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How to make bio diesel

How to Make Bio Diesel

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  • Ph.D., Biomedical Sciences, University of Tennessee at Knoxville
  • B.A., Physics and Mathematics, Hastings College
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Biodiesel is a diesel fuel that is made by reacting vegetable oil (cooking oil) with other common chemicals. Biodiesel may be used in any diesel automotive engine in its pure form or blended with petroleum-based diesel. No modifications are required, and the result is a less-expensive, renewable, clean-burning fuel.

Here’s how to make biodiesel from fresh oil. You can also make biodiesel from waste cooking oil, but that is a little more involved, so let’s start with the basics.

Materials for Making Biodiesel

  • 1 liter of new vegetable oil (e.g., canola oil, corn oil, soybean oil)
  • 3.5 grams (0.12 ounces) sodium hydroxide (also known as lye). Sodium hydroxide is used for some drain cleaners. The label should state that the product contains sodium hydroxide (not calcium hypochlorite, which is found in many other drain cleaners).
  • 200 milliliters (6.8 fluid ounces) of methanol (methyl alcohol). Heet fuel treatment is methanol. Be sure the label says the product contains methanol (Iso-Heet, for example, contains isopropyl alcohol and won’t work).
  • Blender with a low-speed option. The pitcher for the blender is to be used only for making biodiesel. You want to use one made from glass, not plastic because the methanol you will use can react with plastic.
  • Digital scale to accurately measure 3.5 grams, which equals 0.12 ounces
  • Glass container marked for 200 milliliters (6.8 fluid ounces). If you don’t have a beaker, measure the volume using a measuring cup, pour it into a glass jar, then mark the fill-line on the outside of the jar.
  • Glass or plastic container that is marked for 1 liter (1.1 quarts)
  • Widemouthed glass or plastic container that will hold at least 1.5 liters (2-quart pitcher works well)
  • Safety glasses, gloves, and an (optional) apron

You do not want to get sodium hydroxide or methanol on your skin, nor do you want to breathe the vapors from either chemical. Both are toxic. Please read the warning labels on the containers for these products. Methanol is readily absorbed through your skin, so do not get it on your hands. Sodium hydroxide is caustic and will give you a chemical burn. Prepare your biodiesel in a well-ventilated area. If you spill either chemical on your skin, rinse it off immediately with water.

How to Make Biodiesel

  1. You want to prepare the biodiesel in a room that is at least 70 degrees F because the chemical reaction will not proceed to completion if the temperature is too low.
  2. If you haven’t already, label all your containers as “Toxic—Only Use for Making Biodiesel.” You don’t want anyone drinking your supplies, and you don’t want to use the glassware for food again.
  3. Pour 200 milliliters methanol (Heet) into the glass blender pitcher.
  4. Turn the blender on its lowest setting and slowly add 3.5 grams sodium hydroxide (lye). This reaction produces sodium methoxide, which must be used right away or else it loses its effectiveness. (Like sodium hydroxide, it can be stored away from air/moisture, but that might not be practical for a home setup.)
  5. Mix the methanol and sodium hydroxide until the sodium hydroxide has completely dissolved (about 2 minutes), then add 1 liter of vegetable oil to this mixture.
  6. Continue blending this mixture (on low speed) for 20 to 30 minutes.
  7. Pour the mixture into a widemouthed jar. You will see the liquid start to separate out into layers. The bottom layer will be glycerin. The top layer is biodiesel.
  8. Allow at least a couple of hours for the mixture to fully separate. You want to keep the top layer as your biodiesel fuel. If you like, you can keep the glycerin for other projects. You can either carefully pour off the biodiesel or use a pump or baster to pull the biodiesel off of the glycerin.

Using Biodiesel

Normally, you can use pure biodiesel or a mixture of biodiesel and petroleum diesel as a fuel in any unmodified diesel engine. There are two situations in which you definitely should mix biodiesel with petroleum-based diesel:

  • If you are going to be running the engine at a temperature lower than 55 degrees Fahrenheit (13 degrees C), you should mix biodiesel with petroleum diesel. A 50:50 mixture will work in cold weather. Pure biodiesel will thicken and cloud at 55 degrees Fahrenheit, which could clog your fuel line and stop your engine. Pure petroleum diesel, in contrast, has a cloud point of -10 degrees Fahrenheit (-24 degrees C). The colder your conditions, the higher the percentage of petroleum diesel you will want to use. Above 55 degrees Fahrenheit, you can use pure biodiesel without any problem. Both types of diesel return to normal as soon as the temperature warms above their cloud point.
  • You will want to use a mixture of 20% biodiesel with 80% petroleum diesel (called B20) if your engine has natural rubber seals or hoses. Pure biodiesel can degrade natural rubber, though B20 tends not to cause problems. If you have an older engine (which is where natural rubber parts are found), you could replace the rubber with polymer parts and run pure biodiesel.

Biodiesel Stability and Shelf Life

You probably don’t stop to think about it, but all fuels have a shelf life that depends on their chemical composition and storage conditions. The chemical stability of biodiesel depends on the oil from which it was derived.

You found the most informative site on the internet for learning how to make your own biodiesel at home as a hobby. This is one hobby that can save you money and help you to play a part in saving the world from global warming. Making biodiesel is great fun, like having a chemistry set for grownups,

Introduction to Biodiesel

What is biodiesel? How is it made and used? Can I use biodiesel in my car?

The 5 Tests Every Home Brewer Should Know

While there are dozens of tests available to home brewers, there are only five that every biodiesel home brewer needs to know.

Biodiesel Tutorial

      • Introduction to Biodiesel
      • Ingredients
      • Collecting WVO
      • Drying WVO
      • Biodiesel Recipes
      • Winter Biodiesel
      • Biodiesel Safety
      • Biodiesel Processors
      • The Appleseed
      • Processor Upgrades
      • Methanol Recovery
      • Dry Washing Biodiesel
      • Water Washing
      • Dealing with Byproducts
      • Biodiesel Chemistry
      • Quality Testing

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Biodiesel – Food for thought was produced for the Big Bend Economic Development Council with a grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture – Rural Development.

Produced and directed by Kathy Kiefer
JACOL Filmworks, LLC
Soap Lake, WA 98851

Biodiesel Compatibility

Will my car run on biodiesel? Do I need to convert my car to run biodiesel? Find out here.

Biodiesel in Winter

Tips for making and using biodiesel in the Winter. How to run biodiesel even in the coldest weather.

Enzymatic Biodiesel

Commercial biodiesel producers are using enzymes as a catalyst for making biodiesel from high FFA oils without the need for strong acids.

Drying WVO for Biodiesel

The most common cause of problems when making biodiesel is water in the feedstock oil.

Biodiesel Dispensing Station Plans

After making your biodiesel you want a way to pump it into your vehicle. This article has some good instructions for building you own multi-drum biodiesel dispensing station.

Biodiesel Recipes and Processes

There is more than one way to make biodiesel. This section contains articles detailing all the various methods used by hobbyists.

The _ Appleseed

The Appleseed Biodiesel Reactor is a water heater based processor design that anyone can build.

Biodiesel Safety

This section contains tips on making biodiesel as safely as possible.

Biodiesel Processors

Investigate different kinds of biodiesel processors in this section on Processors.

WARNING

Making Biodiesel requires the use of flammable, toxic liquids and strong caustics to make a fuel. No matter what safety precautions are put in place or what equipment you use, making biodiesel will never be a safe hobby and can place you, your property, and your family at risk of injury or even death. Make Biodiesel at your own risk.

How to Make Bio Diesel

The fat from your favorite restaurant’s deep fryer offers more than fries. When businesses recycle their used oil with SeQuential, they contribute to the production of clean, sustainable, and efficient biodiesel. Biodiesel is a valuable fuel source made from soybean oil, animal fats, and other kinds of recycled cooking oil. It’s renewable, clean-burning, reduces waste, and is surprisingly easy to make. All that’s necessary is a simple chemical reaction. Learn how biodiesel is made with SeQuential with an outline of the process used to transform kitchen grease into useable fuel.

It Starts with Used Cooking Oil

The first step of our biodiesel process is the collection of used cooking oil. A large amount of oil comes from commercial fryers at local restaurants, food processors, and any business that serves food, as well as home kitchens. All kinds of cooking oil can be used, including soy, vegetable, canola, and animal fats.

The collection process is simple. Home cooking oil can simply be stored in its original container and dropped off at one of many convenient locations. Restaurants and businesses, on the other hand, can sign up for our free service and set up a collection schedule. For those who partner with SeQuential, we provide a durable storage container for used cooking oil and will empty it regularly at no cost.

Purification and Refinement

After used cooking oil is collected, the next step is refinement. Used oil is usually full of impurities, such as meat scraps, water, crumbs of breading, and other leftovers. These contaminants must be filtered out, so they don’t interfere with the conversion process.

Used cooking oil also contains a high amount of free fatty acids (FFAs). When you use oil repeatedly, the high heat starts to break down the molecules. Fatty acid particles detach from the rest of the molecule and start to float freely. These FFAs can’t be converted into biodiesel directly. After filtering, used cooking oil is pre-treated to make the FFAs usable. Then, it’s ready to be turned into biofuel.

Understanding the Chemical Process

Used cooking oil is not a safe fuel by itself. In order to make it safe, cooking oil goes through a process called transesterification.

Transesterification is the chemical process that transforms waste oil into diesel fuel. It’s a long name for a relatively simple concept. During this process, we combine an ester with an alcohol. In the case of biodiesel, the “ester” is used cooking oil, which is combined with methyl alcohol, or methanol. A small amount of catalyst – usually sodium chloride – is added to the mix to kickstart a chemical reaction. The end results are methyl ester – the technical term for biodiesel fuel – and glycerin.

After transesterification is complete, the biodiesel is ready to use. The glycerin is separated out and can be used as an ingredient in cleaning products, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals. Meanwhile, the biodiesel is locally distributed for use in vehicles, machinery, farm equipment, and more.

Switch to Biodiesel Today

Only a simple chemical process is necessary to transform used cooking oil into sustainable fuel. Compared to traditional diesel fuel, biodiesel reduces greenhouse gases, smog, unhealthy air pollution, and waste. Best of all, it’s renewable. To learn more about biodiesel or make the switch to our biodiesel, contact SeQuential today. We’re the West Coast’s leading producer of biodiesel with locations in Salem, OR and Bakersfield, CA and serve most metro areas on the West coast.

In today’s world, biodiesel fuel is very appealing. It burns cleanly and can be made by unwanted or wasted organic material, helping the environment and saving energy. With the rising cost of oil and gasoline, many consumers and businesses are eager to make the switch to biodiesel to run their diesel-powered vehicles, generate electricity or heat their homes or commercial buildings. Many people are interested in ways to produce biodiesel fuel for their own consumption. One way to do this is through the use of soybean-based oil.

Making Biodiesel from Soybean Oil

Step 1

Pour the methanol into the plastic container, using the funnel. Add the lye through the second funnel. Place the top on the container and swirl it until the lye is dissolved.

Step 2

Heat the soybean oil to130 degrees F.

Step 3

Pour the heated oil into the blender, add the core chemicals and blend on the lowest setting for 30 minutes. Be sure to use a spare or secondhand blender and not one you intend to use for food.

Step 4

Transfer the mixture to one of the soda bottles and allow to settle. Screw the lid onto the soda bottle tightly and let the bottle sit for 24 hours.

Step 5

Prepare your wash bottles while the mixture settles. Take two of the soda bottles and pierce a small hole that is about 2 mm in size in the bottom corner of each. Cover the hole with duct tape.

Step 6

Carefully pour the top layer of glycerin into one of the empty soda bottles. Be sure to pour slowly so the biodiesel and glycerine do not mix again. If they do, allow the mixture to sit again until the layers separate once more.

Step 7

Add the biodiesel and 150 ml of water into one of the wash bottles, cap it tightly, lay the bottle on its side, and roll it on a flat surface. You will need to roll the bottle until the water and the biodiesel are completely mixed. Stand the bottle up when finished and then let it settle for three hours.

Step 8

Remove the tape from the wash bottle and allow the water to drain. Replace the duct tape when only the biodiesel remains in the bottle.

Step 9

Repeat Steps 6 and 7, alternating wash bottles until you have washed the biodiesel four times. Make sure to clean the wash bottle before using it again.

Allow the biodiesel to dry in an open soda bottle. When the biodiesel is dry, it will appear translucent. This can take as many as five days. Once it’s dry, it’s ready to be used.

  • • If during step 6, your biodiesel does not separate from the water after the time window has elapsed, you will need to begin the process again, being more careful about the measurements of the methanol and the lye.
  • • Your soybean oil must be fresh as you begin working with biodiesel. As you have more experience, you may find that you are able to switch to used oil instead.
  • • The amount of ingredients above will give you a small amount of biodiesel. Its purpose is to learn the procedure. Once you have successfully completed it a few times, you can increase the size of your batches.
  • • Methanol, KOH lye, and the HDPE #2 container are all available from online chemical supply stores. Both chemicals should be kept out of the air as much as possible. Soybean oil is also available in bulk once you are ready to begin producing larger batches of biodiesel.

Warnings

  • • Safety goggles and rubber gloves should be worn throughout every step of this process. Lye can burn the skin. Be very careful to protect your arms, hands and chest when measuring lye
  • • Methanol fumes can be very dangerous. Be sure to work with the raw material in a well-ventilated area. Be sure to read all warning labels on the bottle.

Items you will need

  • 200 ml of 99 percent pure methanol
  • 2 Funnels
  • ½ liter HDPE #2 plastic container
  • 5.3 g of KOH lye, measured into a plastic baggie and sealed until ready to use
  • Stove or hotplate
  • 1 liter of fresh soybean oil
  • Thermometer
  • Blender
  • 4 empty 2 liter soda bottles
  • Box cutter or other blade
  • Duct tape

This article was written by the It Still Works team, copy edited and fact checked through a multi-point auditing system, in efforts to ensure our readers only receive the best information. To submit your questions or ideas, or to simply learn more about It Still Works, contact us.

Introduction: How to Make Biodiesel (fast and Easy Way)

How to Make Bio Diesel

How to Make Bio Diesel

How to Make Bio Diesel

hello, today we will see how to make multi purpose bio diesel. that can be used for cars but for heaters ,stoves or oil lamps too.

but we will not use the usual way. we will not use dangerous lye and methanol , but an easier way with no byproduct like glycerin.

we will use the solvent blending in wvo method .it is a lots easier and faster ,it can be done in micro batch or in larges quantities.

Step 1: WVO : Waste Vegetable Oil

first we will use vegetable oil in our biodiesel. in a blend of 80%.

it can be olive, sunflower ,palm ,grape,algae or any other vegetables.

it can be clear oil but wvo is more interesting.

the oil should be filtered first and all contaminant should be removed.

oil without animal fat inside is better.

in the case of wmo or waste motor oil, i think you should just stay away from it. it is dirty, full of chemicals and metal particles , it is dangerous to burn and can clog engines so we will not use it.

Step 2: Solvent

we will use solvent to thin the oil ,it will improve the biodiesel viscosity and stop it from gelling.

the solvent used will be : gasoline, white gas or turpentine. and will be blended at 20% to 30% in the biodiesel.

white gas (called too naphta, coleman fuel or essence F)is the cleaner burning of all solvant, but sadly is petroleum based.

regular unleaded gasoline is the perfect solvent for cars and the lowest priced but sadly it is petroleum based .

turpentine is the perfect vegetal solvent but has a strong pine smell.

note only one solvent will be blended at 20 to 30% too much solvent will make the biodiesel flammable and dangerous , not suitable for multi purpose use.

optional: you can add 2 to 3% of acetone for better thinning at very low temperature can help when gelling, but too much acetone can damage rubber.

acetone can be petroleum or vegetal based.

we will not use in the biodiesel blend regular diesel or kerosene mostly because of their low thinning power, they are not interesting until they are at least 50% blended in the mix.

Step 3: Final Result.

here are mix of 80% sunflower oil 20% white gas and 2%acetone .it is a very nice biodiesel , I’m mostly using it as an emergency lamps oil fuel in the cold.

the smell is different than regular diesel but it is as strong smelling.

the mix need to settle 24h at minimum before use, sometime impurities can be pushed out by the solvant and another filtering can be needed before use if there is some impurities.

Recycling your used motor oil into diesel is efficient way to save both money and the environment. Used motor oil can generate quality energy, if processed, stored and handled with care.

Step 1

Collect waste motor oil (WMO) in a black, aluminum container and leave it in the warm sun for a few days; the color and type of the container will help draw heat into the oil, without reaching boiling point. Oil should never reach the boiling point; it should reach just below the point where it’s smoking. If the motor oil is boiling, it will make it difficult to filter and you will be left with excess tar and sludge.

Step 2

Use an electric inline fuel pump purchased from an auto shop to filter the warm oil through a fuel injection filter. You can prevent the pump from collecting sludge by keeping the suction hose off the bottom of the container. Most pumps will have a built-in pre-filter. Filter the heated oil into a separate and clean container, removing any particles that may have seeped through.

Step 3

Clean out the filter by back flushing it with gasoline. This will move along the filtering process by cleaning the oil. You can do this by setting the filter in reverse and pushing the suction hose into a pan filled with gas. A clean stream of liquid will circulate when this step is complete. Filter six or seven times to break the oil down to micron-sized units.

You can also use a condenser which will vaporize some of the oil. Too much condensation will result in the loss of diesel through vaporization, however, so use this step in moderation. Now you have successfully converted used motor oil into diesel.

BioDiesel – Make Biodiesel At Home!

How to Make BioDiesel!

December 18, 2008 by makebiofuel

Making Biodiesel

Biodiesel boasts a number of benefits compared to other alternative fuel, but one of the biggest benefits is that that anyone can make Biodiesel at home. Let us imagine: Being able to make your own fuel for your vehicle or even create energy to run your home. Won’t that be interesting? That would translate into lots savings for you.

The process of making Biodiesel is not really that difficult. It is great to get involved in making your own Biodiesel if you can because you get to save gas costs when you use Biodiesel that is made from your home.

Making Biodiesel – The Supplies

To produce a small volume of Biodiesel at home, you only need a few sets of inputs You have to source out actual ingredients to make the Biodiesel alcohol substance, lye and vegetable oil. You also need some supplies to mix the fuel: unfilled plastic bottles, duct tape, a blender and measuring cups. Make sure that any inputs for the production of Biodiesel should not be used for any other purpose and avoid using again for your cooking ingredients.

When supplies are ready, you can start learning the process of making Biodiesel

Hazard Free Procedure

Producing Biodiesel in not a risky business, health wise. Fire or explosion is remote to happen. Infact your only major concern in terms of your safety, hurting yourself due to flames. Exercise caution and ensure that the mixture’s temperature is under control.

You will go through the easy process of making Biodiesel which entails bringing the ingredients together, letting it set, breaking up the byproduct and Biodiesel and then purifying the Biodiesel. The whole process can take a few days to a few weeks. The cleanliness of your vegetable oil has bearing on the production timeframe.

Low Volume or High Volume

Yields in Biodiesel production can be small scale or large scale. Using Biodiesel kits is a good idea if your goal is to make a few gallons of Biodiesel at a time. If you are a lawnmower user or a user of other lawn equipments then A Biodiesel kit makes sense. It is easy to use and will need a small level of inputs.

If you are looking to make more Biodiesel, say to fuel your vehicle, then you will need a Biodiesel processor. This makes the process super simple, so your output can reach more than a few a gallons at a time. With a processor you will need some more supplies but you can be more productive in making Biodiesel since iterative tasks can be handled by the processor.

Making biodiesel is actually separating the vegetable oil or the fat, incase it is produced from animal, from the glycerin. The chemical process name is transesterification. At the end of the process we receive two materials, glycerin and bio diesel also known with its chemical name as methyl ester.

As you can understand, the process of making biodiesel is not complicated and it is very easy to follow several steps. For the process of transesterification there are three ingredients, vegetable oil or animal fat, methanol (i.e. alcohol) and lye or soda caustic. In the bio-diesel production, the glycerin will be excluded from vegetable oil or the animal fat by a chemical reaction. In order to create this chemical reaction we use methanol and a catalyst such as lye. The ratio between these three ingredients is:

  • 75% vegetable oil or animal fat
  • 22% methanol
  • 3% lye or soda caustic

Caution: Please protect your eyes and skin by wearing gloves and protecting glasses.

Mix all three materials in one container and leave the rest for the chemical reaction for about 50 minutes. After the chemical reaction take place the products are separated according to their specific weight. The glycerin is the heaviest so it will settle on the bottom of the container. The biodiesel will be above the glycerin.

Generally, this is the description of making bio diesel. Some biodiesel producers make it with different ingredients or that they mix the resulted biodiesel with paraffin or other type of petrolatum to make it thinner and more liquid but basically this is the process and by using or preparing biodiesel you help for a cleaner environment and being economically wise.

Here are the first 3 steps to learning how to start making your own biodiesel fuel. It’s easy, fast and more simple than you think!

It feels great to fill up your vehicle with inexpensive, clean, renewable, non-foreign fuel!

Bio diesel reduces pollution up to 90% because it has no sulphur in it and adds almost no carbon dioxide to the atmosphere. Bio Diesel comes from plants that take carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere and release oxygen. The plants convert the carbon dioxide to oil so when the oil is burned and carbon dioxide is released, it is a small net increase of carbon dioxide. Because it comes from plants it is renewable. It is also easy on your wallet because it only about $1.50 per gallon to make. The fact that we do not have to buy it from foreign countries is also a huge bonus .

Bio diesel can be used in any regular diesel engine such as cars, trucks, tractors, heavy equipment and even generators without modification. It can be used in any combination with petrol diesel from 100% (B100) to 1% (B1). We usually run B100 in the warm months and B50 to B75 in the colder months to keep the fuel from jelling.

Making your own Bio diesel does take some time and equipment but the process is relatively simple. It is a “low tech” process so almost anyone can do it.

I have always felt that the grass roots public will have to solve this energy crisis. For some reason I do not have confidence that big government, big automakers, and big oil companies will ever solve the problems of pollution, cost and foreign dependence. Maybe it is the fact that they do not want to solve these problems and in fact they have a vested interest in keeping things the way they are, which means unbelievable profits, and/or tax revenues and tremendous power. That is why they want to build a Hydrogen Economy so they can continue to have control over the energy. Whereas, Bio diesel could be done by any number of small producers, which would eliminate the ability of a few huge companies or suppliers to control the energy and the prices.

There is not near enough land available to produce enough vegetable oil for our fuel needs using, corn, soy, rapeseed or palm oil but there is enough land available to produce enough vegetable oil for our fuel need using algae. More on this topic later in our series about Bio diesel.

For now lets see how to make our own Bio diesel.

The first thing that you need to find out is what regulations (if any) your local government (usually County) has on picking up and transporting used vegetable oil. Most smaller counties have no regulations and require no permits. Some of the larger counties do, so check with the Health Department of your county and see if a permit is required and what it takes to obtain one. The other permit that may be required is a processing plant permit.

Check this at the same time. Hopefully there will be none required in you area. If there are permits required you must take this into account when looking at the total cost of producing the diesel. One individual in my county even moved to a neighboring county so he could make his own fuel.

The second step is to locate a supply of used fryer oil. At first this may seem daunting, but as you get into it you realize that there are many sources for oil. Restaurants have been our best source but grocery stores, hospitals, retirement homes, private school kitchens, festivals, large churches that have commercial kitchens, gas stations that sell fried chicken etc. all have oil they need to dispose of.

In the next article we’ll go into more detail about this process.

Posted February 14, 2014

How to Make Bio Diesel

Making Biodiesel:

Biodiesel is a home made fuel for diesel engines. Biodiesel is made by taking organic oil and chemically altering it through the use of a catalyst and methanol. The chemical reaction breaks down the oil molecules and replaces the glycerin aspect of the oil with alcohol. The glycerin sinks to the bottom of the liquid where it is drained. The result is biodiesel. The final step is to remove any impurities from the fuel by washing it. The great thing about biodiesel is that the car’s engine requires no modification to use it.

How to Make Bio Diesel

The process of making biodiesel involves the use of toxic chemicals. A person can be seriously hurt or killed when working with these chemicals. Keep a fire extinguisher handy when making fuel as you will be transferring highly flammable fluids and gases. Work in a well-ventilated area away from pets and children. Use safety equipment such as ventilation masks, flame retardant gloves and goggles. Check with your local government and/or fire department to ensure the making of such fuel and the storing of the chemicals is permitted in your area. Despite the fact that biodiesel has been tested on thousands of vehicles, some manufacturers will still void any warranties of the vehicle with the use of biodiesel fuels. Biodiesel itself is considered to be safe and non-toxic if spilled.

The Production Process:

Chemically altering the molecular structure of any organic oil by utilizing alcohol and a chemical catalyst is very straightforward. Organic oil is heated to a particular temperature and then mixed with the catalyst and alcohol. The three components are blended for a certain amount of time before being allowed to settle. The successful completion of the mixing process is a tri-layered liquid. Biodiesel rises to the top (Ester as it is known chemically). The middle layer is composed of soap and the bottom is glycerin. Layering means it’s time to separate the biodiesel from the glycerin and soap. The fuel is washed, either by mist-wash or bubble-wash, to remove any impurities and residual soap. Dry the fuel to remove water and then circulate the fuel through fuel filters to ensure clarity.

Production Times:

People produce biodiesel in 20 to100 gallons batches as it takes approximately two to seven days to make.

An idea of productions times is as follows:

Oil collection 1 hour

Oil filtration 1 to 2 hours

Titration of oil 15 minutes

Oil transfer 15 minutes

Heating oil 2 to 4 hours

Methoxide production 20 minutes (methanol and catalyst)

Mixing into oil 30 Minutes

Oil settling 8 to10 hours (typically overnight)

Draining glycerin and soap 5 to10 minutes

Transfer to wash 15 minutes

First mist wash 2 to 3 hours

Second mist wash 2 to 3 hours

First bubble wash 6 to 8 hours

Second bubble wash 6 to 8 hours (typically overnight)

Transfer to drying container 15 minutes

Storage transfer 15 minutes

Equipment Needed:

Biodiesel can be made in a soda bottle. However the amount of time it takes to make the fuel warrants the purchase of the proper containers or processors specifically designed for the process. The processing kits can be purchased on the Internet or made using diagrams and plans available online. Professional processing kits can cost anywhere between $500 and $5,000.00. Start by making a small batch in a soda bottle before attempting mass production.

In a SHTF scenario, knowing how to convert used vegetable oil into usable oil for biodiesel at home is going to be critical. It will be a skill that you need for yourself, and will also be a valuable bartering skill because people are going to need it. Today we’re going to tell you exactly what you need to do to make oil at home for conversion into biofuel.

Whether you’re using biodiesel in order to be independent, to save some money, or to save the environment, you’re doing the right thing. Biodiesel is not-toxic, biodegradable and organic. It doesn’t hurt the environment and it doesn’t rely on petroleum or other fossil fuels for production.

In other words, by using biodiesel, you’re breaking free of petroleum dependence AND you’re helping the environment. It’s a win-win. Let’s get started.

Materials and Ingredients

You’re going to need more than just vegetable oil for this process. Here’s your list:

  • Used vegetable oil, also known as WVO
  • Lye of potassium hydroxide (KOH)
  • A large stock pot
  • An eye dropper
  • At least 5 glass quart jars
  • Distilled or purified water
  • Isopropyl alcohol

Collect Your Oil

You can use fresh vegetable oil, but that can get expensive and it’s also a waste. Instead, get your oil for free from local restaurants and bars. In a survival situation, you won’t want to waste your valuable fresh oil on fuel but you will want to recycle your own and whatever you can still collect.

Many restaurants are willing to give away used vegetable oil because they typically have to pay for its removal. Go around, make friends with managers, and establish some sources.

Don’t rely on just one though; putting all of your eggs in one basket is never a good idea. It’s easiest if the restaurant just puts the used oil back into its original container once it cools off. Since this oil is going to have bits and pieces of fried foods in it, it’s best to let the oil settle for a couple of days after you pick it up.

Filter Your Oil

You don’t need to remove every single impurity but you definitely need to remove the largest chunks. Using a fine screen or even a paint screen will do the trick. Make sure that all of your oil is filtered, though. Simply put the screen over what we refer to as a holding tank and pour the oil through the screen and into the tank. Don’t pour the chunks and sediment that have settled on the bottom through. Leave them in to original container.

Heat the Oil

This is an optional step but we do it in order to remove excess water and sediment. Gently heat the oil to 70 degrees Celsius and keep it there for a few hours. The water and sediment will settle to the bottom of the oil. Siphon the oil off the top, leaving the water and sediment.

How to Make Bio DieselWhy Used Oil Needs Prepared

Used cooking oil has food chunks in it that need to be filtered out. Also, when you fry vegetables in the oil, water gets trapped in the oil. We can get most of that out by heating the oil gently to 70 degrees Celsius. The water will settle on the bottom and we just drain it off.

The combination of water and heat from frying also causes a chemical change in the composition of the oil. The oil becomes more acidic. The triglycerides (fat molecules) in the oil break down and form what are known as free fatty acids, or FFAs; fat molecules that aren’t bound to glycerin.

That’s a bad thing because that reaction uses up the catalyst and keeps it from turning the triglycerides into biodiesel. When the FFAs bind with the catalyst, they turn to soap.

Balance the pH of Your Oil

To counteract this, it’s necessary to balance the acidity in the oil. This means that we introduce a base to counteract an acid in order to restore the oil to something that will convert into biodiesel. Now, if you’re like me, your head is probably spinning and you’ve decided that making biodiesel is above your pay-grade. Relax. There’s a simple procedure called titration that chemists have figured out. It’s based upon the concept that one molecule of base neutralizes one molecule of acid.

In order to figure out how much extra base (either KOH or lye) that you need to add to you oil in order to begin the transesterification reaction (turn it into biofuel) here is what you do. Use oil that you’ve already filtered, heated, and siphoned:

  1. Dissolve 1g of KOH or lye in 1L of distilled or purified water.
  2. Put this reference solution in jar 1.
  3. In jar 2, add 20ml of isopropyl alcohol.
  4. Pour 10 ml of the alcohol into jar 3.
  5. Add 2 or 3 drops of phenolphthalein solution (a pH indicator) to jar 3.
  6. Swirl to mix.
  7. Add 1ml of your oil to jar 3 and swirl to thoroughly mix. Bubbles in the oil will separate and start to mix with the alcohol.
  8. Repeat steps 3-7 two more times so that you have 3 separate jars of this solution. It’s called the analyte.
  9. Now begin the titration process. Record the amount of reference solution in the burette.
  10. Start with 1 jar of analyte solution under the tap of the burette of reference solution.
  11. Add one drop of reference solution at a time to the analyte, swirling between each drop to see if color goes away.
  12. Continue to add reference solution until the mixture of analyte and reference solution turns pink and stays pink for 30 seconds while swirling.
  13. Record how much reference solution you used by finding the difference between how much reference solution you started with and the final volume. Record quantity used as T.
  14. Complete titration with the other two jars of analyte.
  15. Calculate the average value for T using the three trials.

This sounds really technical, but when you actually do it, you’ll see how easy it actually is. What T equals is the amount of EXTRA base (either KOH or lye) that you’ll need to add per liter of used oil in order to properly turn it to biodiesel. If you were using virgin vegetable oil, you would use 7g of KOH or 5.5g of lye per liter of oil. So, to figure how much you’ll need in total, use this formula:

KOH: T + 7g = how much KOH to add per liter of oil

Lye: T + 5.5g = how much lye to add per liter of oil

Now you know how to make oil at home for conversion into biodiesel. The actual process of making biofuel is fairly easy and can be completed with very little effort.

However, you’re now a step ahead of many other people and this skill will be extremely useful in a SHTF scenario. We did our best to simplify the process so that it’s easy to understand!

This article has been written by Theresa Crouse for Survivopedia.

Is it hard to make your own bio diesel processor?How to Make Bio Diesel

Well, not if you know how to drill a hole, and connect pipes.

If you do, then you can save big bucks with DIY bio diesel kits and plans.

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Click here for more info about this eBook. If you can’t, don’t despair!

There are a lot of good, reliable bio diesel plants available that you can buy either ready to assemble or ready to use.

So, which option is best for you?

General Considerations for Choosing Bio Diesel Plants

Safety of Bio Diesel Kits

How to Make Bio Diesel

When assessing home biodiesel kits – whether DIY or ready-made – safety must be your biggest concern.

Methoxide feed part of biodiesel processor.
Click on pic for source.
When you make your own bio diesel, poisonous gas (methoxide) as well as heat is given off in the mixing of catalyst and alcohol stage of producing bio diesel.

So, unless ventilation is excellent, and you aren’t too close to affect your neighbours, it is important that the container chosen for mixing this is properly sealed so that no toxic fumes escape.

Accurate temperate control is also vital at all stages of the process, not only to ensure it results in a successful batch of biodiesal, but also to avoid exceeding the temperature at which the alcohol (usually methanol) combusts.

Bio Diesel Processor Capacity

Home bio diesel kits and plants come in a range of yield capacities. So before buying one you should work out how much you will need to produce to match your requirements, and how often you are willing to make biodiesel.

Obviously, the bigger the capacity of biodiesel conversion kits the less often you would need to make up a batch.

Making Your Own Bio Diesel Processor

How to Make Bio Diesel

With a reliable step-by-step guide to follow, building your own bio diesel kits is a safe and viable option. However, when it comes to safety, the buck stops with you!

Home made biodiesel processor wash tank.
Click on image to view source.
Your DIY home bio diesel generator will only be as safe and reliable as the quality of components and attention to workmanship that you have put into it!

So follow the home biodiesel kit instructions to the letter in both construction and use of the plant.

Off-the-Shelf Bio Diesel Processors

How to Make Bio Diesel

Biodiesel Processor. Expect to pay from $1800 to around $3000 for simple but cost effective bio diesel plants.

While there are some excellent biodiesel home kits constructed of industrial grade plastic on the market, stainless steel tanks are more expensive but safer simply because they won’t burn if there’s a fire.

Also remember that ready-made bio diesel plants will cost more to buy and ship than those that come as home biodiesel kits and need to be assembled by you.

Then there’s the upper end of the market…

Some biodiesel fuel kits are fully sealed units (no toxic fumes) made with stainless steel components and high grade woven biodiesel hoses where you just put the ingredients into the right places and press a button – the whole process is managed for you. Of course such units are going to cost you a lot more!

I have boought a 2.4 ford transit van and am considering making my own fuel.

What is involved and is it safe to do so? I have heard that only bosch pumps can have biodiesel run through them

8 Answers

How to Make Bio Diesel

how to make biodiesel?

Biodiesel is most commonly made from used cooking oil. It can also be made from oil pressed from crops such as canola (rapeseed), and from oil pressed from algae. You will need an oil press if you are going to press your own oil.

There are a lot of videos on You tube and other sites that show the process of making biodiesel. Basically it involves, breaking a chain of molecules off of the oil, to make it flammable, and then filtering the result so that it is 99.9% pure. It is very dangerous to make biodiesel, so you most use safety precautions.

My understanding of biodiesel is that it works in diesel engines, not gasoline engines. So make sure your Ford Transit has a diesel engine.

In today’s era the world is shifting quickly to Green Energy- Biodiesel to overcome the sheath of polluted emissions over our environment, Atmospheric Pollution, Global Warming, Health hazards, Scarcity of Fuels etc. MEDORS is looking forward to help the environment “Go Green” and developed technology for Manufacturing, assembling and processing of Biodiesel Plants to produce Biodiesel as an alternative source of Energy.

How to Make Bio Diesel

Making biodiesel is basically refining vegetable oil. You need filter the oil, then refine the oil in a process that uses methanol and lye. Safe? There are some hazards. As far as your fuel pump. if there are any internal seals made of rubber, they will degrade when using with biodiesel. Viton is the standard, instead of rubber, because biodiesel is very caustic. It will eat the paint off your car and clean the inside of your fuel tank.

What is Biodiesel Fuel, is a type of fuel that is created through the renewable green energy sources, particularly local crops. You can use vegetable oil and other crops to power your car. If you have a source, for example a restaurant that discards vegetable oil at the end of the night, you can make biodiesel and you can make a lot of it.

Rudolf Diesel, the man who invented the diesel engine in 1892 intended for his engine to run on various fuel sources, derived from many different crops. Many celebrities believe in the power of Biodiesel and use it in their everyday lives. Jay Leno had GM create what is known as his EcoJet, is a jet engine, biodiesel-powered car. Willie Nelson’s tour bus is powered through biodiesel. Splash actress Darryl Hannah and sustainable living advocate powers her Chevrolet El Camino with biodiesel. Biodiesel Fuel is derived from plant or animal fat. Therefore, some cars omit a “French fry” smell if powered solely through vegetable oil. Biodiesel is created through a process known as transesterification. Methanol or Ethanol is used as the alcohol component when combined with vegetable or animal oil, or the oil component. Lye or potassium hydrochloride is the catalyst. After processing, this results in biodiesel.

Biodiesel is good for your diesel car and the environment. Why?

◦ No Contribution to Global Warming

◦ Equal Amount of MPG for Petrodiesel

You can purchase biodiesel from producers and marketers, petroleum distributors and certain “gas” pumps across the nation. You can also create Biodiesel yourself. There are step-by-step guidelines to creating your own biodiesel. The best thing to do is research online and pick up books that provide a detailed account of exactly how to make the product. Biodiesel is not straight vegetable oil. It is absolutely necessary to follow the detailed procedures to ensure that you are safe and that your car and its engine is not harmed in any way. Through the creation of biodiesel, you do not need to add any type of conversion or modification to your engine or fuel system. Therefore following the directions is absolutely crucial. Do your research and make a checklist to see if biodiesel is right for you and your car.

This page contains the chemical processes involved with making Biodiesel. If you want to know how to make Biodiesel at home then please click this link

Making Biodiesel – The Process

The process of making biodiesel is known as transesterification. This process is achieved by adding methanol to vegetable oil. The process requires a catalyst to increase the rate of the chemical reaction between the methanol and vegetable oil. The catalyst used in the creation of biodiesel is an alkaline. This can be either either Potassium Hydroxide or Sodium Hydroxide.

When the transesterification process is complete the catalyst can be recovered completely unaffected by the chemical reaction that it helped accelerate. This is along with the glycerol separated from the vegetable oil.

How to Make Bio Diesel

How Biodiesel is made
If waste vegetable oil is used you also have to consider that it have been been reheated several times during the course of its use. Reheating causes some of the fatty acids to bond to the glycerol then break away and float freely in the vegetable oil – hence the name Free Fatty Acid (FFA) . There are two ways of dealing with free fatty acids:

1. Esterify the FFAs creating methyl esters then proceeding with the transesterification.
2. Increase the amount of catalyst in the transesterifaction process so that the additional catalyst neutralises the Fatty Free Acids – creating soap as an additional by-product.

Option 1 is used in the commercial production of biodiesel. For smaller scale production option 2 is favoured as it reduces the complexity of the whole process. If using option 2, we would have to perform a titration on a sample of the waste vegetable oil in order to calculate the amount of additional catalyst required to neutralise the Fatty Free Acids.

Ths additional catalyst would then react with the Fatty Free Acids creating soap in the process.

Transesterification is a reversible reaction. This means that the process is working both ways simultaneously until a balance between the vegetable oil and biodiesel is reached. Consequently we need to ensure that the process continues the creation of biodiesel rather than stall once it reaches this point of equilibrium.

In commercial production we would tap off the output as it is created thus ensuring that there is a greater quantity of input vegetable oil to keep the reaction producing the biodiesel. For smaller scale production it is more practical to use an increased volume of methanol to ensure that the reaction continues in the direction of producing biodiesel.

Like the catalyst, this excess methanol will be left over after completion of the reaction.

How to Make Bio Diesel

How to Make Bio Diesel

How to Make Bio Diesel

How to Make Bio Diesel

How to Make Bio Diesel

How to Make Bio Diesel

How to Make Bio Diesel

How to Make Bio Diesel

Run your car on vegetable oil for absolutely FREE! Fast food joints have to pay to have their grease hauled off and disposed, but you can run your car off it just like petrol.

  • Description
  • Reviews (4)

Description

Bio Diesel or BioDiesel (made from french fry grease or straight vegetable oil SVO) is a clean gas Substitute to polluting petroleum/diesel products. This HUGE 329 page book is packed with 5 different methods for making & running your vehicle on BIO-DIESEL for as low as $0.50 per gal.

Simple and basic, no specialty knowledge/experience needed. Typical items used making access available to everyone.

  • Cheap AND easy
  • Is applicable in any region, any temperature and adapted to any size required
  • Beginner to Experienced level format (process made simple)
  • Tested, and now patented process
  • Set up time is typically 2 days.
  • 100% money back guarantee if not satisfied
  • Free unlimited support

Dan Martin’s has written his guides so that everyone, everywhere, of all ages and genders can easily carry-out each set of step by step instructions at the lowest cost (often with free materials) possible. They’re packed with easy to read directions, clear step specific photos and great diagrams/drawings.

No more excuses, sit down this weekend and do it!

To save on paper and further help the environment, all books are now digitally delivered

4 reviews for How to Make Bio-Diesel

Hanz – September 9, 2011

This is a good explanation on alternative energy options. It’s not a new idea, of course, but it’s written in a very practical, easy to understand way. I like the different choices you give for thinning the oil. I’m anxious to put it to the test.

jack olsen – July 18, 2012

Excellent list of ideas and product availability-easy paths to follow to succeed.” Useful information in getting started in producing my first bio-diesel.”

Sam – October 27, 2012

Interesting concept. Not sure if restaurants are charging now for their vegetable oil waste or they may be recycling the oil waste with Green companies who are trying to bottle the biodiesel concept to patent it and control biodiesel like the oil companies control gas prices. It’s a good alternative and any choice is better than what we have now—no choice.

Richard Gains – November 1, 2012

I like the ideas put forth in this guide. However, it seems like it would cost more energy to keep the hot water tank heated for the stored oil than you would save in using biodiesel oil, once made, in the car. Also, it seems like you would need a constant supply of the waste vegetable oil from truck stop or restaurant waste bins to keep making enough biodiesel to keep your car running. However, if those two hurdles could be solved, and there was a way to get an on-going supply of the vegetable oil waste in mass quantity, it might be a cheaper way to keep the car running than being a slave to the oil companies controls.

Go Green Technology!

How to Make Bio Diesel

How to Make Bio Diesel

How to Make Bio Diesel

How to Produce Biodiesel at Home

Many try producing biodiesel, however with so many variables it can be very tough to come up with a dependable system to replicate results. The good news is that you can learn how to produce biodiesel without complex formulas or a technical background, using step by step guides and visual instructions that are easy to understand and follow.

Here are some excellent Free Guides on How to Produce Biodiesel:

FAQ: How to Produce Biodiesel

What is Biodiesel?

Vegetable and other natural oils are thicker than diesel fuel, so must be thinned in order to properly operate in a diesel engine. Producing biodiesel results from vegetable oil being chemically treated through a process called transesterification to remove the glycerin and thereby to thin the oil so it burns like diesel fuel.

Producing biodiesel requires an industrial alcohol such as methanol and a catalyst such as lye to convert the oil into a fatty acid methyl ester fuel. The fuel is registered with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as legal for use in any concentration with diesel fuel, for the operation of both highway and non-road diesel vehicles.

Different than a Straight Vegetable Oil (SVO) Diesel Conversion Kit?

Another way to use vegetable oil as fuel is to heat the oil on board the vehicle to thin it. Check out how a Diesel Conversion Kit works to switch your diesel vehicle into a dual fuel hybrid.

Will Biodiesel work with my Vehicle?

Biodiesel works in most diesel vehicles without any vehicle modification! The solvent properties of Biodiesel can however result in a slow degradation of rubber fuel lines over an extended course of time, so it is beneficial to use Synthetic Polymer Fuel Lines, which are standard in almost every vehicle after 1985.

It usually a simple procedure to update your fuel lines if necessary. Biodiesel is likely to be affected by extreme cold, so an electric fuel heater should be added to the vehicle for maximum assurance of smooth effectiveness in cold environments.

How do I store biodiesel?

Biodiesel can be stored in your processing unit once it is made, or pumped into barrels or drums, or something built specifically for this purpose such as a biodiesel storage tank. If your biodiesel will be stored for some time consider adding biocides, which are additives designed to stop the growth of microorganisms that are available at auto parts stores.

Over time biodiesel can have a tendency to cause slow degredation to rubber parts, so choose containers that are free of rubber or are have synthetic rubber. You will also want a suitable biodiesel pump in order to transfer the fuel most effectively.

What Equipment Do I Need To begin Producing Biodiesel?

With the proper equipment, producing Biodiesel fuel is easier than you think, and far better than watching the sharp increase in price every time you are filling up your tank!

Oil Source : To find, gather, and filter a waste oil source, such as from used cooking oil at restaurants, refer to the Vegetable Oil Filtration Guide. You can also purchase oil sources from local farms, or you can grow it yourself and use an Oil Expeller Press to obtain the oil. Some are even choosing to make Biodiesel from Algae!

Biodiesel Processors: These incredible units are the professional or no hassle answer to how to produce biodiesel. Here you can find a selection of Biodiesel Processors, or you can build one your own with this free How to Produce Biodiesel Guide .

Safety Gear: Because youll be using chemicals to refine your oil, you should always be sure youre wearing protective safety gear before starting the process. Safety goggles, gloves, protective apron and boots are essential.

Chemicals: Producing Biodiesel requires methanol, sulfuric acid and catalyst along with air-tight storage containers for each.

Fuel Filter: The fuel filter works to filter and remove water from the fuel. Because initial use of Biodiesel can release deposits previously accumulated on tank walls and pipes, its recommended that the fuel filter be changed after the first tank of Biodiesel.

Transfer Pump: A biodiesel pump provides safe, efficient transfer of the fuel to your engine. Consider models that are heavy duty with thermal overload protection, strainer and automatic nozzle for easy fuel transfer.

Fuel Heaters: A Biodiesel fuel can sometimes gel, either due to cold temperatures or because its been produced from heavily saturated fats such as waste oil from restaurants. An Electric Fuel Heater works to effectively keep Biodiesel from solidifying.

Biocides: Biocides are an additive designed to stop the growth of microorganisms in your fuel, thus helping preserve the life of stored Biodiesel.

Synthetic Polymer Fuel Lines: The solvent properties of Biodiesel can result in a slow degradation of rubber fuel lines over the course of months or years. Therefore, it is beneficial to use Synthetic Polymer Fuel Lines when it comes time for replacement.

BioDiesel – Make Biodiesel At Home!

Posts Tagged ‘Making BioDiesel’

What is Bio Fuel?

Biodiesel as Alternative Fuel-Make Your Own BioDiesel

With fluctuating fuel prices there seem to be an industrial revolution to look for an alternative fuel. People want something more economical when it comes to fuel. The majority want a cleaner and safer fuel. They want fuel that is also cheaper.

Today, we get to experience a number of new alternative fuel and a couple of them have gathered a following. Biodiesel is one of the fuel that is in this category. Biodiesel offers a great alternative to high priced diesel fuel.

Biodiesel is Different

One of the things that makes Biodiesel a good candidate is that you do not need to buy a new car or even modify your car so that you can use Biodiesel. If you have been using diesel as fuel then you can Biodiesel.

It is very different from regular diesel, but in positive ways. Biodiesel works like any other diesel which is the main reason why you can use this fuel in your engine just as you would regular diesel. In addition, Biodiesel is proven to burn cleaner, so there tend to be lesser wear and tear and lesser pollution to the environment. It also is safer with less chance of explosion or fire.

Different Blends of Biodiesel

If you look around, most commercial Biodiesel sold today are blended version. This means is that Biodiesel and regular diesel are mixed together at different levels. The reason is that Biodiesel at its purest form does not perform well with conventional rubber parts found in most cars. You see, hoses and other rubber parts in the car will wear down over time with Biodiesel use. The solution to correct this common issue is to mix Biodiesel and regular diesel into a blend.

B100 (ie. 100% Biodiesel) is non-blended Biodiesel can still be found. The reason why they are sold is because some car owners have removed the rubber parts in their engine. These drivers will get the maximum benefits from using pure Biodiesel. However, a blended Biodiesel still wins over the straight diesel fuel and it can be used in any diesel-driven vehicle without much issues.

The Myths of Biodiesel

There are many myths about Biodiesel that make people question about the usability. The known issue of Biodiesel breaking down rubber parts of the engine is not really that huge of a deal. It is cheap when it comes to changing the rubber parts compared to the common problems that may arise from using regular diesel. Biodiesel is much cleaner and so the effect of wear and tear is greatly reduced. This will also mean that you will have lesser servicing done to your vehicle

In the end, most drivers will realize that Biodiesel is simply a better choice. Despite all the rumors and negative reports, Biodiesel has proven itself as the diesel fuel alternative for all.

How to Make BioDiesel!

Making Biodiesel

Biodiesel boasts a number of benefits compared to other alternative fuel, but one of the biggest benefits is that that anyone can make Biodiesel at home. Let us imagine: Being able to make your own fuel for your vehicle or even create energy to run your home. Won’t that be interesting? That would translate into lots savings for you.

The process of making Biodiesel is not really that difficult. It is great to get involved in making your own Biodiesel if you can because you get to save gas costs when you use Biodiesel that is made from your home.

Making Biodiesel – The Supplies

To produce a small volume of Biodiesel at home, you only need a few sets of inputs You have to source out actual ingredients to make the Biodiesel alcohol substance, lye and vegetable oil. You also need some supplies to mix the fuel: unfilled plastic bottles, duct tape, a blender and measuring cups. Make sure that any inputs for the production of Biodiesel should not be used for any other purpose and avoid using again for your cooking ingredients.

When supplies are ready, you can start learning the process of making Biodiesel

Hazard Free Procedure

Producing Biodiesel in not a risky business, health wise. Fire or explosion is remote to happen. Infact your only major concern in terms of your safety, hurting yourself due to flames. Exercise caution and ensure that the mixture’s temperature is under control.

You will go through the easy process of making Biodiesel which entails bringing the ingredients together, letting it set, breaking up the byproduct and Biodiesel and then purifying the Biodiesel. The whole process can take a few days to a few weeks. The cleanliness of your vegetable oil has bearing on the production timeframe.

Low Volume or High Volume

Yields in Biodiesel production can be small scale or large scale. Using Biodiesel kits is a good idea if your goal is to make a few gallons of Biodiesel at a time. If you are a lawnmower user or a user of other lawn equipments then A Biodiesel kit makes sense. It is easy to use and will need a small level of inputs.

If you are looking to make more Biodiesel, say to fuel your vehicle, then you will need a Biodiesel processor. This makes the process super simple, so your output can reach more than a few a gallons at a time. With a processor you will need some more supplies but you can be more productive in making Biodiesel since iterative tasks can be handled by the processor.

According to some sources biodiesel fuel involves a simple process and is easy to make, but other sources give a complicated process with a lot of precautions. This complicated process with all the precautions is probably the more correct process and should be the process used in order to remain safe while producing your biodiesel fuel. Once you have made the fuel, however you have a clean burning fuel that will not contaminate the environment.

Homemade biodiesel

The process for making biodiesel fuel is similar to the soap making process. In fact when it does separate you get glycerin, which can be made into soap. So you not only have your biodiesel fuel, but also glycerin.

In order to make biodiesel you can use any leftover oils and animal fats. These must first be filtered to remove any food particles. The oil is then heated and mixed with lye and alcohol. This mixture can be very dangerous and the ingredients by themselves are dangerous to an inexperienced person. You can’t breathe it or get it on your skin. If you are not experienced at using chemicals you should not try it.

Children and pets must be kept away from this process completely. Heating of the oil itself can be dangerous. After mixing, the glycerin will separate to the bottom and the biodiesel fuel will be on the top. One source talked about water-washing the fuel to enhance its purity. For a more detailed explanation for making your own biodiesel, please refer to articles below.

Biodiesel from algaeHow to Make Bio Diesel

The energy crisis in the 1970’s prompted the U. S. government to establish the Aquatics Species Program in 1978 initiated by President Carter. Research continued for some 20 years without coming to viable conclusions and the program was then discontinued by President Clinton in 1996. The conclusion of the program produced a 328 page report that is sometimes referred to as the “Algae Bible.” It is all about producing biodiesel fuel from a little plant called Algae.

Researchers, scientists, and inventors around the world experiment with different techniques for producing biodiesel fuels.

One such person according to the Popular Science article entitled, The Greenest Green Fuel by Elizabeth Svoboda, is Jim Sears. He established a firm called Solix Biofuels in Boulder, Colorado in conjunction with the Colorado State University, where he started the process of making biodiesel fuel from Algae. Although the founder he has been voted out as Solix’s CEO, but the program continues.

Jim Sears process involves growing colonies of Botryococcus Braunii Algae, which is so far the algae that stores the most fat, in the desert in transparent plastic bags. There are thousands of species of algae, and scientists are continuing their search for better and better oil-producing algae.

Algae are simple organisms that photosynthesize and produce vegetable oil, which can be made into biodiesel fuel. To grow, algae only needs water, sunlight, and carbon dioxide. Due to their small size they grow and multiply quickly and can be grown in a more confined space than soybeans, canola, corn and other seed oils.

The process used by Solix to make biodiesel fuel from algae is as follows: After the colonies of algae have matured, they are starved for nutrients which puts them into survival mode which causes them to produce more fats. Once they have produced the fats they are collected and broken apart and filtered. Solvents such as methanol are used to separate the fats from water-soluble proteins and sugars. The collected fats are purified and the solvents are evaporated. The final process is to put the fats into a chemical reactor that completes the process of producing biodiesel fuel from the vegetable oil of the algae plant.

Since algae needs a lot of CO2 or carbon dioxide to grow and mature, the Solix lab has added a Brewery to the operation – the New Belgium Brewery. Since breweries typically release a huge amount of their by-product, CO2, this makes for easy access to CO2 needed to nourish the algae.

Biodiesel fuel research

Other companies engaged in the active experimentation and research into biodiesel fuel are

* Green Fuel with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology
* Aurora Biofuels
* Solazyne
* Green Fuel Technologies Corp of Cambridge Massachusetts.

Green Fuels Technologies has been negotiating with a South African biodiesel producer to produce up to 6 million gallons of biodiesel per year.

Biodiesel is a global venture. In the U. S. alone 140 billion gallons of biodiesel is needed every year to replace petroleum transportation fuel. This is according to information supplied by Popular Science, July 2007. Also stated, is that it would take 3 billion acres of land to supply that amount of biodiesel and there are only 434 million acres in the U. S., but enough algae could be grown on 95 million acres. And since Algae grows in water, desert land, or any land could be used to house the reactor and processing plant to grow and produce the algae.

Producing fuel from algae is still in the R & D stage, being researchers are still working on extracting the oil from the algae, and still looking for the highest oil producing algae researchers and scientists involved in the process.

However, if scientists do succeed, the prospect of using carbon dioxide emissions to fuel the algae growth seems like a good way to stop polluting the environment and to offer better air quality.

How to Make Bio Diesel

Biodiesel is a diesel fuel that is made by reacting vegetable oil (cooking oil) with other common chemicals. Biodiesel may be used in any diesel automotive engine in its pure form or blended with petroleum-based diesel. No modifications are required, and the result is a less-expensive, renewable, clean-burning fuel.

Here’s how to make biodiesel from fresh oil. You can also make biodiesel from waste cooking oil, but that is a little more involved, so let’s start with the basics.

Materials for Making Biodiesel

  • 1 liter of new vegetable oil (e.g., canola oil, corn oil, soybean oil)
  • 3.5 grams (0.12 ounces) sodium hydroxide (also known as lye). Sodium hydroxide is used for some drain cleaners. The label should state that the product contains sodium hydroxide (not calcium hypochlorite, which is found in many other drain cleaners).
  • 200 milliliters (6.8 fluid ounces) of methanol (methyl alcohol). Heet fuel treatment is methanol. Be sure the label says the product contains methanol (Iso-Heet, for example, contains isopropyl alcohol and won’t work).
  • Blender with a low-speed option. The pitcher for the blender is to be used only for making biodiesel. You want to use one made from glass, not plastic because the methanol you will use can react with plastic.
  • Digital scale to accurately measure 3.5 grams (0.12 ounces)
  • Glass container marked for 200 milliliters (6.8 fluid ounces). If you don’t have a beaker, measure the volume using a measuring cup, pour it into a glass jar, then mark the fill-line on the outside of the jar.
  • Glass or plastic container that is marked for 1 liter (1.1 quarts)
  • Widemouthed glass or plastic container that will hold at least 1.5 liters (2-quart pitcher works well)
  • Safety glasses, gloves, and an (optional) apron

You do not want to get sodium hydroxide or methanol on your skin, nor do you want to breathe the vapors from either chemical. Both chemicals are toxic. Please read the warning labels on the containers for these products. Methanol is readily absorbed through your skin, so do not get it on your hands. Sodium hydroxide is caustic and will give you a chemical burn. Prepare your biodiesel in a well-ventilated area. If you spill either chemical on your skin, rinse it off immediately with water.

How to Make Biodiesel

  1. You want to prepare the biodiesel in a room that is at least 70 degrees F because the chemical reaction will not proceed to completion if the temperature is too low.
  2. If you haven’t already, label all your containers as “Toxic-Only Use for Making Biodiesel.” You don’t want anyone drinking your supplies, and you don’t want to use the glassware for food again.
  3. Pour 200 milliliters methanol (Heet) into the glass blender pitcher.
  4. Turn the blender on its lowest setting and slowly add 3.5 grams sodium hydroxide (lye). This reaction produces sodium methoxide, which must be used right away or else it loses its effectiveness. (Like sodium hydroxide, it can be stored away from air/moisture, but that might not be practical for a home setup.)
  5. Mix the methanol and sodium hydroxide until the sodium hydroxide has completely dissolved (about 2 minutes), then add 1 liter of vegetable oil to this mixture.
  6. Continue blending this mixture (on low speed) for 20 to 30 minutes.
  7. Pour the mixture into a widemouthed jar. You will see the liquid start to separate out into layers. The bottom layer will be glycerin. The top layer is biodiesel.
  8. Allow at least a couple of hours for the mixture to fully separate. You want to keep the top layer as your biodiesel fuel. If you like, you can keep the glycerin for other projects. You can either carefully pour off the biodiesel or use a pump or baster to pull the biodiesel off of the glycerin.

Using Biodiesel

Normally, you can use pure biodiesel or a mixture of biodiesel and petroleum diesel as a fuel in any unmodified diesel engine. There are two situations in which you definitely should mix biodiesel with petroleum-based diesel:

  • If you are going to be running the engine at a temperature lower than 55 degrees Fahrenheit (13 degrees C), you should mix biodiesel with petroleum diesel. A 50:50 mixture will work in cold weather. Pure biodiesel will thicken and cloud at 55 degrees Fahrenheit, which could clog your fuel line and stop your engine. Pure petroleum diesel, in contrast, has a cloud point of -10 degrees Fahrenheit (-24 degrees C). The colder your conditions, the higher the percentage of petroleum diesel you will want to use. Above 55 degrees Fahrenheit, you can use pure biodiesel without any problem. Both types of diesel return to normal as soon as the temperature warms above their cloud point.
  • You will want to use a mixture of 20% biodiesel with 80% petroleum diesel (called B20) if your engine has natural rubber seals or hoses. Pure biodiesel can degrade natural rubber, though B20 tends not to cause problems. If you have an older engine (which is where natural rubber parts are found), you could replace the rubber with polymer parts and run pure biodiesel.

Biodiesel Stability and Shelf Life

You probably don’t stop to think about it, but all fuels have a shelf life that depends on their chemical composition and storage conditions. The chemical stability of biodiesel depends on the oil from which it was derived.

Biodiesel is the best alternative to petrol and petroleum products along with petroleum diesel. Its preparation from biodegradable substances is the primary reason for the diesel being called the Biodiesel. The Biodiesel can be used in its pure form, but is also adaptable to a blend with petroleum diesel.

The preparation of this Biodiesel is a very easy task and can be carried out even in a ranch or farm. Biodiesel can be made through numerous processes. It is easier to make a homebrew Biodiesel than to make it on a large scale or in a refinery. The following are some of the ways that are commonly used for preparing the Biodiesel at home.

Use of Vegetable Oil

Under proper conditions, waste as well as new vegetable oil can be used for the production of Biodiesel.

Preparation of Biodiesel using new vegetable oil: For the preparation of Biodiesel, there are a lot of kits that are available on the market today. For making convenient Biodiesel, you must first study the kit carefully and must first make small batches of it. For the preparation of a home brew Biodiesel, you will need the following apparatus:

  • A blender with Glass jar.
  • A scale which weighs upto 0 to 50 gm with the nearest 0.1 gm.
  • One quart jar.
  • A hand pump
  • A liquid measuring cup
  • Methanol
  • Sodium Hydroxide

Method

Take proper care of your guarding equipments and then pour 1 cup methanol in the blender. Put 3.5 gm of sodium hydroxide and put it in the methanol in the blender. Blend the mixture for about 5 minutes. The blended mixture is a very strong base, called sodium methoxide.

Please take care to avoid getting in contact with it. Pour one quart of new vegetable oil into the sodium methoxide and blend the mixture for 30 minutes at low speed. Let the mixture to set for around 8 hours at room temperature.

The mixture after the setting is a mixture of the Biodiesel, which floats on top of a dark colored glycerol. You can then pump the light Biodiesel out with the help of the hand pump.

Preparation of Biodiesel using waste vegetable oil: The waste oil is more acidic than the new oil because of the high amount of fatty acids that are present in it. You will have to first determine the amount of catalyst needed for the preparation with the help of titration.

When you determine how much sodium hydroxide is required, you can follow the same method for the preparation of Biodiesel with the new vegetable cooking oil. The end result is also the same, but there is a white layer in between the diesel and the glycerol.

It is the soap and is present if there is even a small amount of water present in the vegetable oil. To remove the oil you will have to warm the oil and when the water settles down, you can remove it by the hand pump or can just pour it over the top.

Did You Know?

What is Biodiesel Fuel?

Making Biodiesel at Home

Method 1

  • Isopropyl alcohol
  • Measuring cylinders
  • Titration apparatus (burette, pipette, conical flask, beaker, etc.)
  • Phenolphthalein indicator
  • Distilled water (DW)
  • Respirators that are chemically resistant
  • Long-sleeved gloves
  • Eye protection like safety goggles, etc.

Procedure

1. Firstly, you need to filter the oil before starting with any kind of complicated process. For this, a simple way is to hang a porous bag onto a pole, and keep a large bucket below it. The oil is poured into these bags and gets filtered, accumulating in the bucket below.

At this point, the acid in the oil has been neutralized, and the reaction is complete.

6. Note down the reading of the amount of lye used, and find out the required quantity of this compound with the help of the following formula:

Number of Moles (N) = Volume (V) x Molarity (M)

For example, if neutralizing 25 ml oil with methanol requires about 5 ml of lye (0.1 molarity), then the concentration of the latter would be:

No. of moles (NaOH) = 25 x 0.1 = 0.25 moles

This provides us with a rough idea of the amount of chemicals required for making the biodiesel.

Method 2

Procedure

1. Filter the oil in order to get rid of all the particulate matter, like bits of fried food leftovers. Use a number of filtering screens. If you want to avoid this step of the process, you can just buy unused oil.

2. Heat the oil up to about 60°C for about 15 minutes, in order to remove any water that might be present in it.

3. Then, put the oil in a settling tank, and let it stand out for 24 hours to allow it to separate. Either drain out the water from the top or from below.

4. Next, the oil should be measured precisely and heated until all the solids melt. It is important to measure it correctly so that the other ingredients that are added are also in proper proportions.

5. Then, using a ratio of 8% to the total amount of oil, add methanol that is at least 99% pure. The higher the purity of the methanol, the better.

6. Keep blending the methanol in the oil for about five minutes. At this stage of the procedure, the mixture of oil and methanol will look cloudy.

Convert vegetable oil into a liter of biodiesel fuel.

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How to Make Bio Diesel

It’s easy to make a small batch of biodiesel that will work in any diesel engine, from a model airplane engine to the family car. You don’t need any special equipment — an old juice bottle will serve as the “reactor” vessel — and on such a small scale you can quickly refine your technique and perform further experiments. After a few liters’ worth of experience, you’ll know if you’ve been bitten by the biodiesel bug.

The principle behind biodieseling is to take vegetable oil (either new or used), and process it into a fuel that’s thin enough to spray from a regular diesel engine’s fuel-injection system. This is done chemically, by converting the oil into two types of compounds: biodiesel, which shares the original oil’s combustibility, and glycerin, which retains the oil’s thick, viscous properties. Drain away the glycerin, and you’re left with a fuel that you can pour into any diesel vehicle with no further modification.

Once you get to the far side of the learning curve, making biodiesel is very much like cooking. In fact, a commercial biodiesel production plant shares more in common with a large-scale bakery than a petroleum refinery. There’s organic chemistry involved in baking a cake, but most bakers wouldn’t consider themselves organic chemists.

$92.43 – $157.60

Diesel is used to fuel many different types of machines including:

  • Construction equipment
  • Delivery vehicles
  • Heavy-duty trucks
  • Highway tractors
  • Passenger vehicles
  • Diesel-fired heaters

Diesel fuel is an excellent source of energy because it is relatively safe compared to the more combustible option of gasoline. Diesel engines also generally have more torque than gasoline engines and are quite reliable.

As with gasoline, diesel fuel prices can fluctuate greatly. When the cost of diesel fuel gets too high, you may want to look for another source of fuel. Because diesel fuel is actually a type of oil, you can substitute an alternate source of fuel such as vegetable oil to run your diesel engine, although it will need to be processed first.

Creating your own biodiesel can be done right at home if you have a clean, safe, well-ventilated place to work and attention to detail.

  • Warning: Completely read through the instructions and familiarize yourself with them before beginning to produce biodiesel to prevent accidents, injury, or fire.

Part 1 of 3: Set up your workspace

Materials Needed

  • Fire extinguisher
  • Controlled heat source such as hot plate
  • Nitrile gloves
  • Protective smock or coat (for working with flammable products)
  • Respirator (for fuel vapors)
  • Safety goggles

The environment in which you will be making your biodiesel needs to be clean and well-ventilated.

Step 1: Prepare work area. Set up a work table for use only to make biodiesel and keep it organized.

Step 2: Be prepared. Keep the fire extinguisher within reach of your work space.

Step 3: Control the environment. Keep the environment consistently climate controlled to ensure minimal variance in your resulting product.

Step 4: Have a phone handy. Have a telephone nearby in case of an emergency.

Part 2 of 3: “Cook” the biodiesel

The oil you are using to make biodiesel needs to be mixed with methoxide to separate the oil into biodiesel and glycerol.

  • Warning: This is the most dangerous part of the biodiesel-making process. Be very careful as you will be working with a heat source and harmful chemicals.

Materials Needed

  • Carboys
  • Funnel
  • Large capacity pot
  • Long spoon
  • Lye (sodium hydroxide)
  • Methanol
  • Clean vegetable oil
  • Respirator (for fuel vapors)

Thermometer (choose one that goes up to 300 F)

Warning: Lye is very caustic and can cause burns to the skin, lungs, and eyes. Always use skin, eye, and breathing protection when using lye.

Warning: Methanol is very flammable and can burn your eyes and irritate your skin.

Step 1: Put your safety equipment on. Wear your protective safety equipment whenever you are working on producing biodiesel.

Step 2: Pour your oil into a large capacity pot. You want to raise the temperature slowly, so a tall, narrow pot is better than a wide-bottom pot.

Hang the thermometer in the oil.

You will need to carefully monitor the oil temperature as you are heating it up to 130 degrees Fahrenheit.

Step 3: Mix up your methoxide. For each gallon of oil you have, you will need 10 grams of lye and 750 ml of methanol.

Pour the methanol into a vessel such as a carboy.

Put the lye into the methanol, careful not to breathe the caustic dust.

  • Warning: Do not add methanol to lye! It will cause a violent chemical reaction that can cause excessive heat, resulting in burns, explosion, and injury.

Swirl the lye and methanol together to completely mix them. Seal the container.

Step 4: Put the oil on your heat source and turn it on. Heat the oil slowly until it reaches 130F. The temperature needs to be precise for proper end results.

Step 5: Pour into vessel. Pour the warmed oil into the vessel with the methanol using a large funnel.

Stir the mixture well with a long spoon for 2-3 minutes.

The ensuing reaction separates the biodiesel from the glycerol in the oil. The glycerol will float to the top.

Part 3 of 3: Separate the biodiesel from the glycerol

Materials Needed

  • Baster (large capacity)
  • Diesel fuel container
  • Funnel

Step 1: Let the mixture sit for 3-5 days. The biodiesel will be the transparent top layer while the cloudy glycerol will float to the bottom.

  • Note: If the biodiesel appears cloudy at all, leave it for an extra day, then re-check.

Step 2: Separate the biodiesel from the glycerol. Because the biodiesel is on top, pour it off into a clean, labelled diesel fuel container.

Pour off the biodiesel until just before the glycerol is about to come out. It’s better to leave a few ounces of biodiesel behind than to contaminate your fuel system with glycerol.

Alternatively, you can use a baster to suck the diesel out of your vessel a little at a time.

Step 3: Put the biodiesel in your vehicle. The odor from your exhaust may have a slightly “french-fry” type smell because you are using biodiesel. Don’t be alarmed at this.

Making biodiesel yourself can save great amounts of money but is manufactured in a less controlled environment than regular diesel. There may be higher moisture content, so if your vehicle is equipped with a fuel-water separator valve, be sure to regularly check and empty it of water.

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