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How to make pea protein powder

Protein powders have become an essential part of bodybuilding, losing weight, and pursuing a healthy lifestyle. Their prevalence at the gym is testament at just how effective they can be at helping you achieve body goals.

In this article, we are going to look at the why, how, and of when to make your own DIY vegan protein powder. Read on to find out more.

Why Make Your Own Vegan Protein Powder?

There are many reasons you might want to make your own vegan protein powder; it’s cost effective, gives you complete control over ingredients, and is shockingly easy.

I always start the day with a protein shake: protein powder mixed with water, peanut butter, and yoghurt to thicken it up
Greg Rutherford, MBE, track and field athlete

Savings: Protein powder can get expensive, and even when the cost of producing vegan-friendly powders is typically less, the companies that make them still seem happy to charge more for the privilege [1]. Making your own means, you can choose a price per scoop that suits you instead of having it dictated to you.

Simple Ingredients: Making your own protein powders means that you have complete control over what is and isn’t going into it. If you are particular about the effects you want and the ingredients you would rather avoid, it can save a lot of time scanning packaging for only natural healthy ingredients.

It’s Easy And Fun: When presented with the concept of making your own vegan protein powder at home, you might think that it is a lot more complicated than it actually is. In reality, you can create your own delicious and nutritious protein powders with relative ease as long as you have the equipment and time to do so.

So how do you make homemade protein powder? Read on, and we’ll tell you.

3 Things You Need

So what do you need to make your own protein powders at home?

1. High Protein Source

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

At the heart of your powder, you need something that is going to pack a protein punch, which typically means ingredients that provide a decent portion of protein for a relatively small serving. They should also be ingredients that are fairly common and easy to obtain. Some of our favorite examples are as follows:

2. Additional Protein & Nutritional Bonuses

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

After you’ve picked a good base, you’ll want to consider some optional ingredients that can help to supplement the protein content of your powder but also provide other nutritional benefits as well as filling in the BCAA profile of your powder.

If you can complement your chosen protein source with another that provides something it doesn’t, the benefits will stack. Great examples of additional ingredients include:

For the best taste, we recommend you to add Navitas Naturals cacao powder.

3. Flavor

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

Finally, it comes to the all-important taste test. It’s perfectly feasible that with a clever combination of the above ingredients, you could make a perfectly tasty protein powder. But here are some extra suggested ingredients if you want to make your DIY powder as delicious as it is nutritious.

Unless you want to be working the pestle and mortar for hours on end, it might be a good idea to invest in a coffee or spice grinder. You can get pre-powdered ingredients or variations of most of the food above.

In which case, the only items you really need is an airtight container to store your DIY vegan protein powder in and a decent scoop to portion it out with.

Vegan Protein Powder Recipe

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

If you’d like a specific recipe to give yourself a good idea just how easy it is to make your own protein powder try this one we found over at Fork And Beans.

Ingredients

Instructions

Grind up the chia seeds and hemp hearts into a fine powder, but be careful not to over grind them. A coffee or spice grinder is the recommended tool but do your best with what you have or use already powdered forms of protein.

Mix the resulting powder with the rest of the ingredients and then store it in an airtight container in a dry and dark place.

Use the protein powder in baking, for smoothies, or however, you would normally take it. It’s important to note that if adding to breakfast smoothies, you should add the powder last to stop the chia from expanding in the water or dairy-free milk too much.

Nutritional Information

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

Tips and Possible Variations

Using the above recipe as a basic blueprint, you can replace the flavors and protein sources to your liking and experiment with different recipes. A really quick, easy, and protein-packed favorite of ours is hemp protein powder, cacao, cinnamon, and mesquite.

If you track the nutritional value of the ingredients you put into your powder, you can make yourself a perfect blend that suits your needs as well as your tongue.

Apps like Noom or sites like Cronometer are great for this.

If you want some tips on ideas for using your protein powder, you should give our articles on the best protein shake, protein cookie, protein bar, and protein ball recipes a quick read.

The Bottom Line

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

So there you have it, making your own protein powder at home is a lot easier than you might think.

Using food that you have chosen for yourself means you can choose every aspect of your protein powder’s nutritional worth and save yourself a fair few dollars vs. the per scoop cost of store-bought protein powders.

However, there are those amongst us who don’t have the time and energy for even that, and working out the exact amounts and nutritional worth of the food you’re putting in there can be taxing.

The convenience of ready-made and ready-to-use protein powder still has a lot of appeal, and if you wanted to check out a selection of the best there are, then read our article on the best vegan protein powders here.

And for budget-friendly choices, you can check out the list here.

Want to try some vegan muscle building recipes? Check out out article here.

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

We include products we think are useful for our readers. If you buy through links on this page, we may earn a small commission. Here’s our process.

Pea protein powder is a popular supplement made by extracting protein from peas.

Not only does it add more protein and iron to your diet, but it’s also naturally hypoallergenic and vegan. As such, pea protein has become a popular alternative to whey-based protein powders in post-workout shakes and smoothies.

All the same, finding a high quality product can be a challenge.

The products on this list were evaluated based on the following factors:

  • the quality of their ingredients
  • the lack of fillers, preservatives, additives, and artificial flavors
  • adherence to premium manufacturing standards
  • the use of third-party testing for sports or workout products

Here are the 15 best pea protein powders of 2020.

A note on price

General price ranges with dollar signs ($ to $$$) are indicated below. One dollar sign means the product is rather affordable, whereas three dollar signs indicate a higher cost.

Generally, prices range from $0.47–$2.84 per ounce (28 grams), or $12.49–$54.99 per container, though this may vary depending on where you shop.

Pricing guide

  • $ = under $0.75 per ounce (28 grams)
  • $$ = $0.75–$1.50 per ounce (28 grams)
  • $$$ = over $1.50 per ounce (28 grams)
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The clue is in the tittle,
Im trying to be as plant based as possible which doesnt leave me with many protein powder choices (soy, pea and a few others) but pea seems to be the cheapest with the most protein and the least calories.

However whenever ive put it in smoothies it just tasted like dirt!
Anyone has any suggestions on what would make it taste good?
recipes?

Replies

How to cook carp.

4 cups bread crumbs
3 tablespoons finely chopped onion
3/4 cup finely cut celery
6 tablespoons melted butter
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon sage

Cook celery and onion for a few minutes in the butter. Mix the other ingredients and add them to the butter mixture. Wipe dressed fish with damp cloth and salt lightly inside and out. Stuff with dressing and sew or tie with string to retain stuffing. Place in preheated oven and bake at 375 degrees for one hour.

When the fish is done, remove it from the oven, throw it out and find an acceptable fish to eat. Stop trying to dress up something that’s terrible to begin with.

No matter how much lipstick you put on this pig it’s going to taste blah. I don’t see any compelling reason to avoid whey protein.

How to cook carp.

4 cups bread crumbs
3 tablespoons finely chopped onion
3/4 cup finely cut celery
6 tablespoons melted butter
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper
1 teaspoon sage

Cook celery and onion for a few minutes in the butter. Mix the other ingredients and add them to the butter mixture. Wipe dressed fish with damp cloth and salt lightly inside and out. Stuff with dressing and sew or tie with string to retain stuffing. Place in preheated oven and bake at 375 degrees for one hour.

When the fish is done, remove it from the oven, throw it out and find an acceptable fish to eat. Stop trying to dress up something that’s terrible to begin with.

No matter how much lipstick you put on this pig it’s going to taste blah. I don’t see any compelling reason to avoid whey protein.

Here’s a recipe for how to make your own Homemade Lentil Protein Powder that you can use in smoothies or baked goods. It’s an easy, budget-friendly recipe.

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

Homemade Lentil Powder

Back when I was vegan, I was always looking for unsweetened protein powders that didn’t both my stomach. I first made this homemade Lentil Protein Powder recipe back in 2013, but I’ve updated it for current times.

I’m not vegan anymore, but I do still love making vegan and plant-based recipes. And, this Homemade Lentil Protein Powder recipe is a winner since it’s budget-friendly and great for adding extra protein to the diet.

Each serving of lentil powder (about 2 tablespoons) has approximately:

  • 113 calories,
  • 0 grams of fat,
  • 20 carbs,
  • 3 grams of fiber,
  • and 8 grams of protein!

Once you make the powder, you can just add it to your favorite smoothies or baked goods to help bump up the protein and fiber. This recipe is 100% plant-based, vegan, and gluten-free.

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

Recipe Steps

Step One

The first step in making homemade lentil protein powder is to grab your lentils. I like to use brown or green lentils for this recipe. Cook two cups of the lentils according to the directions on the package, or using my recipe below.

Step Two

Cool the cooked lentils by placing them in the refrigerator for a few hours.

Step Three

Dehydrate the lentils in a dehydrator or using your oven. Be sure to get them completely dry so they can then be blended into a powder.

Step Four

Place the dried cooked lentils in the base of a food processor or a high-speed blender. Blend until the lentils turn into a fine powder.

Step Five

Transfer the lentil powder to a storage container. You can then use the powder as you would a regular protein powder.

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

Recommended Items

  • Organic green lentils
  • Countertop dehydrator

Here’s the printable recipe:

How to Make Lentil Protein Powder

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

5 from 2 reviews

Here’s a recipe for how to make your own Homemade Lentil Protein Powder that you can use in smoothies or baked goods. It’s an easy, budget-friendly recipe.

  • Author:Carrie Forrest, MBA, MPH in Nutrition
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 15 hours
  • Total Time: 15 hours
  • Yield: 12 1 x
  • Category: Side dish
  • Method: Dehydrator
  • Cuisine: American
  • Diet: Vegan

Ingredients

  • 2 cups dried lentils
  • 6 cups water

Instructions

  1. Rinse lentils and pick through for any debris.
  2. Place the lentils in a large pot, and cover with the water.
  3. Turn the heat to high. Once the pot is simmering, reduce the heat, cover the pot, and simmer for about 20 minutes.
  4. Once the lentils have done cooking, transfer them to a storage container. Place them in the refrigerator for at least 2 hours to cool down.
  5. Now, divide the cooked and cooled lentils on several dehydrator sheets (they should have room to breathe) and dehydrate them at 115°F for 10-12 hours, or until completely dry.
  6. Place the dried sprouted lentils into a high-speed blender and process finely into a powder.

Notes

Use the homemade lentil powder in smoothies or baked goods to add plant-based protein to the dish.

Store the powder in a tightly sealed container in a cool, dry place for up to several weeks.

Keywords: how to make homemade lentil protein powder, homemade protein powder, lentil powder

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Pea protein is a vegan protein from yellow peas. Just like all proteins from legumes pea protein is deficient in one of the essential for humans amino acid – methionine.

I use a pea protein that has a PDCAAS (Protein Digestability Corrected Amino Acid Score) of 82% and this is precisely because the methionine is in slightly insuficient qantities in this protein.

There are many ways pea protein could be enhanced to become a near perfect protein source, but not if you are interested in vegan protein sources only.

For example, meat, especially fish are high in methionine. Eggs and milk are great sources, too. But, for vegans the choices remaining are grains.

Now, grains are not all that great for you for too many reasons, and I don’t want to veer off topic here. But, for reasons of making a great sources of vegan protein like pea protein a complete one, we can deffinitely use grain proteins.

So, how do you make pea protein a complete vegan protein by adding which and how much if it grain protein? Simple. To every 100 g of pea protein add 30 g of rice protein (80 percent or higher). Or if you can’t measure, to every 3 parts of pea protein add 1 part rice protein.

This will bring the methionine level back to where it needs to be for the vegan protein blend to have a near perfect PDCAAS score and the reference amino acid profile suggested by FAO/WHO. Voila!

This post may contain affiliate links.

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

Protein powder is one of the best ways to get your protein in, especially if you’re not able to get a sufficient amount of protein through your meals on a daily basis. Plus, with so many delicious protein powder options out there, you can add it to almost anything, from breakfast to dessert! From protein smoothie recipes to delicious dessert recipes with a touch of protein, these protein powder recipes will help you stay satisfied and lose weight fast!

What is Protein Powder?

Protein powders are nutritional supplements that are helpful for those of us who aren’t getting enough protein from whole foods or want a convenient way to take protein on-the-go. There are many different types of protein powders that can be used for everything from smoothies to baking to cooking.

As the name reveals, protein powders consist of powdered protein from sources like soy, pea, whey or casein. They come with or without carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and other ingredients like fat metabolizers. Since protein is an essential macronutrient that helps build muscle, repair tissue, and make enzymes and hormones, protein powders can help you lose weight and tone your muscles!

6 Tips for Cooking and Baking with Protein Powder

1. Exchanging Flour for Protein Powder
The general rule for baking is that you can exchange one third of flour in a recipe with protein powder. Don’t go overboard with the protein powder and remember, it’s not an exact substitute for flour when you’re baking.

2. Use a Moisturizer
When you cook and bake with protein powder, your food can end up really dry if you don’t use a moisturizer. A moisturizer is an ingredient that moistens your food and weighs it down. Think: Greek yogurt, cottage cheese, apple sauce, bananas and cooked beets.

3. Use Fat When Making Protein Cookies
There are tons of protein cookie recipes out there! Make sure that when you make them you use a fat like coconut oil, nut butter or actual butter to ensure you end up with a moist and crunchy cookie!

4. Add Strong Flavours with Pea Protein Powder
Since pea protein powder has an earthy flavour, you can add strong flavours like peanut butter or chocolate to cover it up. This will ensure you get your protein in and whatever you’re making will still taste delicious.

5. Bake Protein Powder in Stoneware/Ceramic
When you’re baking or cooking with protein powder, try to use stoneware/ceramic. This will offer a moister result and ensure your treats are as delicious as can be. Rachel Ray has an affordable 3-piece casserole set we love!

6. Lower Temperature When Baking with Whey Protein Powder
If you don’t have stoneware/ceramic to bake in, lower the oven temperature 25 degrees and bake for longer when baking with whey protein powder. This will give you a moister final result and prevent your baking masterpiece from becoming dry and rubbery.

Best Protein Powder for Baking: 4 Products to Try

1. Devotion Nutrition Brownie Batter Protein Powder
This protein powder was made for all your baking needs! It’s sugar free, gluten free and bloat free, so you can get the taste of rich brownies without the guilt! With 20 grams of protein, you’ll feel full and lose weight quick!

2. Nubeleaf Organic Pea Protein Powder
From protein shake recipes to cookies, this protein powder is awesome for baking! It’s rich in essential amino acids to support healthy weight loss, and is an energy-boosting protein source so you’ll feel great all day!

3. Sacha Inchi Protein Powder
This organic protein powder also contains a good source of fibre, iron and calcium, helping your body becoming stronger and healthier. It has a mild, nutty taste, making it perfect for baking your favourite treats!

4. Isopure Zero Carb Protein Powder
One scoop of this unflavoured powder will bake perfectly into your favourite treat to make it as high-protein as possible. With only 100 calories per serving and zero carbs, it will also help you reach your weight loss goals!

7 Breakfast Protein Powder Recipes

8 Protein Powder Shakes and Smoothies

8 Dessert Protein Powder Recipes

7 Low Carb Keto Protein Powder Recipes for Weight Loss

Cooking and baking with protein powder is one of the best ways to get in the daily recommended amount of protein and reach your weight loss goals in the process! Try out these recipes and see the results for yourself!

This post contains affiliate links.

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How to Make Pea Protein Powder

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It’s not as gross as it sounds, I swear.

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

When I was a kid, I remember hating when my dad insisted I ate every last pea on my plate at dinnertime.

It’s safe to say that 6-year-old me would be kind of horrified that peas—specifically, pea protein—are in everything these days, from veggie burgers to vegan-friendly protein powders.

A post shared by Natural.Simple.Clean (@flosuperfoods) on Jul 1, 2018 at 1:49pm PDT

A post shared by Tropeaka® Nutrition to Conquer (@tropeaka) on May 8, 2018 at 4:32pm PDT

But yeah no, people are not just eating pea-flavored protein shakes. (Six-year-old me—and adult me—shudders at the thought.) Pea protein is so, so much more than that.

What is pea protein?

Pea protein is extracted from green and yellow split peas, according to the University of Michigan. It’s used to make protein powder, and often serves as a base in packaged foods like veggie burgers (oh hai, Beyond Burger!) and vegan mayo, and even replaces dairy in some ice creams and “milks.”

“As more and more consumers are looking to plant-based items, pea protein powder interest has soared among my clients,” says Alexandra Caspero, R.D.

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

You might wonder, why peas? Well, the legume is naturally rich in protein, at 11 grams per quarter cup. And peas are a vegan source of protein (more on that in a sec) making it a great option for plant-based people who want to add more of the nutrient to their diet.

A single serving of pea protein powder, for example, nets you around 90 to 120 calories and 17 to 24 grams of protein, depending on the brand, making it pretty comparable to other types of protein powders. (Note: Flavors may potentially add more sugar.)

Pea protein powder is also an excellent source of iron, at around five milligrams (mg) per serving—nearly a third of your daily needs, making it ideal for vegans, notes Caspero.

Here’s what you get in a quarter-cup serving of Caspero’s favorite pea protein powder, Bob’s Red Mill Pea Protein Powder (which is unsweetened and unflavored):

  • Calories: 100
  • Fat (sat fat): 1.5 g (0 g)
  • Carbohydrates: 2 g
  • Fiber: 1 g
  • Sugar: 0 g
  • Sodium: 260 mg
  • Protein: 21 g

Pea protein benefits

As mentioned above, pea protein is totally plant-based, making it safe for vegans to eat. Remember, most other types of non-meat protein alternatives (whether they’re protein powders or packaged foods) include dairy, whey, soy, and/or eggs, says Jessica Cording, R.D.

Cording also recommends pea protein-based products to people with allergies (since lots of people are lactose-intolerant, or have soy, wheat, or egg allergies). Pea protein tends to be pretty easy to digest, she adds, although you may have a reaction if you’re allergic to other legumes like peanuts.

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

Like all other protein powders, a shot of pea protein after workouts may reduce soreness and speed recovery while boosting muscle mass gains. What’s more, pea protein has loads of the amino acid arginine, which may help lower blood pressure, according to the Mayo Clinic (although more research is needed). As a plant-based food, pea protein is also kinder on the environment than animal-based proteins, since peas need less water and energy to grow than, say, a cow.

Pea protein vs whey protein: Which one is better?

Pea protein is similar in calorie and protein levels to whey protein, Cording says. Pea protein, however, is not a complete protein like whey is, meaning it doesn’t contain all of the essential muscle-building amino acids your body needs.

But as long as you eat a variety of other healthy proteins and whole grains like rice throughout the day, you’ll make up the essential amino acid requirements to make pea protein complete, explains Caspero.

Is pea protein better than other plant-based proteins?

If you’re sensitive to gluten, lactose, soy, or dairy, says Caspero, pea protein is usually much easier on your tummy than most other types of protein powders. It’s also thought to be less genetically modified than some soy protein powders, Cording adds.

As far as plant-based proteins go, “pea protein has a very mild taste and palatable texture that blends easily into other foods and with other flavors,” says Cording.

You can use pea protein powder just like you would any other kind of protein powder: as a base for a protein shake, stirred into baked goods, blended into smoothie bowls, you name it.

“Overall, I’m a big fan and would encourage it to someone looking for an alternative to whey or soy protein,” says Cording.

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

Check the label carefully, since some protein powders are way more processed and filled with added sweeteners, flavors, colors, and preservatives. Caspero likes the above-mentioned Bob’s Red Mill Pea Protein Powder since it only has one ingredient: yellow peas.

Not into powders? Cording suggests just eating fresh or frozen peas, which contain the same protein-boosting power plus nearly triple the fiber in a quarter-cup serving, plus other phytochemicals and nutrients that may get stripped during processing.

The bottom line: Pea protein is actually a food trend worth trying, especially if you’re vegan or have food allergies. Just be sure to eat a well-balanced diet to ensure that you’re getting a complete range of amino acids.

Pea protein is extracted from yellow pea

The pea is a member of the food legume family and historically was first cultivated as a protein-rich crop primarily in west Asia and North Africa.

Pea protein is extracted from golden or yellow pea (Pisum sativum). It is mostly produced from plants cultivated in the USA, Canada and Europe. Golden pea crops from Northern European countries such as France and Belgium are known to be of the best quality.

Extraction process of pea protein

Pea protein is obtained through a gentle water-based isolation process without the use of chemical solvent. It includes dry and liquid phases. First, during a dry process, the outer shell of the pea (essentially consisting of insoluble fibres), is removed by mechanical action.

After grinding and milling, a flour retaining soluble fibres, starches and proteins, vitamins and minerals is obtained. Being water-soluble, pea proteins are therefore easily separated from fibre and starch by wet filtration and centrifugation.

The next stage of the process is to precipitate the protein to its isoelectric point. It is then finally dry sprayed. The end product is a fine white powder of purified protein that can be used in human nutrition: pea protein isolate.

Pea protein isolate is the final product of pea protein extraction from golden peas. It’s a highly concentrated protein substance with exceptional digestibility (98%). It is the main ingredient of our pea protein blends. It is also interesting to note that most of the carbohydrates are removed in manufacturing pea protein isolates.

The better the quality of the protein isolate, the higher the protein content. Measured on dry matter, Go Good’s pea protein isolate has a protein content of about 85 to 90%, which makes it one of the best in the world. It does not impact the colour, taste or texture of products and is commonly used as a meat replacement and alternative protein source in many foods.

Properties of pea protein isolate

Recent studies regarding pea protein functionalities have revealed unique properties compared to soybean protein isolates.

Pea protein is first used for its high protein content, good digestibility and well-balanced aminogram which covers 95% of the daily needs in essential amino acids of an adult. Pea protein isolate is also both gluten-free and exhibits low incidents of allergen which makes it interesting for the nutrition, particularly for child nutrition, elderly, food without lactose, veganism, etc.

The lysine content of pea protein helps with the building of muscle protein and which is required for growth and bone development.

Moreover, good solubility, outstanding dispersion in water and easy mixing, the fluidity of powder. are all features of pea protein. With very little taste or smell, pea protein isolate is used is an amazing plant-based alternative to whey or soy protein to include in your protein shakes, smoothies and baking recipes.

Go Good uses Pisane pea protein isolate made by Cosucra, in Warcoing, Belgium. This private company has been in business since the early 1850s and producing plant protein isolate for more than 30 years. All of the yellow pea used for its Pisane pea protein is obtained from within 250km of the factory site. Stringent European farming and transforming laws ensure that the highest standards are upheld.

Go Good Pea Protein Powder

Go Good mix the isolate with only a minimal number of ingredients, all 100% natural: organic raw cacao or organic vanilla bean, natural flavour, thaumatin (a natural sweetener extracted from the Katemfe fruit) and sunflower lecithin.

The quality of our pea protein powder is also reflected by what you won’t find in it. Our blends gluten-free, dairy-free, soy-free and lactose-free. They contain no emulsifiers, no gums, no added sugar, no fillers or preservatives. Absolutely nothing your body doesn’t need.

Nutrition Facts about pea protein

Nutrition facts can vary between brands, but — for example — one 30-gram serving of Go Good Organic Vanilla Pea Protein Powder contains:

  • Calories: 118
  • Protein: 22.7 grams
  • Carbs: 1.7 gram
  • Total fat: 2.1 grams
  • Sodium: 39.9 mg

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

KANSAS CITY — Pea protein has its advantages when compared to other plant protein sources. It may be lower in cost and non-G.M.O. Pea protein, however, also may have specific taste issues that are easy to describe.

“They taste like peas,” said Paulette Lanzoff, technical director for Synergy Flavors, which has a U.S. office in Wauconda, Ill. “If you try to make a vanilla shake or a strawberry-flavored shake with something that tastes like peas, it’s a little bit of a challenge. They’ve done a lot of things to clean up the pea protein (flavor). We’re getting a much cleaner profile with it, but there’s still a lot of vegetative notes that come through. We’ve really got to modify flavors to get them just right for the end application.”

Modifying or masking the pea protein flavor may allow for its use in shakes, bars and baked foods. Sweeteners, flavors and other plant protein sources may assist in such masking.

A 2017 study from GlobalData Plc revealed the growing awareness of pea protein, which increased to 47% in 2017 from 38% in 2015, said Tom Vierhile, innovations insight director for GlobalData. While 18% of respondents in 2017 said they did not know what pea protein is, the percentage was 30% in 2015.

People may describe pea protein’s flavor in unflattering terms. Common descriptors are grassy, beany, earthy, bitter and chalky, said Ryan Loy, Ph.D., assistant principal scientist at Chromocell Corp., North Brunswick, N.J. Chromocell owns FlavorHealth, which offers ways to mask flavors. A ProteinBrite system from FlavorHealth mitigates off-tastes from plant proteins, Dr. Loy said.

“This solution offers companies in the wellness and nutrition field the ability to add essential micronutrients or plant proteins to their products without compromising on great tastes across their product lines,” Dr. Loy said.

The quantity of pea protein in a sports/nutritional drink or a protein bar may be the primary challenge, said David Bom, Ph.D., technology development manager – beverage flavors, North America for Sensient Flavors, Milwaukee.

“Dosages can range from 10 grams to 30 grams per serving,” he said. “That is a large amount of bitter stimuli for any taste-masking system to overcome.”

Low-calorie or zero-calorie sweeteners may be used to mask flavors in pea protein applications, but that strategy may bring bitter, metallic off-notes.

“This is where we can leverage our taste modulations technology, which excels at masking the off-notes associated with these products, making them much more palatable,” Dr. Bom said.

Applications where the protein is bound, even during mastication, tend to be more palatable than applications where the protein is more available to the taste buds, including beverages, shakes or yogurt, he said.

How pea protein fares in shakes may depend on the flavor of the shake.

“We can do a really good job of pea protein in vanilla and chocolate and the sweet brown flavors, but some of the fruity flavors are a little bit more of a challenge, strawberry in particular,” Ms. Lanzoff said.

In baked foods, pea protein pairs well with a sweet, brown flavor that may be used in cookies, muffins or cakes, she said.

Besides its flavor, pea protein comes with an aroma that consumers may not like. Vanilla might solve the issue.

“You’d want a very aromatic french vanilla profile — spice notes rather than a plain standard vanilla flavor that you’d use in whey protein,” Ms. Lanzoff said.

Other plant protein sources may be used in masking pea protein’s flavor to give the finished product a more balanced flavor profile, Ms. Lanzoff said. Almonds, macadamia nuts and pumpkin are options.

Pea proteins may have issues with astringency and bitterness, but Cargill’s pea protein is different, said Paige Ties, technical service manager, research and development, for Minneapolis-based Cargill.

How do they turn plants into a concentrated protein powder?

There’s not an obvious answer. But after doing some digging, it’s pretty simple.

Let me break it down.

If you’ve looked at what vegan protein powder is made of, you know that there are 4 main components in most powders:

  • A protein isolate – pea, brown rice, hemp, or soy usually
  • Nutritional ingredients – flaxseed, chia seeds, or kale to add some nutrition to the powder (optional)
  • Flavoring ingredients – “natural flavors”, cocoa powder, vanilla
  • Stabilizers – for texture, guar gum, acacia gum, or xanthan gum is added (often a blend)

The ingredients are literally just blended together, there’s nothing special going on there.

It’s worth noting that there’s typically a mix of protein isolates, in order to balance amino acid profiles.

So that leaves one question:

Where does protein isolate come from?

That’s a bit more complicated, but let me try and simplify it.

Table of Contents

How is Vegan Protein Powder Isolate Made?

It starts with a plant, whether it’s peas, rice, hemp, or soybeans.

They all contain, in different proportions, all 3 macronutrients:

  1. Fats
  2. Carbohydrates
  3. Protein

New vegans often turn to plant-based protein powder to help meet protein goals.

But how do they get protein from ingredients like peas? The challenge is to isolate the protein from the fats and carbohydrates, and that’s what this post will cover.

There are multiple ways to do this in a commercial setting. Keep in mind that the goal is near complete protein isolate (>95% by weight). There are some methods that work, but leave too much carbohydrate, so those products (called protein concentrates) are not usually used in protein powders.

Here are the most common methods that are relevant.

Method #1: Solvent extraction – Hexane

This is by far the most controversial method of protein extraction.

In a nutshell, hexane is a solvent used in the extraction process to isolate the protein. However, not all of the hexane can be removed.

Hexane is a chemical neurotoxin, that’s a fact. The debate is around how much of it does there need to be to cause harm.

Short answer: We don’t know yet.

But if you want to be cautious and avoid it, that’s completely understandable.

Note – Hexane solvent extraction is most commonly used with soybeans, which isn’t used too often in protein powders. Certainly not in high amounts.

If you’re interested in what the actual process looks like, let me try to summarize it.

It’s a complicated process, but you can see that hexane is involved in multiple stages:

Basically, the hexane is passed through soybean flakes, which still have fat and protein in them.

Then, the hexane-oil (fats) and hexane-soybean flake mixtures can be separated.

The hexane in the soybean flakes is mostly removed, as previously mentioned, but not completely removed.

To finish off here, remember that while some bloggers make a huge deal about hexane in protein powders, this is not an extremely common method. If you’re really concerned, get in touch with the company that manufactures your protein powder and see if they use this technique.

Method #2: Ultrafiltration

Ultrafiltration is mostly a mechanical process, meaning that few chemicals are used to extract the protein.

To start with, the plant source is grinded down into a flour, then dissolved in an alkaline solution (slightly basic, pH 9-10). Anything that doesn’t dissolve is removed.

Next, protein precipitates (becomes solid) through acidification, and then separated out using centrifugation. These protein solids are 90-95% protein, which is a great protein isolate.

There are many variations and specific processes based on this general approach. It’s fairly common, doesn’t introduce any health concerns, and is effective.

Method #3: Enzymatic Extraction

The final method I’ll cover uses enzymatic hydrolysis.

There’s 2 parts to this.

First, enzymes are biological catalysts which speed up reactions.

Second, hydrolysis is a type of chemical reaction where something reacts with water. In this case, our legumes, with a separated protein as the product.

It’s trivial to isolate the protein at this point.

This is a relatively slow process, but “clean”, meaning that there’s little risk of damage to any nutrients, and no potentially dangerous chemicals are added.

Summary

Now you have a very good picture of how vegan protein powders are made, start to finish.

What can you do with this knowledge?

Well, you could try to make your own.

Or, you could just be satisfied with knowing more about how your food is made.

You hopefully also understand that the processes used to obtain plant-based protein isolate aren’t always so healthy. So if you’d like to be on the safe side, try to rely a little less on protein powders to meet your nutritional needs.

About the author

Dale Cudmore

Your friendly neighborhood vegan from Toronto. Chemical engineer turned semi-professional soccer player and freelance nutrition writer. I’ve been vegan for years and try to make life easier for others by sharing what I’ve learned.

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

Pretty much everyone has the exact same complaint about protein powder. No matter which kind you choose to add into your smoothie, it always winds up making that hearty mix of fruit and veggies super chalky—not to mention the icky aftertaste. A combo that’s never appealing. That’s exactly why one dietitian decided to ditch it altogether and source her protein with frozen peas instead.

Whitney English, RD, the registered dietitian behind Plant-Based Juniors, isn’t a big fan of protein powder in general. But she also knows it’s not at all required in order to infuse her smoothies with a solid source of plant-based protein. Instead of going for one of the trendiest options—aka pea protein, which is everywhere right now—she decided to go straight to the source and grab a bag of frozen peas out of her freezer.

“The popularity of pea protein got me thinking: Why not just throw the whole pea in? And ya know what, it worked,” she wrote on Instagram. “Tossing frozen green peas into your smoothie adds protein (4 grams per 1/2 cup), fiber, and creamy texture without any weird aftertaste.”

For the perfect protein-packed smoothie, English recommends combining 1/2 cup of frozen peas with a banana, unsweetened vanilla soy milk, frozen blueberries, hemp seeds, and peanut butter. What you’re left with is a morning beverage that not only energizes you and keeps you full until lunch, but also leaves you feeling totally satisfied. Who knows—peas might be the small but mighty addition your blends have been missing.

Recently-launched Origin Nutrition’s vegan powder, which is made in Chennai, will soon be available in flavours such as vanilla and berry

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Recently-launched Origin Nutrition’s vegan powder, which is made in Chennai, will soon be available in flavours such as vanilla and berry

Aditi Mammen Gupta, an entrepreneur, has a challenge at hand — that of making pea protein taste good. “It is horrendous,” she says, trying hard to describe the taste. But after a lot of permutations and combinations, Aditi is finally satisfied with the result. And more importantly, she and her husband no longer have to be the guinea pigs any more.

Peas, along with pumpkin seeds, are the main source of protein in Aditi’s just-launched vegan protein powder, Origin Nutrition. The 34-year-old is keen to make it a wellness brand with more products in store.

“My husband is lactose intolerant and he can’t have whey because it is made from dairy,” says Aditi. Which is why the couple was importing vegan protein powder from abroad. The deliveries, however, were delayed because of customs formalities. “That is when I decided to try and formulate one on my own,” says Aditi. She started research last May and it took her a year to understand the techniques involved.

Origin Nutrition, as of now, comes with a chocolate flavour. Things slowed down with the lockdown and sourcing raw materials posed a challenge. Each serving has more than 25 grams of protein and 130 calories. “For the first batch, we did 40 pouches, each about 375 grams,” says Aditi, adding, “We didn’t realise it would sell so quickly. It got sold out in a day.”

In comparison, her other brand, Posh Nosh, that she started in 2014, had a fairly slower start. “We have already got pre-orders for more than 60 packs for our next batch of protein powders,” says Aditi, adding that flavours such as vanilla and berry would be available in the next few months.

The website will be up shortly and the protein powder will also be available on Amazon.in. For now, it is priced at ₹1,100 for 375 grams (temporary packaging). The final packaging will have 750 grams and be priced at ₹2,200.

For details, call 9940091795 or check out @originprotein on Instagram

You have reached your limit for free articles this month.

January 27, 2015 by Cara

I’ve been a big ol’ sloppy, greasy-haired, no-showering, energy-lacking mess this week. In fact I haven’t been feeling very well over the past couple of weeks and have been relying on smoothies to really ensure that I am getting my veggies and good-for-you stuff into my body to promote healing. I call it Lazy Man’s Nutrition, which I am perfectly fine with the word lazy. Imagine me, rats’ nest and all, in the kitchen one day in a nervous panic* when I realized that I was out of my usual protein-packed nuts, the perfect booster to my LMN (lazy man’s nutrition) drink. 1). I didn’t have the energy needed to go to the store; 2). I have been dropping and running into everything (I have THREE huge knots on my head to vouch for that statement) and I could not risk going for #4 in public; and 3). I wasn’t anywhere near presentable to the world without a fright so I began to search and raid my cabinet for a good protein source like a mad scientist, on a mission to make a DIY Plant Based Protein Powder for myself. Little did I know that in my hot mess-ness would be birthed a new go-to recipe for me. Maybe it’s just me but I’m a sucker for this stuff especially because protein powders are a gamble to buy unless you initially try out a sample pack to make sure it’s something you like. But still it’s rare that I find one I like.

*A mere exaggeration. Sweaty, maybe but that was from this horrible sickness I have been enduring.

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

This took several attempts (and bad smoothies to down) in order to achieve the right texture and flavor. I wanted to initially try spotlighting green lentils but I quickly realized how NOT a good idea it was…unless you love the flavor of what tastes like dry chickpea flour. I wouldn’t recommend drinking homemade lentil flour. So then I thought, “Well brown rice is a go-to store-bought powder experience.” Another bad idea. Too gritty in a smoothie. So there I stood in my pantry, desperately trying to figure out what good protein source I could find that I already had.

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

I already had hemp hearts, chia seeds and maca powder; I just needed an extra boost of protein. I spotted the almond meal and thought, What the heck–why not? Made sense though since I usually use a handful of nuts and because it was already ground up, it would take less work on my part. You’ve got my attention, brain. Less work always sounds like a plan to me. Please note that if you are nut free, you can always use sunflower seeds and grind them up into a fine flour.

The carob powder is optional but adds a great dimension to a smoothie with strawberries or no fruit added. I never thought I’d ever like carob powder until I have been exploring with it recently and I really dig on it. This candida infection has exposed me to even more ingredients that I would normally not try.

Karen Collins

Q: I’m suddenly seeing pea protein everywhere. What is it and is it healthy?

A: Pea protein is an extract from split peas, and food manufacturers are adding this protein to a variety of foods like energy bars, meal-replacement shakes, veggie burgers and even cereals. You can also find it as a powder to add when making smoothies.

With protein getting a lot of attention right now, pea protein offers a healthy option. Traditional approaches to boosting protein might have involved larger meat portions, yet evidence is strong that excess red and processed meats increase risk of cancer and other chronic diseases.

Growing interest in vegetarian and plant-based diets has likely prompted the increased availability of pea and other plant-based proteins. Pea protein also appeals to people who are lactose-intolerant or do not include dairy-based protein. But compared to getting protein from foods that bring a bevy of other valuable nutrients, it’s not the answer for everyone.

Growing interest in vegetarian and plant-based diets has likely prompted the increased availability of pea and other plant-based proteins.

Pea Protein versus Other Plant Proteins

Proteins are made of amino acids and there are nine amino acids that are essential in our diets. Unlike animal sources of protein, protein from plant foods is often low in one or more of these nine amino acids that makes a “complete” protein. Yet research shows that as long as you eat a variety of protein sources throughout the day, it’s not necessary to consume complete proteins in each meal.

Like the legumes from which it’s made, pea protein contains all the essential amino acids but it is low in one called methionine. That means it should be used as only one of many different protein sources, not the major choice throughout the day.

Pea protein is not all the same. Protein and other nutrient content varies based on the brand and whether it is a concentrate or isolate (isolates typically have more protein). Even when supplying equal amounts of protein, the amount of fiber differs. Some are a good source of fiber yet most contain little. This protein is relatively low in fat yet at least one that I looked at contained a concerning amount of trans fat (the type of fat most clearly damaging to heart health).

Compared to protein-fortified products with protein isolated from hemp seed, rice and most other grains, pea protein contains a better balance of essential amino acids.

Compared to protein-fortified products with protein isolated from hemp seed, rice and most other grains, pea protein contains a better balance of essential amino acids.

The less desirable aspect of pea protein is that it can have a gritty texture. So it seems to work best in smoothies with a variety of other ingredients, or in protein-enriched products using recipes that overcome that problem.

Pea Protein in the Big Picture

As a dietitian, I’m glad to see people thinking about ways to meet protein needs beyond big meat portions, and including protein in meals throughout the day. But it’s important to recognize that just because the grams of protein listed on a bar or drink look good, protein doesn’t turn a food lacking in nutrients into a healthy meal.

Consider what else you get from foods that supply protein. The standard size serving of pea protein powder as listed on labels often provides about 21 grams of protein. That’s the amount in about 3 ounces of meat, fish or poultry (the size of a deck of cards).

However, in extracting the protein, some of dry peas’ other nutrients may be removed. Split peas provide important amounts of magnesium, folate, and potassium, but labels provide no indication of how much is retained in pea protein powder. A serving of pea protein powder does often remain a good source of iron. But isolated pea protein also is missing the pea’s carbohydrate compounds that can support anti-inflammatory gut bacteria.

Foods that contain smaller amounts of protein can add up to meet your protein needs and provide other nutrients and phytochemicals. For example, blenderizing a smoothie with soy milk or tofu, or including a handful of nuts in a snack or mixed into salad also supplies magnesium, potassium, polyphenols, and vitamin E.

If you choose it to boost protein, just remember that whole foods provide more than protein: keep an eye on the big picture.

Pea protein can be a useful ingredient to provide structure to gluten-free foods or improve texture. If you choose it to boost protein, just remember that whole foods provide more than protein: keep an eye on the big picture of what your foods provide to promote overall health.

Karen Collins, MS, RDN, CDN, is AICR’s Nutrition Advisor. Karen is a speaker, writer and consultant who specializes in helping people make sense of nutrition news. You can follow her blog, Smart Bytes®, through her website and follow her on Twitter @KarenCollinsRD.

AICR Impact

The American Institute for Cancer Research helps the public understand the relationship between lifestyle, nutrition and cancer risk. We work to prevent cancer through innovative research, community programs and impactful public health initiatives.

09/21/2020

Pea protein powder is a complete and highly useful vegan protein supplement but it can be tricky to know exactly what to do with it. Here are a few ideas to get you started.

Summer Fruit Smoothie

  • 2/3 cup peeled cucumber, seeded
  • 2/3 cup honeydew melon, seeded
  • Zest of half an orange
  • 1/8 cup fresh mint
  • 1 scoop Naked Pea protein powder
  • Ice (as needed)
  • Water (as needed)

Place all ingredients in blender and process until thoroughly combined. Use ice and water as need to achieve the desired texture.

Pumpkin Pie Smoothie

  • 1 cup milk (of choice)
  • 1 scoop Naked Pea protein powder
  • 1/2 cup yogurt
  • 1/3 cup pumpkin puree (not pie filling)
  • 1/2 tsp. roasted ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 tbsp. maple syrup
  • 1 tbsp. brown sugar
  • 1/2 tsp. pumpkin pie spice
  • Ice (as needed)
  • Water (as needed)

Place all ingredients in blender and process until thoroughly combined. Use ice and water as need to achieve the desired texture.

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

Protein Mac’n’Cheese

  • ½ cup macaroni
  • 1 scoop Naked Pea protein powder
  • ¾ cup milk (of choice)
  • ¼ cup shredded cheddar cheese
  • Salt (to taste)

Cook the macaroni. At the same time, mix the rest of the ingredients in a small sauce pan over medium-high heat. Do not allow the sauce to boil.

Once the pasta is cooked to your liking, mix it with the cheese sauce.

When it comes to protein, peas pack a powerful punch. This vegan and gluten-free protein source contains all nine essential amino acids and is a great source of iron. Studies have even shown that pea protein may help reduce the risk of heart disease by lowering cholesterol. However, when choosing the best pea protein for you, there are a few styles of protein powders to consider.

Pea protein is made by extracting the protein from ground yellow peas. Unflavored 100% pure pea protein is perfect for adding to recipes without altering the taste. They can be added to smoothies or even used in cooking. Since they’re sugar-free and don’t contain additives, if you have a sensitive stomach, unflavored pea protein may be a safer bet.

Most plant-based protein blends also include pea protein as a main ingredient, along with other vegan protein sources like pumpkin and chia seeds for an even more rounded dose of amino acids. These blends are often convenient flavored powders, which can be added directly to water for a quick and easy post-workout pick-me-up or added to a shake.

When deciding on a product, taste and texture are key. While some are smooth and creamy, others can be a little grainier. Higher-quality pea proteins are often better-tasting and have a smoother texture, but can also be on the pricey side. For adding directly to water, a smooth, great-tasting pea protein is the way to go, but that may not matter as much for adding to recipes, so figure out how you plan on using it.

The pea protein powders featured here are either 100% pea protein or blended with ingredients like pumpkin seeds, chia seeds, quinoa, or brown rice so they’re all great vegan choices.

A big selling point for Naked Pea is the purity of its products. This unflavored vegan pea protein, contains a single ingredient: yellow pea protein. No artificial flavors, gluten, GMOs, or added sugar are in sight, so it’s great for recipes such as soups, sauces, smoothies, or baked goods. And, it comes at a great price.

However, if you’re looking for a pea protein to add directly to water, this may not be the best-tasting. While it’s also available in chocolate and vanilla flavors, some reviewers noted that it has a slightly grainy texture.

ABOUT THE REVIEWER

Claudia Thompson, PhD, RD

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Sara Lindberg

If you’re looking for creative ways to sneak in some extra protein during the day, then why not try a breakfast of oatmeal with protein powder? All it takes is a serving of fiber-rich oats along with your favorite protein powder and a few extras, and you have a great way to start your day.

Mixing protein powder into hot oatmeal is quick and easy. Once the oatmeal is cooked, add the protein powder to the oatmeal, and stir until it is thoroughly mixed in.

Oatmeal With Protein Powder

Protein powder, and more specifically, whey protein powder, is a by-product of the cheese-making process, according to the Mayo Clinic. It’s also one of two proteins found in milk, with casein being the other protein. With that in mind, if you have a dairy allergy, avoid using this product and consider trying a plant-based protein powder instead.

According to the USDA, 1 scoop of whey protein powder isolate has 103 calories, 0.3 grams of fat, 8.3 grams of carbohydrates, and approximately 17 grams of protein. It’s important to note that these figures are based on a generic protein powder. For exact nutrition information, refer to the product label on the protein powder you’re using.

Oats are an excellent source of fiber, both insoluble and soluble. Beta-glucan, which is the type of soluble fiber in oats, may help slow digestion, increase satiety and suppress appetite, according to Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

There are several types of oats, including quick-cooking, steel-cut, old fashioned rolled oats and instant. According to the USDA, 1 cup of cooked oatmeal has 166 calories, 3.6 grams of fat, 28.1 grams of carbohydrates, 4 grams of fiber, 0.6 grams of sugar and 5.9 grams of protein.

Oats with protein powder is an excellent addition to any diet. Plus, you don’t have to limit it to your morning meal. Oatmeal with protein powder topped with fresh fruit and nuts is a great pre- and post-workout meal.

Whey Protein Oatmeal Recipe

On those days when plain oats and whey for breakfast doesn’t sound very appetizing, consider adding fruit or nuts to the recipe. Mix-ins are easy to add at the end of the cooking process or right before serving. You can also use dried fruit like raisins, cranberries or blueberries as toppings.

The next time you’re looking for a healthy and delicious way to start your day, consider giving this Supercharged Oatmeal recipe a try.

Recently-launched Origin Nutrition’s vegan powder, which is made in Chennai, will soon be available in flavours such as vanilla and berry

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Recently-launched Origin Nutrition’s vegan powder, which is made in Chennai, will soon be available in flavours such as vanilla and berry

Aditi Mammen Gupta, an entrepreneur, has a challenge at hand — that of making pea protein taste good. “It is horrendous,” she says, trying hard to describe the taste. But after a lot of permutations and combinations, Aditi is finally satisfied with the result. And more importantly, she and her husband no longer have to be the guinea pigs any more.

Peas, along with pumpkin seeds, are the main source of protein in Aditi’s just-launched vegan protein powder, Origin Nutrition. The 34-year-old is keen to make it a wellness brand with more products in store.

“My husband is lactose intolerant and he can’t have whey because it is made from dairy,” says Aditi. Which is why the couple was importing vegan protein powder from abroad. The deliveries, however, were delayed because of customs formalities. “That is when I decided to try and formulate one on my own,” says Aditi. She started research last May and it took her a year to understand the techniques involved.

Origin Nutrition, as of now, comes with a chocolate flavour. Things slowed down with the lockdown and sourcing raw materials posed a challenge. Each serving has more than 25 grams of protein and 130 calories. “For the first batch, we did 40 pouches, each about 375 grams,” says Aditi, adding, “We didn’t realise it would sell so quickly. It got sold out in a day.”

In comparison, her other brand, Posh Nosh, that she started in 2014, had a fairly slower start. “We have already got pre-orders for more than 60 packs for our next batch of protein powders,” says Aditi, adding that flavours such as vanilla and berry would be available in the next few months.

The website will be up shortly and the protein powder will also be available on Amazon.in. For now, it is priced at ₹1,100 for 375 grams (temporary packaging). The final packaging will have 750 grams and be priced at ₹2,200.

For details, call 9940091795 or check out @originprotein on Instagram

You have reached your limit for free articles this month.

Posted on July 27, 2017 By Chef Billy Parisi

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

I have been on absolute protein shake binge that last few weeks, and it’s all thanks to Bob’s Red Mill Pea Protein Powder. I’ve had a little more motivation that usually since I’ve been more persistent about getting to the gym at least 4 days a week, so with going to the gym comes being more conscious of what I’m putting in my body. When I can start off the morning with a delicious Pea Protein Powder Shake with Coconut Milk and Berries, I immediately feed energized and full, which is perfect for giving my what I need to endure a busy work day, find time to go to the gym and hang out with my family.

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

Bob’s Red Mill Pea Protein Powder is loaded with nutritional benefits from 21 grams of protein to having 0, yes that’s right, ZERO grams of sugar in it. It has a really mild pea flavor, but once you mix it in with the fresh berries and coconut milk, you don’t taste anything other than pure deliciousness.

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

One of my absolute favorite things about drinking a protein shake in the morning time is that I can change it up every single time, especially since the pea protein powder is so natural in flavor. It could be a peanut butter and banana day, or a vanilla and frozen berries kind of day, no matter what it is I usually poke around the house to see what we have and use it.

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

Protein Shakes are meant to be quick, easy and delicious so if you plan on drinking them on a daily or weekly basis don’t go overboard on gathering all of the ingredients so that you’re making some 20 ingredients $35 dollar shake every morning. Keep the recipes simple and low in count so that you can spend more time on things that matter, like family, or the gym :-).

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

In addition to this Pea Protein Powder Shake with Coconut Milk and Berries being part of my daily morning routine, I’ve also used it as a meal replacement or a snack during the afternoon. Sometimes I’m just busy as all get out and don’t get time to make a meal or even a quick snack, so I just toss everything in the blender and boom I’m done in under a minute with a protein packed tasty treat. I’ve also subscribed to the fact that these are phenomenal replacements for those sweet tooth cravings that you may have later at night. I remember reading a Men’s Health® with Ryan Reynolds in it, yes he’s my man crush, and it was right after he did Blade 3 and the dude was JACKED!! I remember reading in the article that he said if you are hungry after 8 o’clock to avoid any carbs or sugars and go straight to a protein shake. It will fill you up with no regrets, and you know what he’s absolutely correct. I’ve been doing it a lot these past few weeks and I’m loving how I feel when I wake up. I know if I eat garbage the night before that I am so sluggish the next day.

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

In addition to making blended protein shakes with pea protein powder you could also get creative by incorporating it into muffins, baked breads or even cookies. Yes, you should avoid all of the sugar you put into things like that and find more natural replacements like honey, agave or even coconut sugar. The whole idea is to get creative and make things that work for you and your family, and of course your lifestyle.

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

I’ve been drinking these Pea Protein Powder Shake with Coconut Milk and Berries for 3 weeks and I’ll do my best to post my progress on how I’m feeling as well as hopefully my physique slimming down a little bit. When I turned 30, something definitely changed with my body and I immediately noticed I couldn’t just eat whatever I wanted and expect for it to fall away by doing next to nothing. The body is a temple and we need to be taking care of it and feeding it properly. Just like the old saying goes, garbage in – garbage out!

Naked Pea – 5lb

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

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Naked Pea – 5lb

What is Pea Protein Powder?

Pea protein powder is made by extracting the soluble pea protein from yellow-split peas. It is not the same as ground peas as most of the starch and fiber is removed. Yellow pea protein powder is an excellent source of dietary protein for vegetarians and vegans that cannot use animal / milk based proteins.

Naked Pea is a vegan protein made exclusively from raw yellow peas grown in the USA and Canada. Gluten free, dairy free, and soy free; Naked Pea’s superior amino acid profile is the result of processing via mechanical water-extraction without the use of chemicals. Naked Nutrition is committed to shortening the steps between our farms and you.

Don’t let labels and big agribusiness fool you; additives are for their bottom line, not your health.

The Naked Difference:

  • Exclusively From Farms in the United States and Canada
  • Vegan
  • No Artificial Sweeteners, Flavors, or Colors
  • 27 Grams of Protein and 5.7 Grams of BCAA’s Per Serving*
  • Only One Ingredient: Yellow Pea Protein
  • Non-GMO, Soy Free, and Gluten Free
  • Dairy Free
  • Environmentally-friendly farming practices

Mainly made from peas produced in Europe and North America, pea protein is extracted from yellow pea (Pisum sativum) which represents a sustainable protein source and an alternative to the consumption of meat for the coming years.

Pea protein in food applications

In the current plant-based protein market, pea protein is the best alternative: for its nutrition, functionalities and sustainability. Looking at new food product launches in Europe containing pea protein, its popularity on the market is evident: only 7 new products in 2007 containing pea protein compared to almost 600 new products in 2017. Pea protein is largely used in bakery (mainly bread, with a 42% increase of new products in 5 years), meat, fish & eggs and sports nutrition. Also ready meals and cereals were in the top food and beverage product launches in 2017 containing pea protein (INNOVA, 2018). Interestingly, the dairy category is booming with an increase of 90% of product launches in 5 years.

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

Manufacturing process

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

(Picture: yellow peas)

Pea protein is obtained by a process including dry and liquid phases. First, during a dry process, the outer shell of the pea (essentially consisting of insoluble fibres), is removed by mechanical action. After milling, a flour containing soluble fibres, starches and proteins is obtained. Being water soluble, pea proteins are therefore separated from fiber and starch by wet filtration and centrifugation. From this solution, there are two methods to obtain the protein isolate:

One is to precipitate the proteins to their isoelectric point at very high temperature. It gets a thermo-coagulated protein to be used in animal nutrition.
The second one process is to precipitate the protein to its isoelectric point, and then solubilizing the dry spray. It gets a white powder of purified protein that can be used in human nutrition.

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

(Picture : purified pea protein isolate)

The obtained isolate has a protein content of about 85 to 90%. It is marketed as such or can be modified to optimize its technical or nutritional properties through extrusion process. This allows to get pea protein crisp or texturized.

Properties

Pea protein is first used for its high protein content (aminogram covers 95% of the daily needs in essential amino acids of an adult) and good digestibility that make it interesting for the nutrition, particularly for child nutrition, elderly, food without lactose, vegetarianism, organic food.

Many lines of products for sports (protein supplementation) and clinical nutrition (support of malnutrition) use pea protein in their formulation.

Moreover, emulsifying properties, good solubility, outstanding dispersion in water, reaction of Maillard (non-enzymatic Browning), easy mixing, fluidity of powder. are all features of pea protein that are sought by food industries. It is used in bakery, pastry, confectionery, dairy products and desserts. Its sensory profile and texturized shape give it ease of use.

In addition, in culinary products, pea protein displays very good meat binding properties (meat extender) or even texture (meat substitute) in different applications (meats, steaks, nuggets, sauces, dishes cooked. ).

Pea protein is now a popular supplementary nutrition among human, especially gym-goers and health-conscious people. Basically, pea protein can divided into three types: pea protein isolate, pea protein concentrate and textured pea protein. Besides, it can be used to replace some proteins in food industry and won’t cause any bad effects on the products so as to save the cost. Certainly, pea protein is also great protein for human health, helping to improve blood circulation, keep weight, boost metabolism and more. Obviously, there is no doubt that pea protein has a broad market prospect today. It is estimated that reach USD 34.8 Million by 2020 at a CAGR of 8.80% from 2015 to 2020 in terms of value.
How to Make Pea Protein Powder

Pea Protein Global Markt Growth Pea Protein Growth by Applications

Therefore, it is time to grasp this good opportunity to start or expand the pea protein production. There are many methods to extract pea protein, but which is the best pea protein extraction process? What can ensure the highest extraction efficiency? More important, which process can better protect its natural components?

Sub-critical solvent extraction technology, we supply, is the best choice due to its powerful extraction ability, easy operation, low production cost, simple extraction process, energy-saving, solvent recycling and lowest rate of residual solvents. It mainly refers to use sub-critical solvents to extract pea protein at low temperature and normal pressure so as to better protect the natural components of pea.

Pea Protein Powder Extraction

The extraction of pea protein is divided into the following three main process: Extraction Process, Desolvation Process and Evaporation Process.

Feeding Process

Raw Material Feeding → Elevator → Inlet Value of Extraction Pot → Extraction Pot

Raw material feeding: Open the feedstock valve, start elevator and then raw material starts go into the extraction pot. Stop the feeding when the raw material is loaded about 65% to 70%, which is observed through the sight glass. Then, vacuum out the air.

Protein Extraction Process

Solvent→ Valve→ Solvent pump→ Extraction Pot
Solvent Pump→ Mixture material Evaporation→ Solvent Pump
Mixture Material Evaporation→Mixed Pea Protein Storage

The first extraction with solvent in the solvent pot will get pea protein and solvent mixture, which are directly taken into evaporation pot. And, the second extraction with solvent (new) will get mixture of pea protein and solvent, which will be taken into storage tank for the next extraction.

Desolvation

Extraction Pot → Vacuum Pump → Compressor → Condenser → Solvent Holding Tank

When the process of mixed pea protein is completed, open the desolvation valve of extraction pot. At the same time, open all the valve of vacuum pump, compressor, condenser. Start up the compressor and vacuum pump, it start desolvation process. When pressure within extraction pot reach 0.8MPa, stop vacuum pump and compressor. Open the blow-off value and discharge low-temperature pea meal.

Evaporation

Pea Protein and Solvent Mixture → Evaporating Pot → Vacuum Pump → Compressor → Condenser → Solvent Holding Tank

When the mixed pea protein and solvent come into evaporating pot, open valves of all equipment, then it start to separate solvent and pea protein. And when the pressure is 0.8MPa, stop the system. Then, open the pot to get the pea protein. And the solvent is processed for recycle use.

As above mentioned, using sub-critical low temperature solvent extraction method to extract pea protein can better protect the natural components while it can save much money compared to super-critical extraction method. If you are interested in pea protein extraction or there are any questions about our extraction process and machine, please contact us directly!

There’s a new protein in town – pea protein powder! Recognized as a highly bioavailable protein, our 100% pure, non-GMO pea protein isolate provides the nutrition you need after any workout. Pea protein is ideal for vegans and vegetarians, or anyone looking for a dairy-free and soy-free alternative to traditional protein powders. It’s also packed with high concentrations of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) to fuel your muscles. So step aside, whey! Make room for pea protein.

How to Use Pea Protein

Simply mix one scoop (20 grams) of pea protein with 6-8 ounces of a cold beverage (e.g. water, juice, smoothie, etc.). Protein needs will vary by individual.

Looking for more ways to incorporate pea protein into your diet? Since heat does not destroy pea protein, it can be used in both hot and cold recipes. Add it to pancake mix and baked goods like muffins, energy bars, or healthy protein cookies.

Pea Protein Benefits

1) Excellent Protein Source: Pea protein powder packs a whopping 24 grams of protein per serving. Plus, its amino acid profile is similar to whey protein with high concentrations of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs): leucine, isoleucine and valine. These three amino acids account for up to 35% of muscle tissue and are essential for muscle development. There’s no limit to what you can accomplish when you supplement your workouts with pea protein!

2) High in Iron: One serving of pea protein powder provides over 30% of the daily recommended value for iron. This mineral is in charge of carrying oxygen-rich blood cells throughout the body. Low levels of iron can cause fatigue, so pea protein can give you a major boost on your way to achieving your daily iron requirements. Keep those energy levels up!

3) Allergy-Friendly: Whey protein oftens gets the spotlight in the world of protein supplements but it’s a major no-no for vegans and anyone who can’t have dairy. Thankfully, you can get a similar quality source of protein with our pea protein powder. It’s perfect for vegans, vegetarians, and anyone who cannot have soy or dairy. Protein is the macronutrient that’s often lacking in plant-based diets, so using a supplement like pea protein is a major help.

4) Easy-To-Digest: Since pea protein does not contain any lactose or gluten, it’s very easy-to-digest and won’t cause the bloating associated with the products that contain those allergens. Now that’s worth writing home about!

Pea protein is exactly how it sounds, a protein made from peas. Because it’s plant-based, it’s popular with vegetarians and vegans who can’t have traditional whey protein powders.

Nutristrength Pea Protein is free of dairy and devoid of all the common allergens so it is completely plant-based and Vegan Society approved.

What is pea protein powder made of

We’ve already established that pea protein is a protein made from peas, but we’re often asked how pea protein is made. The process is relatively simple and involves drying and grinding peas into a fine flour. The flour is then mixed with water to remove the fibre and starch, which then leaves the protein, vitamins and minerals in paste form. It is this paste that is then dried and grounded further to produce the pea protein powder we recognise.

Nutristrength Pea Protein is made from Canadian yellow-split peas, not the green ones you might find at the bottom of your garden. It is then mixed with the sunflower lecithin for a better mix and smoother taste.

Pea protein vs whey

There are pros and cons to all types of protein supplements and, at the end of the day, the choice should come down to personal preference and lifestyle. Always make sure you are combing your protein supplement intake with a healthy balanced diet to ensure you are getting the right nutrients and sustenance. How to Make Pea Protein Powder

There are arguments for and against pea protein used to contribute to growth and maintenance in muscle mass but studies have shown that there is no difference to muscle mass between pea protein and whey. Pea Protein contains all nine of the essential amino acids, including branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs).

Pea protein also has the added vegan benefit over traditional whey of being completely plant-based and free from animal products.

How much protein is there in pea protein?

One of the first things people generally look for when selecting a protein supplement is the protein content.

Nutristrength products are manufactured under stringent quality accreditations certified to GMP, HACCP, ISO 9001:2015 and SALSA (Safe & Local Supplier Approval) with the raw material tested to ensure it meets the specification requirements of a minimum of 80% protein. This means that there’s 21g to 24g protein per serving of Nutristrength Pea Protein.

Pea protein benefits

Besides the aforementioned benefits of pea protein being vegan-friendly and a great source of amino acids, there are lots of pea protein benefits.

As pea protein is formed typically from a mechanical process, rather than a chemical one, it is able to retain soluble fibre. Pea protein can also help convert fatty acids into energy as peas are high in lysine, the precursor to carnitine, which aids this process.

Because pea protein doesn’t contain any dairy or gluten many people find that it doesn’t cause them to bloat, which can be a side effect of other forms of protein, and it can easier for people who suffer from cow’s milk allergies to digest.

Pea protein recipes

One of the best ways of supplementing your diet with pea protein is adding it to recipes you’d typically make. Because our pea protein comes in powder form it’s easy to stir into porridge, yoghurt, smoothies and other recipe favourites.

From breakfast smoothie pea protein recipes to dinner recipes such as our vegan Mac and Cheese, there’s no reason to change what you eat in order to up your pea protein intake!

How to Make Pea Protein Powder

At Nutristrength, our products are based on great food, not cheap fixes, and genuine recipes are a big part of that. We believe that supplements should be exactly that, nutrition that supplements your diet and meals, so by adding pea protein to recipes you’d make every day you can give your body the sustenance it needs.

Follow our recipe boards on Pinterest or download our protein recipe ebook for pea protein recipe ideas.

Where to buy pea protein powder

You can buy the Nutristrength range of pea protein in different sizes and flavours online, via the Nutristrength shop.

All online orders come with free UK delivery and orders can be placed at any time. You can also find us in a select number of UK retailers such as Boots, Harvey Nichols and Wholefoods Markets.

Not sure which flavour of pea protein will be your favourite? We’ve also created the Vegan Taster Box that offers sachets of every Nutristrength pea protein flavour. That includes Pea Protein Unflavoured, Pea Protein Classic Vanilla, Pea Protein Roasted Cocoa and Pea Protein Smooth Coffee.

Before calculating all the data we should notice that all these numbers are approximate because different types of powders have different weight as the amount of ingredients and flavorings can vary. Let’s figure out how to measure protein powder without using scales.

How many grams of protein powder is one teaspoon?

One rounded teaspoon of protein powder is about 8 to 10 grams.

One level teaspoon of protein powder is 5 grams.

How many ounces of protein powder is one teaspoon?

One rounded teaspoon of protein powder is about 0.3 ounces.

One level teaspoon of protein powder is about 0.18.

How many ounces of protein powder is one tablespoon?

One rounded tablespoon of protein powder is about 25 grams.

One level tablespoon of protein powder holds 15 grams.

How many grams of protein powder is one tablespoon?

One rounded tablespoon of protein powder is about 25 grams.

One level tablespoon of protein powder holds 15 grams.

How many grams of protein powder is metric spoon?

One metric spoonful of protein powder holds 23 grams.

So, let`s find out how many spoons of protein powder correspond to certain amount of grams and ounces:

Note: we will emphasize again on a fact that protein powders from different brands can have slightly different indicators of weight.

  • How many spoons is 100 grams of protein powder? 100 grams of protein powder = 3.53 ounces of protein powder = 4 rounded tablespoons of protein powder.
  • How many spoons is 90 grams of protein powder? 90 grams of protein powder = 3.17 ounces of protein powder = 6 level tablespoons of protein powder.
  • How many spoons is 80 grams of protein powder? 80 grams of protein powder = 2.82 ounces of protein powder = 3 rounded tablespoons of protein powder + 1 rounded teaspoon of protein powder.
  • How many spoons is 70 grams of protein powder? 70 grams of protein powder = 2.47 ounces of protein powder = 2 rounded tablespoons of protein powder + 2 rounded teaspoons of protein powder.
  • How many spoons is 60 grams of protein powder? 60 grams of protein powder = 2.12 ounces of protein powder = 2 rounded tablespoons of protein powder + 1 rounded teaspoon of protein powder.
  • How many spoons is 50 grams of protein powder? 50 grams of protein powder = 1.76 ounces of protein powder = 2 rounded tablespoons of protein powder.
  • How many spoons is 40 grams of protein powder? 40 grams of protein powder = 1.41 ounces of protein powder = 1 rounded tablespoon of protein powder + 1 level tablespoon of protein powder.
  • How many spoons is 35 grams of protein powder? 35 grams of protein powder = 1.23 ounces of protein powder = 1 rounded tablespoon of protein powder + 1 rounded teaspoon of protein powder.
  • How many spoons is 30 grams of protein powder? 30 grams of protein powder = 1.05 ounces of protein powder = 2 level tablespoons of protein powder.
  • How many spoons is 20 grams of protein powder? 20 grams of protein powder = 0.70 ounces of protein powder = 2 rounded teaspoons of protein powder.

Now you can measure protein powder using only two kinds of spoons quickly and easy because you know the amount of grams and ounces in one tablespoon and one teaspoon. If you have any advice on how to measure protein powder without scales please leave comments in a section below.