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How to get a press pass

Are you working asa journalist?

You are eligible to apply for an international press pass from us.

Become a member of the United States Press Agency and take advantage of the many benefits we offer.

Our member base includes
the following professions:

Benefits of United States
Press Agency membership:

Our members are so satisfied with our work that 97.7 % of them renewed their press passes last year. That’s something we are proud of. This vote of confidence inspires us to further expand the services we offer.

Application and fees

Apply for your press pass online in a few easy steps. Fill out an application form and upload a passport photo of yourself. To complete your registration, simply click on the confirmation link you will receive via email. Your membership application will be reviewed and, when indicated, approved within 48 hours. You will then receive an email containing your activation link. Clicking on this link will automatically direct you to our website to make your payment.

There is a one-time registration fee of $108.00.

The annual membership fee is $48. The fee is prorated if you sign up during the year. (Example: If you register in July, we only charge for the months of July through December.) At the end of October, we ask you to renew your membership for the coming year.

How to Get a Press Pass

1.
Click on the link Apply For Your Press Pass on the right.

How to Get a Press Pass

USPA
Press Pass

2.
Complete and submit our application form.
Click on the confirmation link in the email you will receive from us.

3.
We will then send you an email containing your activation link.
We will send you a message within 48 hours.
Clicking on this link will automatically direct you to our website to make your payment.

Frequently Asked Questions

Who is eligible for USPA membership?

The United States Press Agency is open to all media professionals such as photographers, journalists, reporters, bloggers, editors, freelancers and correspondents. Click here for details on eligibility requirements and suitable proof of your journalistic activity.

Journalistic activity shall mean the publication of written material, photographic images and sound, both in print and offline media, as well as on the radio, Internet and through other appropriate means of publication. This includes the following activities: press photography, research, public relations, selection and editing of media content. We also welcome journalism students and those who are just starting out on their career path.

Why do I need a press pass?

The job titles “press photographer” and “journalist” are not protected by law. If you work in this field, legitimate certification is key.

It allows you to stand out from the crowd and distinguish yourself as a professional right from the start. In addition to a press pass, a press ID/Reporter Card, letter of accreditation and a press vehicle ID, we also provide you with our seal to use at your discretion.

Where can I use the press pass?

A press pass is very helpful for visiting many events. Whether you want to cover a concert, trade show, sporting event, film or theater premiere: Many organizers only grant access to journalists who have previously applied for accreditation and can present a valid press pass. A press pass is proof that you are a legitimate journalist. It shows agencies, organizations and event hosts that its owner is conducting journalistic research. A press pass from the United States Press Agency (USPA) is recognized around the world.

Who is USPA?

The United States Press Agency, USPA for short, is among the leading press agencies in the United States. USPA is open to all journalistic professionals such as photographers, journalists, reporters, bloggers, videographers, editors, freelancers, correspondents and photojournalists in the United States and Europe. USPA is an international, nonpartisan, independent association that is not affiliated with any political party, union, financial institution or publisher.

Why should I apply for a press pass from USPA?

We don’t just sell press passes. We also provide the arguably most important document for journalists – your personal letter of accreditation. About our news portal: USPA News (uspa24.com) allows you to create your own, customized USPA News page. This allows you to present proof of your journalistic activity on the go. Event organizers want to see a valid press pass from a recognized agency, but they also want to know where your photos and articles will be published. We are a one-stop shop: We provide you with a press pass, reporter ID card, press vehicle ID and letter of accreditation, and our news portal USPA News lets you create your own landing page featuring your profile picture along with an entry in the masthead under our website credits on the legal notice page. You will have all the tools you need to become a successful journalist. You can market your photos and articles and earn some additional income with Google AdSense. For details about our news portal USPA News (uspa24.com), please visit:

How to Get a Press Pass

In order to gain access to various events as a freelancer, you may need or want to have a press pass proudly displayed around your neck. While these types of credentials are more readily available for people who are employed by larger media organizations, such as national newspapers, it is still possible to get a press or media pass when you’re working freelance.

Contact the Event Organizer

If you are looking for a press pass to cover a specific event, such as a conference or a trade show, it is best to get in touch with the event organizer directly. The event website typically has a page where you can fill out a press or media application, and it is important that you submit this form well in advance of the event itself.

If there is no media application or there are no specific instructions on the associated website, seek out the contact information of the marketing or public relations (PR) professional who is managing the event. Intrepid Freelancer has a step-by-step guide for the typical process.

Go on Assignment

As a freelancer trying to attend an event speculatively before “shopping” the story or photos to a media outlet, it may still be possible to get a press pass. Freelancers who have a serious audience of their own will generally have more success here, as might be the case with popular photographers who shoot for Getty Images, for example, or journalists who have a strong history of writing for major publications on a consistent basis.

However, you will find it is generally easier to gain approval for a pass when you are attending an event on assignment with a media outlet. The outlet can provide you with documentation on their official letterhead to indicate you are working for them in this capacity, which is functionally equivalent to if you were an employee of theirs covering the event. They may help you with the process of getting a press pass or you may need to acquire one yourself.

Apply With the Local Authority

If you are less interested in attending specific events like expos, sporting events, concerts, and fashion shows, and you are more interested in getting behind taped off crime scenes and other areas with restricted access, you may want to inquire into getting official credentials and identification with your local authority.

Each jurisdiction handles press credentials differently and has different requirements. The New York City Police Department (NYPD), for example, ask that NYPD Press Card applicants must have at least one item published or broadcast within the last 24 months, and that the individual has personally covered at least six events on separate days in the past year.

Get an NPPA Photo ID

While the possession of such a card does not guarantee access or admission to events or crime scenes, a photo identification card from the National Press Photographers Association (NPPA) does serve as a legitimized form of identification when trying to gain access to such situations. The NPPA asserts there is no such thing as a universal press pass, but having the NPPA photo ID will identify you as “a member in good standing who has agreed to uphold the NPPA Code of Ethics.”

Make Your Own Press Pass

With the understanding that a homemade “press pass” doesn’t actually hold any real credence, it may help in identifying you with security personnel and other access control professionals as a freelancer. This may help with some level of credibility, particularly at events where press passes are not being issued.

Take some time to design your own custom press pass on your computer or hire a professional designer to do it for you. Print it out on high quality card stock and slip it into a lanyard with a card holder. It may be helpful if your DIY press pass has a high quality photo of you on it, as well as some indication of your role and organization. Make sure that the word “PRESS” or “MEDIA” is clearly visible in block letters.

No Guarantees for Access

You may find yourself in a chicken-and-egg scenario when trying to get a press pass as a freelancer. The media application form for the event you’re trying to attend may require that all freelancers be on assignment from an established media outlet. At the same time, you can’t guarantee you’ll have access when you first pitch the story to that media outlet. Keep this in mind and have a contingency plan in place just in case.

making HR better, one HR pro at a time

How to get a press pass and attend events for free

Just want to say up front that this post is going to appeal more to the bloggers and social media users out there, but I still wanted to share with everyone because it’s neat to see the background of some of my (and other bloggers’) activities. Learning how to get a press pass isn’t difficult, but it takes some effort to position the pitch just right.

When I pitch the idea of covering an event, I think long and hard about the organizer and what they want. The needs of an event planner are fairly simple (I should know).

  • Want people/sponsors to attend
  • Want publicity
  • Want next year to be even better

With those thoughts in mind, I start drafting my pitch. Things I want to cover:

  • Talk about my target audience.
  • Give them some traffic stats.
  • Point to previous event coverage.
  • Give a name or two as referrals to help prove authenticity.
  • Pitch SEO value for future events (when people Google the event, these posts will show up).
  • Tell them exactly what I will provide in exchange for a press pass, comped ticket, etc. (My usual coverage is 3 posts.)
    • Check out this event I am attending and what I expect from the experience
    • Live post during the event or review of a session immediately after
    • Final wrap up, parting words, and recommendation for the next year

One thing I haven’t asked for previously was travel expenses or compensation above the ticket price. As my traffic and audience grows I will get more requests, and I can’t possibly fill all of them. That might be something I’ll have to look at in the future.

A sample email template

I was just checking through my email and saw where a friend had mentioned the XYZ conference. I’ve never even heard of it, so I went out to the website not knowing what to expect.

Wow! I was blown away by the level of detail and professionalism that’s put into this thing. It looks like an amazing event, and I would like to help you guys get the word out about this thing. I have covered other HR events before, and I was wondering if you guys had any kind of press pass. I’m (relatively) local and would love to share the event with my audience. Here are a few details that might help you make up your mind:

  • My audience hits around 3,000 visitors monthly with approximately 70,000 pageviews since I started writing. Alabama is my second highest source of web traffic (for local events only).
  • I covered the 2010 SHRM conference in San Diego this year and those articles and videos were seen by over 1,000 people on my own site and hundreds more on the other platforms where the posts were shared. For many of those readers, it was the only coverage they saw of the entire event. Here’s a sampling of that material from SHRM 2010.
  • I have open invitations to write for other events in the human resources and recruiting space.
  • I’ve written articles about multiple seminars at my local SHRM chapter (NASHRM).
  • I know how important it is for the conference planners to get the word out about the event to generate interest and drive ticket sales.

In exchange for the press pass, I’ll write multiple articles (thinking 3-4 at this point) about the event and will share the content rights with you to post on your own event blog if you desire. It’s reasonable to expect that those articles will reach a large number of people who would otherwise never hear about the event.

Please let me know if I can share anything more to help you in your decision. I’d love to have the opportunity to share the XYZ Conference with the world.

Ben Eubanks
upstartHR
HRevolution cofounder
@beneubanks
LinkedIn
256-778-1236

The next step

If they reply with the affirmative, that’s where I give them more details about my role in the partnership.

Hey, Event Planner Dude/Gal’s name!

At this point I’m planning for at least 3 articles on upstartHR.

  • One will be beforehand where I talk about the event, what makes it unique (example 1, example 2, etc.), and what I hope to learn.
  • The other will be written based on the content of a session or two that I attend. Right now I’m leaning toward writing about the X, Y, and Z sessions, but that could change depending on how they go and how well the speakers do. I hate writing negatively about anything, so I’ll do everything I can to capture the positive aspects of the experience.
  • The final piece will be a recap about the event as a whole, people I met, and whether or not I would recommend someone attend the event in coming years. This is the most fun/valuable, because it really brings a personal feel to the event and helps people get a good handle of the value it can provide.

Like I said in my original email, I expect these posts to be seen by over a thousand people. The content is syndicated across HRMToday, Brazen Careerist, and my Twitter feed (3000+ followers). Another neat benefit for you guys is that the content will be search engine optimized, which means when people are searching for information related to your event a few months or a year from now, the reviews will probably show up high on the search engine results pages.

Thanks again for the opportunity,

And that, my friends, is how I pitch my blog to write for events. As I said before, learning how to get a press pass as a blogger just takes a little effort and attention to detail. I haven’t done it often, but it’s always been successful. Have a question about something I said or forgot to cover? Let me know in the comments below.

7 thoughts on “ How to get a press pass as a blogger ”

This post is EXACTLY what I was looking for, thank you for this great information!!

Ben, thanks for the article. Good advice. I have been successful with this method. I also joined the US Press Association which issues credentials for freelancers. They have written event coordinators on my behalf and I have been quite successful with that as well. Good info, thanks for the post!

it’s been years since I had to pitch myself for an event but this template was great. fingers crossed!

This invite template is great. Thanks for sharing 😀

Fabulous! Thank you!

Thanks for Sharing it is a great template to use

How to Get a Press Pass

Freelance journalists and photographers have a hard time getting press passes which supply get admission to activities that aren’t open to the general public. Read this article to understand approximately press passes and the way to get them.
TAGGED UNDER: Journalism

How to Get a Press Pass

Fact
SCOTUSblog, a prominent internet site, had been denied press passes to cool hearings with the aid of the Supreme Court, in spite of having more accuracy than most tv networks.
Journalism has constantly been a hard gig. With rival information corporations and the yellow police line very difficult to pass, data would not come clean. Since abrupt eyewitness debts or rumors not often sell an awesome story, except in gonzo journalism, difficult information is tough to come through. Journalists had been granted the proper to get entry to records of private businesses and the sports of the government, but it isn’t always that easy with their PR (public members of the family) sellers blockading the way.

Luckily, there may be a way to pass the pink tape and get the proper records. When newshounds need to uncover records that is going past what is to be had at large to the general public, they want some credentials, irrespective of the guidelines that deny this privilege to most people. The most specific occasions and the grisliest crime scenes may be accessed with the aid of an unmarried card. This is called a press card, which gives unique privileges to journalists, photographers, and bloggers.

READ MORE :

What is a Press Pass?
Press passes are issued to journalists who cover breaking information testimonies or have sustained a recognition of masking stay information. This may be carried out to each, print media and internet. NYPD (New York Police Department) most effective doles out press passes to journalists who’ve crossed the yellow police line six instances. Those in possession of a press skip are often asked for an ID that belongs to the accepted corporation or newspaper, as similarly evidence of being a journalist.

Press passes are also issued for quickly-to-be-released-films or launch occasions of a famous brand. But those are issued to handiest reputable newshounds. They also are issued at concert events, which function a backstage skip, in order that reporters can interview the band later, or have their photos taken with the aid of photographers. Those issued for vehicles helps you to park in non-residential areas, typically taken into consideration illegal.

What Does a Press Pass Look Like?
An authentic press pass is fabricated from plastic that is used to make credit playing cards. Since there are newshounds who can also obtain the blessings through going to different events without publishing any work, a press bypass needs to be renewed ever yr.

How to Get a Press Pass
Press passes are always difficult to get for freelance newshounds and photographers. Even bloggers aren’t considered to be reporters, notwithstanding the truth that they cool news very appropriately. But you could get a press bypass if the enterprise you are running for issues them. Or, your ID card too may go as your press pass. But for first-timers or amateurs, the following groups offer these passes:

Cable Muse
Cable Muse offers its club to freelance newshounds of a wide variety for an annual subscription. There are 2 forms of memberships: correspondent club, which gives you a press skip legitimate only for a yr, for a fee of USD eighty four.50. Students or beginner bloggers starting out can get a press bypass for a discounted fee of USD fifty six.00.

International Press Federation
This is one of the most important corporations that serve as a haven for freelance newshounds. It now not most effective hires reporters from the print enterprise, however from the media and net as well. It has 2 varieties of memberships – widespread and company club. Standard membership incorporates 2 programs – individual membership (IM), which has an every year subscription of USD a hundred thirty-five.00, in which the member receives a press skip; and professional membership (PM) fees USD 205.00 for a yr, in which the member gets a 2-yr membership, in addition to a car press ID. The corporate club is offered to institutes offering training, colleges, or magazines, for an annual rate of USD 338.00.

International Federation of New Media
This is an business enterprise that covers writers related to radio, television, magazines, and newspapers. You can reap a press card after filling up their online subscription form, and paying an annual price of USD 103.50, and a car press card for an annual rate of USD 123.50.

International Press Association (IPA)
This is a 25-12 months-antique company that gives press passes to newshounds and photographers for a subscription that needs to be renewed every year. It has three styles of memberships – Silver at USD 155.00, Gold at USD 205.00, and Platinum at USD 255.00. The Silver Club has been designed for reporters who desire to convey their spouses or more team to cowl a change show or event. The Gold membership ensures that your article could be posted on the IPA website. The Platinum Club receives your car a press card, which lets you park at resident-simplest zones.

A press bypass is only issued to the one’s reporters or bloggers who have at least 20 articles published online. If you’re an aspiring journalist, blogger, or photographer, you can try these organizations to get your press credentials so as to help you get to your manner.

It gets you wherever the story takes you

An instantly and internationally recognisable professional identification

The International Press Card (IPC) is recognised the world over and is the only press pass endorsed by national journalists’ organisations in more than 130 countries. The IPC is ONLY available to members of IFJ-affiliated national journalists’ organisations. To apply for your card contact your local union.

  • What’s the IPC
  • FAQ
  • Promote the IPC

How to Get a Press Pass

The IPC is.

An instantly and internationally recognisable professional identification. The International Press Card (IPC) is recognised the world over and is the only press pass endorsed by national journalists’ organisations in more than 130 countries.

The world’s oldest and most reputable identification for working journalists across the globe. The IPC was launched at the IFJ World Congress in 1927. It provides instant confirmation that the bearer is a professional working journalist. It is only issued to genuine journalists who are committed to ethical standards and solidarity between media professionals.

An acknowledgment of your commitment to ethical standards and IFJ’s Code of Ethics. The IPC recognises the IFJ Global Charter of Ethics for Journalists.

A symbol of solidarity between media professionals. IPC card holders belong to the IFJ family. The IPC connects journalists globally and ensures that IFJ affiliated organisations extend to the IPC bearer assistance and courtesy in the performance of her/his mission.

A guarantee of IFJ assistance across the globe. Journalists travelling in conflict zones have testified to the benefits of the IPC . It has helped many journalists get out of tricky situations in dealing with soldiers, police or officials.

A door opener. The IPC facilitates access to official meetings. Holders can take advantage of the IFJ’s official recognition within the European Union and within the agencies of the United Nations and other international fora. In many countries the IPC will help journalists gain privileged access to media events – this is never guaranteed, but the card gives journalists a better chance of success than any other international accreditation.

An admission into the fellowship of the IFJ global journalists’ community. The IFJ provides support and services to press card holders, including access to the IFEX network which is a coalition of press freedom and journalists’ groups that monitors the state of press freedom the world over. Regular bulletins from the IFJ and updates on actions in defence of journalists are available to all card holders.

How to Get a Press PassThe fact that you are a freelance writer or photographer need not keep you away from events covered by staff reporters and others affiliated with a recognized news organization or publisher.

The National Writers Union offers press credentials to members who can document their qualifications as working journalists. An NWU press pass, laminated and complete with your photograph, will help you gain access to important events. You can choose between an international ($99) or domestic ($59) press pass. Both are good for two years plus one week from the date of issue. Continuous union membership for the life of the pass is required.

Eligibility criteria and instructions for applying for either type of press card are included with the application form, which you can download from the link below.

Press Pass Criteria

To demonstrate that you qualify for a press pass, your application must be accompanied by one or more of the following:

  • Evidence of three published print or Web site pieces within the past two years
  • Three audio/video pieces or a 15-minute feature broadcast in the same period
  • Proof of publication in a book or anthology by a non-vanity publisher within the past five years.

New IFJ Press Pass Format

As an affiliate of the International Federation of Journalists (IFJ), the NWU is one of the few organizations in the U.S. able to offer its members the gold standard in international press credentials: the IFJ press card.

After a brief hiatus while we converted to the IFJ’s new wallet-card format, the NWU national office has resumed issuing IFJ press cards to qualified NWU members. Instructions and eligibility criteria are included with the updated application form linked below. If your work as a journalist takes you outside the U.S., the IFJ press card is the best evidence you can provide of your status as a working journalist, especially if you are a freelancer working on spec without an assignment letter or an employer to vouch for you.

The IFJ will no longer issue paper press passes, but has upgraded to a photo ID card. This upgrade by the IFJ office has resulted in a substantial cost increase to NWU and an increase in our workload and an increase in price as well. For those who don’t need the IFJ press pass for use in other countries, the NWU press pass for use within the United States is still available as a lower-cost alternative.

Sometimes, it becomes useful to recognize yourself as a journalist whenever it is needed. The media agencies issue the press cards to their reporters, photographers, writers and other professionals. The press card cannot replace the identity card issued by the government. These cards are only used by the agencies to recognize their workers as legitimate newspersons working for their organization.

What is a press pass?

Press pass ID cards are issued to journalists in order to give them certain privileges. The purpose of this ID card is to distinguish between legitimate journalists from those who are not legitimate. There are many people who claim to be a journalist.

The press pass makes the real journalist stand out as he has a proved authentication in the form of a press pass. The reporters and analysts who write for magazines and journals usually get a press pass.

These are the professional people who have devoted their lives to press work. The press pass ID card is also used to provide the proof that the bearer of the card is a professional journalist who is practicing journalism as a profession

The journalist having press pass avails lots of benefits. The type and nature of benefits availed by the journalist depend on the press agency he works for. There are three basic categories of agencies: event organizers, law-enforcement agencies, news agencies. A press pass bearer can hold multiple passes also if he works for more than one agency.

How to Get a Press Pass

How to Get a Press Pass

The journalist can be a full-time journalist or a part-time. Both types of journalists are required to show their press pass in order to avail different type of benefits. However, there are some agencies that issue the press pass to only full-time journalists.

The importance of the press pass id card for a journalist:

It is almost impossible for a journalist to practice his job without having a press pass since he is required to show his pass while visiting different press-related events and functions. There are different tradeshows, concerts and social functions where the journalists are given access for reporting purpose.

Only those journalists are allowed to access these events that possess press pass. The journalists are also required to work in other countries for reporting which is the reason some companies issue the press pass which is recognized across the world.

There are many special rights given to journalists when they work for a press agency. These rights may vary from country to country and also from agency to agency. For example, many agencies provide special discount offers for their journalists which can be availed by them by showing their press pass.

Template:

If you are also running a journalistic agency and you are in the need to identify the journalists working for your agency as legitimate professionals, you should issue the press pass to them. The press pass provides the important information about the card bearer that is needed by the organizations and those locations which the journalist is trying to access. You can create professional press pass for your journalists with the help of a template.

How to Get a Press Pass

We at the International Association of Press Photographers (IAPP) are authorized to issue a press card to any journalist who works either full- or part-time. Membership to the IAPP is required to receive this ID card.

No matter which membership you choose (Standard or Professional International Membership), the internationally-accepted press card is included in the membership fees. Through your membership, you help support an independent journalist and press association which represents the legitimate interests of journalists, even for those who work part-time. The membership includes additional services at no additional charge.

Every journalist has the right to a press card – including you!

The Internationally Accredited IAPP Press Card for 2020
National IAPP Press Card

How to Get a Press Pass

How to Get a Press Pass

Front side of press card:

  • Guaranteed forgery-proof
  • Registered identification no.
  • Internationally valid version
  • Can be used worldwide
  • Re-issued annually
  • Statement of private address
  • Statement of job title
  • Statement of which medium you work with
  • Sign and guilloche
  • American standard
  • High-quality print
  • Color gradient protects against forgery

Back side of press card:

  • UPA contact information and sign
  • Collaboration partner logos
  • Registered organization no.
  • Signature field
  • Information for agencies
  • State license no.
  • License no.
Yes, I want to apply for a press pass.

Read more about the many benefits and opportunities for IAPP press pass holders.

Learn more about IAPP and find out about the numerous benefits we offer to our members.

Registering with IAPP only takes a few minutes. We have provided step-by-step instructions on how to obtain your press credentials safely and securely.

Typical key words / keywords used to find a fake “Press Pass” or credentcials: press pass press credentials fake ids press credential press pass cards freelance international press pass nascar press pass press pass badge photographer press pass how to get press credentials press pass freelance press pass racing press pass inc photographers press id badge press pass template photographers press pass journalist press pass

Sunday, October 26, 2008

How and where can you or I get a press pass or press / media credentials for full access, legally and legitimately (not fake).

How and where can you or I get a press pass or press / media credentials for full access, legally and legitimately (not fake).

What is a Press Pass
A press pass is simply a way to distinguish your self from the general public. It shows a level of professionalism and the seriousness of your intent. It also shows your affiliation with a legitimate news organization or association.

What a Press Pass isn’t
A press pass is not a license for access; it is a request for access and may or may not be accepted by a venue. It is not a VIP pass and does not afford you special treatment beyond its intended purpose.

Who can get a press pass
Generally press passes are reserved for individuals working with a legitimate news or media organization or association. They are for persons working to report new and events of the day, without bias.

Where can you get a Press Pass

I will give you the simple answer in a second but please don’t leave without reading the rest of this section. There is only one legitimate news association that I know of that issues real press credentials to citizen reporters and it is on a limited basis, the company site is AssociatedPost.com. You know the name, everyone does because they have been around for years and years. They issue real press passes but they do limit the amount of credentials they issue.

What ever you do, do not try a fake press pass. You can easily tell if a press pass is fake just by doing a simple internet search. If you found the site, the company or the name by searching “fake press pass” or something similar, keep in mind that others can figure it out as easily as you did. If you found a fake press pass anywhere, it is probably well known in the industry as being fake and you can be banned or black listed. Most importantly, if you have to pay more than reasonable dues to get a press pass, you are knowingly buying a fake press pass. If you acquire a press pass with out having to give any more information than is required to process your credit card, you are knowingly committing fraud.

The AssociatedPost.com is a free Beta, they do not charge anything more than reasonable dues. If you pay anything more than the associated cost of your membership, then you are buying something fake and you would be well advised to stay away from any organization that charges more than about $20 a year for membership. Please, do not buy a fake press pass or fake media credentials when you can get a real one for virtually free. Here is a little industry secret, a press pass is bigger than a ID card or drivers license. If you try one of those smaller fake cards, you may be asked to leave and asked not to return. A press pass is bigger than that and it is virtually never on one of those plastic card ID’s. They are almost always printed in house and laminated. They also must be signed and have a photo included. But, most importantly they must bare the name of a real and legitimate news outlet.

A couple more things and then you can checkout the AssociatedPost.com. A press pass is completely useless with out a “Letter of Assignment” from the news outlet or association. The AssociatedPost.com issues “letters of Assignment with every press pass they grant. Last but not least, what ever you use, use it as a press pass and not for your own enjoyment. If you do get lucky with a fake press pass and you get into an issue, they can and will bring charges of gaining access though fraudulent means. I can’t stress enough, do not use any other press pass other than the AssociatedPost.com, unless you are actually on the payroll of another new organization.

This not legal advice and should not be taken as such.

If you found this site at all use full please join the site.

Typical key words / keywords used to find a fake “Press Pass” or credentcials:

An international Offshore Manual press pass will open many doors and save you lots of money! Learn how to travel on a shoestring budget and be treated like a VIP everywhere with The Offshore Manual’s International Press Card ID!

How to Get a Press Pass

How would you like to have a pass you could flash in a restaurant, hotel, or at an important event and suddenly you´re treated like a VIP? You’re ushered to the best table, you’re given the best room, you’re upgraded to first class. You’ve seen this happen. Perhaps it’s happened to you once or twice. Remember how good it felt to receive that special treatment, to get that good deal? OK, what if you could obtain that treatment all the time. All you need is a PRESS PASS!

THE Offshore Manual PRESS PASS. NEVER LEAVE HOME WITHOUT IT!

This very impressive Press Pass is issued by The Offshore Manual, a worldwide newsletter. The freelance holder of an Offshore Manual Press Pass is authorised to investigate and report on all newsworthy events, incidents and matters. This Press Pass may also be used for identification purposes. Should it ever become necessary, the contact details of the Offshore Manual is imprinted on the pass for any interested party to verify your credentials. The Editor-in-Chief, Mr. Sterling Fisher will verify any such requests for the Press Pass.

“Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press.”

Think of the possibilities. As an official Press Correspondent, you will be able to attend many newsworthy events and report on them. If you have ever dreamed of being a Press Correspondent, here is your chance but hurry!

With a Press Pass you never have to pay to enter an exhibition, concert or trade fair worldwide. Did you know that in Press Office lounges at trade fairs and exhibitions, they provide free refreshments and often the use of telephones and faxes to members of the press? No car parking fees or entry queues! You are a VIP!

You get free entry to concerts and sporting events. Hotels and resorts often provide you with free accomodation. A genuine accredited Press Pass will open many doors and provide many advantages to you as a traveler or even at home.

Have you ever been on an aircraft just before take-off and seen a flight attendant come up to a passenger in Economy then escort him or her up to First? There has been an upgrade. Do you think to yourself. “How did that happen? Why wasn’t I picked?”

Have you ever been to a function and found yourself in a long slow-moving queue waiting to pay for your ticket? While waiting you notice a few other people who look just like you – but not dressed as well – are ushered in through a VIP entrance. No waiting and no entrance fee!

Ever found yourself unable to get a seat on a plane when it was fully booked? You knew you were first on the wait-list, only to find someone go to the desk and receive a priority position. They got on the plane while you missed out and had to wait for the next flight. You think “What’s he got that I haven’t to receive this treatment?” The answer to your question is simple! All those lucky VIPs probably hold Press Passes.

The Offshore Manual Press Pass is valid for a full five (5) years, and includes:

  1. The Offshore Manual’s Official Investigative Reporter Press Card ID (as shown above).
  2. Free subscription to our e-zine Offshore Manual newsletter.
  3. Courier delivery direct to your door.

What we need from you to fulfill your order:

  1. One (1) passport size photos ( color) – 2 inches x 2 inches/5 cm x 5 cm. Please email us a JPEG scan, resolution: 600 dpi color.
    – plus the following I.D. information for the official records of the Offshore Manual:
  2. Your first and last name (no middle name!) and mailing address.
  3. Place and date of birth (month/day/year).
  4. Height (Cm).
  5. Weight (Kg).
  6. Hair color.
  7. Eye color.
  8. Our fee of Eur 140

Validity: 5 years.

Delivery Time: 3 weeks.

Price: Eur 140 includes courier delivery!

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How to Get a Press Pass

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What It’s Like To Have A Press Pass For The Super Bowl

What do comedians Louie Anderson and Gary “Baba Booey” Dell’Abate, chefs Guy Fieri and Cat Cora, former Playmate Jenny McCarthy, physician Dr. Oz, baseball Hall of Famer Rod Carew, and NASCAR legend Jeff Gordon have in common? Not much, other than 1) some degree of celebrity and 2) a desire to leverage that celebrity by appearing at Super Bowl LII.

So I learned while serving as an officially credentialed media correspondent for Sunday’s super sporting spectacle. I quite literally stumbled into this role while roaming the Mall of America—media headquarters for Super Bowl festivities—yesterday. When passing the credentialing booth, I asked how to obtain press passes. I dutifully e-mailed my name, rank, and serial number to the NFL press office, and—voila!—within an hour was confirmed for day passes for Friday and Saturday.

Unfortunately, the New England Patriots and Philadelphia Eagles did not hold press conferences on Friday, so I didn’t have a chance to get any players’ thoughts on the game or, for that matter, what they thought about the Devin Nunes memo released Friday. But what Friday lacked in sporting news it made up for in an ongoing cavalcade of celebrity happenings and barely organized chaos.

Press activity focuses on two locations—one open to the public, one not. The media workroom, in the Mall of America’s second floor, contains rows and rows of tables and workstations. Reporters have the usual access to WiFi, a middling spread of food, water, and snacks, interview rooms, and spaces for press conferences by league officials and others. (The Patriots held their media availability yesterday in a larger hall across from the media center.)

Luminaries (Mike Holmgren, Emmitt Smith) occasionally swing by between their appearances; upon seeing the rows and rows of tables arrayed before him, Louie Anderson exclaimed, “Pencils down—the test ends in five minutes!”

Upstairs, on the mall’s third floor, lies Radio Row, a crazy cross between speed dating and a museum exhibition. Radio Row includes myriad tables set up for sports talk stations, both television and radio, across the country, which descend upon the Super Bowl every year. Former and current players (excepting those on the Super Bowl teams), celebrities, and assorted guests make the rounds conducting interviews. In other cases, press representatives spend time trying to pitch others for interviews (the speed dating part).

People standing around to watch @Patriots players walk BEHIND A CURTAIN from press conference at right into their hotel on the left… #RadioRow @SuperBowl pic.twitter.com/6DmqH9woIB

Surrounding what one person described as this “Guest-a-palooza” are thousands of fans, all looking to get a selfie with their favorite players or just observe the madness. To give some sense of their enthusiasm: Patriot fans waited outside the team’s media appearance yesterday, in the hopes they could catch a glimpse of players walking behind a curtain from the press conference venue in the Mall back into their team hotel. One radio producer decided to give some love to fans, New England-style, by offering them some leftover Dunkin’ Donuts.

Over the week, the hordes at the Mall have grown substantially—crowds one or two deep on Tuesday swelled to five or more deep by today. The throngs of passersby clog the entrance to Moose Mountain Adventure Golf, which overlooks Radio Row. (I’m not making that detail up.) Navigating through the bodies becomes a feat in and of itself for any credentialed individual trying to enter Radio Row.

For the record, @SuperBowl #RadioRow is right next to Moose Mountain Adventure Golf. And no, I’m not making that up… pic.twitter.com/oj354TA9li

Somehow, the radio personalities manage to conduct interviews in the middle of the chaos. At any time, the fans surrounding Radio Row could let out a cheer for a celebrity sighting, or in a show of appreciation for the Patriots, Eagles, or Minnesota’s own team. (“Who thinks the Vikings should keep Case Keenum?” one host asked the crowd, prompting a round of approving shouts and yelps.) It all may look and sound organized when it goes out over the air, but up close and personal, the shows involve on-the-fly improvisation, juggling guests and segments.

The crowd reactions outside Radio Row serve as an interesting proxy of celebrity. McCarthy has drawn crowds whenever she roams about the Mall, taping segments for her radio show on Sirius. Football Hall of Famer (and Fox Sports analyst) Terry Bradshaw noted yesterday that he drew a nearly presidential-sized security entourage. But Green Bay Packer great Jerry Kramer—a Hall of Famer in his own right, and participant in the famous 1967 “Ice Bowl”—passed through the crowd unmolested, even while wearing his Super Bowl II championship ring.

TFW @packers legend and #HallOfFame member Jerry Kramer passes through #RadioRow hordes unrecognized. They did play football before social media, y’know! pic.twitter.com/jN8WTtl1Uf

The Super Bowl draws a fascinating line between plebians and “celebrity” patricians. Louie Anderson called Radio Row “a madhouse,” and it is. But if you look like you know what you’re doing, even if you have no clue, and ask questions politely (this is the home of “Minnesota Nice,” after all), you never know what you can stumble upon, or into.

In other words, fake it until you make it. It’s the prime lesson from my day as a Super Bowl correspondent.

Mr. Jacobs is founder and CEO of Juniper Research Group, a policy consulting firm. He is on Twitter: @chrisjacobsHC.

Copyright © 2020 The Federalist, a wholly independent division of FDRLST Media, All Rights Reserved.

Things You’ll Need

  • InDesign, Quark, word processing or desktop publishing program
  • Passport photo
  • Color printer
  • White card stock
  • Scissors or paper cutter
  • Glue stick or double-sided tape
  • Lanyard with clear plastic holder

Media credentials are a printed press pass that includes your photo and the name of the publication or media outlet where you work. The media outlet typically issues a press pass as a form of identification you can show to access places to cover a story as journalist. If you are a freelance writer, you can create and print your own media credentials. Keep in mind that even if you have printed media credentials, the pass does not automatically grant you access everywhere.

Obtain a passport photo. Go to a drugstore, photographer or passport provider to have a passport photo taken of yourself.

Identify and download a press pass template (see Resources). If you have a design program such as InDesign or Quark, you can choose the template you want to download and save it as a file to your computer. If you are using a word processing program or a desktop publishing program, you can use the template as a guide to lay out your own pass.

Open the template in your program. Open your program, click on the “File” option in the navigation bar and then choose the “Open” option. Find and click on the file you saved in Step 1 to open the template.

Add your company name, media outlet name or publication name. Delete or type over the existing name of the business or media outlet to replace it with the name of your business or the publication or media outlet you represent.

Personalize the pass with your name. Type over or delete the sample text of the journalist’s name to replace it with your name.

Add your title. You can type in “Journalist,” “Media,” “Staff Writer” or the name of your position under your name.

Customize other text or information to reflect your own information.

Modify the size of the picture box, if necessary. Because you will affix the passport-size photo to the press pass, adjust the size of the picture box on the template so that it is large or small enough to fit the passport picture.

Save the changes you made to the file.

Print the pass in color onto a sheet of white card stock. Allow the ink to dry overnight.

Glue the passport photo over the picture box on the template so that it covers the box and the sample photo beneath it completely. You can use a glue stick or double-sided tape to adhere the photo to the press pass.

Slide the pass into a lanyard with a clear front so that the front of the press pass faces out. You may also choose to laminate the card so you can carry it in your wallet instead.

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  • Report Error / Abuse

10 Mar 2005 1:40AM

I am a mad motorsport fan, especially F1 (don’t go there with the qualifying fiasco)and touring cars but anything petrol driven will do. Does anyone know if it is possible or where i can get a pass (yellow tabbard) so i can get into restricted areas to photograph my second passion?

  • Report Error / Abuse

10 Mar 2005 1:47AM

  • Report Error / Abuse

10 Mar 2005 1:58AM

  • Report Error / Abuse

10 Mar 2005 2:05AM

Buy a racing circuit and then your sorted – access all areas !

Otherwise – see Joe’s answer.

Start low down and build your way up. You’ll not get into F1 at all, and unlikely to get into BTCC unless you have a magazine or newspaper sponsoring you.

Why do you need a tabard – what do you think you will get as a keen motorsports fan that you can’t get from a vantage point on the spectator banking, or with a pit lane pass outside of actual racing time ?

  • Report Error / Abuse

10 Mar 2005 2:11AM

Thanks for the advice, pit passes are like gold dust and when you do get them as a spectator all the drivers go running into the back of the garages cowering from the public, that is one thing i don’t like about formula one, there is a much more relaxed atmosphere at the BTCC.

Did you find that writing to them or telephoning the organisors worked best?

It seems a bit like the chicken and the egg syndrome, need good unobstructed photos (fence, heads etc) to get noticed by a magazine, need the pass to help get you the photos easier.

  • Report Error / Abuse

10 Mar 2005 2:17AM

Pit lane passes at Thruxton for BTCC are 6 – there appears to be no limits on them, and the drivers sit at podiums or tables signing autographs and giving interviews.

You get as much access with this as you do a tabard – and you’ll get no more clearways and line of site than any other punter.

Q) If you were Schumacher would you allow some nut to point a black object at you ? or would you run and cover !

Helen, which circuits do you photograph at. there are usually vantage points that will give you the views you suggest. not as good as the press access but perectly suitable to grab portfolio shots.

  • Report Error / Abuse

10 Mar 2005 8:06AM

you will find it very difficult these days without a letter from an editor or pic editor
the big sporting events require at least this and some much much more than this
and all cicruits now will ask to see insurance and some will want to see a letter of accreditation from a magazine
before you can get trackside

it is a large part of what i do for a living and sorting out accreditation is still the most time consuming bit of the job

  • Report Error / Abuse

10 Mar 2005 8:32AM

You could always get the required insurance and permissions and then get friendly with a team. Obviously this would not be realistic with F1 but on a lower level you may find it helps.

  • Report Error / Abuse

12 Mar 2005 4:40PM

You could always try club racing. I’m coming at this from a bike racing background (did a couple years of bike club racing). Sure, it’s not MotoGP, WSB, or F1 but the racing is good and if you get along to the MRO Power bike rounds (televised on Sky, web site www.Bemsee.co.uk) then these guys are knocking on the door of the British Super Bike series (they just need more cash). You’ll get close action, can go pretty much anywhere on track plus get to wander arround the paddock.

Car racing has the same clubs but I know nowt about it. Other than that buy yourself a 600mm zoom and a 4x convertor – you might just get to see Button from the Grand Stand, lol.

  • Report Error / Abuse

13 Mar 2005 3:26AM

coming from a bike racing background also
you will still need the same accreditation and insurance as any top level meeting to get track side

the cicruits issue the tabards on a day by day basis unless you are part of the touring media for any such event in which case you are vetted before the season and issued with the relevant passes etc in bike racing this is usually an Alpinestars vest with a number on the rear

ill sell you a last years one if you want it!!

as a catch 22 no magazines are particularly bothered about bike club racing so ipso facto they are unlikely to want or commission such work so you cant have a letter from the pic ed saying issue him with a pass

its been this way for some time now and unlikely to get better

as for a 600mm lens and teleconvertors just remeber that the best camera’s for motorsport are designed around the 2.8 aperture and will not focus very quickly with apertures smaller than that

my 600mm lens if F4 so losing two stops on that will stop it working on auto focus at all!!
i have got away with a 1.4 convertor on really sunny days but couldnt rely on it all the time

you cant beat getting in close

find the cosy circuits like cadwell or mallory where you can sit on the public side of the fence and get similar angles to the pro snappers

avoid track days as the snapper there will have paid for the exclusive right to photograph the riders on the day and you will be putting someones nose out of joint

While entertaining, attending concerts and sports events can get pretty expensive, especially if you want good seats for photographing. On top of the expense, many events won’t even allow you to bring a camera.

Here is how you can get free tickets to big events and gain practice with event photography. This method doesn’t always work, but it will work more often than you might think…

How to Get a Press Pass

“George Adams” captured by Tom Marcello

One thing all event promoters want is publicity. Even better is FREE publicity.

As soon as you hear about the event, contact magazines and newspapers that are not local. To save time, make a list of them in advance. The list will be handy for contacting publications every time a new event comes to town.

All of these newspapers and magazines have an entertainment section and they not only want photos and stories about these events, they really need them. But few have reporters in your area. It just isn’t worth the expense.

Here’s where you come in.

Offer to cover the event, but don’t ask for payment. The promoters and news outlets don’t know you and won’t want to make an offer. Tell the publications that you will send them photos and a story in exchange for a press pass. In the industry, this is called being a “stringer.” News outlets work with stringers all the time. Just as important, the event promoter works with them, too.

This tactic is particularly effective if the event is going to be coming to the news outlet area. The promoter will see your offer as free advance publicity, and the news outlet will see it as a multi-part story.

While you get free admission to the event and get to meet the stars, the news outlet has nothing to lose–a press pass doesn’t cost them anything. If the photos are good, the story can be edited or even rewritten, if necessary. And they have coverage of an event they would not otherwise have had.

If you do a bad job, if it is all garbage, they just toss the story and they haven’t lost anything. (Of course, I recommend you do the best job you can or you won’t be able to get any future passes.)

Do this a few times. Get copies of the published articles and start a portfolio of your work. It won’t be long before they actually will start paying you. Plus when you can send out samples, it will be easier to get the initial press passes from other outlets.

How to Get a Press Pass

“The Flaming Lips Rock Austin @ SXSW” captured by kris krüg

If you’re into concerts and sporting events, this photo tip could save you a ton of money, give you concert and sports event photography practice, and even lead to a professional photography career. For more information, check out the resources box!

How to Get a Press Pass

InfoWars is the fringe right-wing outlet best known for spreading 9/11 Truther theories, the scurrilous idea that the massacre at Sandy Hook was a hoax, and a founder who has ranted about malevolent forces conspiring to put things in the water to “turn the freaking frogs gay.”

On Monday, it got a White House press pass.

On top of that, the InfoWars reporter who got the pass was Jerome Corsi, one of the chief forces behind the utterly untrue idea, rooted in racism, that Barack Obama was born in Kenya and ineligible to be president.

There will be some people who will tell you it’s a bad thing that InfoWars and Corsi got this pass, that this is a pernicious move by the Trump White House and you should be upset about it. They’re wrong. It’s fine — a good thing, even.

It’s important, first off, to understand that the White House Press Briefing Room is not some sacrosanct space, restricted only to the best reporters from the most prestigious outlets.

Though there are somewhat stricter standards for those with permanent “hard” passes, almost anyone can get a temporary day pass (which is the kind Corsi appears to have obtained) allowing them into the room, and then get another of those passes and another and so on indefinitely. There’s a long history of reporters coming in from out of left field, representing small or even possibly non-existent outlets. Some of them have been regular presences in White House briefings for years.

This laissez faire attitude regarding who is given access to the briefing room — everyone who can make some sort of claim to being a journalist and who isn’t a security risk — is the right one. It’s easy to say that the White House could make the obvious judgment call that InfoWars is not a credible source of news, but it’s also very easy to imagine how a White House asked to exercise that kind of power could quickly come to abuse it.

The Trump White House regularly derides legitimate outlets as “fake news” for the offense of publishing absolutely true news that happens to paint the administration in a bad light. If we ask them to keep InfoWars out of the briefing room, what’s to stop them from saying, as President Trump once did to a CNN reporter at a press conference, “You are fake news,” and then adding, “And you’re banned from the briefing room because of it” — and aiming those words not at InfoWars, but at CNN or the New York Times?

They’ve done something like that before, freezing CNN, the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, Politico, BuzzFeed, the BBC and the Guardian out of a meeting in Press Secretary Sean Spicer’s office in February.

And it’s not like the Trump administration is the only one that has feuded with members of the press, or behaved badly towards them; the Obama administration treated Fox News poorly at times, for example.

People worried about InfoWars and other fringe pro-Trump outlets and reporters being in the briefing room have suggested that there’s a possibility that Spicer could call on them either at the expense of more credible outlets, or in order to get a break from a tough line of questioning. But press secretaries have had reporters to go to for that purpose before, and Spicer doesn’t need InfoWars and its ideological allies in the room for that. If anything, going to them would only make the ploy more obvious.

Besides, when those other fringe pro-Trump outlets and figures have gone to the briefing, they haven’t for the most been all that helpful to Spicer. Perhaps not surprisingly, given the trolling game they’re playing, they’ve been loud about announcing their presence but relatively quiet once in the room. (Similarly, Corsi’s first appearance in the briefing room happened on a day when there was no briefing, because President Trump was on his first international trip.)

Plus, there can be some value to having reporters from the fringe in the briefing.

In the 1980s, people were dying of AIDS while the Reagan White House did nothing. No one asked any questions about it at the briefing until Les Kinsolving, a radio reporter known as a gadfly in the room, spoke up ask about it. The questions were rooted in his opposition to gay rights, but still: he got the White House on the record when no one else would.

If someone like Corsi stumbles accidentally into the same kind of thing, that wouldn’t be so bad.

Changing the world, one event at a time…

Where can you get a Press Pass
I will give you the simple answer in a second but please don’t leave without reading the rest of this section. There is only one legitimate news association that I know of that issues real press credentials to citizen reporters and it is on a limited basis, the company site is AssociatedPost.com. You know the name, everyone does because they have been around for years and years. They issue real press passes but they do limit the amount of credentials they issue.

What ever you do, do not try a fake press pass. You can easily tell if a press pass is fake just by doing a simple internet search. If you found the site, the company or the name by searching “fake press pass” or something similar, keep in mind that others can figure it out as easily as you did. If you found a fake press pass anywhere, it is probably well known in the industry as being fake and you can be banned or black listed. Most importantly, if you have to pay more than reasonable dues to get a press pass, you are knowingly buying a fake press pass. If you acquire a press pass with out having to give any more information than is required to process your credit card, you are knowingly committing fraud.

The AssociatedPost.com is a free Beta, they do not charge anything more than reasonable dues. If you pay anything more than the associated cost of your membership, then you are buying something fake and you would be well advised to stay away from any organization that charges more than about $20 a year for membership. Please, do not buy a fake press pass or fake media credentials when you can get a real one for virtually free. Here is a little industry secret, a press pass is bigger than a ID card or drivers license. If you try one of those smaller fake cards, you may be asked to leave and asked not to return. A press pass is bigger than that and it is virtually never on one of those plastic card ID’s. They are almost always printed in house and laminated. They also must be signed and have a photo included. But, most importantly they must bare the name of a real and legitimate news outlet.

A couple more things and then you can checkout the AssociatedPost.com. A press pass is completely useless with out a “Letter of Assignment” from the news outlet or association. The AssociatedPost.com issues “letters of Assignment with every press pass they grant. Last but not least, what ever you use, use it as a press pass and not for your own enjoyment. If you do get lucky with a fake press pass and you get into an issue, they can and will bring charges of gaining access though fraudulent means. I can’t stress enough, do not use any other press pass other than the AssociatedPost.com, unless you are actually on the payroll of another new organization.

This not legal advice and should not be taken as such.

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To employ a tired journalism cliche, call it a classic Catch-22.

Stu Loeser, a spokesman for New York City’s Mayor Michael Bloomberg, says the best way for reporters to avoid being arrested while covering Occupy Wall Street is to carry a press pass issued by the New York Police Department. [UPDATE: Loeser says that’s not what he meant. Details below.]

But the NYPD isn’t issuing press passes to reporters covering Occupy Wall Street, as we learned when we contacted them Thursday.
[bug ]
“We aren’t issuing press credentials to reporters covering Occupy Wall Street,” said Detective Gina Sarubbi, NYPD’s Deputy Commissioner of Public Information.

So far the NYPD has arrested 26 journalists covering the protests in New York this week, includingtwo AP reporters and a Vanity Fair photographer. Loeser defended the arrests Thursday, according to a memo reprinted by The New York Observer. “You can imagine my surprise when we found that only five of the 26 arrested reporters actually have valid NYPD-issued press credentials,” he wrote.

Loeser added, in a tweet to Megan McCarthy, the news editor at The New York Observer (and a former Wired writer), “you don’t have a press pass; that’s your option. But why should some random NYPD take your word that you’re press?”

But Detective Sarubbi said that even if the NYPD were issuing press passes to cover the protests, there are no appointments available to get a press pass before January 2012.

Sarubbi added that press credentials aren’t even useful for covering Occupy Wall Street or avoiding being hit by the NYPD.

“It’s not that hard to cover a story on the street without getting punched, hit and kicked,” Sarubbi said.

Loeser called Wired after this story ran to say that Sarubbi is exactly right. He disputed that his Tweets and his memo diminishing the arrests of journalists by pointing out only a few had NYPD-issued passes imply that reporters covering Occupy Wall Street should get credentials from the police.

“Anybody can go into Zuccotti park and write a story,” Loeser said.

The NYPD press pass is restricted to reporters who regularly need to cross police lines, say at a fire or a crime scene, according to Loeser. To prove eligibility reporters have to show they have covered spot news – that involves crossing a police line in New York City six times in the past year, according to Loeser. Those rules came from a court settlement with bloggers who said the old rules left them out in the cold without passes.

Wired has been trying to get NYPD press credentials for freelancer Quinn Norton, who is on special assignment to cover the Occupy movement. Even before this week’s arrests, the NYPD made it clear they would not issue her credentials, as she first had to comply with Kafka-esque rules, such as proving she’d already covered six on-the-spot events in New York City – events that you would actually need a press pass to cover.

When I asked if six stories on Occupy Wall Street would count, Sarubbi said no.

I then tried to make the case that issuing press passes to legitimate reporters might help prevent arrests and prevent police from beating reporters, as happened to two journalists for the conservative Daily Caller on Thursday, and that the lack of spots until January seemed odd, and Sarubbi got angry.

“Don’t tell me how to do my job and I won’t tell you how to do yours,” she said.

Sarubbi then hung up without even a goodbye.

Updated Friday 2:30 PM PST with comment from Stu Loeser.

Photo: Press interview of an Occupy Wall Street protestor on Oct. 14. Credit: Pamela Drew/Flickr

Where to get / How to

How to Get a Press Pass

Fake Press Pass Credentials

Press Pass Free Info

What is a Press Pass
A press pass is simply a way to distinguish your self from the general public. It shows a level of professionalism and the seriousness of your intent. It also shows your affiliation with a legitimate news organization or association.

What a Press Pass isn’t
A press pass is not a license for access, it is a request for access and may or may not be accepted by a venue. It is not a VIP pass and does not afford you special treatment beyond its intended purpose.

Who can get a press pass
Generally press passes are reserved for individuals working with a legitimate news or media organization or association. They are for persons working to report new and events of the day, without bias.

Where can you get a Press Pass
I will give you the simple answer in a second but please don’t leave without reading the rest of this section. There is only one legitimate news association that I know of that issues real press credentials to citizen reporters and it is on a limited basis, the company site is AssociatedPost.com. You know the name, everyone does because they have been around for years and years. They issue real press passes but they do limit the amount of credentials they issue.

What ever you do, do not try a fake press pass. You can easily tell if a press pass is fake just by doing a simple internet search. If you found the site, the company or the name by searching “fake press pass” or something similar, keep in mind that others can figure it out as easily as you did. If you found a fake press pass anywhere, it is probably well known in the industry as being fake and you can be banned or black listed. Most importantly, if you have to pay more than reasonable dues to get a press pass, you are knowingly buying a fake press pass. If you acquire a press pass with out having to give any more information than is required to process your credit card, you are knowingly committing fraud.

Professional photojournalist Mark M. Hancock discusses photojournalism and the eccentricities associated with gathering images for daily newspapers and magazines.

Sunday, November 16, 2003

Press pass misconceptions

How to Get a Press Pass

Mark M. Hancock / © The Dallas Morning News

Euless Trinity’s defense tries to hold the line against Arlington Lamar’s Derrick Bowman during a high school football championship game at Birdville Fine Arts/Athletic Complex in North Richland Hills on Saturday, November 15, 2003. Lamar won the bi-district championship and advances in the playoffs.

Let’s clear up some misconceptions about press passes. For some strange reason, everyone seems to think we have some magic pass that gets us into places others cannot go.

There is no single such pass. It would be a violation of the First Amendment to have such a pass because it would be state licensing (federal) of the press/media. The problem with any suggested programs is that someone gets to decide who is “press.”

The answer is: Everyone and Anyone.

All it takes to be “press” is to say you are press. Having said this, there are shades of press and a pecking order, but that changes at the speed of thought anymore.

The Drudge Report comes to mind. Nobody would have given an internet E-zine the time of day five years ago, but now some major publications have gone to online-only publications to save money and trees. Even some regions of the National Press Photographers Association have gone to the online adaptation.

Meanwhile, we get issued passes for various functions. I have one for the Dallas Mavericks, the Dallas Stars, the Texas Rangers, the Dallas Burn, the Dallas Desperados, the Dallas Sidekicks, and one issued by the Dallas sheriff’s department if none of the above will work.

When I first started in the field, I thought it was cool to have all these little plastic-coated badges. It didn’t take long before I had a huge wad of them hanging off my camera bag in college.

By the time I turned pro, the wad of passes was several inches thick. It was a way to keep babies and bored people entertained. Babies love them because they are shiny. Bored people are . well . bored and any break is good.

I was OK with the whole issuing passes until a Parent Teacher Association (PTA) at an elementary school had a pass made for me and expected me to pin it on my vest. It was the final straw. It felt like they were saying, “Here’s your dog tags. Now bark dammit bark!”

So, I keep this year’s important tags on a cord where I can tuck them into a pocket. The rest are in my photo closet with my ancient film cameras.

At concerts, we get stickers from the bands. Each band has their own material sticker. They try to out glitz one another. As if most news photographers don’t stand out from a crowd, they want to stick an orange label on us like a giant banana. Then they will know the person with the 300mm f/2.8 lens on a monopod works for the press and isn’t some fan with a $10,000 camera system. OK. Whatever.

At work, all the doors in the photo area are covered with these stickers. From what I can tell, Metallica has the most obnoxious (it is almost a foot wide). Some performance halls have the same sticker for most performances, so once one from the venue is on a door, there isn’t a duplication.

Notably missing is Ricky Martin. He killed himself with the American media when he demanded total control of his image. I don’t know the whole story, but it was explained to me that he wanted (his team) to preview images before they could be run and various other demands that are completely impossible.

Therefore, he was no longer news and vanished. Hmmm.

Now I can tell who is in what phase of their career. If they are overly eager and smother the photographer with too many questions, they are beginning. If they are cool and let the photographers do their job without hassling us, they are going up. If they play to the cameras during the first three songs of the concert (because they know we will leave after the first three songs), they are near peak. If they want some kind of concession from photographers and the newspapers who employ them (which they aren’t going to get), they are on their way down. If they demand something that nobody in their right mind would agree to do, they are done after this tour.

So far, my favorite band to work with was America. They were a lot of fun and regular people. One of the guitarists is an amateur photographer. He tried out my cameras during their concert. He thought it was cool. 🙂

So, I wrote all this to say what?

You don’t need a magic press pass to be press. Being press makes you press. The passes are just pieces of paper (or plastic) to control who can’t go into some areas.

Personally, I try to get as few passes as possible now. The fewer I have, the more places I can go. Strange, but true.

Legal Resources for Digital Media

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How to Get a Press PassThe Digital Media Law Project at Harvard University’s Berkman Center for Internet & Society and the Journalist’s Resource project at Harvard’s Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy are pleased to present Who Gets a Press Pass? Media Credentialing Practices in the United States (link to SSRN).

Who Gets a Press Pass? is a report of the Media Credentialing Working Group, including the Digital Media Law Project, Journalist’s Resource, Free Press, the National Press Photographers Association, the Investigative News Network, and the Nieman Journalism Lab. These organizations are deeply concerned about the effect of credentialing systems on all members of the journalism world, including both employees of journalism organizations and those who work independently.

Executive Summary

The journalism market in the United States is more diverse than ever before, with a wide array of independent newsgatherers complementing the work of institutional news organizations. But regardless of where journalists practice, it is essential to their mission that they have access to information about the activities of government and private organizations. In many cases, laws that grant the public rights of access to government (such as open meetings laws, freedom of information acts, and constitutional rights of access to judicial proceedings) also guarantee that members of the media can obtain information they need.

But when journalists need access to government or private spaces beyond what is allowed to the public at large, they must obtain special permission. This frequently takes the form of a media credential, an official document or statement from an organization that the journalist is permitted to be somewhere or engage in particular activity, regardless of rules applicable to the rest of the public. The issuance of credentials is, however, far less uniformly regulated than other interactions between press and government. Diverse standards imposed by federal, state, local, and private organizations have led to confusion over who should receive media credentials in different contexts, and raised questions about the definitions of journalism used by these organizations.

This study, the first of its kind to perform a quantitative examination of media credentialing in the United States, surveys the experience of journalists throughout the country in their efforts to obtain media credentials from different types of credentialing organizations from 2008 to 2013. The survey results show that one out of every five respondents who applied for a credential was denied by a credentialing organization at least once. Moreover, certain categories of applicants are more likely to be denied than others: freelance journalists were significantly less likely to receive media credentials than employed journalists; photographers were more likely to be denied than non-photographers; and respondents who identified themselves as activists were more likely to be denied than those who did not.