Categories
Self-organization

How to hack your social media skills to make bank

How to hack your social media skills to make bank

  • Share
  • Pin it
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Email

Ever find yourself helping a neighbor build a Facebook page? Or talking to a friend about how Pinterest could drive potential customers to her website? Or showing a former colleague how to use Twitter to connect with influential people?

I was hiking in the woods with a friend several years ago, helping him brainstorm how to use social media to find clients for his adventure expeditions, when he suggested I start using those smarts to make bank. He suggested I let people hire me to help them the same way I was helping him.

My first reaction was to balk. “I don’t know enough about social media to do that,” I told him.

“Are you kidding?” he responded. “Everything you’ve told me is worth paying for.”

The next month I landed my first client, and my business has snowballed since then.

That friendly chat — and the success that followed — helped me realize something big: that I do have something to offer that’s worth paying for. Sometimes when your knowledge seems familiar and normal, you don’t recognize it as an asset. You think everyone has those same skills.

But if you’re good at something, there’s probably someone out there who’s not good at it, who needs it, and who’s willing to pay for it. Moreover, there are a whole lot of people, organizations, and companies that need help with social media.

If you have social media skills, that’s where your opportunity comes in.

Now, you don’t want to be one of those gurus or ninjas who claim they’re in-the-know about social media and then haven’t the faintest idea how to grow an online community. But if you’re like most people, you likely have the opposite problem; you probably underestimate yourself and your skills.

If you think you’re almost to the point where you could take on social media freelance work but don’t quite feel comfortable yet, here are a few things you can do to take your confidence and savvy to the next level:

Work for free to gain experience

By the time I had that conversation with my friend in the woods, I’d already helped an organization spread the word about their cause on Twitter. I did this because I wanted to help the movement, not because I wanted to gain experience. However, in retrospect, that work helped me gain the knowledge — and recommendations — I needed to land paid work.

So who can you lend a hand to? Who can you help? How can you turn that opportunity into a way to learn?

The best part is no one will ever know you didn’t get paid. Experience is experience, and connections are connections. Whether you got paid for that work is irrelevant, so leave out that detail when you interview for your first paid position.

If you can’t find a company or individual to let you work for them — or maybe you don’t even feel comfortable doing that yet — practice with your own accounts. One friend of mine even has a Facebook account for her cat (apparently there’s an underground culture of cats on Facebook?) that she uses to test new ideas on the platform.

Brush up on your skills through a course

In addition to learning by doing, you can master social media through more formal instruction. You’ll find lots of social media courses online, each with its own focus. I often several on my own site, including a guide on how to create a social media strategy and a five-week course that will help you become a Twitter Power User.

Again, you can learn this stuff for free, so don’t feel like you have to take a course! But some people learn faster and more thoroughly with more structure and guidance.

Mimic the best

One way to teach yourself is to find a handful of Facebook pages or Twitter feeds or Pinterest accounts that are hitting it out of the park, and study their tactics.

Create a Twitter list of companies, non-profits, or individuals who effectively use the platform to grow their following. Alternatively, put together a list of Facebook pages that do a stand-up job of interacting with fans.

By simply watching what successful people do, you’ll learn more than you could imagine.

Push yourself to get started

The timing will never feel right. You’ll always wish you knew more, had more experience, and had more contacts. However, if you wait until every single piece is in place before diving in, you’ll never get started.

Not sure how much to charge? This post on fees for social media freelance work will help you figure that out.)

Once you do get started, you’ll learn as you go along. You’ll hit an obstacle you haven’t hit before, and you’ll figure it out. A client will request something you don’t know how to do, and you’ll teach yourself that skill out of necessity.

Learning as you go along doesn’t mean you’re a scam, it means you’re smart. Being able to do that is essential, especially in a field like social media that morphs regularly.

Because Facebook will make a tweak that requires you to build a page in a totally different way. Twitter will introduce a feature that changes the game completely. And some new social media tool will pop up (monthly, weekly, even daily) that you’ll have to evaluate — and decide whether it’s worth using. You’ll be forced to learn as you go along no matter how much knowledge you start out with.

So what are you waiting for? Get out here and make some moolah from your skills.

Featured photo credit: Euro bills in a blue jeans pocket via Shutterstock

How to hack your social media skills to make bank

These days, Social Media have become a significant need in our everyday life. It encourages us to associate and connect with anyone over the world. We share our day to day routine, private life, and our financial details with our followers. That is the reason; malicious hackers pick social media platform for hacking because they get every single aspect of an individual without any problem.

We are living in an era where technological advancements are rapidly flourishing, despite people having non-technical backgrounds are unable to pay attention to how to secure their data from malicious hackers. Around the world, there are currently 2.8 million cybersecurity professionals who have complete knowledge of malicious hacking and how to prevent it. Unfortunately, that is a minimal number related to how many people are using social media, giving their day to day information on these platforms, which are prone to cyber-attacks.

Table of Contents

How Hacker Accesses Your Social Media Account

In this article, I will explain each tactic of a malicious hacker so that you will get an idea of how these hackers can hack social media accounts. These are the most common attacks a hacker can perform:

Man in the Middle Attack

How to hack your social media skills to make bank

This type of attack occurs when a hacker privately steals and alters the communication between the sender and receiver. A user may think he is communicating with a legitimate user, but actually, all the conversation is passing through hacker, and he possibly alters their communication without their knowledge.

For this purpose, BurpSuite is the commonly used tool by hackers to perform a man in the middle attack. By using this tool, hackers can intercept between the machine and a server, captures the request that is generated by machine to the server, and alters it by requesting another thing from the server.

Prevention

Always use a good antivirus with a firewall that can detect the fake user. Besides, use VPN and Proxy server to access the network.

Phishing Attack

How to hack your social media skills to make bank

Phishing is the most common yet most effective tactic used by hackers to fool people and steal their information. In this attack, a hacker will make a fake social media login page that looks legitimate and share it with victims to get login from a fake site. When a victim enters its credentials, it directly redirects to the hacker’s machine. This is the most effective technique because many users can not differentiate between the real and fake sites’ login pages and get fooled by giving their credentials. This attack requires persistence and excellent skills for making the victim login from your duplicate fake page.

Prevention

Double-check the URL before entering your credentials or any personal information. Moreover, do not log in through messages and emails.

DNS Spoofing/ Cache Poisoning Attack

How to hack your social media skills to make bank

DNS Spoofing is a type of malicious attack wherein a user is forced to navigate to a fake website page disguised to look like a legitimate one, divert traffic or steal credentials of the users.

Attackers can poison a DNS cache by manipulating DNS resolvers into caching false information, with the result that the resolver sends the wrong IP address to users, and users attempting to navigate to a website will be directed to the wrong place.

Spoofing attacks can go on for a long period without being detected and can cause severe security issues.

Prevention

Learn to manage your DNS server and firewall securely.

Cookie Hijacking

How to hack your social media skills to make bank

This attack generated by saved cookies from your browser. When the user login an online account i.e. Facebook or Twitter account, the server returns a session cookie, which is a piece of data that indicates the user to the server and provides them access to their account. Given that the user’s device holds on to that session token, the server will allow them to use the application.

When a user signs out of an application, the server immediately invalidates the session token, and all further access to the account requires the user to submit their login credentials again.

A hacker steals the session token and, with the help of this token, access the user’s account. The token can be hijacked by inflicting the user’s device with malware that monitors and steals session data. Another method can be used to hijack the session i.e., cross-site scripting attack in which hacker uploads a malicious code into a webpage that the user frequently visits and forces the user’s computer to send the session cookie data to the server.

Prevention

Clean your cookies from browsers in every 4-5 days and never use public wifi.

Keylogging

How to hack your social media skills to make bank

Another most straightforward way to hack social media is keylogging. There is a software named “key logger” that is made by hackers to trace out the pattern of the keys of keyboard typed by the user. After that, it immediately generates a file of that key pattern and sends it to the hacker’s computer through the internet. With this technique, a hacker can compromise even computer experts because this can be downloaded from anywhere.

Keyloggers can be installed by a social engineering attack when a user clicks on a link or opens an attachment/file from a phishing mail.

Keyloggers can also be installed through the webpage script. This is done by exploiting a vulnerable browser, and the keylogger is launched when the user visits the malicious site.

Prevention

Always download software from trusted sites only and avoid opening phishing emails.

This article explains how hackers compromise your social media accounts (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, etc.) and how to prevent these attacks by applying simple security measures. The most common techniques used by hackers are discussed above. I hope you are now well aware of these techniques and have learned how to keep yourself safe.

What if I told you, I am gonna teach you how to hack a Social Media account in this article?🤫 Trust me, we will learn Social Media Hacking today. But hey, first let’s look at the Agenda…

Agenda – Aim of this article is to make you aware of how this works in real life so that you prevent yourself and your friends from this hack. That means, this is for the educational purpose only, and be ethical😉

Before we start, Let’s look at what Hacking is.

How to hack your social media skills to make bank

What is Hacking?

Hacking refers to exploiting system vulnerabilities and compromising security controls to gain unauthorized or inappropriate access to the system resources. Hackers are individuals with excellent computer skills, with the ability to create, explore, and exploit the computer’s software and hardware. The intention can be either to gain knowledge or to poke around to do illegal things.

What is Ethical Hacking?

It involves the use of hacking tools, tricks, and techniques to identify vulnerabilities so as to ensure system security. Ethical Hacker performs security assessments of their organization with the permission of concerned authorities.

That said, now let’s move ahead and let’s talk about Social Engineering.

What is Social Engineering?

Social engineering is the art of manipulating people so they give up confidential information.

The types of information these attackers are seeking can vary, but when individuals are targeted the attackers are usually trying to trick you into giving them your passwords or bank information, or access your computer to secretly install malicious software–that will give them access to your passwords and bank information as well as giving them control over your computer.

So, we can conclude that it is one of the most dangerous hacking attacks. Someone can just trick you to give your information and Boom!🎇

Now, let’s talk about Phishing.

Phishing is a type of social engineering attack often used to steal user data, including login credentials and credit card numbers.

It occurs when an attacker, masquerading as a trusted entity, dupes a victim into opening an email, instant message, or text message.

We will be using this technique called Phishing to learn about Social Media Hacking. So, let’s keep the theory things aside, and dive into the practical and let the hacks begin ☠

  • You will need Virtual Box downloaded in your machine
  • You will need Kali Linux installed in your Virtual Box so that you can use tons of tools that are provided in Kali Linux for hackers.

Once you have Kali Linux installed in your system, we are ready to roll…

We will be using a Kali tool called Shellphish — Shellphish is one of the most amazing tools to perform Phishing. Shellphish offers predefined 15+ templates of the majority of social media and email providers.

So, let’s get started, it is pretty simple to work with once you have access to Kali Linux.

Step 1 – Installing ShellPhish

Downloading and installing shellphish is pretty simple. Just hit the below command in your Kali Linux terminal,

Step 2 – Giving Permission

Once you have downloaded and installed Shellphish, to use it, you will need permission to use this.

Using the terminal, move to the folder where you installed this tool,

Next, you will need to use the command ‘ls’ that will list out all the directories in that folder.

Step 3 – Running the tool

Once you have listed all the directories, you will need to run the file called,

This can be done in the following way,

This will start the tool that will look something like below,

How to hack your social media skills to make bank

As you can see, there are 20+ options that you can use. So, let’s try and hack Instagram.

Step 4 – Launching the attack

We just need to type the number corresponding to the template. Let’s say we need to use Instagram, so on the command line, we will hit command,

This will result in something like below,

How to hack your social media skills to make bank

As we can see, we have got a link, we need to send this link to the victim and trick them into opening the link and entering the credentials. Here your Social Engg. skills come into action. Once the victim opens the link, they will be able to see a page that will look exactly like the Instagram login page, and this will earn their trust. Once they have entered the credentials, HACKED! You will be able to see their username and password on your Kali Linux terminal. The victim will be now redirected to the original Instagram page.

This is how Social Media Hacking works and this is what Phishing is… This is how most of the time, people get tricked into giving up their own personal information. Thus one should always be careful while opening the link and checking whether the site is legitimate or a clone.

Let us know below in the comment if you have ever come across this hack. Help your friends and family and be ethical. That’s it for this article. 😀

Long gone are the days when hacking was associated with only illegitimate or illegal activities. Today, it is not just used by the dark organizations but also by legal officials who lend their skills for ethical hacking purposes.

From hacking mobile apps, websites to skilled hackers offering their services, hacking is easily accessible to the common people. So, if you have been looking for ways to spy on someone’s cell phone activities, you can easily hire professionals for the same.

But how to find reliable and trusted hackers to be able to hack and monitor someone’s activities?

Who are hackers for hire?

Quite a lot of people look up to hacking activities as they wish you gain access to information that they are curious about. Especially people who are suspicious of their loved ones and want to monitor their activities to keep an eye on them secretly.

You must be aware of groups of hackers breaking their way into systems of national importance. However, unlike them, hackers for hire are available to hack cell-phones, emails, social media, and other applications too.

While computer hacking and mobile hacking have a lot in common, but it bears a lot of risks. Thus, only professional hackers with commendable skills can be trusted for the same. But why must you hire a hacker when there are innumerous spy apps available?

Well, surely the internet is bursting with spy apps that claim to hack devices secretly and in no time. However, they require getting hold of the target device for putting a bug or a host app on it. Only then it can provide you with reliable information remotely.

Given the risks and prerequisites of using spy apps, hiring hackers is the best available option for spying discreetly.

Can you hire hackers to hack social media accounts?

Yes! You can certainly hire hackers to hack social media accounts and retrieve your accounts that you are unable to access. Here are some of the things that a social media hacker can do for you:

  1. Intercepting texts and messages

One of the most basic things that a social media hacker can do is intercepting the texts of the target and relaying them to you. This allows you to keep track of all the conversations and dig the details into the matters of concern.

By using Key Logging techniques, a hacker can easily record all the keys entered by the target. Thus, every message exchanged by the target can be intercepted and retrieved.

  1. Fetching passwords

Another basic hacking skill is Phishing. It is the process of setting a trap for the target user by creating a phishing site to capture passwords. It can be a fake message leading the target to open a fake login site that is designed to capture the credentials of the user.

This will directly fetch you the IDs and Passwords of the user, which you can use to login and access the target’s accounts.

  1. Infiltrating accounts

There can be a case when someone illegitimately makes your fake social media account and imposes to be you. Such situations might require seizing control over that social media account and the content being sharing.

For this, social media hackers can be hired to gain access to the fake account, managing the private messages, and revealing the culprit. While these hackers mostly do not reveal their techniques, but a proficient hacker can be relied upon for it.

  1. Other services

Other than these, they can hack email accounts, hijack web-sessions and private messages too. Sending denial of services errors, extracting personal details/credentials for gaining access to accounts by other means are also carried out by them.

However, it mainly depends on their ethical policies and the services they offer. A ‘white hat’ hacker will have stricter policies aligned to ethics, while a dark web hacker w ill be much flexible to your needs.

Social media hackers that you can trust to hire

There are countless social media sites available on the internet that people make use of. However, the highest hacking demands are for accounts of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Whatsapp, etc. To gain access to social media sites, you must hire the right hacker.

To help you with the same, here is a list of the most reliable hackers available for hire:

  • Hack Wizards
  • Hack Elites
  • Professional hackers services
  • Hire a hacker services
  • Anongroup7
  • Database hacker

As hacking can sometimes land you in trouble, it is best to hire hackers who are well known for their professionalism and efficiency. You must understand and state the needs that you want to be addressed and count on them for quality output.

While the demand for hackers for hire is increasing, so is the number of scammers as well. So, you must beware of scammers and do not risk your privacy and security until you are completely sure of their credibility. Now that you have adequate information about hiring hackers for social media go on and hire the best for you!

Update: If you think this technique is old and can not be used to hack your social media, bank or any online accounts, then you are mistaken. A real-world SS7 attack has been spotted this month when some unknown hackers exploited the design flaws in the Signaling System 7 (SS7) to drain victims’ bank accounts.

Hacking Facebook account is one of the major queries on the Internet today. It’s hard to find — how to hack Facebook account, but researchers have just proven by taking control of a Facebook account with only the target’s phone number and some hacking skills.

Yes, your Facebook account can be hacked, no matter how strong your password is or how much extra security measures you have taken. No joke!

Hackers with skills to exploit the SS7 network can hack your Facebook account. All they need is your phone number.

The weaknesses in the part of global telecom network SS7 not only let hackers and spy agencies listen to personal phone calls and intercept SMSes on a potentially massive scale but also let them hijack social media accounts to which you have provided your phone number.

All they need is the target’s phone number and some details of the target’s device to initiate the silent snooping.

The researchers from Positive Technologies, who recently showed how they could hijack WhatsAppand Telegram accounts, now gave the demonstration of the Facebook hack using similar tricks, Forbes reported.

SS7 has long been known to be vulnerable, despite the most advanced encryption used by cellular networks. The designing flaws in SS7 have been in circulation since 2014 when the team of researchers at German Security Research Labs alerted the world to it.

Here’s How to Hack Any Facebook Account:

The attacker first needs to click on the “Forgot account?” link on the Facebook.com homepage. Now, when asked for a phone number or email address linked to the target account, the hacker needs to provide the legitimate phone number.

The attacker then diverts the SMS containing a one-time passcode (OTP) to their own computer or phone, and can login to the target’s Facebook account.

Although the network operators are unable to patch the hole sometime soon, there is little the smartphone users can do.

  • Do not link your phone number to social media sites, rather rely solely on emails to recover your Facebook or other social media accounts.
  • Use two-factor authentication that does not use SMS texts for receiving codes.
  • Use communication apps that offer “end-to-end encryption” to encrypt your data before it leaves your smartphone over your phone’s standard calling feature.

How to hack your social media skills to make bank

How to hack your social media skills to make bank

Story by

George Beall

How to hack your social media skills to make bank

Story by

George Beall

Hackers think social media is the best thing ever. Not only has it attracted longtime hackers, but it has also created new ones. It’s just so easy! Individual social media platforms have been hackable since their introduction. But, believe it or not, social media was a small net at one time. Now that social media platforms have multiplied and attracted hundreds of millions to their universe, they’re inviting hacking attacks.

The problems that exist

According to a 2016 study by The University of Phoenix, 84 percent of U.S. adults claim to have at least one social media account and, “as the prominence of social media has grown, so too has the number of criminals preying on those who use it.” The same survey showed, “Nearly two in three U.S. adults who have personal social media profiles say they are aware that their accounts have been hacked and 86 percent agree they limit the personal information they post due to the fear of it being accessed by hackers.”

Users don’t understand or appreciate their vulnerability. For most users, social media offers a means to chat with family and friends, share photos and promote causes. They underestimate their individual presence and value to outsiders. So, they get careless. After all, if no one out there is really interested, there’s no need to worry about passwords, for example.

Psst. need help reaching your clients?

Here’s how AI can improve your company’s customer journey

Among the things they don’t understand is the sophistication of the technology. For example, if you download a free game, the game will ask you to connect with friends. To make it easier, the game asks for you to turn over your Facebook friends. Do that and you’ve established a new network that those friends may, in turn, share with others, and so on.

Any hacker that gets a foot in your door inherits access to all your contacts. If you use social media to comment on retailers, restaurants or services, the hacker gets access to your browsing and shopping history. So, common users do their best to protect their personal information. Still, they fail to remember:

  • Nothing posted on social media can be completely deleted.
  • Passwords need unique qualities, regular updating and a credible password manager.
  • Using social media while on public Wi-Fi hotspots allows for it to be accessed by anyone utilizing that hub.
  • Profile information creates a goldmine of info for hackers, the kind of data that helps them personalize phishing scams.
  • Everything you place in your profile – personal preferences, political opinions, social commentary and more – is exposed even if you control the privacy settings.
  • Any negative comments about an employer are accessible to that employer without any expectation of personal privacy.

You’re asking for it

Social media users and the businesses that employ them to work on their computers are asking for trouble. Hackers have a dozen or more techniques to get into your identity. Physical theft of your phones, tablets and laptops give a thief immediate access to your contacts, social media and history unless you install security firewalls specific to those threats.

Social engineering is a trick that simply asks for passwords. You are giving your email addresses away all the time. Possessing your email address lets criminals approach you for private info including passwords. They can approach you as a trusted business you deal with such as a doctor’s office that you patronize, or a service you use. Even posting the email addresses of business officers or of other employees exposes them to unwanted solicitations.

Keyloggers are programs that can be leached into your system to report every move you make on your computer, a huge database the program can then mine for passwords, contacts and personal information.

Continuous education and training cannot be underestimated. A run-through conducted by IT isn’t enough. Training on best practices in policy and procedure must be systematic and accountable. Security must become a cultural mandate because of its alignment with corporate goals.

IT personnel must engineer response and remediation. Businesses of size need to staff up to the need, and the small businesses that cannot afford the staffing must secure outside professional support and controls.

Shadowing, side jacking and firesheep make libraries, coffee shops and public parks easy places to steal your info. Dedicated hackers use technology to follow users and their use.

Some technology has access to every keystroke and other programs can de-engineer computer user habits and history. They can run analytics that describe and predict behavior. They can, for example, identify the type of and source of emails that specific users tend to open.

No system too big or too small!

Reporting for The New York Times, Sheera Frenkel writes, “the human error that causes people to click on a link sent to them in an email is exponentially greater on social media sites… because people are more likely to consider themselves among friends.” She continues, “Once one person is compromised, attacks can move quickly through that person’s friend network, leading to what [Pentagon] officials described as a nightmare situation.”

As is well known, the highest US government systems have been hacked from inside and outside. Allowing those government systems some credit for their in-place security, you should understand the vulnerability of your personal or business data. There are no universally effective solutions, but you need to take the steps available to reduce the vulnerability and, thereby, reduce the cost of loss and remediation.

Your smartphone, tablet, laptop and desktop can receive and host malware. The intrusion then follows your networks that expand with every social media contact. You thereby become a traveling contagion carrier.

Any business can take the lead by educating its employees on their personal vulnerability. And, on the assumption that the personal interest will get and hold their attention, you can then expand that concern to protect the group’s interest. It helps when individuals understand that the threat to the whole is a threat to their own interest.

One of the most common and highly publicized Silicon Valley myths is that the biggest, most innovative companies start from an instantaneous moment of experiencing a problem followed by a lightbulb flash where the billion-dollar solution formulates, perfectly, in your brain. But what many serial founders and venture capitalists understand is that entrepreneurship is, in fact, more often a thoughtful and iterative process that is meticulously planned over a span of months or years. Most would be surprised at the number of companies where the business actually comes first and the visionary story is backed into later. Included here are some ideas to get aspiring entrepreneurs started. Try working through these steps and see what you can come up with.

1. Explore markets with the greatest potential.

Venture capitalists think about three core areas when evaluating a company: team, product and market. Reasonable people can argue about which of the three is most important, but if you start with a large market versus a smaller one, your likelihood for success increases exponentially. Consider which groups, either economically or by sheer number of membership, have the greatest spending power. There’s no right way to do this, but consider taking a design thinking approach—use a white board and sticky notes and throw up anything that comes to mind. Sort them and remove the less interesting ones later. A current, high-focus group is baby boomers/senior citizens. As the largest consumer group by age, solutions that serve this population will be critical in the next five to ten years. There are other markets that are sizable, but are also highly tapped, like financial technology. Thousands of fintech companies have been started in the last five or so years. But the important point here is knowing this trend started when people began to notice finance and banking were expansive markets with a lot of unhappy users.

Entrepreneur brainstorming using sticky notes.

2. Think about the chosen market’s biggest pain points.

The next step is to uncover the most pressing pain points for which people in your chosen market would pay hard-earned of money to resolve. This task can be done even if the market isn’t large by number. That said, if the market is not wide and deep, founders will need a high-value product for which a small number of people have a high willingness to pay. So explore this. Think about it in terms of how many customers it would take to hit a certain revenue target. If you want to reach $10,000, consider how many customers you would need if they pay $5 or $100 each.

3. Talk to potential customers.

After you’ve identified a market and pain points, talk to potential customers. Even if you think you know the scope of the problem, there’s likely more to learn. Countless companies have failed thinking they know how to solve a problem without being completely sure there’s even a problem to be addressed. If you have an idea in mind, formulate your customer questions around understanding the core of the pain point: What is the underlying cause? What about the structural or economic environment make it such a tough issue to solve? What solutions currently exist in the market? Why are those solutions falling short? Is there a technology gap that could help bridge the need and the solution? Has the customer created a makeshift solution on their own? All of these questions help uncover what the true need is and provide potential insights to start working toward a solution. The biggest key, though, is not starting with the solution in mind ahead of your interviews. Go in with a desire to understand the problem and the customer persona.

4. Consider your skillsets.

With an identified market, problem and customer, it’s time to determine how your specific background and skillsets can translate in a meaningful way to the solution. Maybe you were a former teacher, worked in banking, or spent time as a marketer. Do any of those skills make sense for this company? If they do, put it in the story. But if they don’t, connect with someone who does have a background that could work on the company. They could join as a cofounder or you can simply pass the idea to them and work on something else. Everything isn’t for everyone, that’s okay.

5. Test the product.

Do some quick mockups of potential solutions and test them with your customer type. See how they respond. Do they love them? Hate them? Are they indifferent? There are some great online options that let you create samples of what an app would look like on mobile or help visualize a landing page for a product. This is also the perfect time to run some cheap ads to check the interest level. These tests can help clarify who and where to target for your go-to-market strategy and add to the narrowing of your critical customer type.

Founding team testing/receiving feedback on ideas.

6. Iterate. Keep at it.

Make little tweaks to your mock-ups based on the feedback from your tests. See what happens when the wording or colors are changed. Note how people respond when they are allowed to take the reins on minimum viable product (MVP) versus you walking and talking them through it. If the customer insights show that the product has struck a nerve, don’t let up! Keep digging. If the insights show you’re consistently falling flat, fail fast! Trash it (or throw it on the shelf) and start again.

7. Create/Complete your story.

If it all works out, figure out how to make it all make sense. Move the puzzle pieces around so that the market, the product and the founding team that you’ve put together make sense for this company. Here’s the thing, the work now has been done to create a compelling company—talk about that. Talk about why the team fits, why this market is perfect to capture and how you’ve identified the right problem and the right solution.

What’s most important for founders to walk away from this piece with is this: if you don’t have a lightbulb moment with a crystal clear, billion-dollar company in mind, that’s okay. If you do it right, most venture capitalists honestly won’t know (or care) the difference between a lightbulb business and a more thoughtfully planned business with a story that came later. This approach is just flipping the business-building assumption on its head: inducing versus deducing. Now go and create the company you never dreamed of!

How to hack your social media skills to make bank

Smartphones have changed the face of parenting in profound ways. But for all the efficiency they’ve introduced into family life, those same devices simultaneously bring risk.

With smartphone and tablet use growing at ten times the rate of PCs, hackers know precisely where to shift their focus these days. Cyber thieves love smartphones because once inside, they can access private information, location, email, photos, social media, and bank accounts.

If you’re a parent, a smartphone breach is an even bigger deal. Shoring up the security gaps in your phone isn’t a big deal but what about the other four or more smartphones under your roof? If you were to multiply the risk, you’d soon realize the potential havoc that’s looming.

While you can’t shut out every digital risk, you can tackle the most prominent ones. Let’s get started!

8 Ways to Hack-Proof Your Family’s Smartphones

  1. Think Like a Criminal. Work a potential hack backward. Look at every possible entryway into your phone and ask yourself, “How could I get into this phone if I were determined?” Then, methodically lock up each digital door. Challenge yourself to find every security gap. Examine your password strength, social profiles, web browsing security, general and app settings.
  2. Juice Up Your Password. How do you create a password that a criminal can’t hack? With great intention and a few extra layers. 1) Avoid the common error of using easy passwords such as “12345” or “password.” Get complex and create a combination that isn’t logical. 2) Use multi-factor authentication (MFA). Having multiple factors to authenticate your phone use such as your fingerprint, face, or a trusted device, increases security. Most smartphones offer MFA so, even if it seems tedious, use it. The more factors — or digital layers — you can combine, the more protected your smartphone will be. Too many passwords crowding your brain? Consider a password manager.
  3. Trust No App. Not all apps you download to your phone are created equal. Many third-party apps do not go through rigorous security vetting of Google or Apple. Hackers can infect apps with malware or viruses that demolish your phone’s security and allow hackers access to your data. Beware. Examine all apps, read reviews, and steer clear of apps that ask for too much access. Even legitimate apps can be used for malicious purposes such as listening in via a phone’s microphones and even spying using a phone’s camera. To pull back an app’s access, just go to your settings. On Android: Go to Apps and Notifications, choose App Permissions and make changes. On iOS: Go to your settings, select Privacy, and make changes to app permissions accordingly.
  4. Passcode, Track Your Phone. Be proactive in case your phone gets stolen or lost. Make sure your device is passcode and fingerprint protected. Take a few minutes to enable phone tracking. For Android, you’ll download the app Find My Device and for Apple use Find My iPhone. Make sure those apps are always enabled on your phone. If your phone is lost or stolen it can be tracked online.
  5. Log out, Lock Online Services. If you bank, shop, or access sensitive accounts via your smartphone do it with extreme care. This means logging out and locking those accounts when not in use and avoiding using auto-login features. Instead, use a password manager app the forces you to re-enter a master password each time you want to access an account. It’s worth the extra step. An essential part of this equation is disabling keychain and auto-fill in your browser. You can do this by finding your web browser in Settings and toggling each option to OFF. Also, avoid using public Wi-Fi for accessing sensitive accounts or conducting any transactions.
  6. Turn Off Bluetooth. Bluetooth carries inherent vulnerabilities and is another open door for hackers to enter. When Bluetooth is turned on it is constantly looking for other open connections. Hackers work quickly through open Bluetooth connections, and often victims don’t even know there’s been a breach (there’s no evidence a phone has connected with a criminal source). Make sure to switch Bluetooth off if you are not using it.
  7. Take Updates Seriously. Because people design phones, phones will be flawed. And, it’s just a matter of time before a hacker discovers and exploits those flaws. Developers use updates to combat all kinds of breaches, which make them critical to your phone’s security. Along with staying on top of updates, consider the added safeguard of antivirus, identity, and privacy protection that covers all family devices.
  8. Stop! Don’t Click that Link. Unless you are 100% sure of the legitimacy of a link sent to you through text, email, or direct message, do not click it. Random links sent by hackers to access your data are getting more and more sophisticated as well as destructive.

How to hack your social media skills to make bank

Smartphones have changed the face of parenting in profound ways. But for all the efficiency they’ve introduced into family life, those same devices simultaneously bring risk.

With smartphone and tablet use growing at ten times the rate of PCs, hackers know precisely where to shift their focus these days. Cyber thieves love smartphones because once inside, they can access private information, location, email, photos, social media, and bank accounts.

If you’re a parent, a smartphone breach is an even bigger deal. Shoring up the security gaps in your phone isn’t a big deal but what about the other four or more smartphones under your roof? If you were to multiply the risk, you’d soon realize the potential havoc that’s looming.

While you can’t shut out every digital risk, you can tackle the most prominent ones. Let’s get started!

8 Ways to Hack-Proof Your Family’s Smartphones

  1. Think Like a Criminal. Work a potential hack backward. Look at every possible entryway into your phone and ask yourself, “How could I get into this phone if I were determined?” Then, methodically lock up each digital door. Challenge yourself to find every security gap. Examine your password strength, social profiles, web browsing security, general and app settings.
  2. Juice Up Your Password. How do you create a password that a criminal can’t hack? With great intention and a few extra layers. 1) Avoid the common error of using easy passwords such as “12345” or “password.” Get complex and create a combination that isn’t logical. 2) Use multi-factor authentication (MFA). Having multiple factors to authenticate your phone use such as your fingerprint, face, or a trusted device, increases security. Most smartphones offer MFA so, even if it seems tedious, use it. The more factors — or digital layers — you can combine, the more protected your smartphone will be. Too many passwords crowding your brain? Consider a password manager.
  3. Trust No App. Not all apps you download to your phone are created equal. Many third-party apps do not go through rigorous security vetting of Google or Apple. Hackers can infect apps with malware or viruses that demolish your phone’s security and allow hackers access to your data. Beware. Examine all apps, read reviews, and steer clear of apps that ask for too much access. Even legitimate apps can be used for malicious purposes such as listening in via a phone’s microphones and even spying using a phone’s camera. To pull back an app’s access, just go to your settings. On Android: Go to Apps and Notifications, choose App Permissions and make changes. On iOS: Go to your settings, select Privacy, and make changes to app permissions accordingly.
  4. Passcode, Track Your Phone. Be proactive in case your phone gets stolen or lost. Make sure your device is passcode and fingerprint protected. Take a few minutes to enable phone tracking. For Android, you’ll download the app Find My Device and for Apple use Find My iPhone. Make sure those apps are always enabled on your phone. If your phone is lost or stolen it can be tracked online.
  5. Log out, Lock Online Services. If you bank, shop, or access sensitive accounts via your smartphone do it with extreme care. This means logging out and locking those accounts when not in use and avoiding using auto-login features. Instead, use a password manager app the forces you to re-enter a master password each time you want to access an account. It’s worth the extra step. An essential part of this equation is disabling keychain and auto-fill in your browser. You can do this by finding your web browser in Settings and toggling each option to OFF. Also, avoid using public Wi-Fi for accessing sensitive accounts or conducting any transactions.
  6. Turn Off Bluetooth. Bluetooth carries inherent vulnerabilities and is another open door for hackers to enter. When Bluetooth is turned on it is constantly looking for other open connections. Hackers work quickly through open Bluetooth connections, and often victims don’t even know there’s been a breach (there’s no evidence a phone has connected with a criminal source). Make sure to switch Bluetooth off if you are not using it.
  7. Take Updates Seriously. Because people design phones, phones will be flawed. And, it’s just a matter of time before a hacker discovers and exploits those flaws. Developers use updates to combat all kinds of breaches, which make them critical to your phone’s security. Along with staying on top of updates, consider the added safeguard of antivirus, identity, and privacy protection that covers all family devices.
  8. Stop! Don’t Click that Link. Unless you are 100% sure of the legitimacy of a link sent to you through text, email, or direct message, do not click it. Random links sent by hackers to access your data are getting more and more sophisticated as well as destructive.

  • Subscribe —
  • Newsletter —
  • Decimal Technologies appoints Manish Sharma as Chief Business Officer for Saarathi
  • Yellow Messenger rebrands to yellow.ai, launches next-gen AI-powered Voice bots for CX automation
  • Online textile industry can deliver next unicorns
  • Infosys offers digital banking SaaS offering for cooperative banks in India
  • Why employee engagement should be a must have feature of HRMS
  • Indian businesses struggling to hire people with the right cybersecurity skills: Survey
  • IIT Kanpur Professors Predict Three Likely Scenarios for Third Wave of COVID-19 Pandemic in India
  • IIT Ropar Offers Free Online Course on Python, Students Who Have Passed Class 10 Can Enroll
  • HERE appoints Jason Jameson as SVP for Asia Pacific
  • Airtel and TCS partner to implement ‘Made in India’ 5G

How to hack your social media skills to make bank

Hacking-as-a-service – or HaaS as it is popularly known – is a fast-growing ‘business’ which is powering the ever-increasing hostile activity on the internet. These hackers provide their ‘services’ to anyone willing to pay them, which allows practically everyone to become a cybercriminal!

Pay and play

Hacking markets have existed for long in the dark web. But, they have now evolved into full-fledged marketplaces complete with an ecosystem that supports the business of cyber crime. Hacking marketplaces boast of people looking to outsource hacking, suppliers, and the actual hackers. And, as with any other marketplace, hackers compete amongst themselves to provide ‘satisfactory’ services to their ’employers’.

To make the service more professional, hackers are listed according to their skills. Based on the requirements and budget, one can select the hackers, enter into a contract and get started. Hacker marketplaces such as Hackers List feature a complaint mechanism and even offer money-back guarantee. Too many complaints against a hacker result in his removal from the list.

The website Alienspy makes hacking easy to enable persons with zero hacking skills to orchestrate an attack on his/her own. Then there are websites such as Real Deal that sell zero-day exploits.

Attack, make money, settle personal scores

Some of the common services that are outsourced through hacking marketplaces include distributed denial of service (DDoS), phishing, breaking into social media accounts of genuine users, hijacking telephone numbers, call blocking, disrupting communication networks, distributing malware, and controlling botnets. On the positive side, though, organizations are contracting services of professional hackers for ethical hacking—penetration testing of their own networks to find any security loopholes.

The rise of HaaS has made the cyber crime landscape complex and more sinister. This is because HaaS has created a pay-to-play environment that empowers amateurs and wannabe criminals to plan and launch attacks that are beyond their own skills and capabilities. This means that apart from financial heists, Hacking-as-a-service can be easily abused to take revenge and settle personal vendettas.

Defense against Hacking-as-a-Service

In an increasingly complex threat landscape, organizations need to devise strategies that enable them to:

  • Build resilience to attacks: Although complete protection from cyber threats is nearly impossible, organizations that are agile and quick to detect and remediate risks will have a competitive advantage edge over the others.
  • Identify threat areas: This threat intelligence will help inform risk assessment and devise appropriate defense strategies.
  • Train the staff: Employees can either be the first line of defense or the weak links depending on how they are trained to handle security risks. Regular and frequent security training combined with strict implementation of security policies can help minimize the risks to an organization.

The article has been written by Neetu Katyal, Content and Marketing Consultant

She can be reached on LinkedIn.