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How to Cover a Paperback With Junk Mail

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Tired of having your mailbox crammed with unsolicited mail, including preapproved credit card applications? Fed up with getting telemarketing calls just as you’re sitting down to dinner? Fuming that your email inbox is chock-full of unsolicited advertising? The good news is that you can cut down on the number of unsolicited mailings, calls, and emails you receive by learning where to go to “just say no.”

Consumer Reporting Companies

If you decide that you don’t want to receive prescreened offers of credit and insurance, you have two choices: You can opt out of receiving them for five years or opt out of receiving them permanently.

To opt out for five years: Call toll-free 1-888-5-OPT-OUT (1-888-567-8688) or visit www.optoutprescreen.com. The phone number and website are operated by the major consumer reporting companies.

To opt out permanently: You may begin the permanent Opt-Out process online at www.optoutprescreen.com. To complete your request, you must return the signed Permanent Opt-Out Election form, which will be provided after you initiate your online request.

When you call or visit the website, you’ll be asked to provide certain personal information, including your home telephone number, name, Social Security number, and date of birth. The information you provide is confidential and will be used only to process your request to opt out.

If you don’t have access to the Internet, you may send a written request to permanently opt out to each of the major consumer reporting companies. Make sure your request includes your home telephone number, name, Social Security number, and date of birth.

Experian
Opt Out
P.O. Box 919
Allen, TX 75013

TransUnion
Name Removal Option
P.O. Box 505
Woodlyn, PA 19094

Equifax, Inc.
Options
P.O. Box 740123
Atlanta, GA 30374

Innovis Consumer Assistance
P.O. Box 495
Pittsburgh, PA 15230

Direct Marketers

Telemarketing

The federal government’s National Do Not Call Registry is a free, easy way to reduce the telemarketing calls you get at home. To register your phone number or to get information about the registry, visit www.donotcall.gov, or call 1-888-382-1222 from the phone number you want to register. You will get fewer telemarketing calls within 31 days of registering your number. Telephone numbers on the registry will only be removed when they are disconnected and reassigned, or when you choose to remove a number from the registry.

Mail and Email

Consumers can register at the Direct Marketing Association’s (DMA) consumer website: www.DMAchoice.org for a processing fee of $2 for a period of ten years. Registering online is the fastest way to see results. DMAchoice offers consumers a simple, step-by-step process that enables them to decide what mail they do and do not want.

In addition, DMAchoice online offers registration for DMA’s eMail Preference Service (reduce your unsolicited commercial email);

Mail-in registration:
If you do not wish to complete your registration online, you can register for DMAchoice by using the mail-in form that is online: fill out the DMAChoice Mail In Form with all required information, print it and mail to the address below.

Or, if you do not have access to the Internet, you can register by sending your name and address (with signature), along with a $3 processing fee (check or money order payable to DMA) to:

DMAChoice
DMA
PO Box 900
Cos Cob, CT 06807

Department of Motor Vehicles

The Drivers Privacy Protection Act allows states to distribute personal information only to law enforcement officials, courts, government agencies, private investigators, insurance underwriters, and similar businesses — but not for direct marketing and other uses.

Replies (1) 

Sorry for the late response. Please be informed that with the current design of Outlook.com, the option to block multiple email addresses at one time isn’t available. I will forward the suggestion over to our product team as consideration for a future release .

If you want to send a suggestions straight to our product team, kindly send us feedback on this link .

As a workaround, i f they are using certain words on the subject or their name, you can create a Custom Filter or Rules to avoid receiving their email. Refer to the steps below on how to do this:

1. Sign in to Outlook.com.

2. Click the gear icon on the upper right corner beside your name.

3. Select More mail settings.

4. Under Customizing Outlook, click Rules for sorting new messages.

5. Click New.

6. For this step you will be asked to setup your rule.

7. Under Step 1: Which messages do you want this rule to apply to?

Choose the condition that you want to apply, 3 fields are required for this step. In the first field when you click the drop down button you have,

– Sender’s address, Sender’s name , To /cc address, Subject and Messages has attachments.

– On the second field you have is, contains, contains word, does not contain, begins with, ends with.

– On the third field you will enter the word that can conclude the action of the 2 fields (for example Sender’s name, is, Hotmail Team).

8. Under Step 2: What action do you want to apply? Select the action for your desired settings.

9. Click Save.

Should you have other questions or any other concerns, please reply to this thread and we will be happy to further assist you.

Written by: eHow Culture & Society Editor

Written on: July 14, 2020

Paperback books can be recycled in the same manner as other paper products such as phone books. Unlike hardback books, the slick-paper covers on paperback books are easily removed. Paperback books can also be recycled through donations or by selling.

Recycle paperback books along with other printed items such as magazines, catalogs and junk mail. Place paperback books into the “Mixed Paper” bin of the local recycling center.

Donate the books to an international organization that ships them overseas (see Resources). These organizations provide books for needy children and adults in the developing world by accepting charitable donations of paperback books.

  • Paperback books can be recycled in the same manner as other paper products such as phone books.

Pass along used paperback books to local charities. Youth groups, literacy centers and homeless shelters would appreciate the donation of some well maintained paperback books.

Sell paperback books at a yard sale. If there are a lot of paperback books for sale, offer to sell them by the bag full. School lunch bags are ideal, as they allow buyers to select several books without over-stuffing the bag.

Look through the telephone book for used books resellers. Most medium to large cities have used books stores. If the books are in good shape and especially rare, used books stores will offer a fair price for them.

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Are you being deluged with unwanted junk mail? Most of us are tired of seeing our mail boxes fill up with stacks of mail offering us items we would never dream of purchasing or asking us to contribute to causes we never heard of. This unwanted mail clutters our homes and costs thousands of tax dollars to process of every year.

You can recycle all your junk mail by putting it in your green recycling cart. That includes window envelopes and glossy inserts.

But, you might also wish to try to reduce the volume of junk mail you receive. You can do that several ways.

  • Follow the directions outlined by the Federal Trade Commision.

The FTC has several links and mailing addresses to the various companies responsible for pre-screened offers and direct mailings that clog your mailbox. Visit the FTC site to learn how to contact these organizations.

  • You can also:
    • Use post paid response cards and envelopes to send back junk mail. Be sure to include the mailing label and request to be removed from the mailing list.
    • Call toll free numbers on junk mail and let them know you no longer want mailings.
    • When you apply for a credit card, magazine subscription or membership in an organization, or donate to a charity, write “Please do not rent, sell, trade, or give my name to other businesses or organizations” on your application.
    • When you donate to a charity, ask them to limit future solicitations to one per year.
    • Call the office of the weekly “shopper” newspaper and ask to have delivery stopped. In Madison, contact Capital Newspapers at (608) 252-6200 or (608) 252-6236, or use their online form.
    • Have the phone company remove your name from the published phone directory. Some mailing list companies use the directory as a source of addresses.
    • Write refused on unwanted first class mail.

How to Cover a Paperback With Junk Mail

If you are like me, you have a few postcards around. What do you do with them? Nothing much except move them from shoe box to shoe box or.

drawer to drawer. Why not make something useful with them, instead?

This little notebook has two postcards as the cover and is filled with pages cut from various pieces of junk mail plucked from my recycle bin.

Here’s how to make it:

How to Cover a Paperback With Junk Mail

#1: Select two post cards of the same size. These will be your covers. Cut a stack of pages the same size as the post cards.

How to Cover a Paperback With Junk Mail

#2: Score lines on the “spine end” of each post card, so that the cover will fold open neatly when the book is assembled. Punch holes in each of the pages. The number and placement of holes is not important. That they all be placed at precisely the same spot on each page is very important. At the lower left of the photo above, I show the cardboard template that I used to punch my holes. The folded paper piece is what I used to determine the placement of the holes for the template.

How to Cover a Paperback With Junk Mail

#3: Using yarn or heavy thread and a needle, sew the pages together.

How to Cover a Paperback With Junk Mail

#4: Spread a thin, even layer of white glue on the inside flaps of the postcards.

How to Cover a Paperback With Junk Mail

#5: Carefully position the covers onto the pages and clamp to hold in place.

How to Cover a Paperback With Junk Mail

#6: Optional last step: Add a fabric covering for the spine. Cut a piece of fabric the proper width to wrap around the the spine, but leave it too long. Carefully coat the spine area with a thin layer of glue. Press the fabric in place and clamp. When the glue is completely dry, unclamp and trim away the excess fabric at the top and bottom.

More ideas for handmade notebooks:

How to Cover a Paperback With Junk Mail

These twig notebooks appear in the Fall 2010 edition of Nuno Magazine. Preview a free 28 page excerpt from Nuno Magazine (with three complete projects) here.

Enter to win a free copy of Nuno Magazine (along with Make It! Hardware Store Decor) right here on Curbly!

New here? You may want updates via email or RSS feed. Thanks for visiting!

In yesterday’s discussion about how to stop junk mail, icup mentioned using junk mail for mulch. Intrigued, I asked for more information. Here’s what he had to say.

I’m more interested in saving money than saving the environment, but when I see junk mail piling up every day, it makes me stop to think about the sheer amount of waste that junk mail creates. As a homeowner with multiple mulch beds, I also feel a little guilty about building up a nice big pile of mulch, because after all, that mulch used to be trees, and I know in my heart that cutting down trees is not necessarily a good thing.

How to Cover a Paperback With Junk MailOne day when emptying my shredder, I got to thinking about wasted trees, and the thought occurred to me that shredded junk mail and mulch are basically the same thing: tiny bits of trees. Wouldn’t it be possible to save those bags of shredded junk mail for use instead of mulch?

It seemed like a good idea, but I consulted the internet just in case. I was worried about the ink. Last time I checked, you can’t buy mulch with tiny words and pictures printed on it with who knows what chemical.

Googling revealed concerns about heavy metals in some inks, but those occur mainly in the colorful, glossy ads I rarely receive (and wouldn’t shred anyway). Most people seemed to agree that the majority of inks are soy based because of economic reasons. The chemical make-up of non-glossy colored ink seems to be vigorously debated, but I think the risk of contamination is minimal. But because there’s some risk, I decided to only use shredded junk mail on beds that won’t be growing anything edible.

I also had concerns about plastics. My shredder has a credit card and CD slot, so I have to be careful about picking that stuff out. Also, some envelopes have a cellophane window. This isn’t really a contamination issue because of how tough plastic is to break down, but it is rather unsightly, like throwing trash on the ground.

With that in mind, I decided to use the following rules when using shredded junk mail as mulch:

  1. I only shred the non-glossy stuff, and try to avoid colored ink as much as possible. Since I’m shredding to avoid identity theft in the first place, and credit applications these days contain colored ink, I can’t stay 100% black and white, but I can accept that.
  2. I shred plastic items like credit cards and CDs separately and discard.
  3. I store the shredded paper in a place that is safe from fire and children. Fire because I believe shredded paper in bulk is a fire hazard, and children because shredded paper in bulk is a mess hazard.
  4. I only use the shreds where food is not grown, just to be safe. You can also use it in the bottom of flower pots inside the house to save potting soil.

How to Cover a Paperback With Junk MailSo far the bulk of the paper has been used along the foundation of my house. I estimate I would have had to use 33-50% more bags of mulch if not for the paper. With the amount of mulch I need to put down this spring, that is a substantial savings. Also, I’m able to pile the mulch nice and high, so it looks better. From what I understand, the paper should be completely broken down in far less than a year.

I love this. It’s frugal and prevents identity theft at the same time! Mulch photo is not from icup, and is from the Flickr stream of mtneer_man.

How to Cover a Paperback With Junk MailMost people don’t give a second thought to tossing junk mail in the recycling bin. But with over 100 billion pieces delivered annually, some savvy recipients are seeing it differently. Instead of seeing junk mail as junk, they see it as a gold mine. As the saying goes, one man’s junk is another man’s treasure.

For this reason, some people order as much junk mail as they can. I once read about a man who burned his junk mail. He received enough of it to keep his house warm all winter. In another vein, JunkMailGems.com strictly sells products made from re-purposed junk mail.

Here is a list of creative and useful things you can do with your junk mail. Of course, take into consideration the different types of paper used in junk mailings and chemicals that may be in adhesives or inks.

Utility

1. Burn in Place of Wood

Yep, you can do it too. Stay warm in the winter by a fire made of all that junk mail. Just throwing it in the fireplace won’t be too effective, but by using an inexpensive product like a Paper Log Maker or Newspaper Brick Maker, you can make paper logs or bricks that will burn like real wood.

2. Use as Packing Material

Sure, dehydrated mushroom mycelia and plastic pillows filled with air are both good green packing material options, but why not use your bounty of junk mail? Just run it through the paper shredder and use to ship or store fragile objects.

3. Use as Animal Bedding

Avoid the cost of buying bedding for your small rodent friends by shredding your junk mail. It might also come in handy as bedding for your urban chickens.

4. Use as a Funnel

This works best with those return envelopes you get in the mail. Simply cut a small section of one corner of an envelope (for the bottom of the funnel) and a larger portion from its opposite corner (the mouth of the funnel). Use this to conveniently refill salt and pepper shakers. This idea is one of the useful ideas from JunkMailGems.com.

Gardening

For these gardening projects, make sure there are no toxic adhesives or inks on the paper goods you use.

4. Make Seedling Pots

Another clever product is the Pot Maker (about $15). Use paper to make seedling pots, which can then be planted directly into the soil and will decompose on their own. This way, you don’t have to buy plastic pots (saving money and natural resources).

5. Garden Mulch

You can literally lay out junk mail or old newspapers on your garden as a mulch. This makes an excellent weed barrier and will have all the benefits of traditional mulch. But since this is a little aesthetically displeasing, you might also want to cover with a layer of leaves or other traditional mulch.

Alternatively, you could also shred junk mail or old newspapers first and then lay them as mulch. This will break down easier.

Arts and Crafts

6. Handmade Recycled Paper

Instructions for how to make your own recycled paper from junk mail or old newspapers abound on the internet. It is a fun art project and a relatively easy way to make some really pretty paper.

7. Make Mosaic Portraits

Artist Sandhi Schimmel Gold is another individual who has found a way to make money from her junk mail. She creates colorful portraits in a sort of mosaic style from bits cut from junk mail and other paper waste. It’s possible to DIY. Just take a picture you’d like to use, cut out colored bits from your junk mail and magazines, and paste them onto the picture. Then either hang on the refrigerator or sell for $2,000.

8. Festive Decorations

The classic elementary school paper chain, useful as a decoration or for visually representing how many days until the school year ends, can be made from junk mail instead of the more traditional construction paper.

How to Cover a Paperback With Junk Mail

Ever wonder how much junk mail actually costs? In just one state – Massachusetts, the estimated cost to cities and towns to dispose of the catalogs, flyers, phone books, and other junk mail that gets thrown away every day is $20 million annually. And to make matters worse, sixty-five percent of the 308,000 tons of junk mail that’s tossed in the garbage every year in Massachusetts isn’t even recycled. The anti-junk mail group, 41pounds.org (the name is a reference to how much junk mail the average adult receives each year), reports that state and local governments across the country spend over $320 million yearly to get rid of it. Add to that the 100 million trees harvested and 28 million gallons of water used to produce junk mail, plus the $550 million in transportation costs to haul it around, and you can see how the numbers add up quickly. And we haven’t even considered identity theft, and how much all those unwanted pre-approved credit card offers in the wrong hands cost us.

On the other hand, “direct advertising mail and catalogs account for more than $702 billion in U.S. sales and 10 million jobs annually,” according to the Direct Marketing Association, which represents over 275,000 marketers in the U.S. No doubt the steady flow of junk mail is also a huge boon to the struggling U.S. Postal Service, with advertising mail helping to keep down the cost of postage stamps. In fact, the USPS was in the red to the tune of $8.5 billion in 2010 and borrowed over $12 billion from the government to stay in business. Regular first class mail volume, which pays for most of the agency’s operations, has gone down nearly 30% since 1998. At the same time, advertising has been on an upswing, now making up 48% of all mail.

Nevertheless, people around the country are clamoring for an easy way to stop the overflow of unwanted advertising in their mailboxes. Though a national “Do Not Mail” program doesn’t exist, individual states and cities have taken action to combat this issue. Massachusetts has initiated a pilot program in Brookline and Cambridge in collaboration with Catalog Choice to opt-out of some of the advertising mail and to help consumers report complaints about those companies who ignore their requests. Seattle, Washington has a similar program, also through Catalog Choice.

Tip: Getting Rid of Junk Mail

Whenever I receive an “invite” in the mail for a credit card that I do not want (an unsolicited invite), I tear it up into several pieces because I do not have a shredder and can’t afford one right now. Then I take the pieces and put some in each waste basket around the house so just in case a thief wants to paste the information back together, all the pieces are not there.

Some pieces are in the bathroom waste basket, some pieces are in the kitchen waste basket, some pieces are in the bedroom waste basket and not all waste baskets get emptied at the same time. This eliminates the risk of any personal information getting into the wrong hands.

Source: myself

By Kathy from Sylvania, OH

13 More Solutions

Share on ThriftyFun This page contains the following solutions. Have something to add? Please share your solution!

Tip: Unsubscribe And Return Junk Mail

To cut down on junk mail, first, I “unsubscribe” from as many websites as I can. That cuts down on a lot of junk mail.

Tip: Shred Mail Without A Shredder

If you don’t have a shredder, here is an easy way to “shred” your mail. Take all the mail you don’t want, tear it up into little pieces, put it all in an empty envelope, seal it, and toss it in the trash.

Tip: Shred Junk Mail Immediately

To keep the clutter down of junk mail coming in the house, we keep a shredder handy and go through the mail as soon as it comes in. Magazines, newspapers, ads, etc. go into a bag to be recycled.

Tip: Immediately Sort Junk Mail

When I bring in the mail, I head straight for the trash can and immediately sort out the junk mail. The rest goes in a small basket, until I get a chance to deal with it properly.

Tip: Using Junk Mail to Prevent Weeds

I save up my junk mail until I get enough to mulch a section of my flower garden where weeds are a problem. You can lay the pieces of mail two, three or four pieces deep and spread over the area to be mulched.

Tip: Recycle Junk Mail

I recycle everything! My husband and I use the cloth bags that we use every week to get our groceries. I keep one next to my office desk, my living room chair, and the kitchen pantry, in order to toss things in after they are read.

Tip: Junk Mail Therapy – Use Your Shredder

Keep a shredder right next to the place you sort the daily mail – what a joy to watch all that junk mail go through the shredder! By CA Thomas

Tip: Recycle Junk Mail Immediately

Take all junk mail directly to the recycle bin. Saves you time and mess. Also put any catalogs or magazines which you no longer want in the recycle bin as well.

Tip: Return it to Sender

I mail it back to the sender if they enclose an envelope for which they will pay. Let them pay twice for the spam and they can get rid of the clutter.

Tip: Shred Junk Mail

I have a shredder. I shred all of my junk mail. I use the strips for packing materials when I mail boxes.(eBay) I also use them for paper mache projects with my children or kids in my class. I sort the colored paper out.

Tip: Refuse Junk Mail And Return Unopened.

I have, in the past, just written “refused” on the unopened junk mail and put it back in the mailbox. The postal service will take it away.

Tip: Go Through Junk Mail Once

Go through what might be junk mail only one time; shredding or recycling the junk and saving what might be useful.

Tip: Sort Junk Mail At The Mailbox

The quickest way to get rid of junk mail is to have a wastebin (waste basket) somewhere near where you pick up the mail. Don’t let the junk mail get any further.

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Contents

  • 1 Filtering With XMission’s Zimbra Collaboration Suite
  • 2 Zimbra Base Filtering
  • 3 Zimbra Premium Junk Filtering
  • 4 Marking Junk vs Not Junk
  • 5 Allowing Email Addresses
  • 6 Spam Assassin Details

Filtering With XMission’s Zimbra Collaboration Suite

There are several different ways you can filter email in Zimbra. This wiki page will explain all of the filtering options made available to you and help you understand how to make them work best to suit your individual needs.

There are Class of Service differences between Zimbra Base and Zimbra Premium accounts. This wiki will cover both.

Zimbra Base Filtering

Your Zimbra Base account comes default with a spam scoring of 8. For more information on how your filtering impacts you depending on the scoring of your messages, please see Spam Filtering.

  • 1) Log into your Zimbra account online through the web portal Zimbra Web Interface
  • 2) Navigate to the Preferences tab
  • 3) Select “Filters” from the left hand menu
  • 4) Click “Create Filter” to begin setting up a custom filter

How to Cover a Paperback With Junk Mail

  • 5) Name your filter
    • Be sure to name the filter something relevant to the task you will have it do, as differentiating them from others is important. The example is named “Spam Level”
    • The filter we have created in this example is intended to move any emails with a spam rating of 6 or higher into a folder named “Junk”. But first we need to specify what to look for

How to Cover a Paperback With Junk Mail

  • 6) Use the top conditions fields to specify rules the filter will follow
    • For the example, we have specified one simple subject filter that contain headers with “X-Spam-Level” over 6. Any emails received with more than 6 *’s will be put into junk.
    • To add new rules, click the green ‘+’ and it will create a new row.
  • 7) Tell the filter what to do with the above specified rules
    • The example says to move the message into the folder “Junk”
  • 8) If you are complete, check the “Do Not Process Additional Filters” checkbox
  • 9) Click OK

NOTE: Be sure to save your work with the “Save” button in the top left!

Zimbra Premium Junk Filtering

Choosing your level of filtering in Zimbra is easy and convenient with XMission’s custom filtering zimlet. The filters are designed to filter email using flags added to mail when it is scanned by Spam Assassin. You will have the option of a High or Low level of filtering, or you can turn all filtering off entirely. When mail is filtered, it will go into your Junk folder where you can review and delete the messages permanently at your discretion.

    • Simply log into your Zimbra account via the Zimbra Web Interface and click the “Junk Filter” button, then select what level of filtering you want to use.
    • The High level of filtering is the most aggressive, filtering email with a Spam Assassin score of 5 or higher. If you select this filter you’ll likely want to keep a closer eye on your Junk folder for a short time to be sure no legitimate email is being filtered.
    • The Low level filter is less aggressive, filtering email with a Spam Assassin score of 8 or higher. While you’re less likely to filter legitimate email with this level of filtering it is still a good idea to watch the Junk folder to be sure you don’t miss any important email which may be getting a higher Spam Assassin score than expected.
    • Selecting the Disable button will turn all filtering off, even the default Zimbra filtering, so no email is sent to your Junk folder at all. We mainly recommend the Disable option to people who use an email client like Thunderbird and manage their own filtering through that software.

Marking Junk vs Not Junk

When logged into the Zimbra Web Interface you’ll notice the Junk button when viewing your email. When you mark a message as junk it will be flagged as spam, moved to your Junk folder, and reported to XMission for system wide filtering purposes. As well, when you go into your Junk folder and see a legitimate email has been filtered, click the “Not Junk” button and that message will be moved to your Inbox and all email from that sender will not be filtered henceforth.

  • If you click “Not Junk” by mistake, you can just click “Junk” again on that message to continue sending mail from that sender to your Junk folder.

Allowing Email Addresses

If you need to allow a person or email address you can modify and maintain it easily yourself rather than just using the “Not Junk” feature mentioned above. You can add or remove addresses to the “Block/Allow messages from” section in your Mail Preferences.

  • 1) Log into the Zimbra Web Interface then select Preferences, then Mail.
  • 2) Scroll down until you find “Spam Mail Options”

How to Cover a Paperback With Junk Mail

  • 3) Add or remove addresses to either the Block or Allow messages from sections
  • 4) Click “Add” to save that address to the specified section
  • 5) Click “Save” in the top left corner to save your work

Spam Assassin Details

For specific details on how Spam Assassin scores email visit Spamassassin