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How to make iphone autocorrect ducking let you swear

Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He’s written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times and Reader’s Digest, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami’s NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times—and that’s just here at How-To Geek. Read more.

AutoCorrect automatically fixes typos, which is convenient—but it thinks swears are typos. Your iPhone or iPad likes changing swear words into similar, incorrect words. If you ducking hate that, here’s how to get the keyboard out of your way.

All you have to do is add the curse words (or whatever other words) to your text replacement shortcuts. Any words you have there are treated as real words by the keyboard.

Head to Settings > General > Keyboard > Text Replacement on your iPhone. Tap the “+” button to add a new shortcut.

Type the word you want to use into the “Phrase” box. For example, to get your iPhone to stop correcting “fucking” into “ducking,” type “fucking.”

Tap “Save” after. You don’t have to type anything into the Shortcut box.

You’ll see the shortcut appear here. Repeat this process to add as many words as you want—for example, if you use similar words a lot, you might want to add “fuck,” “fucker,” and other variations

Of course, this also works for words that aren’t profanity. If you have a word you use as an in-joke or a nickname that doesn’t appear in a normal dictionary, you can add it to the shortcuts here and your iPhone keyboard will understand that it’s a word you’re trying to type.

When you try typing that curse word once again, your iPhone will consider any words in your text replacement shortcuts as valid words.

Even if you make a typo while trying to type the swear word, your iPhone will helpfully correct it to the properly spelled swear word.

Other Ways to Tame Autocorrect

This isn’t the only way to stop autocorrect from bugging you. You could also add contacts to your phone with profanity in their name. For example, if you added a contact named “Fuck Fucker,” your iPhone would automatically think “Fuck” and “Fucker” are fine, acceptable words and automatically offer them while typing. However, it’s probably better to have the profanity in your shortcuts rather than littering your contacts.

You can also disable autocorrect to prevent it from getting in your way if you want. But we think autocorrect is pretty useful after you’ve trained it to stop messing up the words you want to type.

If you would like to disable autocorrect, head to Settings > General > Keyboard and disable the “Auto-Correction” option.

Finally, it’s possible to train autocorrect with a lot of time and patience. When you type a curse word, just tap the option at the top-left corner of the keyboard’s suggestion bar—the one enclosed in quotation marks. This tells the keyboard that, yes, you did mean to type this word. After you do this enough times, the keyboard should gradually learn that you meant to type the word and stop correcting it.

However, this can take a while. It really is faster to add the profanity to your text replacement shortcuts instead of fighting a long, drawn-out battle with that ducking keyboard.

This default setting can be annoying, but it ensures children—and anyone who doesn’t want to use profanity—won’t have it automatically pop up as a suggestion, especially in professional emails and messages. That’s fine, but we wish Apple would offer a simple “Allow Profanity” option that made this easier. Google offers a single toggle to enable profanity on its Gboard keyboard, after all.

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‘I was the person responsible for making the software . I’m sorry,’ says Ken Kocienda

Unless you’ve never uttered a dirty word, you’ve likely had an impassioned text using profanity autocorrected on your iPhone — and judging from the new products Apple announced this week, it doesn’t look like the feature will be changing anytime soon.

Engineer Ken Kocienda is responsible for creating the autocorrect feature for the original Apple product. Kocienda was a principal engineer of iPhone software at Apple for over 15 years, and recounts his experiences in his book, Creative Selection: Inside Apple’s Design Process During the Golden Age of Steve Jobs.

Kocienda explained the thinking behind the autocorrect software to The Current‘s Friday host Michelle Shephard.

Here is part of their conversation.

So WTF Ken? Why does iPhone want to clean up our language?

Well, this is part of a product decision that we made years ago for the original iPhone. I was the person responsible for making the software keyboard, compiling the dictionary and working with the team to make this decision to get in the way of your swearing. I’m sorry.

It’s so fascinating to hear about those early days. Can you take us into those labs? What were you thinking when you were designing the autocorrect software?

Let me just take you back for a second. If you think about smartphones before the iPhone, it was the BlackBerry, with its hardware keyboard, those little plastic chiclet keys. Well, the iPhone was never going to have a keyboard like that — you couldn’t feel the keys. So the software had to step in to help you get what you wanted to type.

So we came across this problem that you’re bringing up here of swearing. Let me tell you about it from the other angle.

Picture yourself. You’re on vacation. You’ve rented a house by the lake and you want to tell grandma about it. You want to tell her about the beautiful ducks on the pond. You don’t want the software to come in and replace that word and have the message take a whole other direction.

And so, I’m sorry . but it was the best choice that we could make at the time.

I covered terrorism for the last 15 years and whenever I try and type ‘it is’, I now get ‘ISIS’. And ‘she has’ becomes ‘Shabaab’. How does the technology work?

The idea of autocorrect is that it looks at the patterns of the keys that you type — to type the word that you’re going for. Now, in your case, covering terrorism with these new terms, and so the software learns, well, these are pretty important words for you. You type them a lot.

So the iPhone wants to change ‘f–k’ to duck. How did you settle on that? Why not ‘luck’ or ‘truck’?

Well, it has to do with the proximity of the keys to each other. Autocorrection isn’t spelling correction — I mean, we’re pretty familiar with how the computer can help us with our faulty spelling. But on the iPhone it was a matter of, you can’t feel the keys, and so it’s likely you’re going to make these little mistakes to the right or to the left or above or below. And so the letter D for ‘duck’ and the letter F for—well, that other word—they’re right next to each other on the keyboard. So that’s why those two words kind of got this magnetic attraction to each other.

Has there ever been any talk of tweaking the anti-profanity part of the software?

We’ve gone back and forth. Let me tell you a different angle on this. From the very beginning, we realized that this problem extends into different areas. For example, hate speech. We actually had to go and research all of the nastiest, most horrible things that people say to each other and about each other and put them in the dictionary. It’s kind of an interesting time to just plumb those depths. But the notion there was, we wanted to recognize those words, and I marked them so that the software would never offer them.

What do you make of this idea that you’re limiting an incredibly powerful communication tool with the feature?

I’ll be honest with you. I hate the word ‘moist’ more than I hate the word ‘f–k’.

Yeah it’s a difficult issue. Part of the challenge for making products like the iPhone is that you don’t know who’s going to be buying them. And these days, of course, kids have smartphones.

I think you hit on an important point there. This is an age where we have access to so much that is really quite salacious content at our fingertips. Doesn’t it seem a bit quaint and puritanical that this part hasn’t been changed with the newest phone?

It’s a question of continuing this discovery of where these products fit into our culture. We had nothing like iPhones when I was a kid growing up in the 1970s. It would have seemed magical to be on a city street and get a map pointing directly to where I am, and then text my friends telling them exactly where we’re going to meet.

So I hope that we’re going to continue deciding what role and what features and where this swearing decision is going to come down.

Listen to the full conversation near the top of this page.

This Q & A was edited for clarity and length. Produced by Samira Mohyeddin and Howard Goldenthal.

Apple’s iOS 13 update brings a swipe-to-type keyboard that curbs your self-expression.

Contributing Writer, ZDNet

Jason Cipriani is based out of beautiful Colorado and has been covering mobile technology news and reviewing the latest gadgets for the last six years. His work can also be found on sister site CNET in the How To section, as well as across several more online publications.

We all know that the iPhone’s keyboard tries to autocorrect away the fact that people like to cuss . How many times have you perfectly typed out your swear word of choice, just to have the keyboard change it to “ducking” or “shut” without your permission? Sometimes you just need to let it out.

Over time, your iPhone eventually gives in and lets you talk like a sailor. At least, that was the case until iOS 13’s new swipe keyboard was released. As The Verge’s Tom Warren pointed out on Twitter, it’s almost impossible to swipe-type a curse word.

That means that the new iPhone 11, 11 Pro and 11 Max Pro might not let you express yourself as colorfully as you’d like. What the hell, Apple?

I’ve been trying to get iOS 13’s swipe-based Slide to Type keyboard to let me use as much profanity as I want. Here’s where I’ve had the most success:

1. Open the Settings app.

2. Select General from the list.

3. Next, tap on Keyboard.

4. Tap on Text Replacement and then the + button.

5. Enter your word of choice in the phrase field and tap Save.

6. Create as many text shortcuts as you want or need.

After creating a text shortcut, you should be able to swear with a swipe.

Swipe your word of choice a few times, and then you should be set.

Screenshots by Jason Cipriani/CNET

In my experience, it takes a few tries for the keyboard to start to recognize the right word. More often than not, the word shows up in the predictive text box on the far left for the first few swipes — when that happens, tap on the word to tell iOS 13 what it is you’re trying to enter, and start teaching your phone to quit being so proper.

You can install iOS 13 now , just make sure to get your iPhone or iPad ready before you check out all of the new features — such as a dark mode , blocking unknown callers and new photo and editing tools .

Have you ever had one of those ducking days where NOTHING seems to be going right? The day is probably made much worse by the fact that your iPhone’s autocorrect systems invariably send messages with words you did not intend.

The gold-standard autocorrect error on the iPhone is the infamous “ducking.” Without fail, your iPhone will always correct “f—king” to “ducking.” Yes, it’s true the iPhone is trying to make you a better person by doing this–no one likes a swear head. But given the versatility of the word “f––cking” sometimes it is the most appropriate word to use.

“Ducking” isn’t the only autocorrect problem, of course. Sometimes iOS autocorrects to other words you don’t mean. If iOS’s autocorrecting capabilities are bugging you, here’s what you can do about it.

Disable iPhone Autocorrection

This is the nuclear option. But it’s a great option for those people who have frequently been embarrassed by the messages they send that have been inadvertently autocorrected. Thankfully, Apple makes disabling autocorrect easy:

  1. Open the Settings app on your iPhone or iPad.
  2. Tap General > Keyboard.
  3. Toggle the Auto-Correction switch to OFF (white).

Your autocorrect problems are now gone.

Use Text Replacement To Change “Ducking” To “F––king”

iOS has a powerful text replacement tool built into the operating system. Text replacement allows you to have certain text replaced by with whatever other text you specify. For example, you can make it so that any time you write “mb” it automatically autocorrects to “MacBook.”

Obviously, you can also set “ducking” to autocorrect to “f—king” too. To use text replacement, do the following:

  1. Open the Settings app on your iPhone or iPad.
  2. Tap General > Keyboard > Text Replacement.
  3. Tap the + button to add a new text replacement.

If you decide you want to delete a specific text replacement, just tap the Edit button on the same screen and then tap the red delete button by the text replacement.

Use Predictive Text To Thwart “Ducking” Errors

Finally, iOS also has a third tool that allows you to better enable the words you want to convey are actually being written by your iPhone. That tool is called Predictive Text. Predictive Text is a toolbar that sits atop your iOS keyboard that offers you word suggestions for what word iOS thinks you might want to type next.

Predictive Text is a great tool because by using it you’ll type both faster and more accurately–and iOS will know the word you’ve chosen is the word you want because you’ve explicitly tapped on it. As Apple explains: “As you type, you can see choices for words and phrases you’d probably type next, based on your past conversations, writing style, and even websites you visit in Safari.”

To turn Predictive Text on:

  1. Open the Settings app on your iPhone or iPad.
  2. Tap General > Keyboard > Text Replacement.
  3. Toggle the Predictive Text switch to ON (green).

Using the above tips are sure to make your typing experience much better on iOS devices.

Following is a transcript of the video.

Narrator: Have you ever tried typing something but your phone keeps changing it to something else? This ducking keyboard can be so frustrating! It can seem like autocorrect is working against you instead of helping you. But the iPhone has had autocorrect for over 10 years. Why does it still suck? Whether you’re on iPhone or Android, using the default keyboard or a third-party app you deal with autocorrect every single day. Usually, it works great but sometimes it completely refuses to understand what you typed. To figure out what’s happening we have to understand how autocorrect works. When you type something on a phone there’s a lot of work going on in the background. The phone analyzes your input and compares it to stored dictionaries and language models. The phone then tries to correctly interpret the word or phrase you’re trying to type. So when you type “fopd” your phone changes it to “food” because “fopd” isn’t a word but it’s only one letter away from “food.” But not every example is this obvious.

Ken Kocienda: The vowels U, I, and O are very close to each other so a word like put, pit, and pot those, those were real challenges.

Narrator: That’s Ken Kocienda, he’s one of the people who developed autocorrect for Apple. We spoke with Ken to find out what’s happening inside of autocorrect.

Ken Kocienda: My job was to come up with a way to make speedy and accurate typing possible on a sheet of glass.

Narrator: The hardest part isn’t correcting spelling or grammar, it’s interpreting what you meant to say from what you wrote. And autocorrect is actually pretty good at this but users tend to notice autocorrect only when it makes mistakes.

Ken Kocienda: If it does what it’s supposed to do 19 times and then that 20th time it makes a mistake that is either distracting or embarrassing, that one mistake wipes out the positive feelings that people have for the 19 times where it just worked.

Narrator: This is especially obvious when autocorrect leads to unwanted changes. Sometimes it can feel like you’re fighting against your keyboard.

Ken Kocienda: Mostly people complain about how autocorrect gets in the way of their swearing. The ducking keyboard.

Narrator: The iPhone keyboard will let you swear, it just wants to prevent you from accidentally sending a word that you didn’t mean to send. It might seem like you’re always wrestling with autocorrect, but you can take control of your dictionary. On iOS go into Settings, General, Keyboard, and then tap “Add Shortcut” or “Text Replacement.” Here you can add a new word or a shortcut that fills in a word when you type a few letters. You can Google around to find out how to add words to the various versions of Android or third-party keyboards. So, you might still think autocorrect sucks but it’s actually gotten a lot better since version one and some developers have introduced new tools like swipe to type to make typing on a smartphone easier. In the future, machine learning might create an autocorrect that’s more accurate than ever but whatever the technology is we can’t lose sight of the original goal of autocorrect.

Ken Kocienda: The goal that I like to think about for the product is for it to have the software melt away. Autocorrection is not supposed to be glamorous, right? It’s just supposed to be useful.

Narrator: Autocorrect is far from perfect but our messages would look a lot worse without it.

How To Turn Off Auto-Correct On iPhone and iPad. Photo KnowInsiders

Auto-correction can be a helpful feature, but you may not want it on all the time. For all the good it can do and the time it saves, auto-correction errors can be embarrassing, frustrating, or unintentionally funny. Here’s how to turn the feature off if you’d rather trust your typing skills on your iPad or iPhone.

How Does Auto-Correct Work?

Photo Apple

Auto-Correction uses your keyboard dictionary to spellcheck words while you’re typing, automatically correcting misspelt words for you.

The iPhone automatically enables autocorrect on its keyboards, which means it’ll automatically fix a typo like “adn” to “and” if you’re typing quickly and misspell a word. It’s convenient most of the time, but it can get awfully annoying when it autocorrects common words.

Why Does Auto-Correct Feel So Frustrating?

When your iPhone or iPad corrects a word automatically, it’s drawing on both a dictionary and a predictive text algorithm that learns from how you type. The dictionary may not include every proper name, acronym, or new term as it appears on the scene, so it can be frustrating when auto-correct changes what you know is correct. Also, if you misspell a certain word frequently enough, the predictive text algorithm will learn that typo, and it may begin “fixing” correct instances of a word or term when you don’t want it to.

How to Disable Auto-Correction on iPhone and iPad

First, open the “Settings” app on your iPhone or iPad. The following screens are from an iPhone, but the iPad steps are nearly identical with only slight layout variations.

In Settings, navigate to “General.”

Photo howtogeek

In General, tap “Keyboard.”

Photo howtogeek

In Keyboard settings, scroll down to the “All Keyboards” sections. Tap the switch beside “Auto-Correction” to turn it off.

Photo howtogeek

In Settings on iPhone or iPad, turn off the “Auto-Correction” switch.

Siri is an useful Apple assistant but sometimes you don’t want it to appear on your iPhone and iPad. Check out how to disable Siri.

How to Turn off autocorrect for certain words on iPhone and iPad

Open Settings and tap General.

Photo igeeksblog

Tap Keyboard. On the next screen, tap Text Replacement.tap on general keyboard and then tap text replacement in settings on iphone

Tap the plus icon (+).

In the Phrase and Shortcut fields, type the same word, and tap on Save.tap on plus type in phrase and shortcut then tap on save on iphone

Photo igeeksblog

This will ensure that autocorrect will not swap it for another word when you type the original.

Using this feature, you can create text shortcuts that let you type a sentence or phrase using a few characters.

Note: If you’re using a hardware keyboard with iPad, open Settings → General → Keyboard → Hardware Keyboards → toggle off Auto-Correction.

Use normal typing instead of slide to type

With iOS 13 and later, the built-in iPhone keyboard also supports slide to type. This lets you swipe your finger over multiple keys to type. It’s similar to Auto-Correct in that it will automatically convert swear words and other phrases to non-profane alternatives.

To disable slide to type, head to Settings → General → Keyboard → Toggle off “Delete Slide-to-Type by Word.”

You can also just opt to tap on each individual letter rather than swiping across the keyboard.

We hope this helped you disable autocorrect on your iPhone or iPad. If you’d like to spruce things up, we have a list of the best keyboards for your iOS device. They offer features like theme support, built-in clipboards, and more.

Additionally, the keyboard in iOS 14 has seen improvements like allowing users to search for emojis by name.

How to adjust autocorrect manually

Open Settings on your iPhone

Choose “Text Replacement”

Tap the + button in the top-right corner

Here, to be appropriate, we’ll create the phrase “be right there” and use the shortcut “brt.” This lets you type “brt” and automatically expand that into “be right there” when you’re sending a text message or e-mail.

You could also make “ducking” the shortcut and change the phrase to the word you’re probably actually trying to type. This means every time your phone thinks you type “ducking” it’ll put the other word in its place.

Check out the simple ways to backup your iPhone into your computer.

Screenshots are one of the easiest ways to document something you saw on the web, or keeping a proof of some app activity, or just .

Where is the home button on iPhone 13? Does the iPhone 13 have a home button? How to get back a home button on-screen on .

Swearing is impossible on NBC’s The Good Place, but it’s also impossible in this regular place we call Earth if you are a person with autocorrect on your phone.

If you haven’t watched the show, here’s the deal: The Good Place (or whatever part of the afterlife Eleanor, Chidi, and the gang are in these days) is known for censoring swears to sound like confusing and cutesy words, rather than the ferocious things they’re intended as. For example, “Oh shit” would be changed to the much classier, “Oh shirt.”

So recently, after autocorrect changed a whopping THREE swear words during a text rant to my BFF Jessye, I came to the realization that trying to swear on an iPhone is just as challenging as trying to swear in The Good Place.

Motherforker, what the duck?

In the Good Place, “fuck” becomes “fork” and yes, you guessed it, “motherfucker” transforms into “motherforker.”

But in the world of autocorrect, whenever iPhone users try to say “fuck” they are often end up cracking quacking someone up. It is quite the struggle.

What bullshirt! I’m sick of this shot.

If you are sick of this no-swearing BS, join the club! Sometimes Eleanor just wants to vent and complain about “shit,” but all that comes out of her mouth is, “shirt.”

Meanwhile, in the world of autocorrect, I’m just over here sounding like I’m astounded by shots. Very ineffective.

In The Good Place, we’ve heard “bitch” become “bench,” “asshole” become “ashhole,” and “dick” switch to “dink.” It’s exhausting, truly.

And even though I’m not on a television show (as far as I know,) autocorrect makes me feel like I’m being censored, too. When I try to type “hell” on my phone it changes to “he’ll,” and because the feature is

“dick” once again becomes “duck.”

And before you give me shot about this, just know I’m not the only person who fears they’re living in the Good/Bad/whatever place.

Yes, the obvious quick fix to this madness would be to disable autocorrect, but IT HELPS ME in other instances, okay?? So until this issue works itself out, I suppose all we can do is sit back, be annoyed, and watch this lovely curse word montage.

Have a great forking/ducking day, everyone.

The iPhone’s autocorrect feature is wonderful and convenient, but it doesn’t always work with informal language like profanity. If you’ve ever used the F-word, there’s a good chance you’ve had your curse words “corrected” to other words that don’t ducking make sense. And with the release of iOS 13, swearing in your messages and on social media could get a little harder.

One of the many new features in iOS 13 is the new swipe keyboard, referred to by Apple as QuickPath or Slide to Type. It makes typing faster since you’re gliding across keys instead of tapping them one by one, but it also makes it harder to write obscene words.

When you type in a swear word, you can usually see it in the predictive text panel above the keyboard. However, with gesture typing, you can’t. If you attempt to swipe in the F-word, you’ll get words like duck, sick, dick, or dock — but not the actual f— word. Luckily, there’s a quick tip to curse with the glide keyboard in iOS 13. It’s not perfect, but it’s all we have for now besides using another keyboard like Gboard (which allows offensive words).

Step 1: Try Swipe-Typing Curse Words with QuickPath

Before we get into the tip, try out the QuickPath feature to enter in cuss words. Swipe around and see which words appear in the autocorrect panel instead.

For the word s—, the three words that appeared for me in the autocorrect panel included shut, shout, and shoot, but you may see different ones depending on which words you use more. For instance, you may notice short, shot, sit, etc. Unfortunately, no matter how much you try, you’ll never be able to type in any curse word by swiping — unless you use text replacement.

Step 2: Add Your Curse Words to Text Replacement

The text replacement feature on iOS allows you to quickly enter email addresses, long words, emoticons, and more without typing them all out. For example, iOS transforms “omw” into “On my way!” And you can also use the feature to force autocorrect to show words that it usually doesn’t show, like obscenities.

To access the text replacement feature, open the Settings app, tap “General,” select “Keyboard,” and then go into “Text Replacement.”

Add your foul-mouthed word into text replacement by tapping on the plus (+) sign in the top right. Next, enter the profane word into the Phrase box and leave the Shortcut box empty. Finally, hit “Save.” Continue doing this until you’ve entered every swear word you use (which could take a while).

Step 3: Try Swipe-Typing the Curse Words Again

Now, whenever you use the QuickPath keyboard to swipe out a curse word, you’ll see the word in one of the boxes in the panel of suggested alternatives above the keyboard. Tap on it to enter it into the text field and also to teach the keyboard that you mean to type in the curse word, not other words.

After tapping on the curse word in the panel of suggestions a few times, it will automatically appear in the text field. It won’t work every time, but it’s a decent workaround to Apple’s seeming distaste of bad words. Even if it doesn’t work every time, you’ll at least have faster access to picking the right one from the suggested alternatives.

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HERE’S how to prevent your Apple iPhone from autocorrecting swear words with safe-for-work alternatives.

If your iPhone is preventing you from cussing, this could be an essential tip

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Swearing isn’t big or clever. But let’s be honest, sometimes a situation calls for a little bit of effing and jeffing.

Problem is, the Apple iPhone has an annoying habit of autocorrecting curse words into safe-for-work alternatives – sometimes to comical effect.

Fortunately there is a way to prevent this.

To ensure your next four-letter profanity makes it through uncensored, head to Settings > General > Keyboard > Text Replacement.

This menu lets you create automatic substitutions and allows you to override the in-built autocorrect system.

General > Keyboard > Text Replacement” title=”On your iOS device, navigate to Settings > General > Keyboard > Text Replacement” width=”590″ height=”517″>

On your iOS device, navigate to Settings > General > Keyboard > Text Replacement

Press the + button in the top right-hand corner of the screen.

In the Shortcut text field write the word Apple usually autocorrects – ducking, for example.

In Phrase, simply write your chosen obscenity. And voila!

Once saved, you will never have to accidentally send the wrong word again.

You can specify your own personal autocorrections for common phrases on iOS

Although, make sure you double-check any messages where you don’t intend to swear (talking to your boss about a “whit”, for example) since this could lead to some horrific misunderstandings.

Keyboards tend to avoid pre-programming swear words exactly for this reason.

VP of Mobile Products for Nuance Communications – the firm behind best-selling third party keyboard, Swype, Aaron Sheedy explained the problem to Engadget.

“The risk of having profanity in the dictionary is too high for most users,” he said.

“If someone wants to send a professional email, or send a text to their mom, they will be extremely displeased if the word they are trying to write ‘duck, whit, etc’ gets replaced by a swear word.

“From a usability perspective, it’s better for a user to add their own words to the dictionary so that they can anticipate the possibility of those words coming up, instead of surprising their friends or family with them.”

Automatically check spelling, set up automatic text replacements, add words to the spelling dictionary, and more on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac.

Set up auto-correction

Turn on auto-correction on your device:

  • On iPhone or iPad, open a document in Pages, Numbers, or Keynote, tap the More button , tap Settings, then tap Auto-Correction.
  • On Mac, in Pages, Numbers, or Keynote choose [app name] > Preferences from the menu bar, then choose Auto-Correction.

Use the auto-correction settings to customize how Pages, Numbers, and Keynote handle spelling and formatting by selecting and deselecting the available options. These options include:

  • Detecting lists
  • Detecting web and email links
  • Detecting phone links
  • Applying link styles
  • Applying superscript to number suffixes
  • Formatting fractions
  • Using smart quotes and smart dashes, which replaces single and double quotes with curly quotes or your chosen quote style and automatically converts double hyphens to dashes (Mac only)

If you are using iCloud Keychain, each app’s settings are shared across all your Apple products signed into your iCloud account.

Some options might also be available in other menus within iWork. If you change a setting in another menu, your auto-correction settings change too. Some iWork settings are similar to other settings on your iPhone, iPad, or Mac. In most cases, the settings that you choose in Pages, Numbers, or Keynote override the system setting on your device.

Set up custom text replacements

With text replacement, you can use shortcuts to replace longer phrases. When you type the shortcut in your document, the phrase automatically replaces it.

In the auto-correction settings for Pages, Numbers, and Keynote, you can set up text replacement specifically for use within each app.

Set up custom text replacements on iPhone or iPad

  1. With a document open, tap the More button .
  2. Tap Settings.
  3. Tap Auto-Correction.
  4. Make sure that Text Replacement is turned on, then tap Replacements List.
  5. Tap the Add button .
    • For Phrase, enter what you want the app to change the text to (for example, “©”).
    • For Shortcut, enter the text that you want to use to prompt the replacement (for example, “(c)”).

If you used this example, every time you type “(c)” in Pages, Numbers, or Keynote, the app changes it to “©.”

Set up custom text replacements on Mac

  1. Open the auto-correction settings.
  2. Under Replacement, make sure that “Symbol and text substitution” is selected, then click the add button .
    • Under Replace, enter the text that you want to use to prompt the replacement (for example, “(c)”).
    • Under With, enter what you want the app to change the text to (for example, “©”).

If you used this example, every time you type “(c)” in Pages, Numbers, or Keynote, the app changes it to “©.”

Undo text replacement

If Pages, Numbers, or Keynote replaces the text, and you want to restore it to the way you typed it in, press Command-Z on your keyboard or tap the Undo button .

Use auto-correction with other languages

Auto-correction is available for languages that your Mac is set up to spell check. To see these languages, go to System Preferences > Keyboard > Text and click the Spelling pop-up menu. Click “Set Up” to learn how to add spelling dictionaries for additional languages. On iPhone or iPad, auto-correction is not available for all languages.

Add words to the spelling dictionary

When Pages, Numbers, or Keynote detects a word that it doesn’t recognize, it underlines the word with a dotted red line. You can add the word to the dictionary on your device so that iWork and other apps recognize the word and includes it in spell check:

  • On iPad or iPhone, tap the underlined word, then tap Learn Spelling (you may need to tap Replace first).
  • On Mac, Control-click the word, then choose Learn Spelling.

In Pages, Numbers, or Keynote on Mac, you can also choose Ignore Spelling if you no longer want that app to mark this word as misspelled. To add, edit, or remove the words in your iWork app’s Ignored Words list, choose Pages > Preferences, choose Auto-Correction, then click Ignored Words. Click the add button (+) or the remove button (-) to add or remove words. Or click on a word to edit its spelling.

If spell check and auto-correction aren’t working

If your iPad is managed by an organization such as your school, features like spell check, auto-correction, and text replacement might be turned off. Learn more about restricting keyboard and dictionary functions.

  • Forums
  • iPhone, iPad, and iPod Touch
  • iPhone
  • iPhone

alphatectz

macrumors 6502a
  • Jun 5, 2009
  • #1
  • gloss

    macrumors 601
    • Jun 5, 2009
  • #2
  • alphatectz

    macrumors 6502a
    • Jun 5, 2009
  • #3
  • Knowlege Bomb

    macrumors G3
    • Jun 5, 2009
  • #4
  • The most annoying is the phone changing “is” to “I’d”. Which is the more common word? Really. Not only do I have to backspace once for the wrong letter, I have to go back three for the apostrophe and the capital “I”.

    AiralynRose

    macrumors 6502a
    • Jun 5, 2009
  • #5
  • Settings > General > Reset > Reset Keyboard Dictionary

    (Looking on a 3.0 phone though, so not 100% sure it is the same on 2.x).

    alphatectz

    macrumors 6502a
    • Jun 5, 2009
  • #6
  • The most annoying is the phone changing “is” to “I’d”. Which is the more common word? Really. Not only do I have to backspace once for the wrong letter, I have to go back three for the apostrophe and the capital “I”.

    alphatectz

    macrumors 6502a
    • Jun 5, 2009
  • #7
  • Settings > General > Reset > Reset Keyboard Dictionary

    (Looking on a 3.0 phone though, so not 100% sure it is the same on 2.x).

    Not running 3.0, just checked it out, it’s the same sequence as you said.

    Thnx.
    But it will be great it the auto-correct would be freakin fixed .

    sd2009

    macrumors 6502
    • Jun 5, 2009
  • #8
  • wwooden

    macrumors 68020
    • Jun 5, 2009
  • #9
  • alphatectz

    macrumors 6502a
    • Jun 5, 2009
  • #10
  • gloss

    macrumors 601
    • Jun 5, 2009
  • #11
  • alphatectz

    macrumors 6502a
    • Jun 5, 2009
  • #12
  • StuddedLeather

    macrumors 6502a
    • Jun 5, 2009
  • #13
  • gloss

    macrumors 601
    • Jun 5, 2009
  • #14
  • You already can. Type the word enough times, cancel any correction suggestions, and the dictionary will learn the word after three or four times.

    Of course, if you mean that hopefully you can add words to the dictionary manually, then yes, I agree. I’d like to be able to edit the dictionary so we can add/remove words without wiping the whole thing.

    alphatectz

    macrumors 6502a
    • Jun 5, 2009
  • #15
  • You already can. Type the word enough times, cancel any correction suggestions, and the dictionary will learn the word after three or four times.

    Of course, if you mean that hopefully you can add words to the dictionary manually, then yes, I agree. I’d like to be able to edit the dictionary so we can add/remove words without wiping the whole thing.

    rarity

    macrumors regular
    • Jun 5, 2009
  • #16
  • JML42691

    macrumors 68020
    • Jun 5, 2009
  • #17
  • The most annoying is the phone changing “is” to “I’d”. Which is the more common word? Really. Not only do I have to backspace once for the wrong letter, I have to go back three for the apostrophe and the capital “I”.

    This is by far one of my biggest complaints regarding typing on an iPhone or iPod, do they really think that people use “I’d” more than “is”? And there needs to be a manual way to enter into the dictionary.

    Another big complaint is changing of very common names. The one that I notice the most is “Ed,” by typing this name the phone suggests changing it to “We.” I have encountered this one way too often, and the phone seems to refuse to adjust the dictionary on that one.

    seanofthedead

    macrumors member
    • Jun 5, 2009
  • #18
  • I’m actually surprised at how well my iPhone cleaned up my texts while I was still getting used to the whole “touchscreen keyboard” shortly after I bought it. The most impressive to me is when it capitalizes certain names or people, places, companies, etc. Only gripe I have in that regard is that it capitalizes Honda, Toyota, Subaru, etc., yet it doesn’t capitalize Chevrolet or Ford?

    Besides that, it works wonders. Plus I swear a LOT when I text (i’m 19, leave me alone) so I’m surprised that it picked up all of my “naughty” words.

    hitman45400

    macrumors regular
    • Jun 5, 2009
  • #19
  • everytime i type ‘lol’ it comes out ‘LOL’ and makes me look like a douche. no one caps ‘LOL’ unless it’s that funny.

    i cancel the spell check and type it ‘lol’ but nother happens =[

    gloss

    macrumors 601
    • Jun 5, 2009
  • #20
  • macrumors regular
    • Jun 5, 2009
  • #21
  • Maybe the spell checker is smarter than we originally thought

    alphatectz

    macrumors 6502a
    • Jun 5, 2009
  • #22
  • everytime i type ‘lol’ it comes out ‘LOL’ and makes me look like a douche. no one caps ‘LOL’ unless it’s that funny.

    i cancel the spell check and type it ‘lol’ but nother happens =[

    alphatectz

    macrumors 6502a
    • Jun 5, 2009
  • #23
  • Maybe the spell checker is smarter than we originally thought

    The General

    macrumors 601
    • Jun 5, 2009
  • #24
  • The auto-correct is what makes the iPhone’s keyboard usable. Without it, the keyboard is impossible to type on. If you are having problems with it, then you aren’t using it correctly.

    Just type, let it do its thing. Once in a while it will do something you don’t want, but that’s a lot easier than fixing the millions of typos made when auto-correct is off.

    The “LOL” thing doesn’t happen to me. It might be a fix in 3.0. I also have a contact that fixes other annoyances like swear words. No, I’m not “ducking” kidding. Just make a contact called whatever you want, and in the Company section just put all the words that you don’t want it to auto-correct, separated by spaces. I put every swear word I can think of, I put “lol”, and I put some other stuff, like lowercase names, “its” (because I’m okay with leaving out an apostrophe, but I never want an extraneous one), and other stuff like that.

    Most Apple users like using autocorrect on their iPhone and iPad to catch common typos. As a result, it’s enabled by default and works well for most.

    However, it’s not always the most reliable feature—sometimes the mistake corrector is the mistake creator. If you’d rather do without the possibility of those pesky errors, here are three ways to turn off autocorrect in a few quick steps.

    How to disable autocorrect on iPhone and iPad

    1. Open Settings and tap General.
    2. Tap Keyboard.
    3. Toggle off Auto-Correction.

    Your iPhone won’t automatically change or correct any word now.

    If you change your mind, follow the steps above to re-enable this option. You can use this trick anytime you want to turn autocorrect off or on.

    How to Turn off autocorrect for certain words on iPhone and iPad

    1. Open Settings and tap General.
    2. Tap Keyboard. On the next screen, tap Text Replacement.
    3. Tap the plus icon (+).
    4. In the Phrase and Shortcut fields, type the same word, and tap on Save.

    This will ensure that autocorrect will not swap it for another word when you type the original.

    Using this feature, you can create text shortcuts that let you type a sentence or phrase using a few characters.

    Note: If you’re using a hardware keyboard with iPad, open Settings → General → Keyboard → Hardware Keyboards → toggle off Auto-Correction.

    Use normal typing instead of slide to type

    With iOS 13 and later, the built-in iPhone keyboard also supports slide to type. This lets you swipe your finger over multiple keys to type. It’s similar to Auto-Correct in that it will automatically convert swear words and other phrases to non-profane alternatives.

    To disable slide to type, head to SettingsGeneralKeyboard → Toggle off “Delete Slide-to-Type by Word.”

    You can also just opt to tap on each individual letter rather than swiping across the keyboard.

    We hope this helped you disable autocorrect on your iPhone or iPad. If you’d like to spruce things up, we have a list of the best keyboards for your iOS device. They offer features like theme support, built-in clipboards, and more.

    Additionally, the keyboard in iOS 14 has seen improvements like allowing users to search for emojis by name.

    Learn how to use Auto-Correction, predictive text, and text replacement, so you can type with fewer taps.

    Use Auto-Correction

    Auto-Correction uses your keyboard dictionary to spellcheck words as you type, automatically correcting misspelled words for you. To use it, just type in a text field.

    To make sure that this setting is turned on, use these steps:

    1. Open the Settings app.
    2. Tap General > Keyboard.
    3. Turn on Auto-Correction. By default, Auto-Correction is on.

    Use predictive text

    With predictive text, you can write and complete entire sentences with just a few taps.

    As you type, you can see choices for words and phrases you’d probably type next, based on your past conversations, writing style, and even websites you visit in Safari.

    To turn predictive text off or on, touch and hold the smile emoji or the globe icon . Tap Keyboard Settings, then turn on Predictive. Or go to Settings > General > Keyboard, and turn Predictive on or off.

    Set up text replacement

    With text replacement, you can use shortcuts to replace longer phrases. When you enter the shortcut in a text field, the phrase automatically replaces it. For example, you could type “GM” and “Good morning” would automatically replace it.

    To manage text replacement, tap Settings > General > Keyboard > Text Replacement.

    • To add a text replacement, tap the Add button , then enter your phrase and shortcut. When you’re done, tap Save.
    • To remove a text replacement, tap Edit, tap the Remove button then tap Delete. To save your changes, tap Done.

    If you want your iPhone to stop messing up your swear words, you have options.

    Autocorrect on smart devices is great for hard-to-spell words or quick typing when you’re not really paying attention to where you’re tapping. But swear words are another story. That’s why you need to know how to add swear words to iPhone.

    Spelling out swear words, especially iOS, can be a huge pain in the add ass. But, you actually have a couple of different options when it comes to typing out swear words on iPhone and iPad.

    Thanks to your iOS device’s penchant for suggesting your contacts list in the autocorrect space, you can hack your iPhone to swear happily without you having to laboriously type out each seedy word letter-by-letter.

    How to add swear words to iPhone

    Thanks to my ever-increasing Twitter addiction, the answer to the question “how do I teach my iPhone to swear?” popped up on my feed last year.

    Now it’s time to share that wisdom with all of you:

    Tap the Phone app and then the Contacts tab on your iPhone or iPad

    Add a new contact, then fill in the name fields with your favorite swear words.

    Save the contact

    That’s it. Now your iOS devices will stop autocorrecting your favorite swear words while you’re texting your friends.

    Use text replacement to add swear words to iPhone and iPad

    There’s also another, possibly better way to broaden your iPhone’s vocabulary. Did you know you could set text replacements? Here’s how.

    1. Open the Settings app

    Image: KnowTechie

    1. Tap on General

    Image: KnowTechie

    1. Then, tap on Keyboard

    Image: KnowTechie

    1. Tap on Text Replacement

    Image: KnowTechie

    1. Tap the + button in the top right corner

    Image: KnowTechie

    1. Add all the vulgar or irreverent words you want. You can also add shortcuts, like if you never want to see the word “ducking” again.

    Image: KnowTechie

    Once you’ve tapped on Save, your dictionary is ready. You could also turn off Auto Correction, but we don’t recommend this. You’ll be far more frustrated by having to type everything properly.

    Now your iOS device will automatically suggest the swear words you saved because it thinks that they are Contact names instead of vulgar words. You’re welcome, have a great ducking day.

    Have any thoughts on this? Let us know down below in the comments or carry the discussion over to our Twitter or Facebook.

    Geoffrey_Carr

    La Correzione automatica corregge automaticamente gli errori di battitura, che è conveniente, ma ritiene che gli errori siano errori di battitura. Il tuo iPhone o iPad piace cambiare le parolacce in parole simili e sbagliate. Se non riesci a odiarlo, ecco come rimuovere la tastiera.

    Tutto quello che devi fare è aggiungere le parole maledizioni (o qualsiasi altra parola) alle scorciatoie per la sostituzione del testo. Tutte le parole che hai sono trattate come parole vere dalla tastiera.

    Vai su Impostazioni> Generali> Tastiera> Sostituzione testo sul tuo iPhone. Tocca il pulsante “+” per aggiungere una nuova scorciatoia.

    Digita la parola che vuoi usare nella casella “Frase”. Ad esempio, per far sì che il tuo iPhone smetta di correggere “cazzo” in “ducking”, digita “cazzo”.

    Tocca “Salva” dopo. Non devi digitare nulla nella casella di scelta rapida.

    Vedrai il collegamento visualizzato qui. Ripeti questa procedura per aggiungere tutte le parole che vuoi, ad esempio, se usi molte parole simili, potresti voler aggiungere “fuck”, “fucker” e altre varianti

    Naturalmente, questo funziona anche per le parole che non sono volgarità. Se hai una parola che usi come in-joke o un nickname che non appare in un dizionario normale, puoi aggiungerla ai collegamenti qui e la tastiera del tuo iPhone capirà che è una parola che stai cercando di digitare.

    Quando provi a digitare ancora una volta quella parola maledizione, il tuo iPhone considererà qualsiasi parola nelle tue scorciatoie per la sostituzione del testo come parole valide.

    Anche se fai un refuso mentre provi a digitare la parolaccia, il tuo iPhone lo correggerà utilmente nella parolaccia scritta correttamente.

    Altri modi per domare la correzione automatica

    Questo non è l’unico modo per impedire a un errore di correggere automaticamente. È anche possibile aggiungere contatti al telefono con parolacce nel loro nome. Ad esempio, se hai aggiunto un contatto denominato “Fuck Fucker”, il tuo iPhone penserebbe automaticamente che “Fuck” e “Fucker” siano parole valide e accettabili e li offrano automaticamente durante la digitazione. Tuttavia, probabilmente è meglio avere le parolacce nelle scorciatoie piuttosto che sporcare i tuoi contatti.

    Puoi anche disabilitare la correzione automatica per impedirne l’intralcio, se lo desideri. Ma pensiamo che la correzione automatica sia piuttosto utile dopo che l’hai addestrata a smettere di incasinare le parole che vuoi scrivere.

    Se desideri disattivare la correzione automatica, vai su Impostazioni> Generali> Tastiera e disattiva l’opzione “Correzione automatica”.

    Infine, è possibile allenare la correzione automatica con un sacco di tempo e pazienza. Quando digiti una parolaccia, tocca l’opzione nell’angolo in alto a sinistra della barra dei suggerimenti della tastiera, quella racchiusa tra virgolette. Questo dice alla tastiera che, sì, hai intenzione di digitare questa parola. Dopo averlo fatto abbastanza volte, la tastiera dovrebbe gradualmente imparare che intendevi digitare la parola e smettere di correggerla.

    Tuttavia, questo può richiedere un po ‘di tempo. È davvero più veloce aggiungere le parolacce alle scorciatoie per la sostituzione del testo, invece di combattere una battaglia lunga e tirata con quella tastiera dimenando.

    Questa impostazione predefinita può essere fastidiosa, ma garantisce che i bambini, e chiunque non voglia usare profanità, non lo visualizzino automaticamente come suggerimento, specialmente nelle e-mail e nei messaggi professionali. Va bene, ma vorremmo che Apple offrisse una semplice opzione “Consenti profanità” che rendesse tutto più semplice. Dopo tutto, Google offre un unico interruttore per abilitare le parolacce sulla sua tastiera Gboard.