. The usual way to cook sago is to boil it for a while until it becomes translucent, with no sign of white, uncooked starch. The recommended length of time to cook sago varies depending on the size of the pearls and the desired consistency, but it can take from about twenty minutes to an hour. If a firmer texture is desired, it should be cooked for less time, and, if it is being added to a dish such as a liquid-based pudding, it can be removed from the boiling water in the last ten minutes since it will soften more when it soaks up some of the fluid.

Another tip for cooking sago is to stir it very frequently to prevent the formation of clumps from pearls that are stuck together that could lead to undercooked pearls. It should be kept on the lowest heat setting that will boil the water to prevent lumps of starch from forming in the pot and burning. It’s also a good idea to rinse it thoroughly in cold water after cooking to wash away any excess starch and prevent stickiness. Once it is cooked, sago can be served in a variety of ways, and it will absorb flavor from the other ingredients in the dish. Some popular ways to serve sago include soaking it in coconut milk and molding it into shaped puddings which are coated in palm sugar syrup.

Labu Tale, one of the three Labu villages located opposite the Lae port, will be the first in PNG to use sago to produce as an alternate form of flour.

September 6, 2018

BY BENNY GETENG

Labu Tale, one of the three Labu villages located opposite the Lae port, will be the first in PNG to use sago to produce as an alternate form of flour.
The area hosts a vast field of sago palm tree bordering with the mountains of Buang in Bulolo district.
A team under the Momase Governors Council Secretariat trainers conducted a one-week practical skills training last week (August 20th-25th) on sago processing and preserving which was successfully completed at Labu-Tale, Huon Gulf district.
Unlike traditional wheat flour, the Labu Tale processed sago, in fine dust like form, can be processed and preserved for up to 10 years.
The trained locals, mostly mothers, can now bake bread, buns, cakes, pizzas, biscuits, gravy and also cook up other recipes like stew.
They also can now be able to identify and extract glue, starch, self raising substance like yeast.
According to master trainer, Jacob Mailai, a graduate from the University of Technology in Auckland, New Zealand, the trained locals are now empowered and can be economically independent by being involved in small scale downstream processing by using their own local resources and staple food like sago through the skills obtained.
“I believe the community can at least contribute a fair share to the country’s economic growth and growing in terms of business and agriculture,” he said.
“I appeal to resource owners and the youth to return home and make use of their land and resources, rather than aimlessly moving into urban towns and cities looking for a rich life.
“Stay home, use your resources and turn it into cash and develop good living standard and support others in need of education and training,”
The Labu Tale trained participants who are now preparing towards a project launching date to be set next month to showcase their variety of sago flour products, the different sago flour dishes and also how they harvest and process their sago as part of the annual Morobe Agricultural Show in October.

How to Cook Sago Pearls Quickly! (Instant Pot)

What’s up guys to day Rei and I are going to s how you how to cook Sago in the Instant Pot! Sago typically takes four to six hours to fully cook all the way through but using the instant pot, you can cook it in about 1/3 of the time! To start, first pour in enough water into your Instant Pot to fully submerge your Sago We filled ours to around the 4 cup mark

When in doubt it’s better to have a little to o much than to o little water Next press the sauté mode and make sure it’s on the highest setting And bring your water to a boil Once at a boil, drop in your Sago pearls We used about half a cup here

So after you drop your Sago in, turn off your Instant Pot And then immediately secure the lid on top And turn the steam release to the sealing position Next tap on the manual but to n and set it at high pressure for 30 minutes Allow your Sago to pressure cook for the allotted time

When it’s done turn off your Instant Pot and quick release it by turning the steam release to the venting position Once the float valve unlocks, set a timer for 30 minutes and allow this ago to swell before opening the lid Afterwards remove the lid And then strain the Sago from the water And thoroughly rinse them using cold water

At this point your Sago should be halfway cook ed and a white core should still be visible in all of the Sago All you want to do now is repeat all the steps one more time Since we’re just going over the same exact steps as before, we’ll just blitz through it just so you guys get an idea of the whole process By the time you’re done allowing your Sago to swell the second time around, the white cores should be completely gone All there is to do is strain them and rinse them off in cold water

And your Sago are finally ready to eat! Sago is used in a variety of Filipino desserts, but we’ll be using these Sago to make Sago at Gulaman Be on the lookout for that video! It’s talagang tasty!

I bought a packet of large sago. and i’ve been cooking it for over an hour. However it doesn’t seem to get cooked to what it usually is. There is still a white core at the centre that is hard.

I’m still cooking it now. Help. Do I still continue to boil it or am I doing it wrong?

4 Answers

How to Cook Sago

Did you soak it first?

I soak it in warm water for at least an hour, usually about half a bowl of sago to a full bowl of water, it will probably absorb all of the water.

Then I put in a saucepan, and cover with milk, and simmer on LOW till tender, it shouldn’t take too long, just try bits till you get the semi clear little balls without the gritty centre bit.

Then, I stir in the desired amount of sugar, till dissolved, and add a dash of vanilla essence, OR two or three strips of lemon rind.

Allow to cool, then stir in a small bottle of cream, remove the lemon rind, and enjoy.

How to Cook Sago

Always add sago to boiled water. Continue boiling for 15 minute in low flame, stir occasionally. Turn off the fire and leave it for another 15 minute till it turn translucent totally. Drain it with a sieve. Then place then in cool water to stop it further cooking by itself. It all ready to your cooking…….

How to Cook Sago

Continue to boil. Better put the lid on and put on low heat. The best way to do this is to PRE-HEAT the water, then pour in the sago. Afterwards, put it on low heat and leave it to simmer til the white center is gone.

How to Cook Sago

May be, you just need to turn the fire down a bit .

And then wait about 3 more min then take it out , see what happen. =]

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Sago, a slang term that commonly refers to the sago drink, features the Southeast Asian ingredient sago. Similar to tapioca, sago is derived from the palm plant and is available in pearls or in powered form. The sago drink puts the pearls on display and surrounds them with a tasty liquid. Making sago at home is easy to do and even easier to enjoy.

Soak the sago in water before you cook it. Leave the sago to soak for about two hours.

Place the sago in a pot with water. Bring the water the boil. Stir the sago while it is cooking to prevent the pearls from sticking together. Remove the pot from the heat when the sago is translucent and drain the pearls from the water.

Place two pieces of gulaman—Asian gelatin—into boiling water. When the gulaman begins to dissolve into the water, remove it and cut it into pieces.

Pour three cups of sugar into a sauce pan and allow it to heat until it becomes carmelized. Add three cups of water to the sugar and stir until the sugar is completely dissolved. Allow the simple syrup to cool, then pour a bit of it on the sago to sweeten it.

Place your desired amount of sago and gulaman into a glass. Pour cold water over the sago and gulaman until it just fills the glass. Add simple syrup until the drink is your desired sweetness.

Sago is a starchy substance processed from the pith of certain species of palm. The trees are harvested for sago just before they flower when they are around 15 years old (if allowed to flower, the central pith dries up so the plant can produce seeds and it’s then useless for sago). The pith is crushed and worked to release its starch; a series of washings in water extract the starch from the plant fibres and, once collected in the water, the starch particles are left to settle and the water strained off. Sago is widely used in flour-form but also processed into small white balls, which is how we’re most familiar with it in the west. Tapioca, which is similar to sago, tends to be processed into larger balls and is sourced from the cassava plant.

1.Thai sago soup

Simmer 4 whole chicken thighs with 6 kaffir lime leaves in 2 litres (500 ml) chicken stock until tender. Remove chicken, cool then shred the meat. Add 100 g sago, 80 ml fish sauce and salt and pepper to the stock and cook for 30 minutes or until sago is translucent. Add chicken, 3-4 chopped red chillies, some chopped coriander and 2 teaspoons of sugar. Serve with rice vinegar to season.

This light, textural dish is often served as a fasting meal in the Indian province of Maharashtra. It’s not hard to make, but you must use sago imported from India, which is processed differently to regular sago and comes in slightly larger, and whiter, “pearls”. Don’t cook the sago over too high a heat or it will turn gummy in the pan, and make sure it is perfectly dry before you cook it.

3. Indian sago fritters (sabudana vadai)

Soak ½ cup sago for 20 minutes then drain. Mix with ½ cup rice flour, ⅓ cup fresh or frozen grated coconut, 2 large chopped green chillies and ⅓ cup Greek yoghurt. Season well. Form slightly heaped tablespoonfuls into balls then flatten into discs about 7 cm across. Deep-fry at 170°C for 4 minutes or until golden and cooked through.

This Thai street snack isn’t so hard to make once you have the knack of forming the sago “dough” into a thin disc then wrapping it around the mince filling. These mightn’t have the same ultra-thin exterior as they do in Thailand but no matter, they are still utterly delicious!

Thai pork and sago dumplings

5. Honeydew-sago pudding

Cook 1 cup sago in 7 cups water for 20 minutes or until translucent. Pour mixture into a large sieve over a sink and drain for 20 minutes. Heat ½ cup sugar (110 g) in ½ cup water (125 ml) to dissolve sugar. Stir into the sago in a bowl with 2 cups honeydew melon purée and 300 ml coconut milk. Decorate with melon balls and serve warm or cold.

6. Sago jellies (keuh sago)

Soak 300 g sago for 1 hour then drain well. Combine with 150 g caster sugar, 1 tbsp cornflour, ½ tsp salt and 2 ½ tbsp rose syrup in a bowl. Steam, covered, in a bowl for 30 minutes or until thick and translucent. When cool enough to handle, cut off small pieces and roll in fresh (or frozen thawed) grated coconut

7. Lemon-lime sago

Combine 3 cups water, the finely grated zest of 2 limes and 1 lemon, ¼ cup (60 ml) each lemon juice, lime juice and honey and ¾ cup (165 g) sugar in a saucepan. Bring to the boil, add ½ cup sago then simmer, stirring often, for 30 minutes or until thick and translucent. Cool and serve with whipped cream.

These simple-to-make cakes are popular in Indonesia, especially during Ramadan as part of a fast-breaking spread. Cantik means “pretty” in Bahasa and manis means “sweet”, although they are not so sweet as the name might suggest. Their prettiness comes from the deployment of pink and green dyed sago pearls, which you can easily find an Asian grocer.

Vanilla-scented sago cakes (cantik manis)

9. Warm tofu with palm sugar syrup and sago

Cook ⅓ cup sago in simmering water until translucent then drain and rinse well. Combine ⅔ cup firmly packed brown sugar, 1 tbsp finely julienned ginger and ⅔ cup (180 ml) water in a saucepan and bring to a simmer, stirring to dissolve sugar. Meanwhile, steam 500 g soft tofu over boiling water until heated through then divide among bowls. Spoon over some of the sago and top with warm syrup.

From the English repertoire of steamed fruit puddings comes this classic that uses sago as a surprising, key ingredient. No doubt thrift and ease were behind its invention – this pudding is way more economical and a whole pile simpler to make than traditional plum pudding. Dried cherries give a glamorous edge but you can use raisins (or sultanas) instead. Despite the long soaking time and extended steaming, this is very quick and easy to put together.

How to Cook Sago

Here is another classic, sweet-tasting Chinese soup prepared with highly nutritious green mung beans. In Chinese traditional medicine, the colour of green belongs to one of the Five Elements, namely ‘Wood’, and thus relates to the Liver.

It is said that green-coloured foods enhances our ‘Qi’ circulation and metabolism functions of the liver. Such foods also help alleviate fatigue, resolves and prevents liver diseases, boosts the immune system and improves eyesight. How to Cook SagoHow to Cook SagoHow to Cook Sago

The mung bean is the most common food tonic in this regard. It is also nutritionally rich in proteins, calcium, iron, vitamins B1 and B2. It is a food with cooling properties, so those who are pre-disposed to ‘heat’ in their bodies should consume mung beans on a regular basis (source: ‘100 Chinese Desserts’ by author Winnie).

How to Cook Sago
Here is the recipe (serves 3 – 4):

Ingredients:

150 gm Mung Beans

2 tbsp Small Sago Pearls

1/2 cup Hot Water

4 Pandan (Screwpine) Leaves, tied into knots

1.5 litres of Water

Rock Sugar, to taste

Method:

1. Wash mung beans thoroughly until water runs clear.

2. Place sago pearls in a sieve or fine strainer and wash under running tap water. Once most of the whitish sand-like particles have washed off, soak sago pearls in hot water and set aside for at least 15 minutes. Drain and set aside.

3. Meanwhile, bring water with knotted pandan leaves to boil in a pot, over high fire. When boiling, remove the pandan leaves, and add the mung beans. Bring to a boil again, and reduce to medium heat and let simmer. Regularly skim the scum off the surface during simmering.

4. When the mung beans just start to break open, about 30 minutes into the cooking, the emptied shells or husks will continue to float to the surface as the soup simmers. Use a small sieve or strainer to scoop out the husks.

5. Using the back of a metal spoon, press the husks or any beans accidentally scooped up, against the sieve or strainer. Dip the strainer into the soup to ‘wash’ any mashed flesh, back into the soup. Discard the bean husks. Do this as many times as desired if you wish to remove more shells or husks. The soup will also start to turn murky and somewhat mushy, but this is perfectly normal and characteristic of mung bean soup. (Note: You can completely omit this step if you like or don’t mind having husks in the soup).

6. Add the sago pearls and rock sugar to taste and continue to gently boil until sago pearls are almost cooked through. When almost cooked, the sago pearls look like translucent bubbles with a small whitish uncooked core. At this point, you may turn off the heat, and put the lid on the pot for 15 minutes or so, until the sago pearls are completely cooked through from the residual heat. Serve hot or warm.

Note:
The sago pearls will take up water as it cooks so the soup consistency will thicken. If you like a thinner consistency, add more water. If you like it thicker, let simmer to reduce water content.

Removing as many mung bean shells or husks as you can when these float to the surface, will improve the texture of the soup.

Celia Lim

Hi, I’m Celia. Welcome to my little space where I enjoy sharing simple, delicious, everyday Asian food recipes, and more! Every single yum here can easily be created in your own kitchen. Join me and let’s have fun cooking up a storm!

by Jolina 18 Comments [This site contains affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. See Terms of Use for more information.]

Mango sago is a refreshing dessert you’ll want to make all summer long. Made of fresh sweet mangoes, sago or tapioca, milk and cream, it’s easy to make and so good. Perfect in this summer heat!

(If you love mangoes, you will love this mango float or mango graham cake recipe . Easy to make, even easier to eat!)

How to Cook Sago

Wikipedia will tell you that the OG mango sago dessert actually originated from Hong Kong (mango pomelo sago). When it eventually found its way to Philippine kitchens though, it lost the pomelo and became a much simpler dish.

Some recipes call for coconut milk but we usually just make ours with evaporated milk, table cream and a little condensed milk. You can cook the sago or use pre-cooked ones; what’s more important is you use sweet, ripe mangoes.

Philippine carabao mangoes are the best but any variety works. We get ataulfo mangoes here and they’re awesome for this recipe too. Let’s get cooking!

Ingredients for mango sago recipe

How to Cook Sago

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To make mango sago, you’ll need:

  • Ripe mangoes — one you’ll puree and the others you’ll dice
  • Sago or tapioca pearls
  • Evaporated milk
  • Table cream*
  • Condensed milk

*Ideally, you’ll want to put Nestle cream, which is a kind of thick, sweetened cream that Filipinos put on buko salads and other cold desserts. It’s not easily available here though so I always use table cream and it works just fine.

How to make mango sago dessert

How to Cook Sago

For the detailed recipe, please scroll to the bottom of the page for a printer-friendly recipe card including estimated nutrition information.

Making mango sago is so easy you’d want to make it all summer!

1. COOK SAGO. First thing you’ll want to do is to cook your sago. This would depend on the kind of sago you have — some require almost an hour of cooking while others are done in 5 minutes. I provide more sago cooking tips below. Once your sago is done, put it aside in a bowl of cold water while you work on the rest of your ingredients.

2. MIX MILK AND MANGO PUREE. In a large bowl, combine evaporated milk, table cream and mango puree. Stir until fully incorporated.

3. SWEETEN. At this point you’ll want to sweeten your mixture with condensed milk. How much condensed milk you put largely depends on how sweet your mango puree is. Careful not to put too much though; we don’t want the condensed milk to overpower the mango flavour. I usually put 1-2 tablespoons.

4. ASSEMBLE. Now it’s time to assemble! Add your cooked sago and diced mangoes into your milk mixture and stir. That’s it! Chill and serve cold.

Is sago and tapioca the same?

How to Cook Sago

Although the terms “sago” and “tapioca” are often used interchangeably, they are two different things.

According to The Spruce Eats: Sago is an edible starch that is made from the pith of an array of tropical palm trees. Tapioca pearls, on the other hand, are made with tapioca or the starch from cassava, a root crop.

They look similar, taste similar, have a similar chewy texture when cooked, and cooked the same way. They’re often substitutes of each other in recipes too, though not always.

In this recipe, you can use either one.

How to cook sago or tapioca pearls

How you cook sago depends on the kind of sago or tapioca pearls you have. I like the quick-cooking ones (it would say right on the package); plus, those usually have English cooking instructions on the back.

If you can’t find those, you probably have the kind that needs about an hour to fully cook.

If you google how to cook sago, you’ll find 101 ways to do it; this is how I do it:

  1. Bring a big pot of water to a rolling boil. I don’t bother to measure how many cups of water; I just make sure it’s enough to fully cover the sago or tapioca.
  2. Add the sago slowly and allow to simmer for 10 minutes. Stir occasionally so the sago don’t stick to one another.
  3. Switch off the stove and cover the pot.
  4. Wait another 10 minutes before draining the water and catching the sago in a mesh sieve.
  5. Rinse the sago in cold running water for 15-20 seconds.
  6. Place the sago back in the pot, add water and cook on medium heat for 10 minutes.
  7. Repeat 3 to 6 until your sago is fully translucent and chewy but still al dente.

I’ve found that how long this process takes largely depends on the brand of sago or tapioca you have. So I really make it a point to look for and buy the quick-cooking ones. They taste the same and perfect for lazy cooks like me.

If you have the quick cooking sago, all you’ll need is to follow the package instructions. It’s usually done in 15 minutes or less.

You also have the option to buy pre-cooked sago usually sold in bottles (like the one I use for making buko pandan ). Most brands package the sago in sweet, flavoured syrup so you’ll need to rinse the sago to get that flavour out.

What does sago taste like?

Sago on its own has no flavour. It takes on the flavour that you add to it. For example, some people like to soak it in brown sugar syrup to give it a bit of sweetness.

How long does sago stay fresh?

Home-cooked sago becomes hard and rubbery the longer it sits. They’re best eaten the day they’re cooked but still okay to serve the next day.

Uncooked sago is good for a few months; just make sure to seal the package tightly once opened.

Mango sago is such an easy, simple, refreshing dessert or merienda/snack. Sweet, creamy, cold and full of tropical, summery mango flavour. Enjoy!

Other mango recipes

Love mangoes but tired of the same old? Here are some mango recipes that’s not a mango shake!

Mango chia pudding is similar to mango sago but made with superfood chia seeds. It’s just as light, refreshing and easy to make.

You only need 2 ingredients for this delicious fresh mango mousse !

  • How to Cook SagoMango Chia Pudding
  • How to Cook SagoFresh Mango Mousse

And be sure to check this out for a list of delicious, must-try Filipino dessert recipes .

How to Cook Sago

What is Sago? If you are not familiar with these translucent chewy pearls, they are made from palm stems and the texture is spongy and by itself, there is not much taste.

How to Cook Sago

It was only recently that I discovered that Sago actually helps to reduce high blood pressure and promote healthy blood flow to the heart as they contain a decent amount of potassium.

How to Cook Sago

Used mainly in Southeast Asian desserts, they are most commonly used in making mango sago. I love to add them into Chinese dessert soups like red/green bean soup.
Cooking sago requires boiling water. If you cook them in cold or lukewarm water, you’ll end up with a goopy mess of sticky starch.

How to Cook Sago

Ingredients:
80g sago pearls
1000 ml water

makes 6 servings

In a medium pot, bring water to boil.

How to Cook Sago

Add in sago pearls, give it a stir and turn down heat.

How to Cook Sago

Cover and simmer over medium low heat for 15 mins, until the sago are almost translucent. Turn off heat and let it sit for another 10 mins.

How to Cook Sago

It is okay if there are still small specks of white in the sago. They will continue to cook further in the residue heat.

Drain in a sieve and rinse with cool water to remove excess starch.

How to Cook Sago

Transfer into a bowl or container. Cooked sago keeps well in the fridge for up to 5 days.

Nangu is a common dish that is prepared and known all over both the East and West Sepik Provinces. Locals from different parts of Sepik Province prepare Nangu as part of their daily meal. It is common and the preparation doesn’t take much time. Apart from other foods like yam, taro and sweet potato (kaukau), the locals believe that Nangu is still the best.

Nangu is prepared using specially prepared white sago, which is stored in the water, before being used in the dish. The things needed to prepare nangu include a dish, boiling hot water, a big wooden spoon, two wooden chopsticks called, and dry powdered sago which is white or sometimes pinkish.

The preparation time doesn’t take long and is believed to be less than three minutes. This depends on how hot the heat being produced from the fire is, to actually boil the pot of water. The quantity of sago to be used depends on the total number of people there are to feed.

Here is how Nangu is prepared;

  1. Boil water
  2. While the water boils, the stored dry white sago is removed and poured into a bowl
  3. Once in the bowl, hot water is added at the same time, a big wooden spoon is used to stir the added hot water with the sago, so they both blend to mix well.
  4. This process requires a lot of hot water. More water is added to the sago and more stirring continues until all the dry sago is completely covered with hot water, and is mixed gently.
  5. Gentle stirring continues until the dish and its contents resemble a jelly-like mixture.
  6. When the the sago looks like this, the Nangu is almost at its final stage, ready to be eaten. But before it can be eaten, the sago is beaten up.

Note: The stored Nangu wrapped with these leaves can last for five days and will not go bad.

You may be familiar with sago gulaman already. It is the common drink you can found everywhere in the Philippines. It is originally made of brown sugar (which gives the overall sweet taste), sago or tapioca pearls, and gulaman or gelatin. A kwek-kwek or fishball vendor (or any street food vendor) usually has this drink. However, this mango sago gulaman dessert is more than a drink. It is a dessert. It is creamier. Although the name will lead you to think that it is like that sago gulaman drink you know, it is actually different. This dessert is more of a salad, a variety of our buko or fruit salad.

Mango sago gulaman can also be compared with buko pandan dessert, except that it is, again, creamier. This is due to the combined effect of condensed milk, crema-asada, and all-purpose cream. Sago and gulaman are commonly used ingredients in Filipino desserts. Sago or tapioca pearl is starch extracted from tropical palm trees. Sago can also be obtained from cassava. Sago starch can be used as thickener in other dishes or baked to produce a product that is like a bread or pancake. Any starch can be pearled through heating and stirring of small aggregates of moist starch. The process will produce a partly gelatinized dry kernels. These kernels or balls swell, but they remain intact upon boiling. You have probably tried eating these pearls. They are chewy. Gulaman is dried agar; it is made of processed seaweed. Previously, you can have this jelly by using dehydrated agar bars. Nowadays, powder gulaman is available.

This recipe is an easy but delicious one. Combining the heavenly goodness of mango, creams, sago, and gulaman will give you an affordable yet satisfying dessert. No one will fail with mango! You can actually add other fruits if you want. But that is a different version already. Let us keep it pure and simple in this mango sago gulaman recipe. Try it and enjoy every serving!

By swasthi , on September 3, 2019 , 17 Comments , Jump to Recipe

Javvarisi payasam is a sweet dish made with sago or tapioca pearls, sweetener, milk, cardamoms, cashews and raisins. Javvarisi is the tamil name to tapioca pearls & is often used to make payasam or kheer. This is a simple recipe that can be made in no time during festivals or occasions.

How to Cook Sago

Traditionally payasams were made using jaggery as refined sugar does not give the real taste. However if you prefer you can make this even with sugar or kalakandu (rock sugar) or even with palm jaggery.

Most people use javvarisi to make payasam for puja. I was also one among them who would make this for many festivals and even add them to rice or semiya payasam.

I had made this during ganesh chathurthi many years ago. These were the quick naivedyams i offered on the second day of ganesh puja. Sesame seeds peanut ladoo , bellam kudumulu , chalimidi vadapappu and sago payasam.

But in the recent years I have stopped using processed ingredients like javvarisi & semiya for offerings. I make it sometimes during the hot summer days as sago is said to balance the summer heat in the body.

It is also used to make javvarisi upma, sabudana khichdi and sabudana vada.

Javvarisi is also fed to babies during teething and tummy upsets. If you are keen to know how to feed sago to your baby then check this Sabudana kheer.

More recipes from tamil cuisine
Aval laddu
Murukku

Thattai
Aval payasam