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How to help yourself when you’re in a mental funk

By Steve Austin
Post date

This morning, I was texting with a dear pastor friend of mine, who said this time of year is usually difficult for him, mentally. The strange thing is, my best friend and I have said the same thing for YEARS. August through October usually does something really weird to ​me, too. It sends me into a mental funk.

Not a spiral. But definitely a funk.

In fact, this is the first year in as long as I can remember that I haven’t been in one. But if you are.

How to help yourself when you're in a mental funk

​5 Ways to Beat a Mental Funk via @iamsteveaustin #mentalhealth #selfcare #catchingyourbreath

Shift Your Mindset

If you are experiencing low energy, or are not in good spirits, you may want to consider altering your mindset. When you are down, it can be due to negative thoughts. You start to dwell on everything that is going wrong. You reflect that you aren’t where you thought you would be and it gives you a sinking feeling.

When you start to have negative thoughts, you are setting the stage to beat yourself down. What’s worse is this situation continues to grow. Negativity feeds on itself. When you put yourself down, you will eventually put others down. You will look for others who share your negativity because misery loves company. As the negative energy thrives, you fall deeper into the abyss of a mental ​funk.

To turn this around, you first have to realize that it’s happening. No one likes to admit to doing something wrong, but negative thinking is wrong if you are engaging in it. You have to try and reflect on your life. Think back to when you were happy. Was it a couple of months ago or a couple of years? That will give you a good indication of when you started with the negative thinking. When you were happy, it’s unlikely you were thinking negatively.

Once you have identified that you have a negative mindset, work hard to introduce positivity into your life. Set up a bad thoughts money jar and whenever you say something negative, put money into the jar. You can do this at work, at home, or both. When you see the jar filling up, you know you have more work to do.

Avoid other negative people as much as possible. They will try to bring you back down, and you may even let them do it. Limiting your exposure to these people is a great step to take on your journey towards positivity.

Oh, and go to therapy.

Try Not to Drink Alcohol

Don’t shoot the messenger – y’all know I love my whiskey! (Okay, and beer. And vodka. Stopppp!)

But let’s get real for a minute. Alcohol is a depressant. If you are using alcohol to try and pick you up during those dark and slow days, it may make the situation worse. It will end up doing the opposite as it will bring your spirits down. Worse, since you are not getting the pick-me-up that you hoped for you’ll continue to drink. By the end of the evening, you are drunk as well as depressed.

Hobbies are a good way to keep yourself occupied when you are in a mental funk. You can do these without using drugs or alcohol. Many hobbies involve other people which increases the fun. Don’t let alcohol or drugs be the first means of getting out of your funk. Look for other ways.

​Stuck in a mental funk? Here’s help. via @iamsteveaustin #selfcare #catchingyourbreath #mentalhealth

Do Something Different Once Per Week

You have probably heard or read on numerous occasions that setting a routine is the best means of accomplishing your goals. That has some truth to it. It’s similar to creating habits where repetition is the way to develop them. Sometimes, however, this can cause you to get into a rut or a mental funk. You still need to maintain your routine but need something to break it as well.

Commit to trying something different. You could do this every day or commit once per week. The idea is to have something else interesting looking forward. That will help you when tackling your routines. You can think about that new event or activity while you are getting through your daily grind.

You can choose to do any new activities on your own, with other people or a combination of the two. It’s entirely up to you. Sometimes, it’s a good idea to include other people and to meet new people as part of that. When you meet new people, they will share ideas that can stir the pot for you. That is good.

You could join a sports team or go skydiving, but the activity doesn’t have to be full of adventure to break up your routine. For instance, perhaps you have always wanted to learn how to play a musical instrument and eventually join a band. That’s another great activity to add to your list. Another idea is to join a reading group. This activity is a mix of getting together with people and some alone time.

To get more ideas, join local groups that will update you whenever new events happen. The more groups you join, the more options you will have available to you. Be warned, however. You may start having some fun!

Read Inspirational Stories

There is no shortage of stories about inspirational people. When you are feeling down, why not read about others who have overcome adversity? That can be a great way to pick up your mood.

Many stories will highlight the challenges the person went through and what steps they took to get there. Sometimes, it is hard to believe the people we admire ever acted in the manner described in their stories. However, those stories will make you realize they are just as human as everyone else. They will also help you break the barrier of thinking that you cannot achieve what they did. If that doesn’t improve your mood, it’s hard to imagine what could.

Use these inspirational stories whenever you are feeling down. It will help you see that your life isn’t as bad as you thought and it might even help you find some solutions. This last point is the most important. In many cases, you can use the stories as a roadmap on how you can solve your problems. They may not be the same, but just reading about them can spark ideas on how to go about solving any issues.

Try to read at least one story per week. Usually, the stories are relatively short, and you can read them within a couple of days. Sometimes, it’s even a good idea to read stories of people who you don’t admire, and you’ll come up with some different ideas. You don’t have to agree with them, but it’s good to diversify your sources.

Don’t be Alone

My dear friend Robert Vore says depression and loneliness are a deadly cocktail. He’s right. If you’re feeling isolated and you’re already in a mental funk – it’s time to find or create a community. (It might also be time to talk to a therapist or call the Lifeline.)

When you find yourself in a funk, here’s some tips on how to be kind to yourself.

How to help yourself when you're in a mental funk

When you find yourself going through a tough time, remember to take a moment to care for your physical and psychological well-being. Sometimes all it takes is hitting the reset button, whether that means speaking to a friend, going for a walk, or spending time in nature . Lift your spirits with these 15 little ways that help cheer you up.

1. Go for a walk
When you feel yourself in a panic, take a break and go for a walk outside . Walking not only does the body good, it also helps mental health, according to doctors .

2. Soak in a warm bath
Create your own at-home remedy by relaxing in a hot bath. Even just 10 to 15 minutes of a warm soak has physical and mental healing properties .

3. Get some sunshine
If you’re feeling down, you might not be getting enough sunshine and Vitamin D . In fact, researchers are finding a link between lack of sun exposure and depression. So don’t forget to catch some rays each day to feel your best.

4. Put on your favorite outfit
Clothes influence how people feel and interact with the world. Wearing your favorite outfit is an easy fix for a bad mood that will inspire confidence throughout the day.

5. Dance around
Human beings have always turned to dance as a form of therapy, from ancient Native American rituals and expressive meditation practices to modern dance/movement therapy. Put on some happy music , push the couch aside, and dance it out to feel better.

6. Watch a funny movie
The saying goes: “laughter is the greatest medicine.” It’s no joke! Laughter therapy reduces stress. So when you feel overwhelmed, put on your favorite comedy and enjoy a good laugh!

7. Do something creative
Studies show the connection between art and healing to restore emotional balance. Painting, writing, drawing, coloring — creative activities such as these provide a positive outlet for releasing emotional distress.

8. Phone a friend
If you find yourself in a negative thought loop, it can help to get out of your head and speak to true friends or to a relative who cares. Even just having someone listen to what’s on your mind alleviates stress .

9. Spend time gardening
Nurturing plants has major benefits for your mind, body, and soul. A Dutch study found that tending a garden for just 30 minutes a day promotes wellbeing. You can start a small herb garden in your kitchen , or plant an outdoor garden.

10. Drink a cup of tea
The healing herbs and flowers used in teas bring immediate anxiety relief. For the best results, simmer a pot of caffeine-free varieties like chamomile, peppermint, valerian, or lemon balm.

11. Keep a gratitude journal
Gratitude has scientifically proven benefits for improving emotional health and making you feel mentally strong. Keep a weekly gratitude journal by listing your blessings. This will help shift your focus away from the bad things so you can have appreciation for your blessings.

12. Do something nice for someone else
Doing good things for someone else makes you feel good, too. Buy a stranger a coffee. Donate to a charity. Cook dinner for a friend. Kind gestures such as these lead to greater happiness .

13. Exercise
Physical activity not only benefits physical health. Regular exercise also relieves stress and boosts your overall mood. Find an activity that you enjoy whether it is yoga , swimming, jogging, hiking, or a combination of them all.

14. Take a break
Studies show a strong correlation between lack of sleep and mood swings. If you feel down, you might just need to get some rest, even if that means taking a 10 to15-minute break during the day.

15. Drink more water
The brain is very sensitive to dehydration, and lack of water can cause drops in mood. If you find yourself feeling down, make sure you drink enough water. Doctors recommend at least eight eight-ounce glasses of water each day.

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How to help yourself when you're in a mental funk

How To Prevent Mental Health Spirals And Get Out Of A Funk

Lora DiCarlo on Apr 14th 2021

After strict quarantine rules and a timely, effective response to the COVID-19 outbreak, citizens in some countries are somewhat back to normal, working in offices and going outdoors with less fear of getting ill. In other places, that’s not the case. The U.S. has had a shaky pandemic response and there are still some new cases as vaccination rates level off.

People around the world may be living in unique or differing circumstances, but there’s a common thread for many: anxiety about what comes next. Some find themselves worrying over their region’s coronavirus response, and just as many worry over transitioning from calmer times with fewer Google Calendar alerts to a more “normal” level of social interaction and responsibilities.

Both present unique obstacles. After all, nobody should have to fear their health is in jeopardy and nobody wants others to get sick. But social distancing (we prefer to call it physical distancing) offered a slower time to become more mindful, take charge of our own schedules and disconnect from busy social calendars. Giving that up can feel just as stressful. During Mental Health Awareness Month and all year round, there are more reasons than ever to focus on mental health care.

How to help yourself when you're in a mental funk

It Can Happen To Anyone

It’s valid and understandable to be afraid, nervous or stressed out, regardless of why. The CDC reported that the outbreak was stressful for most people, and everyone reacted differently. This makes it incredibly important to be mindful of our mental health and state of mind. Even after COVID, the more aware we are of how we’re feeling, the more likely we are to prevent our feelings and anxiety from spinning out of control.

Downward spirals happen from time to time, bringing negative thoughts, depression and other mental health obstacles—and many times it has nothing to do with politics, global diseases or current events. Preventing or treating thought processes isn’t easy, and for some it’s a battle fought consistently, over and over. However, there are steps you can take to feel a little better, and over time developing these tools into a routine can help prevent downward spirals in the first place.

Know The Warning Signs

Whether you have a consistent or diagnosed mental illness or are struggling with temporary mental health and wellness issues, know the warning signs of a downward mental health spiral and a lack of mindfulness. They may include:

  • Difficulty sleeping
  • Lack of energy and fatigue
  • Loss of appetite
  • Feeling more emotional, such as crying or feeling afraid more often
  • Cancelling plans with people we love
  • Lack of excitement for hobbies or fun activities we enjoy

If you begin to notice these behaviors or feelings, it might indicate your mental health and well-being is taking a toll. Preventative measures are important to ensure your body and mind are cared for.

How to help yourself when you're in a mental funk

Prevent The Spiral

Getting ahead of a health crisis is important, and it may be extremely common for thousands of Americans in the coming months, according to experts. Here are some ways to get ahead of your own negative thoughts and introduce daily mental health care.

Stay connected. Physical distancing is much different than social distancing, and the WHO revised its guidelines to encourage people to stay connected to loved ones. Video calls may feel overwhelming, but plain old phone calls and text messages are still there. You can also connect with friends online through hobbies like gaming, streaming, or watching movies together.

Physical self-care. It can feel like the last thing on your to-do list, but physical well-being directly impacts your mental well-being. Find activities that keep you active, whether it’s walking the dog or living room yoga. Encourage yourself to eat as well as you can. You could experiment with cooking new dishes or ordering takeout from a new health food restaurant.

Take breaks. Being home alone, without distractions like coworkers, phone calls or daily meetings, can boost our productivity. But that doesn’t mean we have to work all the time! Be sure to take breaks for creativity, fun and pleasure. This will keep you happy and mentally well.

Create a mental health safety plan. A safety plan is your mental health first aid kit. By creating one, you’ll have a safety net in case things get worse, and it will be much easier to take the steps, because they’ll already be decided for you. Read more about what goes into a mental health safety plan here.

But I’m Already There!?

It’s possible you’ve already gotten pretty far down that spiral, and that’s okay. It’s normal and understandable. If you feel like you’ve succumbed to depression, anxiety or are feeling less than mindful, there are dozens of resources available. During Mental Health Awareness Month, they’re also highlighted online and through mental health organizations. Here are some ways to climb out of the rut you may be in:

Call the suicide prevention hotline. If you are experiencing suicidal thoughts or ideations, you’re not alone. Millions of Americans experience these thoughts. You can bounce back, and there are experts waiting to help you. Give the suicide prevention hotine a call as quickly as you can at 1-800-273-8255.

Try teletherapy. Many therapists are offering online sessions via Zoom and Google Meet, and there are dozens of new therapy apps that allow you to text a therapist, removing the pressure to meet face-to-face. While therapy isn’t going to be accessible to everyone, there’s no shame in seeking help.

Enact your safety plan. If you’re feeling scared, lonely or down, it’s time to review your mental health safety plan. This is exactly why you created it. Mental health safety plans tell you exactly how to react and help yourself based on how you’re feeling.

You don’t need to worry about making all the decisions. They’re already made for you, and will help you feel better and more secure.

How to help yourself when you're in a mental funk

Mental Health Awareness Month is a great time to take stock, but even after it’s over we have to prioritize self-care.

How are you feeling? How mindful are you? What can you do when you’re feeling bad, and how can you prevent it from getting worse? Let’s face the truth—the world may never be quite the same, and it’s okay to feel stressed or upset. However, that doesn’t mean you can’t help yourself, or that you deserve to feel bad.

You shouldn’t feel guilty for taking care of yourself and feeling at peace. It’s important every day, and you deserve the benefits.

How to help yourself when you're in a mental funk

There are days when I feel a little strange. Not sick, not tired, not distracted, just unable to focus. I want to do work, but when I sit down to start, I can’t bring myself to actually do it.

I can only call this feeling a funk. You’ve probably felt it too—and you’ve probably either found a way to shrug it off (for that I congratulate you) or, more likely, you’ve struggled all day to fight it and only succeeded in doing mediocre work as a result.

I can’t tell you there’s a way to avoid this feeling completely, but I can say that from experience, it’s possible to combat when it happens—so you can get back to work refreshed and ready to go.

1. Figure Out What’s Going On

There could be a concrete explanation—you barely slept all weekend, you’ve been working on this project for too long, you don’t know where to begin, you don’t really want to begin. Or there could be no real reason at all.

That being said, while it’s helpful to know why you’re in a funk, I believe it’s even more important to know what kind you’re in. When you focus solely on the reason why, it’s more of a blame game—“I hate having to wake up this early for work,” “This project is too difficult for me”—and you end up complaining rather than fixing the problem at hand.

But when you explore the what—the physical (your head feels heavy, you can’t stare at one place for more than a second, you have an actual headache) and the mental (your thoughts are jumbled, you can’t pinpoint your emotions)—you can more easily target the problem head on and become more in-tune with yourself. And once you’re at that state, you’re able to move forward with how you’re going to tackle it.

2. Talk it Out

First, I suggest talking out what you discovered in step one—to a friend, to a co-worker, even to yourself (just be sure to warn people around you if it’s in the office). As you probably learned from experience, saying stuff out loud helps you process. When we speak our thoughts, we put a tangible feeling out in the open, and it’s suddenly easier to manage than in our heads.

So try it. Sit down with a colleague and tell him or her what you’re struggling with, or go for a walk and talk it over with yourself.

3. Kill the (Extra) Distractions

While you process, you’re going to want to remove each and every distraction. For example, while writing this very article, I minimized social media tabs, killed any unnecessary programs, and increased the size of my word document to full screen.

This way, the only thing in front of me was a (very blank) Word doc. I may have started out feeling all-over-the-place, but as I narrowed my attention in on this one, simple project, my mind became clearer and more alert.

And science supports this! Studies show that external distractions negatively affect both the quantity and quality of your work.

So, take a few moments to see what’s taking your mind off the main goal—is it your chatty co-workers or your current playlist? Is it a text you’ve been waiting for from your friend or the clock at the top of your computer screen? Whatever it is, eliminate it.

4. Use Your “Get Out of Funk Free” Card

If you’ve made it through the first three steps and you still feel foggy, I’m going to encourage you to take a much-needed break. Even if you just got to work, even if you are swamped, even if you have a deadline.

Because nothing good is going to get done if you continue feeling this way, so you might as well be productive by focusing on you. And the thing is, a break doesn’t mean taking the whole day off. It might not even mean taking an hour off.

So, go against everything I recommended above and give in to all your distractions: listen to that song, play with your favorite desk toy, grab a cup of coffee with your friend, text that person you’ve been waiting to hear back from, really nothing is off limits. Consider these things part of your “Get out of funk free” card.

Here’s the catch: You need to give yourself a time limit. And no, it can’t be all day. Try 30 minutes, 60 at most. Because even when you’re in a funk, you still have work to do—which brings me to my next point.

5. Give Up and Move On

When all’s said and done, you’re still at work, that deadline is still drawing nearer, and your boss still needs that presentation in. So, I can’t tell you to give up entirely and go home.

But I can tell you that maybe today’s not the day you want to take on that huge project. Instead, handle the mundane tasks—emails, scheduling, quick to-dos that don’t take a ton of thought—and you can come back ready for the bigger stuff bright and early tomorrow morning.

When you eventually clear your mind and get the job done, make sure to pat yourself on the back. Because it’s not an easy thing to push through, and you want to remember for the future that you can do it. Remind yourself how you felt going in and how much you achieved despite that. Then, cherish the feeling of accomplishment and challenge yourself to stay this confident again tomorrow.

Oh, and know this: Even the smartest people have off days, it’s how they work through (and around) them that makes them able to create truly exceptional work.

Improving your mental and emotional health usually isn’t just a matter of setting your mind to it. You need a roadmap and some ideas to help you get started. This article will provide you with some tips to help you get started.

1. Accept yourself We’re all different, but the one thing we have in common is that none of us is perfect. Many different things, including our background, race, gender, religion and sexuality, make us who we are. Everyone has something to offer and everyone is entitled to respect, including you. Try not to be too hard on yourself.

2. Get involved Meeting people and getting involved in new things can make all the difference for you and for others. Join a club, meet up with friends, do a course there are many things to do if you look around. Not only will you feel better, but you will benefit from supporting others too.

3. Keep active and exercise Regular exercise can really help to give your mental health a boost. Find something you enjoy sport, swimming, walking, dancing or cycling and then just do it. It may be hard work, but it is worth the effort. Regular exercise can help you feel more positive.

4. Eat healthy Having a balanced diet will not only help the way you feel, but it will also help the way you think. Try to eat regularly and aim to eat five portions of fruit and vegetables every day. Good food is essential for your mind and body to work properly.

5. Keep in contact You don’t have to be strong and struggle on alone. Friends are important, especially at difficult times, so it is good to keep up contact with them.

6. Relax If too much busyness is getting you down, make time to relax. Fit things into your day that help you unwind, like listening to music, reading or watching films. Find something that you enjoy and that will work for you. Even 10 minutes of downtime during a busy day can make all the difference and help you manage stress better.

7. Express yourself Our creativity often goes unnoticed, even by ourselves, much less given a regular outlet. Find a way to express your emotions and needs on a regular basis, such as journaling, blogging, painting, writing, or some other method.

8. Talk about it Many of us can feel isolated and overwhelmed by problems sometimes. Talking about how you feel will help. Confide in someone you trust and if you feel there is nobody to talk to, call a suicide helpline or hotline in your community. Some people are comfortable just chatting with an online or real-life friend, but are embarrassed to start the conversation. You’d be amazed at just how good you will feel if you can take that first step.

9. Ask for help If you were feeling physically sick you would see a doctor, so don’t be embarrassed about getting help for your mental health. Everyone needs help from time to time and there is nothing wrong with asking for it. In fact, asking for help is a sign of personal strength.

10. Talk to a professional Many people run away from the idea of talking to a professional about their problems. They believe that it is a sign of weakness or admitting their own failure in life. Yet it takes enormous inner strength and willpower to acknowledge that most of us are not experts in every area in human living, and to seek out additional assistance. Don’t hesitate to talk to a professional if you feel like your life has reached a dead-end and you’ve tried other self-help methods and tips.

How to help yourself when you're in a mental funk

There are days when I feel a little strange. Not sick, not tired, not distracted, just unable to focus. I want to do work, but when I sit down to start, I can’t bring myself to actually do it.

I can only call this feeling a funk. You’ve probably felt it too—and you’ve probably either found a way to shrug it off (for that I congratulate you) or, more likely, you’ve struggled all day to fight it and only succeeded in doing mediocre work as a result.

I can’t tell you there’s a way to avoid this feeling completely, but I can say that from experience, it’s possible to combat when it happens—so you can get back to work refreshed and ready to go.

1. Figure Out What’s Going On

There could be a concrete explanation—you barely slept all weekend, you’ve been working on this project for too long, you don’t know where to begin, you don’t really want to begin. Or there could be no real reason at all.

That being said, while it’s helpful to know why you’re in a funk, I believe it’s even more important to know what kind you’re in. When you focus solely on the reason why, it’s more of a blame game—“I hate having to wake up this early for work,” “This project is too difficult for me”—and you end up complaining rather than fixing the problem at hand.

But when you explore the what—the physical (your head feels heavy, you can’t stare at one place for more than a second, you have an actual headache) and the mental (your thoughts are jumbled, you can’t pinpoint your emotions)—you can more easily target the problem head on and become more in-tune with yourself. And once you’re at that state, you’re able to move forward with how you’re going to tackle it.

2. Talk it Out

First, I suggest talking out what you discovered in step one—to a friend, to a co-worker, even to yourself (just be sure to warn people around you if it’s in the office). As you probably learned from experience, saying stuff out loud helps you process. When we speak our thoughts, we put a tangible feeling out in the open, and it’s suddenly easier to manage than in our heads.

So try it. Sit down with a colleague and tell him or her what you’re struggling with, or go for a walk and talk it over with yourself.

3. Kill the (Extra) Distractions

While you process, you’re going to want to remove each and every distraction. For example, while writing this very article, I minimized social media tabs, killed any unnecessary programs, and increased the size of my word document to full screen.

This way, the only thing in front of me was a (very blank) Word doc. I may have started out feeling all-over-the-place, but as I narrowed my attention in on this one, simple project, my mind became clearer and more alert.

And science supports this! Studies show that external distractions negatively affect both the quantity and quality of your work.

So, take a few moments to see what’s taking your mind off the main goal—is it your chatty co-workers or your current playlist? Is it a text you’ve been waiting for from your friend or the clock at the top of your computer screen? Whatever it is, eliminate it.

4. Use Your “Get Out of Funk Free” Card

If you’ve made it through the first three steps and you still feel foggy, I’m going to encourage you to take a much-needed break. Even if you just got to work, even if you are swamped, even if you have a deadline.

Because nothing good is going to get done if you continue feeling this way, so you might as well be productive by focusing on you. And the thing is, a break doesn’t mean taking the whole day off. It might not even mean taking an hour off.

So, go against everything I recommended above and give in to all your distractions: listen to that song, play with your favorite desk toy, grab a cup of coffee with your friend, text that person you’ve been waiting to hear back from, really nothing is off limits. Consider these things part of your “Get out of funk free” card.

Here’s the catch: You need to give yourself a time limit. And no, it can’t be all day. Try 30 minutes, 60 at most. Because even when you’re in a funk, you still have work to do—which brings me to my next point.

5. Give Up and Move On

When all’s said and done, you’re still at work, that deadline is still drawing nearer, and your boss still needs that presentation in. So, I can’t tell you to give up entirely and go home.

But I can tell you that maybe today’s not the day you want to take on that huge project. Instead, handle the mundane tasks—emails, scheduling, quick to-dos that don’t take a ton of thought—and you can come back ready for the bigger stuff bright and early tomorrow morning.

When you eventually clear your mind and get the job done, make sure to pat yourself on the back. Because it’s not an easy thing to push through, and you want to remember for the future that you can do it. Remind yourself how you felt going in and how much you achieved despite that. Then, cherish the feeling of accomplishment and challenge yourself to stay this confident again tomorrow.

Oh, and know this: Even the smartest people have off days, it’s how they work through (and around) them that makes them able to create truly exceptional work.

Improving your mental and emotional health usually isn’t just a matter of setting your mind to it. You need a roadmap and some ideas to help you get started. This article will provide you with some tips to help you get started.

1. Accept yourself We’re all different, but the one thing we have in common is that none of us is perfect. Many different things, including our background, race, gender, religion and sexuality, make us who we are. Everyone has something to offer and everyone is entitled to respect, including you. Try not to be too hard on yourself.

2. Get involved Meeting people and getting involved in new things can make all the difference for you and for others. Join a club, meet up with friends, do a course there are many things to do if you look around. Not only will you feel better, but you will benefit from supporting others too.

3. Keep active and exercise Regular exercise can really help to give your mental health a boost. Find something you enjoy sport, swimming, walking, dancing or cycling and then just do it. It may be hard work, but it is worth the effort. Regular exercise can help you feel more positive.

4. Eat healthy Having a balanced diet will not only help the way you feel, but it will also help the way you think. Try to eat regularly and aim to eat five portions of fruit and vegetables every day. Good food is essential for your mind and body to work properly.

5. Keep in contact You don’t have to be strong and struggle on alone. Friends are important, especially at difficult times, so it is good to keep up contact with them.

6. Relax If too much busyness is getting you down, make time to relax. Fit things into your day that help you unwind, like listening to music, reading or watching films. Find something that you enjoy and that will work for you. Even 10 minutes of downtime during a busy day can make all the difference and help you manage stress better.

7. Express yourself Our creativity often goes unnoticed, even by ourselves, much less given a regular outlet. Find a way to express your emotions and needs on a regular basis, such as journaling, blogging, painting, writing, or some other method.

8. Talk about it Many of us can feel isolated and overwhelmed by problems sometimes. Talking about how you feel will help. Confide in someone you trust and if you feel there is nobody to talk to, call a suicide helpline or hotline in your community. Some people are comfortable just chatting with an online or real-life friend, but are embarrassed to start the conversation. You’d be amazed at just how good you will feel if you can take that first step.

9. Ask for help If you were feeling physically sick you would see a doctor, so don’t be embarrassed about getting help for your mental health. Everyone needs help from time to time and there is nothing wrong with asking for it. In fact, asking for help is a sign of personal strength.

10. Talk to a professional Many people run away from the idea of talking to a professional about their problems. They believe that it is a sign of weakness or admitting their own failure in life. Yet it takes enormous inner strength and willpower to acknowledge that most of us are not experts in every area in human living, and to seek out additional assistance. Don’t hesitate to talk to a professional if you feel like your life has reached a dead-end and you’ve tried other self-help methods and tips.

How to help yourself when you're in a mental funk

Everyone gets into a funk sometimes! Even those really successful people who might initially look like they have it all. When those feelings strike and you find yourself flat, unmotivated, and despondent about what you’re trying to achieve, it can be really tough to move forward.

It’s tempting to blame others and become the least productive manifestation of yourself, focusing in on anger, frustration, and anxiety. However, there are ways to tap into your hope and overcome the obstacles that make you feel most stuck. So, whatever your goal, try these six tips that can move forward with your life.

1. Change Your State

Change your attitude by changing your state. This is a popular personal development technique for a good reason, and it can take all sorts of different forms.

For example, if you’ve been indoors a lot, step out of your house and spend the whole day outside.

If you’re feeling despondent, get your body moving by dancing or exercising. If you’re hearing the critical voices of others (or yourself), drown it out by putting on your most optimistic music and singing along.

In addition, reach out to people who make you feel good and who know your true self. Sometimes, just talking to them will be enough to shake you out of your funk.

2. Block Out Negativity, And Take Ownership

If your current funk was partly triggered by the negativity of others (or by people telling you how you should behave), turn your full attention to your mission in life and to your vision of what your realized dream will look like.

Your life is under your full control, and no one else’s! After all, you know what’s best. Get in tune with the sense of trust you have in yourself, e.g. by repeating your most empowering affirmations or by writing down all the negative messages that have been bothering you and then writing down positive beliefs that counteract these limiting statements.

3. Let Go Of The Past

Chances are you are looking at your future life through filters of fear and failures from your past. And this is what is holding you back from truly moving forward.

You need to realize that your past is exactly that, the past. This doesn’t mean that you should try and make yourself forget about your past. Because, firstly, it is pretty much impossible, and, secondly, the past has still taught you some valuable lessons. What you need to do is to let go of the negative emotions and limiting beliefs, so that they lose power over your future.

Of course, it is sometimes easier said than done.

How to help yourself when you're in a mental funk

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4. Start Small

If you’re stuck in a funk because you have a particular task you don’t want to tackle and you’re paralyzed by the thought, find something small that you can do in order to secure a “win.”

Small steps take you on long journeys. Break your biggest, unpleasant task down into lots of little sub-tasks and do at least one of them today. Even this act can help you feel like you’re moving forward and can make dreaded or intimidating tasks seem manageable. And if one of the broken down tasks looks too big, break that down as well!

TIP:

How to help yourself when you're in a mental funk

It is important to find out what one big thing is holding you back. Everyone has something.

For example, it may be an old relationship or a dead end job. Do you know what’s yours?

Usually, when you know what it is and when you get rid of it, all the other small things (like doubts or toxic people) get out of your way much easier.

So ask yourself this, if you could change one thing about your life, what would it be?

Got it? There you go. That’s the one thing you should work the hardest on. And don’t worry if you’re having trouble locating that one thing. Our Law of Attraction Toolkit has all the resources you need to start living your best life.

5. Stick To A Schedule

Being stuck in a funk usually involves inaction, so one of the best things you can do for yourself is to draw up a schedule and then stick to it religiously. Even if you don’t currently have a job (or you’re self-employed), figure out your “hours of operation” and commit to working your way through your task lists during these times.

Even just beginning with an hour a week, three nights a week is a great start! You can then gradually increase the amount of time you devote to working on your goals.

6. Live In Gratitude

If you’re unable to be grateful for what you already have and all that there is to cherish in your life, the universe is not going to give you more! You’ve probably already considered the idea of keeping a gratitude journal (a common Law of Attraction exercise), but there are also other great ways to live in gratitude.

For example, try cultivating a daily habit of thanking someone you care about and practice mindfulness meditations that encourage you to let feelings of love, compassion, and acceptance wash over you.

7. Help Others Move Forward

When you assist others in moving out of their own funds, you make a genuine connection that’s deeply gratifying and can spark your own passion as well. Of course, you don’t want to neglect your own needs and sacrifice all of your time and energy for others, but there’s a balance to be found here.

When you provide support and inspiration for people, you will get more support and inspiration from the universe in return. If, in contrast, you focus on jealousy or refuse to share any of your own resources, you’ll get fewer resources from the universe and are more likely to stay in a funk for longer.

It’s crucial to remember that everyone gets stuck in a funk from time to time and that it’s not always easy to shake it off. Don’t feel guilty for having this very human experience! If you stick to your vision of the life you want to have and stick to your mission to succeed, you’ll find yourself moving forward into happiness and excitement.

How to help yourself when you're in a mental funk

Free Law Of Attraction Tool Kit:
Learn How To Manifest More Effectively Today

How to help yourself when you're in a mental funk

It’s easy for people to neglect their health due to a busy lifestyle or lack of knowledge, but there are many steps you can take to turn your life around, and luckily, it is never too late to change and embark on a healthier lifestyle.

A few small changes to your routine could be all you need to make to transform your health. Get started by reading the below tips on how to improve yourself both mentally and physically.

5 Tips to Improve Yourself Mentally & Physically

Exercise Regularly

Exercise provides your body with a multitude of benefits. It’s not just a perfect way to tone your body and lose weight, as it can improve yourself and cardiovascular health and circulation while helping you to combat stress. If you’re not a big fan of the gym, look for an activity you will regularly look forward to, such as a dance lesson, a game of tennis, a family bike ride, or a boxing session.

Start Meditating

Meditation could be the key to improved mental health. Simply place either a rug or cushion on a floor in a room, play soft music and burn some incense. Once you have done so, sit down and spend 10 minutes focusing on inhaling and exhaling, clearing your mind of all thoughts. You might be surprised by how relaxed you will feel once your meditation session is over, and it can also help you to enjoy a better night’s sleep.

Seek Help

Many people across the world are living with an addiction, which they might be afraid to confront head-on. Rather than suffering in silence, you must take life into your own hands and seek the help and support you need to move forward with your life.

For example, if you are living with a drug or alcohol addiction, get help today from a respected San Diego rehab facility. They will have the knowledge and experience to get to the root cause of your addiction while helping you to recover from your dependency.

Find a Solution for Your Health Complaint

It is common for many people to struggle on in silence when living with a health issue. For example, a person might itch away at eczema rather than applying a topical ointment, or they might suffer from neck pain rather than investing in an effective neck traction.
Whatever your medical complaint, you must find the appropriate solution to eliminate stress and worry from your life while improving your physical health. If you’re unsure of the best options for your health issue, consult your doctor for a diagnosis and treatment recommendation.

Pamper Yourself

Pampering isn’t just about looking good; it’s about feeling both happier and healthier in your own skin. For example, an effective skincare routine will help you to exude confidence every day. Avid athletes will enjoy a greater mental and physical performance following a professional massage, as it will remove tension and strain in their mind and muscles to increase their flexibility and determination. So, set some time aside to enjoy a pamper session to care for both your mind and body.