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How to pack alcohol in your luggage

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How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Most commercial alcohol packaging is not adequately padded for air travel. (Photo: Hemera Technologies/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images )

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Ever since a foiled terrorist plot in 2006 in which liquid explosives were to be used to blow up planes traveling between the United States and United Kingdom, flying with any sort of liquid has become more complicated for travelers. While you could once bring a bag of wine on your flight as a carry-on, customs and airlines now typically require you to pack alcohol – often to exacting specifications – in your checked bags.

Carry-on Restrictions

You can bring alcohol on your flight with you if you keep portions of 3.4 ounces or less in your quart-sized plastic bag with your toiletries. Most miniature nip bottles are 1.7 ounces, so you can bring alcohol in this form on your flight. In international airports, alcohol purchased at the duty free store can be carried on your flight if it is given to you in a tamper-proof bag with a receipt or sent to the duty free desk at your departure gate. But this alcohol can often only be carried on from the airport it was purchased in. Many international airports, particularly within Europe or in Canada on the way to the United States, require passengers to go through a security check when changing planes. If you change planes upon landing in the United States, the alcohol needs to be transferred to your checked bag after you clear U.S. Customs.

Checked Luggage Restrictions

Each airline has specific restrictions for checking alcohol in your hold luggage, but the general rule is that it must be packaged to completely prevent breakage, which could damage other customers luggage and property. Certain carriers srequire foam padded packs. Some airlines, such as Southwest Airlines, allow customers to purchase appropriate packaging at the ticket counter, but you usually have to pack your alcohol before getting to the airport.

How to Pack Alcohol Safely

Typical cardboard alcohol transport boxes are not adequate for commercial air travel due to a lack of padding. If you are transporting an entire case or half case of alcohol, find a foam container specifically designed for the shape of wine or spirits bottles your are transporting. Shipping stores and large wine emporiums typically stock these. If you are transporting a small number of bottles and want to pack them in your luggage, seal them in a leak-proof bag and then pack them with cushioning, such as bubble wrap or clothing.

Bringing Alcohol Through Customs

Buying something in a duty-free store when traveling outside the country does not automatically mean you can bring it back into the United States. Beverages that are more than 70 percent alcohol by volume can not be packed in your luggage. U.S. Customs and Boarder Patrol allows a maximum on 5 liters of alcohol between 24 and 70 percent alcohol by volume. Lower alcohol content items are not limited, as long as they are intended for personal consumption, not resale. Declare the alcohol you are transporting on your customs form and pay the appropriate duty to the customs officer, typically around $1 to $2 for wine and beer, while the amount for spirits varies by type, as of publication.

Disclosure

Leaf Group is a USA TODAY content partner providing general travel information. Its content is produced independently of USA TODAY.

How to Pack Liquor, Wine, and Alcohol in your Luggage

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

I travel regularly for business and often find that a bottle of liquor, wine, or other alcohol often makes its way back home with me in my luggage. It’s fun exploring local liquor stores and seeing what local gems you can find. Every now and then I even find a forgotten, rare bottle at its original price that just needs a quick dusting. With scores like these, it’s important that they make it home in one piece. Whoever said don’t cry over spilled milk clearly didn’t drink whiskey! I outline my 4 step method for packing below.

Before proceeding, you will need to check how much you alcohol actually can bring back if traveling international. I outline my multiple bottle packing method at the bottom. You could also use something like the Jet Bag.

Step 1: Create a Base Layer.

Most luggage contains a hard spine where the extendable handle is stored. The hard spine, glass bottles, and ground crews don’t mix well, so you will want to be sure that you are adequately padding the bottom of your suitcase. I like to used my undershirts for this step. You will want the padded base to be at least 1 inch thick, but 2 inches is better (depending upon how much laundry you have to pack).

Step 2: Create the Nest

The sides of standard luggage also contain a hard plastic frame. To protect against contact with the frame, I ball up my socks and underwear around the edges to create a nest in which I will lay my bottle. A pair of jeans wrapped in a circle works well for this too.

Step 3: Pack the Liquor, Wine, Alcohol in you Luggage

Now that we have out nest created, its time to put the precious cargo in. I first wrap the bottle in a plastic bag and tie tight, just in case. Next, I put the stem of the bottle in a packed shoe if I have one, then lay it in the nest (see photo for example). I fill in any gaps with the other shoe and additional clothing so that there is minimal movement allowed for the bottle in the luggage.

(If you don’t already, you should always travel with plastic bags – they are great or keeping shoes off clean items, keeping dirty/wet clothes separate, and most importantly should you need more space, no airport or airline ever questions a plastic bag as an additional carry on. A friend of mine taught me this trick as airlines assume you purchased the items contained in the airport. It’s really a question of whether or not you feel comfortable hauling around a plastic bag at the airport. I personally flew first class with a plastic bag in hand once. Full suit accented with a plastic bag – classy. Why yes I would like a drink while I sit in the front of the plane with my plastic bag – a double of jack and coke, hold the coke please.)

Step 4: Create the Top Layer

The final step is to lay some additional padding on the top of the bottle. Suitcase are typically soft-shelled on the front flap side, so there is low risk of contact like we have with the rear spine. However, ground crews always lay suitcases front down (fun fact: they go up rubber conveyor belts without slipping this way). Given this, its important we make sure to adequately add some padding over the next. 1 inch should be fine. Now place your dopp kit at the base for an additional impact zone and you are all set to travel!

A Note on Multiple Bottles

Whats better then one bottom of the aqua vitae? Two.

When packing a second bottle of liquor, wine, or other alcohol, follow the steps above but when placing your bottles in the nest in Step 3, bag and shoe the second bottle as well. You will need to finagle and wrangle the bottle on there depending on the size, but it will keep things safe. Please see the photo below for an example of how I typically pack for two.

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Was wondering is there a best way to pack alcohol for checked luggage?

Few times I just packed by wrapping it with my clothes, made sure my luggage was full enough & softly padded, and it survived.

But recently when I travel with ryanair, 2 bottles (of 4) were shattered to pieces even though I packed it like usual & it was the 1st time this thing happens, so Im not sure if the luggage handler threw my luggage or I didnt pack it well enough.

I leave in the front pocket of my case some packing materials just in case, bubble wrap, plastic bags, sealable large freezer bags (helps if there is spillage). and if needed buy some packing tape, does not take up any room and weights next to nothing. And on the odd occasion the plastic covers you get round bottles in duty free.

Wrap up my bottles in the most robust clothing i.e. jeans (or towels) then place in the middle of the case surrounded with other clothing

On almost every flight I either take/bring back bottles of something and to be honest even with some of the worst cases of my luggage been torn/missing lock/handles broken and so on touch wood never had a broken bottle.

Will be doing the same next week with a few bottles of Schnapps!

Following a trip to Europe, I wanted to return with some of my favorite bottles of champagne and wine that I would not be able to find at home. Prior to my trip, I did some research and came across Wineskin .

What is wineskin? Um…pretty much one of the best inventions EVER! It basically is a re-usable leak proof vinyl bag lined with bubble wrap made to fit 750 mL bottles of wine or champagne. So, you pretty much don’t have to worry about the bottle breaking in your luggage and ruining all your belongings from attempting to wrap it in a dirty shirt (I’ve done that before). You can purchase your wineskin directly from their website or from Amazon , which is what I did. I purchased a pack of 8 for $18.99. You can never have too many wineskin bags.

How to pack your champagne or wine:

  1. Check TSA guidelines. You can only bring alcohol in your checked luggage, not a carry-on. This is because carry-on baggage liquid restrictions do not allow liquid containers of more than 3.4 ounces (100 ml). According to TSA in the United States, as of today, you can pack items that are in containers larger than 3.4 ounces or 100 milliliters in checked baggage. The only restriction relates to alcohol content. Travelers can’t transport bottles with more than 70% alcohol content, and can only take 5 liters of alcohol between 24% and 70%. There is no limit on liquids with alcohol content below 24%, and wine fits into this bracket.
  2. Where to buy your wine. Often times, the best place to buy champagne or wine is by going to a local store in the area of where you are staying or the actual winery. Alcohol in the airport is rather expensive in my opinion. Bringing back alcohol on the airplane is not only less complicated, but mostly likely the easiest, safest, and most affordable way.
  3. Use a proper suitcase. I recommend using a hard shell suitcase. Lets be honest, the airport personnel are not going to gently handle your luggage. So having a suitcase with a strong exterior is best.
  4. Protect your bottles. I prefer using a wineskin bag and then placing the bottles in the middle of the suitcase. If you’re going to use a canvas suitcase I would surround the bottles with clothing for extra padding. You can never be too cautious in this case.
  5. Checking your bag. Remember each bottle of champagne or wine weighs approximately 3lbs, so take that into consideration when packing. Most airlines charge a fee if your luggage weighs more than 50lbs. If you are looking to transport a significant amount of bottles I would suggest looking into carry-on luggage that is specifically made to hold alcohol bottles. Lazenne is a company that makes this type of luggage and they meet airlines checked luggage weight limit.
  6. Unpack and Enjoy! Once you arrive at your destination unpack and sip on a glass of champagne or wine.

Pop quiz: Can you bring carbonated beverages in a checked bag? What about a lighter? Or a pocket knife? We all have those items that leave us baffled pre-trip. Even the most seasoned travelers have a hard time keeping the rules straight. For parents traveling with infants, people with special medical needs, or handicapped individuals, there’s even more to know. Thankfully, the Transportation Safety Administration (TSA) website has a massive A-Z list of what’s allowed in checked and carry-on bags, but some rules are contradictory and confusing. To save you the agony of sorting it out, we’ve rounded up and organized 93 of your most frequently asked questions. Scroll ahead for all the intel.

What’s the 3-1-1 rule?

Before we address all your questions about individual items, here’s a primer on the notorious 3-1-1 rule: Liquids, gels, aerosols, pastes, and creams in a carry-on are limited to 3.4 ounces (100 milliliters) and need to be zipped up in a quart-size plastic bag. This is known as the 3-1-1 rule because it’s three ounces, one bag, one per passenger. Also, while TSA pre-check and Global Entry allow you to skip hassles while going through security, the 3-1-1 rule is still in full effect and applies to all passengers—even those in the express lane.

Bringing Alcohol and Drinks on a Plane

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

1. Can I pack liquids in my checked bag?

Yes! And liquids in containers with a volume greater than 3.4 ounces must be packed in checked luggage. There’s no limit for how much (non-alcoholic) liquid you can bring, though too many full-size bottles can easily cause your bag to tip the scale for maximum weight requirements (so maybe leave that jumbo pack of bottled water at home). For carry-ons, individual bottles must meet the 3-1-1 rule: They can’t exceed 3.4 ounces, and all must fit inside a single, zipped one-quart plastic bag to meet the TSA’s requirements.

  • Checked Bag: Yes
  • Carry-On: Yes, With Restrictions

2. Can I pack alcohol in my checked bag?

Go ahead and pack that bottle of Jamaican rum, but pay attention to the alcohol content—and don’t take a sip before stowing it. Each traveler is allowed to pack up to five liters (1.3 gallons) of alcoholic beverages in their checked luggage. But there’s a catch: It must be more than 24% alcohol, but less than 70% alcohol, and it must be unopened. If your booze exceeds 70% alcohol, including grain alcohol and 151-proof rum, or if you’ve broken the seal, you’re out of luck. Mini bottles of alcohol are fair game in your carry-on as long as they follow the 3-1-1 rule.

  • Checked Bag: Yes, With Restrictions
  • Carry-On: Yes, With Restrictions

3. Can I pack canned beer in my checked bag?

Packing beer in your checked suitcase is fine with the TSA—there are no rules against canned bevvies in your checked bag—but your dry cleaner may have a problem, since it could explode and ruin your clothes. (See carbonated beverages below.) Do keep in mind that luggage with cans and bottles are often flagged during screening, so make sure your suitcase has a TSA-friendly lock. Bringing brew in your carry-on is a no-go because a can is probably more than 3.4 ounces.

  • Checked Bag: Yes (Not Recommended)
  • Carry-On: No

4. Can I pack carbonated beverages or soda in my checked bag?

All carbonated drinks are fine to bring in checked bags, but even if carefully packed, there’s a good chance it’ll explode in your suitcase due to changes in air pressure. When it comes to your carry-on, you’ll have to toss your soda before security because bottles and cans exceed 3.4 ounces.

  • Checked Bag: Yes (Not Recommended)
  • Carry-On: No

5. Can I pack wine bottles in my checked bag?

By all means (carefully!) pack that bottle of pinot from Napa. Even high alcohol wines, such as vermouth and Madeira, cap off at about 20%, so you’re in the clear for any alcohol content restrictions. Mini wine bottles are at least one glass worth (way more than 3.4 ounces), so alas you can’t carry them on and you’ll have to get your vino from flight attendant.

  • Checked Bag: Yes
  • Carry-On: No

If you’re a craft beer aficionado, chances are at some point you’re going to be on a trip of some sort and find yourself with some brews that you want to take home. Don’t worry, we’ve all been there — that midnight before the flight inner fight of “Do you chug them all now or do you bring them home?”

Maybe it’s because you got to visit a brewery you’ve idolized. Or maybe you happened upon a spot that was having a special release and you picked a few up. From a souvenir perspective, locally brewed beers make for refreshing mementos from any journey. Regardless of the reason, proper packing for the rough and tumble associated with travel, especially the ruthless handling of checked airline baggage, is a must.

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Bringing beer, wine, or spirits in your carry-on luggage is a non-starter — don’t even try. TSA regulations prohibit liquids in containers larger than 3.4 ounces. If you’re at an airport with a bottle shop beyond the security checkpoint, you’re free to purchase there and carry on those bottles. However, don’t expect any rare, highly sought-after brews.

Without a viable carry-on solution, you’re stuck with checking your beer in a suitcase. As long as your alcohol of choice is lower than 24% alcohol by volume, you can pack as much as you want in your suitcase, as it is not subject to hazardous materials regulations. So go crazy. With a few smart packing decisions, your beer will be safely waiting for you at the baggage carousel, wherever your final destination may be.

The ideal piece of luggage should have a rigid, hard-sided structure. Bags with collapsible walls, such as duffels, are not suited for transporting such delicate cargo. Here are our suggestions to help relieve the hangover-inducing prospect of packing your own beer for travel.

How to Pack Cans

If you have a choice between cans and bottles, choose cans. There’s no longer any stigma around canned beers. Some of the best beers in the world are released exclusively in these portable, sturdy containers. The real travel benefit is that cans are lighter and more resilient than glass. Even though cans aren’t especially fragile, you should still take some precautions when packing.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your LuggageDan Baker/The Manual

To be on the safe side, we suggest using this method for keeping your packed cans safe during travel.

  1. Place your cans inside a plastic bag.
  2. Seal the opening of the bag with packing tape.
  3. Surround the cans in the middle of the suitcase with clothes, towels or other soft goods to create a nest and reduce movement.

How to Pack Bottles

Glass bottles require far more attention and finesse. You need to make sure the bottles do not touch each other, ensure the glass is close to the middle of the bag and pack tightly so that the bottles shift as little as possible.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your LuggageHow to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

This is where creativity comes in to play. Whenever possible, look for ways to safely integrate your glass into protective items you’re already packing. Twelve-ounce bottles fit nice and snug inside running shoes, for example. Or, your waterproof dopp kit may provide an extra space to safely wrap a smaller bottle. Those elastic compartments in the divider of your suitcase? They make another built-in spot to hide away your precious cargo.

If you’re planning to bring more than a couple of beer bottles, or larger format bottles, your travel essentials need to include bubble wrap, packing tape and plastic bags. Use these guidelines for safe DIY packing:

  1. Tape down the caps tightly onto the bottle.
  2. Place each bottle inside of a sock or wrap individually with bubble wrap.
  3. Bundle all of your bottles together and enclose the group in a halo of bubble wrap.
  4. Seal the collection in a plastic bag in the center of your suitcase and pad out the sides with clothes.

Best Products for Packing Alcohol

WineSkin

The WineSkin is a self-sealing, bubble-wrap sleeve designed for wine; but they expertly fit most beer bottles nicely, including 750ml sizes and 22-ounce bombers.

VinniBags

VinniBags are a novel invention that suspends bottles (or anything fragile) in an air cushion with a two-way valve. The bag stands up to the changing pressures of the cargo hold and has a dry seal that holds any liquid in should a leak occur.

Jet Bags

Jet Bags are another option for traveling with potent potables. These bags have zipper seals and can absorb up to 750ml of liquid — just in case the worst happens and you return home minus a bottle.

How to Ship Your Bottles

If all of this sounds like too much, you could just ship your items home. Wrap cans and bottles in plastic wrap, then place in a fitted cardboard box. Place that box inside a larger box with scrap paper, air bags, or packing peanuts as a cushion (all are available at the shipping office). It can become an expensive endeavor, but with insurance, it can provide the safest route home for your new boozy souvenirs. Remember, though, that there are restrictions to shipping alcohol.

Travel Tips

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If you’re thinking of packing your own alcoholic provisions for your next flight, think again: The Federal Aviation Administration prohibits drinking your own alcohol aboard a plane. But if you’re packing a nice bottle of wine as a gift for a friend, or bringing back some duty-free whiskey from an international destination, there’s considerable more leniency in what you’re allowed to pack.

Alcohol as a Carry-On

While you can’t drink your own alcohol on board a plane, you can carry it on with you, as long as it falls under the Transportation Security Administration’s liquids rule. This limits you to only as many liquid items as will fit comfortably in a quart-size, zip-close bag; each bottle must be no larger than 3.4 ounces (100 ml).

There’s just one exception to this rule: You are allowed to carry on larger quantities of alcohol if they were purchased in an international duty-free shop on your way back to the United States. The alcohol must stay in its sealed, tamper-evident packaging from the retailer and have been purchased within the last 48 hours, and you must have the original receipt with you.

Alcohol in Your Checked Bags

The TSA is more lenient about what type of alcohol, and how much of it, you can put in your checked bags. But don’t try to pack anything with more than 70 percent alcohol content; it’s not allowed in your checked bags. You can pack as much alcohol as you like if contains less than 24 percent alcohol – think wine and beer. If your bottles have between 24 and 70 percent alcohol content, you can pack as much as 5 liters (1.3 gallons) in your checked bags, as long as the bottles you’re using can be sealed.

The regulations of your destination country may differ. Check the U.S. Department of State’s country information pages for more information on restricted items; if you’re still not sure how much alcohol is allowed (if any), contact the U.S. embassy in your destination country. If you’re traveling with a local or regional air carrier abroad, it’s a good idea to confirm their policies regarding alcohol too.

Declaring Your Alcohol

To bring alcohol back into the United States from an international destination, U.S. Customs and Border Protection imposes regulations on who can transport the alcohol and when tax and duty fees start accruing. Anybody “importing” alcohol, which includes bringing it back in your luggage for personal use or as a gift, must be at least 21 years of age. As a general rule, you can bring up to 1 liter (0.26 gallons) duty-free, although travelers coming from certain destinations, including Caribbean countries, are usually entitled to more. If you bring more than that duty-free quantity in, you’ll have to declare it and pay duty and federal excise taxes.

Your state of residence may also have its own laws about importing alcohol, and they may be stricter than federal laws. When in doubt, contact your local Alcohol Beverage Control Board about local policies.

Disclosure

Leaf Group is a USA TODAY content partner providing general travel information. Its content is produced independently of USA TODAY.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Well, I will first say that I will never (publicly ;)) tell anyone to go against any cruise line policies. But I can provide information for you to make an informed decision. 😉

You’re on vacation, and if you’re headed to the Caribbean, you’re on a tropical vacation no less.

And drinks are expensive on a cruise ship, and that means alcohol on a cruise can end up costing a lot.

You’re just trying to keep a little bit of extra money in your pocket. And cruise lines are trying to get a little bit of extra money in their pockets. (Maybe there are other reasons, but we’ll just assume it’s for money.)

But don’t be mad at the cruise line. After all, you chose to make it a cruise vacation, which means you understand the alcohol policy before you get on the cruise ship.

So now you can make a rational decision about whether or not you will try to abide by the alcohol policy, or not. 😉

Adjust your expectations

If you’re looking into how to sneak booze on a cruise, you already know that most alcohol is one of the things to NOT pack for a cruise.

As annoying as it is, you agreed to these policies when you booked your cruise.

So, if you decide to go through with hiding alcohol in your cruise luggage, just don’t be mad if all the money that you spent on the alcohol you tried to hide goes to waste if it’s found and confiscated.

What to do if you get caught trying to sneak alcohol on a cruise ship

You knew going in that you weren’t supposed to bring alcohol, so if you get caught, don’t let it ruin the start of your vacation!

Just shrug and tell yourself, “That sucks!” and remember that you are on a CRUISE! Bad attitudes can spread FAST, and that is NO way to start a cruise! 😉

What happens if you sneak alcohol on a cruise and DON’T get caught?

You pat yourself on the back for having just saved yourself some money on liquor, and then you can join all of these people and do a victory lap! 😉

How do you hide alcohol in your cruise luggage?

Is there a place within your suitcase that you can hide alcohol with a better chance of it not being found?

Do the alcohol concealers in these pictures below fool you…?

Well, they may not fool cruise ship security officers!

If cruise lines are smart (which there’s a good chance they are), they probably monitor cruise forums so they can inform their security officers of the latest cruise hacks to look out for.

You can think of cruise ship security officers as being kind of like TSA agents at the airport. No matter how much they are trained, they are not going to have a 100% rate of finding things that aren’t supposed to make it past them. In the case of security officers on a cruise ship, one of those things is hidden alcohol.

Success stories from cruise passengers

And it would seem from all of the success stories and more success stories from cruise passengers that it is confirmed that cruise security doesn’t have a 100% rate of finding hidden alcohol.

…and the failures

Although to be fair, there are also stories of failures from cruise passengers with security officers being aware of the tricks to hide alcohol.

With this in mind, it is worth reading those success stories and failures before deciding if you’ll be trying to sneak alcohol on a cruise.

You can bring wine on a cruise ship from home

Well, you do also have the option of bringing wine or champagne on board many ships. But, if you do bring a bottle to enjoy a glass of wine at dinner, take for example Carnival’s wine policy:

“A $15 USD corkage fee, per 750 ml bottle, will be charged should guests wish to consume their wine or champagne in the main dining room, steakhouse or bar.”

Alcohol policies of popular cruise lines

Have a look at the beverage and alcohol policy of the specific cruise line you’re sailing so you know what it is:

  • Carnival Cruise: policy
  • Royal Caribbean: policy
  • Norwegian Cruise Line: policy
  • Princess Cruises: policy
  • Celebrity Cruises: policy

Drink responsibly at sea

However you get your alcohol, DRINK RESPONSIBLY.

Being at sea is different from being on land.

If you do irrational things on land as a result of drinking too much, maybe you’ll just fall flat on your face and wake up on the ground the next day.

If you do irrational things at sea as a result of drinking too much, well, you can fall into the ocean never to be found again. The vast majority of man overboard situations likely involve drunk people.

More things to maybe pack for your cruise!

Now, here are some more things that you just may want to add to your cruise packing list!

  • This case so you can take pristine underwater pictures with your phone! (It’s cheap!)
  • This waterproof pouch so you don’t have to worry about leaving valuables on the beach
  • These tag holders so you don’t end up with lost luggage on the cruise ship!
  • These packing cubes so you can find your stuff once on the cruise
  • These types of beach shoes so you don’t have to worry about hidden rocks under the sand at any of the cruise ports
  • This type of beach bag that’ll help you dry things out so you can be ready for the next beach day!
  • For your beach outfits, take a look at…
    • These swimsuits and cover-ups for women
    • This swimwear for plus-size women
    • These swimsuits for men
  • Cruise formal: And here are ideas for your cruise outfits for formal night!
  • Seasickness: And here are ideas for snacks and wearables to prevent seasickness
  • Snorkeling: What to wear snorkeling

SAFE CRUISE DRINKING!

More cruise tips:

Best shoes for your active vacation

Hit search at the top for any of these items to get more variety on Amazon through these affiliate links!
– Walking: These types of hiking sandals. For walking in hot weather, they are more breathable than shoes, while still giving you necessary traction on the trails. Also see more about the best shoes for hiking in Hawaii.
– Beach: These types of beach shoes. For beach walking, wading in the water, and rocky shorelines, they can prevent cuts from hidden rocks or when bumping into coral reef.

Swimwear for snorkeling and beach

– These UV protection shirts are a hit so you don’t have to keep re-applying sunscreen and don’t have to worry as much about getting sunburn!

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Was wondering is there a best way to pack alcohol for checked luggage?

Few times I just packed by wrapping it with my clothes, made sure my luggage was full enough & softly padded, and it survived.

But recently when I travel with ryanair, 2 bottles (of 4) were shattered to pieces even though I packed it like usual & it was the 1st time this thing happens, so Im not sure if the luggage handler threw my luggage or I didnt pack it well enough.

I leave in the front pocket of my case some packing materials just in case, bubble wrap, plastic bags, sealable large freezer bags (helps if there is spillage). and if needed buy some packing tape, does not take up any room and weights next to nothing. And on the odd occasion the plastic covers you get round bottles in duty free.

Wrap up my bottles in the most robust clothing i.e. jeans (or towels) then place in the middle of the case surrounded with other clothing

On almost every flight I either take/bring back bottles of something and to be honest even with some of the worst cases of my luggage been torn/missing lock/handles broken and so on touch wood never had a broken bottle.

Will be doing the same next week with a few bottles of Schnapps!

    Browse forums
  • All

We are planning on checking bags and have 2 wine carriers. Is it ok to pack them in our luggage? Any restictions for bringing wine into Iceland?

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Some airlines have limits on the amount of spirits in checked baggage, but I’ve never heard of limits on wine – except to “dry” countries of course.

Absolutely okay if you place the bottles into your check in luggage. – ( you need to obey by the custom regulations & limits of Iceland).

We always carry a few bottle of wines in our check-in luggage – in every country we visit.. there is nothing worse than landing in a city & all bars are shut !! .. plus some countries in the world don’t serve alcohol !

These are a must for anyone thinking of packing alcoholic beverages in your luggage:

Last time we flew to Vancouver, one of my pieces of luggage looked as though they had put it through a saw-mill!

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How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

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It’s easy to breeze through airport security with alcohol miniatures, since they are safely under the limit of 3.4 ounces. However, some of us like to be ready to party on arrival; others want to save money, or simply don’t want to get to their destination without our favorite tipple. There are rules for transporting full bottles of booze in checked luggage.

Regulations

The Transportation Security Administration places limits on both the amount and type of liquor you can pack in your checked bag. Passengers aren’t permitted to transport any beverage with more than 70 percent alcohol, or 140 proof, which excludes grain alcohol and 151 rum. Up to five liters of liquor with an alcohol content between 24 percent and 70 percent are permitted, provided “it is packaged in a sealable bottle or flask” (tsa.gov). Anything with an alcohol level below 24 percent is exempt from the regulations on hazardous materials, so you can bring as much wine as you can fit into your bag.

Airlines differ

To make life more difficult, some airlines have additional rules for the transport of alcohol. Most require that wine and liquor bottles be unopened and in their original retail packaging. Southwest goes one step further, specifying that “Alcohol (wine and liquor) accepted as checked baggage must be contained within a corrugated box secured with sealing tape,” rather than in your bag (southwest.com); liquor and wine packaging is available for sale at Southwest ticket counters. To avoid confusion, check with your airline before departure.

Customs

Most airlines allow passengers to carry on beer or wine purchased at duty-free shops located after the security checkpoint, as long as the alcohol isn’t consumed on board. If you’re connecting from an international to a domestic flight within the U.S. and have to clear security again, the alcohol must be placed in your checked baggage. When going through Customs, remember to declare any bottles of alcohol above the legal limit. An airline may allow you to pack five bottles of liquor in your suitcase, but that doesn’t exempt you from paying the duty on those bottles.

Packing

You may be a fan of single malt Scotch, but that doesn’t mean you’d want to wash your clothes in it. That’s what will happen if your prized bottle of Glenmorangie or Laphroaig breaks in transit. To transport alcohol safely, make sure the bottle is unopened, pace it in a self-sealing bag, and remove as much air as possible, and pad the bottle by wrapping it in an article of clothing such as a sweater or sweatshirt. Position the alcohol toward the center of the bag to insulate it against the indignities of baggage handling.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

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Wondering how to pack wine in a suitcase? We’ve got six easy tips that will help you avoid any breakage or leaks so you can bring back a bottle of wine (or two) as a souvenir from your trip!

Travel Fashion Girl help! A reader asks:

Does anyone know how to pack alcohol in checked luggage, specifically a wine bottle? If so, how?

As much as traveling is about the experience, we all love to bring home a souvenir or a gift for a loved one. A popular option is a bottle of wine, especially when it’s from a region famous for its wine (we’re looking at you, France).

The most important thing to note is that you need to pack alcohol in checked baggage due to liquid restrictions for carry-ons. But this can be tricky, as the glass bottle is delicate and can easily break during air travel. This can not only ruin the wine but also the clothing in your luggage.

We gathered insight from our readers and they shared their experienced tips on how to pack wine in a suitcase:

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Use a Hard Side Suitcase

Before you can determine how to pack a bottle of wine in luggage, you need the right luggage. Multiple readers recommended using a hard side suitcase instead of a soft one. One reader says, “a hard side luggage, if you have some, can protect from impact.”

When bags are tossed on top of each other, the soft suitcases can get pushed in or dented. Hard side suitcases can get tossed around a little more without anything inside getting damaged.

Wrap the Wine Bottle

It’s amazing how many creative ways you can wrap a wine bottle! One reader said her ultimate equation for how to pack a bottle of wine in luggage is, “hard side suitcase, bubble wrap, giant ziplock, more bubble wrap.”

Don’t have bubble wrap? Use your clothes! One reader says, “I just use my clothes. No problems yet (knock on wood).” Another shared, “I packed a bottle of rum from Cuba. Wrapped it in a maxi skirt and put in middle of suitcase with clothes and shoes around it.”

And if you travel with kids, bring some extra disposable diapers! We love this creative tip our readers shared. One said, “we usually bring along a few diapers and plastic bags from home to wrap the bottles in,” while another added, “I’ve used disposable diapers for this purpose too! Absorbent in case of disaster.”

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Invest in a Wine Travel Bag

If you don’t want to use your clothing or bubble wrap, or if you want to make sure a valuable bottle of wine doesn’t break, there are a number of travel wine bags on the market that are specifically designed for traveling with a wine bottle.

WineSkin is a popular option, with one reader saying, “WineSkin has worked every time. I buy them at home and then take on vacation with me so I can bring stuff back.”

As a bonus, many of them are resusable so you can use them on more than just one trip!

Another option is wine sleeves for airplane travel. Made from neoprene, you can wash them and reuse them over and over again. Or, a wine diaper is also a great option, which a reader recommended, saying, “I have used these for years and never a problem.”

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Stuff Your Suitcase

Regardless of what you use to wrap and protect a glass bottle, it may still break if it can move around in your suitcase.

As one reader says, “The key is to pack the bag TIGHT so things don’t shift around. This works best in a suitcase rather than a duffle or other type of bag. I’ve done this numerous times and have not had a problem so far!”

If you have extra room, add paper, bags, or a laundry bag to stuff the suitcase so everything is tight in place and can’t move around. Make sure you keep the wine bottle in the center of the suitcase so it’s padded well.

Additionally, place shoes or other firm objects in between the bottle and the luggage edges to act as a protective barrier.

Use Packing Cubes

Besides organizing your travel wardrobe and accessories, packing cubes are also useful for padding wine bottles too. Just wrap them with some clothes and secure in the bag you intend to check-in at the airport. Overall, packing cubes can help compress many items to fit inside your luggage. You can learn about our packing cube compression hacks in this video!

What are your tips on how to pack wine in a suitcase? Share and comment below!

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How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

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I bought an inflatable wine bags that cushion the wine or any alcohol bottle perfectly. They have been great and then deflate flat once drunk.

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Whether you’re bringing it home as a souvenir or a gift, alcohol often makes its way into our suitcases as we prep for a flight. Before you stash that vino in your carry-on, though, you’ll want to brush up on the basics of flying with alcohol. (And, if you’re still looking for a flight, give Cheapflights.com flight search a go while you’re here.)

Read on for basic answers to common questions about carrying alcohol on a flight. For the official word on what you can and cannot bring with you on a flight (including alcohol), please refer to the TSA.

Am I allowed to carry alcohol on a flight?

Passengers are allowed to carry alcohol on a flight, both in carry-on and checked baggage, as long as you are of legal drinking age and follow any applicable rules. In general, alcohol must be transported in its original, unopened container.

Can I bring any type of alcohol on the plane?

If your booze is unopened and 140 proof or less, you can safely bring your alcohol on board. Anything over 140 proof is prohibited, though, according to the Federal Aviation Administration. In addition to alcohol, here are some other things you might not know you can take on an airplane.

How much can I carry?

How much alcohol you can bring on a flight depends on whether you’re checking your bottles or carrying them on.

If you’re packing alcohol in your carry-on, you’ll be subject to the Transportation Security Administration’s 3-1-1 limit for liquids. Containers must be 3.4 ounces or fewer and fit inside one quart-sized bag.

If you’re carrying alcohol in your checked bags, your limits depend on alcohol content. According to the FAA, there are no limits on how much alcohol you can pack in your checked luggage if the alcohol by volume is less than 24 percent (generally beer and wine). Between 24 and 70 percent, however, the FAA limits passengers to 5 liters.

However, every country has its own rules on carrying alcohol on a flight. U.S. Customs, for example, only allows for 1 liter of alcohol to be carried into the United States duty-free. If you’re planning on meeting the 5-liter legal limit, you’ll be subject to paying duty and taxes for the other four bottles. Other countries like Kuwait forbid passengers from carrying alcohol in the country entirely. Be sure to check the local laws of your destination before packing alcohol in your suitcase.

Can I buy alcohol in a duty-free shop in the airport and bring it on the plane?

If you purchase alcohol in a duty-free shop, you can generally take it with you on the plane – but that doesn’t mean it can travel with you the entire way home. If you have a connecting flight and need to pass through a TSA security checkpoint, your bags are once again subject to carry-on restrictions, which means anything over the 3.4 ounce limit needs to go in your checked baggage. This can be especially frustrating to learn during a layover, as you may not have access to your checked bags to check your alcohol (though you will likely have to claim your baggage and re-check it if you’re re-entering the U.S. and then have a connecting domestic flight). To be safe, be sure to purchase your duty-free alcohol at the last airport you visit before arriving in your final destination to avoid losing it at a security checkpoint.

Can I drink on the plane?

We get it: Sometimes, a stiff drink is the only thing that gets you through a 12-hour redeye sandwiched between the snorer who uses your shoulder as a pillow and the chatty Cathy who won’t stop raving about her trip to Thailand. That may just be why flight attendants serve alcohol – but they are the only ones who can serve alcohol on the plane.

It’s against federal regulation to open your own bottle of alcohol on a flight or to drink alcohol that was not directly served to you by a flight attendant. One of the main reasons is that your flight attendants are basically on bartender duty and need to keep your libations to a safe level. If you’re pounding mini bottles every time your flight attendant comes around and chasing them with swigs from your flask, it can get ugly fast. And no one wants to be stuck in a tiny airplane cabin with that passenger (Kristen Wiig’s infamous flight scene in “Bridesmaids,” anyone?). Stick to what the flight attendants serve you and wait to crack into your stash until you get to your destination.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggagesouthie3, suitcase of wine in the alley via Flickr CC BY 2.0

How should I pack alcohol?

The last thing anyone wants to discover when they open their suitcase is a pile of wine-soaked clothes or glass shards from alcohol that didn’t make it through the flight. Whether you’re bringing back an expensive bottle of wine, exotic spirits or local beer, proper packing can ensure your alcohol makes it home in one piece.

The first step is to start with bottles that have never been opened. Then, place the bottle in a sealable plastic bag. In case the bottle does break, the bag will help contain the alcohol and keep it from spilling on your other belongings. After placing the bottle in a bag, wrap the bottle to give it extra cushioning for the trip. Towels, sweaters, pants and shirts are good options. Not only will they help protect the bottle from bumps and bruises during transportation, but the fabric will also help soak up any alcohol that manages to get past the plastic bag. Finally, try to position the bottle snugly in the center of your suitcase and surround it with more clothes to ensure your bottle survives an accidental fall off the baggage carousel.

If you prefer to invest in something to help you carry your alcohol on a flight, products like the padded JetBag can help ensure your alcohol makes it in one piece. If you’re in a bind at the airport, you can also check with your airline to see if they offer packaging. Southwest Airlines, for example, offers wine and alcohol packaging for $5.

What should I bring back?

When you’re only allowed to bring back a limited amount of alcohol, you can’t risk wasting your allotment on sub-par spirits or bottles that you later discover are readily available back home. What you choose to bring back depends on your tastes, but you might want to consider spirits that reflect the local flavor, a true souvenir of your experience. In East Asia, you might opt for the local shochu or soju liquor. In British Columbia or parts of Europe, you might consider a bottle of the local ice wine, while a local varietal from a boutique winery in South Africa or Australia might be the perfect gift for someone back home. And while you’re in Europe? Go for a bottle of Maraschino liqueur right from the source.

Curious how your airport and onboard drinking habits compare to other fliers? Check out our survey of Americans’ drinking habits while flying.

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We are planning on checking bags and have 2 wine carriers. Is it ok to pack them in our luggage? Any restictions for bringing wine into Iceland?

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Some airlines have limits on the amount of spirits in checked baggage, but I’ve never heard of limits on wine – except to “dry” countries of course.

Absolutely okay if you place the bottles into your check in luggage. – ( you need to obey by the custom regulations & limits of Iceland).

We always carry a few bottle of wines in our check-in luggage – in every country we visit.. there is nothing worse than landing in a city & all bars are shut !! .. plus some countries in the world don’t serve alcohol !

These are a must for anyone thinking of packing alcoholic beverages in your luggage:

Last time we flew to Vancouver, one of my pieces of luggage looked as though they had put it through a saw-mill!

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Was wondering is there a best way to pack alcohol for checked luggage?

Few times I just packed by wrapping it with my clothes, made sure my luggage was full enough & softly padded, and it survived.

But recently when I travel with ryanair, 2 bottles (of 4) were shattered to pieces even though I packed it like usual & it was the 1st time this thing happens, so Im not sure if the luggage handler threw my luggage or I didnt pack it well enough.

I leave in the front pocket of my case some packing materials just in case, bubble wrap, plastic bags, sealable large freezer bags (helps if there is spillage). and if needed buy some packing tape, does not take up any room and weights next to nothing. And on the odd occasion the plastic covers you get round bottles in duty free.

Wrap up my bottles in the most robust clothing i.e. jeans (or towels) then place in the middle of the case surrounded with other clothing

On almost every flight I either take/bring back bottles of something and to be honest even with some of the worst cases of my luggage been torn/missing lock/handles broken and so on touch wood never had a broken bottle.

Will be doing the same next week with a few bottles of Schnapps!

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

For oenophiles who love to travel, a bottle of wine can serve as the perfect vacation souvenir or gift. But as your luggage is handled by various people and jostled on planes and conveyor belts, the risk of having that expensive bottle of red break and spill all over your clothes increases. These handy tips will help you bring home your favorite pours and avoid any airport mishaps.

BE AWARE OF AIRPORT RESTRICTIONS
You never want to be surprised at airport security, so it’s important to understand the ins and outs of TSA rules for transporting alcohol before purchasing a bottle. The best way to transport wine is through checked baggage. The only restrictions in this category relate to alcohol content. Travelers can’t transport bottles with more than 70 percent alcohol content and can only take five liters of alcohol between 24 and 70 percent. Fortunately, wine almost always falls below 24 percent alcohol content, meaning there is no limit to the amount of alcohol allowed in checked bags. Carry-on liquid restrictions do apply to alcohol, meaning you can’t bring liquids in containers larger than 3.4 ounces in a carry-on. The only way to get around this rule is by purchasing alcohol after you’ve gotten through security at one of the duty-free stores. Duty-free allowances differ depending on country; the U.S. typically allows one duty-free liter of alcohol per person.

PACK BAGS SECURELY
There are a couple of different strategies to use when packing wine in a checked bag. One method involves putting the wine bottle in a sock, wrapping a piece of clothing around the bottle’s neck until it’s as wide as the bottom of the bottle, and then wrapping the bottle with additional clothing pieces (like shirts). You can add a watertight plastic bag for some extra security. Travelers can also use bubble wrap, instead of clothing, to wrap the bottle, which adds some additional protection for the journey. Regardless of how you wrap the bottle, make sure to pack it in the middle of a full suitcase to minimize the amount that the bottle will move and vibrate during transport.

PURCHASE WINE GEAR
If wrapping your expensive bottle of wine in clothing feels too risky, you can spend on gadgets to aid your traveling woes. Reusable WineSkin transport bags are available for purchase online or through various retailers. Only $15 for a pack of three, this wine-shaped bag incorporates bubble wrap to secure your bottle during travel. While the skin does have an adhesive, you can add some extra insurance by also sealing it with duct tape. Alternatively, the VinniBag costs about $28 and inflates around each bottle of wine for added protection. And if you typically transport a large number of wine bottles on trips, it’s worth it to invest $70 in Wine Check. The easy-to-transport case, which features wheels and a handy strap, can carry up to 12 bottles of wine in its Styrofoam and padded container. With the bottles included, the case still meets the checked-bag weight limit. If you’re in a last-mintue airport jam, Southwest Airlines usually has $5 wine packaging for purchase at ticket counters.

BACKUP PLAN: DIRECT SHIPPING
Wineries usually offer direct shipping deals that save you the hassle (and space) of packing a bottle of wine in your luggage. Depending on where you purchase from, shipping charges are sometimes small or non-existent.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Dennis K. Johnson / Getty Images

It is likely that you will want to take home a glass bottle or two of wine, beer, liquor, or other bottled goods or beverages. But how do you get your glass-bottled item home? Unless you buy it in the duty-free shops that are past the security lines in the airport, you cannot carry it on the plane according to airline regulations.

So, how to protect the bottles in your checked baggage that you purchased while traveling in the country of your choice?

Check out the following tips that can minimize the chance of a broken bottle spilling all over the contents of your suitcase. Nothing is guaranteed, but if you follow these tips, your chances of arriving home with an intact bottle are better than if you did none of these things.

Bottle Types Matter

Only pack glass bottles that have never been opened. Smaller bottles may be easier to pack than larger bottles. If you can find smaller sized sets that take into account different flavors or variations of a favorite national drink, for example, then tucking it into your suitcase should be easy and relatively risk-free.

Protect Your Suitcase Items

The best way to minimize damage from a potentially broken bottle is to wrap your bottle in a self-sealing bag, like a Ziplock bag, and pressing out all of the air and making sure that the bag is completely closed. If you do not have a self-sealing bag, place it in one plastic bag, wrap tightly, and then place it in another plastic bag. Cover the opening of the first plastic bag with the second, and then, wrap tightly again.

Cushion the Bottle

Roll the bottle in a large, soft garment or cloth, such as a towel, sweater, or pair of pajama pants. When you pack the bottle, place it in the center of your suitcase, so that the bottle is cushioned by clothing on all sides. Any hard objects should be packed away from the bottle or padded with clothing so that the bottle will not be cracked if your bag’s contents shift.

Buy Bottles Packed for Air Travel

Some popular brands of alcoholic beverages come in packaging meant for travel, such as boxes with plastic inserts that keep bottles protected and from shifting around when they are packed. If possible, this may be a good option if you are especially worried about getting them home.

Shop for the Bottle at Home

If you have valuable items that you fear you might get ruined if a bottle should break in your luggage, then it might make the best sense to forego making the purchase while you are traveling. You can attempt to find the beverage in your home country. Some specialty suppliers may stock it, or you might be able to find it online. There is a chance you may only be able to find that bottle in the country you are visiting, but look online and check.

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Was wondering is there a best way to pack alcohol for checked luggage?

Few times I just packed by wrapping it with my clothes, made sure my luggage was full enough & softly padded, and it survived.

But recently when I travel with ryanair, 2 bottles (of 4) were shattered to pieces even though I packed it like usual & it was the 1st time this thing happens, so Im not sure if the luggage handler threw my luggage or I didnt pack it well enough.

I leave in the front pocket of my case some packing materials just in case, bubble wrap, plastic bags, sealable large freezer bags (helps if there is spillage). and if needed buy some packing tape, does not take up any room and weights next to nothing. And on the odd occasion the plastic covers you get round bottles in duty free.

Wrap up my bottles in the most robust clothing i.e. jeans (or towels) then place in the middle of the case surrounded with other clothing

On almost every flight I either take/bring back bottles of something and to be honest even with some of the worst cases of my luggage been torn/missing lock/handles broken and so on touch wood never had a broken bottle.

Will be doing the same next week with a few bottles of Schnapps!

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Are you allowed to pack your own alcohol in your checked baggage and also take 1litre per person that you purchase at Duty Free before you leave as carry on?

Is it cheaper to buy DF in Sydney or DF on arrival in Bali?

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

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It is 1 litre per person regardless of whether you carry it or put in your luggage.

As said, it is strictly 1 litre per person. Your check-in luggage will be x-rayed and any fluids will be found.

I usually take a couple of 750ml bottles of wine in checked in baggage. However, because there are two of us travelling and we only have 1 litre each, I know I’ve only got 500ml left between us should we want to buy any booze at duty free. As Jubilee says, whether it’s in hand luggage or checked in, it doesn’t matter, it’s a 1 litre limit.

There is an extremely limited range of alcohol available at Ngurah Rai airport in Denpasar, and the little shop is often closed. Buy it in Sydney.

Actually newgabe, I’m surprised to hear that the duty free shop still exists in arrivals at Denpasar. I thought it had closed long ago and never re-opened. Doesn’t really make you want to take a punt on it being open.

Most likely you will get caught with the extra bottle. Customs x rays incoming bags and writes a chalk “X” on suspicious (= possible alcohol) bags. The inspector will open the bag and then you are busted.

Hand baggage is also x rayed after immigration.

Now Yamanote all the luggage, check-in and carry-on is x-rayed together after immigration and the luggage carousels just before you pass the customs guys. It’s one process now.

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We are planning on checking bags and have 2 wine carriers. Is it ok to pack them in our luggage? Any restictions for bringing wine into Iceland?

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Some airlines have limits on the amount of spirits in checked baggage, but I’ve never heard of limits on wine – except to “dry” countries of course.

Absolutely okay if you place the bottles into your check in luggage. – ( you need to obey by the custom regulations & limits of Iceland).

We always carry a few bottle of wines in our check-in luggage – in every country we visit.. there is nothing worse than landing in a city & all bars are shut !! .. plus some countries in the world don’t serve alcohol !

These are a must for anyone thinking of packing alcoholic beverages in your luggage:

Last time we flew to Vancouver, one of my pieces of luggage looked as though they had put it through a saw-mill!

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To review the Tripadvisor Forums Posting Guidelines, please follow this link: http://www.tripadvisor.com/pages/forums_posting_guidelines.html

We remove posts that do not follow our posting guidelines, and we reserve the right to remove any post for any reason.

Clear your calendar – It’s going down! Text Blocks kicks off on May 20th, and you’re invited to take part in the festivities. Splash HQ (122 W 26th St) is our meeting spot for a night of fun and excitement. Come one, come all, bring a guest, and hang loose. This is going to be epic!

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

by claire salmon

Oenophiles who enjoy traveling around, bringing back a good bottle of wine can be a great souvenir. Your luggage will be jostled from conveyor belts to planes and handled by different individuals when you travel back. This greatly increases the risks of cracking or breaking an expensive bottle of wine and having it spill over your clothes. This is not what you have in mind when sending wine to China. The package should arrive safely and these useful tips will help you deliver the precious bottles of wine safely.

Be conscious of airport limitations

You should understand the do’s and don’ts of alcohol transportation before buying a bottle and heading for the airport. You don’t want to be surprised, and possibly, be in trouble for breaking any rules. You can transport wine through checked luggage and the alcohol content limit of wine usually falls within the allowed limit. This makes wine shipping quite easy and doable. You cannot carry more than 5 liters in your checked luggage and 3.4 ounces in your carry on. When you follow these rules, you won’t have a problem with transporting liquor to China

Pack your bags securely

Packing wine in a checked bag can be done with different strategies. One technique is to place the bottle of wine in a sock, wrap the top with a cloth until it’s the same size as the bottom and wrap everything in another piece of cloth. You can also use bubble wrap to do the same thing. No matter what you do, wrap the bottles securely before conveying intoxicants to China.

Buy wine gear

Although many people use their clothes, there are gadgets available for securely wrapping wine bottles. Spending some money on these gadgets is especially helpful when you are carrying expensive wine. You will have more peace of mind knowing your investment is securely packed. The wine suitcase is one of such gadgets, and a very helpful one at that. It comes in different sizes that can carry three, six or twelve bottles of wine. You can even find low cost wine packaging at airports for last minute buys.

Leave direct shipping open as a backup plan

To avoid the trouble, and if you will rather not spare the space, you can make use of the direct shipping deals offered by wineries for sending booze within China. Packing your wine in your own luggage leaves you with all the work, but the winery can have the bottle sent to you so you don’t have to do anything. Shipping charges will apply in accordance with the place of origin.

Summary

Sending wine to China can be done in your travel luggage. According to the popular news blog, Clear Publicist , you don’t have to drink all the wine you can have when you travel, you can bring some home with you and enjoy at a later time or gift it to a friend. These tips should help you transport wine successfully and without hassles.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Travelers to Kentucky, Scotland, and a handful of other world-renowned spirit-producing destinations often have one souvenir in mind: a bottle of something strong. As demand and interest in spirits like Scottish whisky and Kentucky bourbon have grown over the last decade, savvy drinkers and collectors have realized that the best bottles often don’t make it too far from the distillery. So picking up half a case in Lexington or Glasgow is a good idea, as long as you follow some rules.

Unlike wine or beer, you can’t just load your suitcase full of bottles and check it in. There is no legal cap on how much wine you can travel with, as long as the liquid in question is under 24 percent alcohol by volume (ABV)—you’re only limited by the size of your suitcase.

Once you move into spirits, however, there’s a cap. You’re allowed up to 5 liters of alcohol “between 24 percent and 70 percent… packaged in a sealable bottle or flask.”

The reason for this is that liquor is a fire hazard. That’s why anything over 70 percent is flat-out prohibited, so forget about Everclear, Bacardi 151, or that moonshine your cousin from West Virginia gave you.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

6 Essential Stops on Kentucky’s Bourbon Trail Craft Tour

Since most American liquor bottles are 750 milliliters, that works out to 6 bottles (plus a pint or so) that you’re allowed to carry. Test that 5-liter limit at your own risk. We’ve seen people forced to leave bottles behind in Louisville’s airport. With international flying, there isn’t a volume limit, though you may have to pay duties if you look like you’ve looted a bar.

Assuming you’re determined to get as much as possible in your bag, it’s important to pack them safely and avoid any catastrophic spills. Keep the following in mind to ensure your bottles are intact when you get home.

Check your seals
Always check screw tops to make sure they are tight; even if they leak half an ounce an hour, a lost bag or flight delay could cost you a lot of liquor. If your bottle is sealed with a cork, it likely protrudes out of the bottle, so take extra care to add padding so it’s not jostled free or snapped off in transit.

Bring tape
If you know you’ll be bringing back bottles, pack masking or Scotch tape. Use it to wrap and reinforce the seal like extra shrink wrap. And don’t use the industrial stuff: You want the tape to peel away easily without removing labels or leaving residue.

Use what you have
Take empty ice and laundry bags from the hotel room and wrap them tightly around the necks of your bottles. Even if everything else you’ve done fails, you’ll likely prevent the spillage from ruining your clothes.

Create a holster for oddly shaped bottles
Beautiful bottles with long, thin necks mean a lot of weak points that can crack under pressure from as little as a poorly placed boot. Wrap with extra laundry to keep them from snapping mid-flight.

Pack each bottle separately
Don’t let glass touch glass. Once you acquire at least two bottles, wrap and protect each one separately, and add padding between them, like a folded scarf or rolled t-shirt, to act as a divider.

FLIGHTS home often see Britons bringing souvenirs and goods back from their holiday destination. However, tourists returning to the UK have to be careful when it comes to certain items as there are strict rules in place – and flouting them could land you in trouble.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Flights: Many people have very little idea of what the duty-free allowance actually is (Image: Getty Images)

Flights back to the UK end with travellers passing through customs at the airport. If you have been on holiday outside the European Union (EU) you have a duty free allowance. This means you can bring in a certain amount of goods for your own use without paying duty or tax. However, it’s vital you follow travel advice and declare any goods over your allowance as they could be seized if you do not do so.

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How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Flights: Why you must never do this with alcohol in your luggage when returning to the UK

Many people have very little idea of what the duty-free allowance actually is.

According to a poll of Britons carried out by flight-comparison site Jetcost, 47 per cent of Britons quizzed didn’t realise there was any restriction on the amount of what you could bring back.

The survey showed that 90 per cent of respondents don’t know how much spirits they are allowed to bring in.

The answer is just one litre of spirits and other liquors over 22 per cent alcohol.

You must not pack more than this in your luggage with declaring it and paying excise duty.

Travellers have to pay £28.74 of Spirit Duty per litre of pure alcohol as well as standard rate VAT at 20 per cent on alcohol and tobacco products.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Flights: You can bring just one litre of spirits and other liquors over 22 per cent alcohol (Image: Getty Images)

The limit for fortified wine (for example port, sherry), sparkling wine and alcoholic drinks up to 22 per cent alcohol is two litres.

The duty for both wine and beer depends on their strength.

Gov.uk explains that travellers should “use the red channel at customs if [they] have something to declare.

“If there’s no red channel, use the red-point phone to declare goods to customs.”

The site adds that “you and your baggage can be checked for anything that must be declared.”

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How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Flights: Not declaring goods over the duty-free allowance could land you in trouble (Image: Getty Images)

Bizarre smuggling attempts

Criminals will go to extreme lengths to earn money, here are some of the most bizarre drug smuggle attempts, from parcels hid inside an ambulance and drugs smuggled inside a wig.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

A cannabis smuggling gang shipped £20 million worth of the class B drug into Britain in rolled up carpets

Not declaring goods over the duty-free allowance could land you in trouble.

“If you do not do what you’re asked, your goods and any vehicle you use to transport them may be seized,” explained Gov.uk.

There are no limits on the alcohol you can bring in from EU countries. However, you’re more likely to be asked questions if you have over 10 litres of spirits, 90 litres of wine, 20 litres of fortified wine or 110 litres of beer.

Commenting on the findings of their study, a spokesperson for Jetcost.co.uk, said: “It’s a habit for many savvy people to make purchases from duty free either before or after a holiday in order to stock up on whatever it is they need.

“However, you need to be aware of the restrictions that are applied, because you may end up having to pay the excess tax at the airport for breaking the rules, something that is going to make a dent in your wallet.”

Earlier this year it was revealed that, under new measures, any alcohol purchased at airport duty free will need to be packed into a sealed plastic bag ahead of a flight. These special bags are branded with the instruction: “Do not open alcohol purchases until your final destination.”

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

We are often asked how our guests can bring their favorite Kentucky bourbons back home after their visit. Here are the current TSA alcohol guidelines and regulations for planes.

Top 3 Things to Know about TSA Alcohol Rules in Carry-Ons and Checked Baggage

  1. Carry-on Alcohol
  2. Checked Baggage Limitations
  3. Airline Specific Regulations

1. Carry-on Alcohol

How to Pack Alcohol in Your LuggageYou’re allowed to take hard liquor like whiskey on your flight in your carry-on luggage, but the amount you can take depends on where you buy it. The TSA restricts the amount of liquid you can take through security to travel-size containers of 3 ounces or less, which must be carried in a single 1-quart plastic bag with a zip-top. This may include miniature liquor bottles, which you can find at most stores that sell beer and liquor.

These restrictions only apply to alcohol purchased before you go through security. Once you clear the security checkpoints, you can purchase a larger bottle of whiskey from an airport vendor.

2. Checked Baggage Limitations

If you want to travel with quantities of whiskey greater than what you can carry in 3-ounce bottles, you will need to pack it in your checked luggage. Even if you do, though, you can’t travel with just anything.

The TSA prohibits any type of air travel with whiskey — or other liquors — more than 140 proof. It also restricts just how much liquor you can travel with, limiting each passenger to 5 liters total.

3. Airline-specific Regulations

Though the TSA does not have specific regulations on how you pack your whiskey — other than recommending that you do so carefully, so it doesn’t break — you should always check with your airline before you pack.

Packing regulations for alcohol vary by an airline to minimize breakage and damage, and the airline reserves the right to refuse your luggage’s contents even if the TSA does not. Some airlines, for example, require that each bottle be packed in a leak-proof bag and sealed with tape in a cardboard container.

More Frequently Asked Questions

Have more questions about your tour? Visit our Frequently Asked Questions page online.

About the Author – Rachel Goldenberg

How to Pack Alcohol in Your LuggageRachel Goldenberg has been Director of Marketing at Mint Julep since 2017. Her extensive bourbon education includes becoming an Executive Bourbon Steward through the Stave & Thief Society and graduating from Woodford Reserve’s Bourbon Academy. She is a Certified Tourism Ambassador and enthusiastic advocate for her adopted hometown of Louisville. When she’s not promoting Mint Julep’s portfolio of southern experiences, she can be found walking her dog or enjoying a drink on a Germantown patio.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Related Articles

Cruising can be a great and inexpensive vacation. Unless, of course, you are traveling on a cruise ship that doesn’t include alcoholic beverages in an all-inclusive package. Many cruise ships don’t include this and they don’t allow you to bring alcohol on with the exception of one bottle of wine or champagne for a special occasion. If you are interested in bringing booze on a cruise, there are ways you can do it.

Check with the cruise line to find out exactly what the regulations are about bringing alcohol on board. You should also know the repercussions if you get caught smuggling booze onto the ship. These can range from a warning and confiscation of the alcohol to being removed from the ship.

Bring only what you will use. Don’t bother smuggling 10 bottles of alcohol on if you are a light drinker. Plan for what you think you will likely consume. Plus, one bottle of vodka might be overlooked, whereas a case of whiskey probably won’t.

Buy beverages that look similar to what you are bringing on. If you are bringing vodka, buy a clear soda with a screw-off lid. If you are bringing on Bailey’s Irish Cream, try Starbuck’s Frappacino bottles.

Transfer the alcohol to the non-alcoholic bottles. Know that some screw lids will leak when repackaged so you might consider storing them in gallon-sized plastic bags in your luggage, just in case. A suitcase reeking of booze will no doubt cause suspicion.

Put it in your checked baggage. When you get to the cruise terminal, you will be checking your large bags. Make sure that the alcohol is in them. You can bring a small bottle with you on the boat for when you set sail, but be aware it’s more likely to get checked and confiscated.

About the Author

Robin Noelle is a professional writer living and working in Northern California. She has a degree in Journalism and a background in high tech public relations. She is the author of travel guides and end-user computer books.

Here some things you should know to keep the bottle intact and your belongings safe when bringing along beer or wine during your travels.

Whether you’re taking a bottle of wine or beer with you on vacation or bringing one back, you don’t want the bottle to break on the way.

Baggage handlers are lousy with luggage and deal with thousands of bags each day. Your bag is not special and will get tossed and beaten, just like all the others.

Use these tips to make sure your beverage survives the trip.

For the last-minute packer

To cushion a bottle, slide it into a high sock (or two), and wrap the neck of the bottle with a shirt. Next, wrap everything with another shirt or sweatshirt, and place this at the center of your bag. Do this with each bottle you’re carrying.

It’s not a fool-proof method, but it should work in a pinch. The risk, though, is soaking and staining the contents of your luggage.

For extra security, pack around the bottle, sandwiching it in the very center of everything. Clothing and the other soft items in your luggage will make a nice cushion that should protect the bottle from any small drops and bumps.

Get a travel bottle protector

If you have the option to plan ahead and know you’re taking or bringing back a nice bottle of beer, liquor or wine, consider picking up some bottle protectors before your trip.

Bottle protectors, like the Jet Bag, are reusable, resealable zip-top bags that are lined with an absorbent padding. They work much like the above makeshift bottle protector, but don’t run the risk of staining and ruining everything in your luggage. Instead, the plastic outer layer should remain intact if the bottle were to break. The zip-top should keep all the liquid inside the sealed pouch, and the padding will absorb the liquid.

Bottle protectors are pretty affordable, too. They typically come in 3- or 6-packs for between $20 (£16.12 or AU$25.92) to $30 (£24.18 or AU$38.88) — definitely cheaper than replacing or dry-cleaning an entire suitcase of clothing.

Shipping isn’t always easier

If you thought you could avoid the checked baggage route altogether and ship your bottle home, it’s possible. Maybe.

While USPS strictly prohibits shipping alcohol, some companies, like FedEx and UPS, will allow you to ship alcoholic beverages, so long as someone over 21 is signing for it and it’s properly packaged (“Completely covered in something soft to prevent glass breakage; Can absorb liquid if the bottle happens to break.”) But the laws vary by state and country, and volume is also heavily and understandably restricted.

None of this even takes into consideration the price of shipping. Assuming the weight of a bottle of wine or liquor is around 3.5 pounds (1.6 kilograms), shipping within the states could cost upward of $35 (£28.21 or AU$45.35) for FedEx Express Saver or $14 (£11.29 or AU$18.14) for FedEx Ground.

With all the regulations, your best bet is usually to pack the bottle in your luggage and hope for the best. But if you would rather ship the bottle home to yourself, call or ask the nearest FedEx or UPS for assistance. They will know what can and cannot be shipped from your current location to your destination.

Boozers: Upgrade your luggage

Baggage handlers are not easy on equipment. You’re lucky if you make it through more than a couple flights without your luggage being severely damaged. You can also wrap and pack a bottle however you want, but quality luggage will might make all the difference.

Dropping a canvas or leather bag will have a greater impact on the contents of the suitcase than the same drop with a hard shell suitcase. The outer shell of a hard-side suitcase will absorb more of the impact, keeping the contents inside more protected from shock.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

It was the midnight before my 7 a.m. flight from JFK to LAX when I opened my case of wine and realized there was no way I could check it. I check cases of wine on flights all the time—it’s the only way to drink well (or enough) while visiting family—but the bottles were protected only by flimsy cardboard dividers, and there was no way the case wouldn’t arrive in Los Angeles a dripping mess of shattered glass.

So, I did what any rational person with a suitcase full of their favorite garments and nine bottles of wine you can’t buy in LA would do: I packed that shit. And not only did I successfully get nine bottles of wine into my already stuffed suitcase, but I got each of them home unbroken with my wardrobe just slightly more wrinkled.

If you love wine and you travel, chances are you’re going to have to transport wine in your checked luggage one day. Whether you’re bringing home a bottle you didn’t end up drinking on vacation, or you’ve realized it’s going to cost three times the amount of the wine to ship it back home (#truth), here’s how to get them into your suitcase and safely off the carousel all in one piece.

Step 1: Take everything out of your suitcase. You can leave the dirty underwear in that pocket you use exclusively for dirty underwear, but everything else needs to be out.

Step 2: Separate your clothes. Put them in piles of heavy, light, and fillers like socks, bras, and whatever other small stuff you brought. Put aside one heavy piece for every bottle of wine you have if possible; sweaters and jackets are best.

Step 3: Use shoes to build a parameter around the inside of the suitcase. Gotta buffer that side impact.

Step 4: Build your base. You want to make sure there is a cushy barrier between the side of your bag and the bottles. Use thick pieces of clothing as the foundation, with lighter pieces on top. Just don’t use all your clothes, you’re going to need them.

Step 5: Check the wastebaskets for bags. Grab any clean ones, or empty the ones that have non-messy snack trash from when you got drunk and raided the mini-bar the night before. Place one bottle of wine into each bag, and knot it tightly at the top. In case there is a problem, this bag can help contain the damage (or at least you can pretend it will).

Step 6: Wrap your bottles. If you have sweaters or jackets, place the bottle inside, roll it up, and then use the exposed sleeve to wrap around the neck. The neck is the most vulnerable part of the bottle, and if it’s going to break, that’s where it will be. This is why you don’t want to put multiple bottles into a single trash bag; each neck needs individual support. If you don’t have jackets or sweaters, use whatever your heaviest pieces are to wrap cushion around the neck and bottle. Roll with a few extra items just to be on the safe side.

Step 7: Use your fillers/anything to separate and cushion the bottles from one another and the sides of your bag. Not only will this protect the bottles from knocking into one another, but it helps keep them in place and reduce movement.

Step 8: Build your top layer. Throw everything left on top and pack it in as tight as possible. If you’re a neurotic packer like me, this whole thing is going to drive you nuts because it looks like a mess, but unbroken wine > perfectly rolled pullovers.

Step 9: Zip it up.

Step 10: Get “Fragile” stickers. When you’re checking your very precious cargo, ask for “Fragile” stickers at the airline counter. They definitely have them, and definitely ask for one for both sides of your suitcase.

Step 11: Cross your fingers. Pray. Take a Xanax. Whatever you do on planes to chill.

Step 12: Rejoice in the baggage claim when your luggage is not leaking and your wine, and wardrobe, have survived unscathed. Have a glass at home to celebrate, although not from one of the bottles you just unpacked. Often wines get bottle shock from bouncing around during travel, making them taste dull and flat. Let them chill out for a week or two before cracking them.

Extra Credit: Prepare for next time. Hey, if it happens once, it could definitely happen again. Get a wine travel bag and keep it in your suitcase. They lie flat, taking up no space at all, and offer a lot of peace of mind if you’re ever having to haul bottles back with you again. I’m a fan of VinniBag. They’re reusable and inflatable, so they can accommodate and cushion different size bottles. Plus, flying is stressful enough without having to wonder if your leather jacket is bathing in Lambrusco.

FLIGHTS at this time of year often see Britons jetting off on holiday to guaranteed snow or winter sun. Those in search of warmer climes may head to such destinations as South Africa, Dubai or the Maldives. However, there’s one thing you should never pack if you’re going to the latter.

Flights to any destination involve travellers packing their bags and heading to the airport. However, not all destinations are equal when it comes to what you can and can’t bring into the country. It’s important to know about any local laws that might render certain items illegal and follow travel advice.

Related articles

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

READ MORE

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

The Maldives is one such country with very strict rules on what globetrotters can bring with them.

Luggage should be packed with care as holidaymakers do not want to end up in trouble just as their holidays are beginning.

Taking alcohol into the Maldives is illegal and anything on you will be confiscated.

Although it might be tempting to make the most of duty free offers at the airport, it’s key to hold off until your return journey.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Flights: The Maldives is one such country with very strict rules on what globetrotters can bring (Image: Getty Images)

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Flights: Taking alcohol into the Maldives is illegal and anything on you will be confiscated (Image: Getty Images)

Rich Quelch, Global Head of Marketing, Lifestyle Packaging explained the rules to Express.co.uk.

“While you can drink alcohol in resorts, if you’re jetting off to the Maldives for a relaxing break, don’t be tempted by the offers in duty-free,” Quelch said.

“Customs officials will confiscate any bottles when you land as it’s illegal to import alcoholic drinks.”

Quelch added: “In many countries with large Muslim populations, like UAE, Saudi Arabia and even The Maldives, alcohol is sold under strict regulations or even banned.

Related articles

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

“If there are exceptions for non-residents, they’re likely to only apply in permitted restaurants, hotels and nightclubs.”

It’s also forbidden to take any alcohol away from resorts, too.

Alcohol isn’t the only thing travellers are banned from bringing in.

The following are banned in the Maldives: explosives, weapons, firearms, ammunition, pornographic material, materials deemed contrary to Islam including ‘idols for worship’ and bibles, pork and pork products, and alcohol.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Flights: Luggage should be packed with care as holidaymakers do not want to end up in trouble (Image: Getty Images)

READ MORE

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

The UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) details the local laws and customs to be aware of.

“Local laws reflect the fact that the Maldives is an Islamic country. Violations of local laws may lead to a prison sentence.

“Public observance of any religion other than Islam is prohibited.

“You should respect local traditions, customs, laws and religions at all times and be aware of your actions to ensure that they don’t offend, especially during the holy month.” of Ramadan or if you intend to visit religious area.”

The Maldives also has a very strict stance on drugs. “Maldives has very strong anti-drugs laws,” explains the FCO.

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How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Flights: “Local laws reflect the fact that Maldives is an Islamic country,” said the FCO (Image: Getty Images)

“Importing or possessing drugs can carry severe penalties, including life imprisonment.”

Nudism and topless sunbathing is also banned, even on resort islands.

Same-sex relations are illegal and convicted offenders could face lengthy prison sentences and fines.

Accoridng to the FCO: “Most visits to Maldives are trouble free.

“The most common problems faced by visiting British nationals are lost and stolen passports, and swimming and diving related accidents.”

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

All your questions about boozing in the clouds answered.

Can you bring alcohol, specifically liquor, on a plane?

Yes. Per the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), travelers can bring alcohol — liquor or otherwise — as long as the bottles are unopened and placed in a sealed bag. While alcohol can’t exceed 70 percent (140 proof) in checked luggage, the TSA doesn’t state a proof-limit for carry-on booze.

In general, be sure to check the laws of your destination—some countries, like Kuwait, forbid passengers from entering the country with alcohol.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage3.4 ounces of a Heineken or Cab, anyone?

How many ounces of alcohol can you carry on an airplane?

You can bring as many 3.4-ounce (100 mL) bottles that will fit comfortably into “one, quart-sized, clear plastic, zip-top bag.”

Mini liquor bottles—a.k.a. airplane shooters—are 1.7 ounces.

By “comfortably,” the TSA, means that “the bag will seal without busting at the seams.” There is a limit of one plastic bag per passenger. So, you could bring wine or beer on a plane but would be better off leaving it in your checked bag due to the 3.4-ounce restriction.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your LuggageKahlua or Baileys mini-liquor bottles make for a superb boozy coffee at 30,000 feet.

Can you open your own alcohol on an airplane?

While you can bring alcohol on board with you, don’t crack it open mid-flight.

Code of Federal Regulations 121.575 states that:

“No person may drink any alcoholic beverage aboard an aircraft unless the certificate holder operating the aircraft has served that beverage to him.”

Some airlines may impose stricter guidelines at their discretion so it’s worth checking with the airline ahead of your flight.

Can you buy duty-free alcohol and then bring it onboard the airplane?

As of January 31 st , 2014, TSA has allowed duty-free alcohol to be transported in carry-on luggage. This overruled previous TSA regulation, which said that duty-free alcohol had to be packed in one’s checked baggage. Before you go merrily stuffing your bag with your handle of Beefeater Gin to enjoy on the flight, you probably won’t be allowed to drink it. But you can bring it if you meet the following requirements:

  • The duty-free liquids were purchased internationally and you are traveling to the United States with a connecting flight.
  • The liquids are packed in a transparent, secure, tamper-evident bag by the retailer and do not show signs of tampering when presented to TSA for screening.
  • The original receipt for the liquids is present and the purchase was made within 48 hours

Can you bring alcohol in a checked bag?

Yes. According to TSA, travelers may check up to five liters of alcohol, as long as the alcohol content is between 24 percent and 70 percent (140 percent), and it’s packed in a sealable bottle or flask. If you’re traveling between European countries, the EU allows ten liters of spirits per checked bag. If you’re entering the EU from a non-EU country, you can bring in four liters of still wine, sixteen liters of beer, and one liter of spirits or two liters of fortified or sparkling wine.

Can you get drunk on a plane?

Yes, and no. While there is technically no limit on how many drinks can be served to a passenger, flight attendants have the right to refuse alcohol to anyone they deem to be too drunk.

And don’t think that your behavior can’t land you in cuffs. A BBC Panorama investigation reported more than 387 people were arrested for being drunk on a plane in 2016–2017 in the U.K., up 250 from the previous year. Because cases of arrest often involve abuse of the cabin crew, some airlines are looking to take a stricter stance. Ryanair, for instance, is calling for a limit of two drinks per passenger, as well as urging airports to ban the sale of alcohol before 10 a.m.

Do international flights serve free alcohol?

Most airlines won’t serve free alcohol during domestic flights (sans business-class passengers). However, the majority of airlines do serve complimentary booze on international flights.

What is the drinking age on international flights?

On most flights, the drinking age is consistent with the country in which the airline is registered. So if you’re flying the Icelandic discount airline WOW air, the drinking age would be 20. However, there are exceptions. Air Canada, for instance, allows the consumption of alcohol by minors if consent is provided by a parent or guardian accompanying them. This rule only applies to international flights. Verify the guidelines of the airline you’re flying to know whether or not you can drink alcohol during your flight.

A round of Tetris for the experts – the boot

From beginners to professionals, there’s something for everyone in “luggage Tetris”. First, place the particularly heavy luggage with the largest surface on the boot floor, directly behind the rear seat backrest so that it can’t move or fall over in to the free space. An anti-slip mat suitable for your model will help. Then put light luggage on top of the large cases and cover it with a blanket and secure it all with a strap. It is best to lash them crosswise, otherwise loose objects can turn into dangerous projectiles. You should use a luggage compartment divider net, especially if the luggage exceeds the height of the rear seat.

The next level – the interior

Well, well, well! The boot is full, but a few bags remain? There is still some space inside: heavy luggage can be safely stored in the space between the front and rear seats. However, this does impede the riding comfort of the passengers. Store small and light objects that you do not necessarily need while driving behind the front seat or in vacuum bags. These bags reduce their volume by up to 75 percent and fit neatly into the storage space under the seats.

Game over? Not yet! The roof box.

There’s still not enough space in your car? No problem – just put a roof box on top. The following applies: a safety net or tensioning straps against slipping parts and a stable front reinforcement are marks of good roof boxes.

Observe a few basic rules so that your driving pleasure isn’t spoiled: evenly spread the volume (volume up to 520 litres) and the permissible roof load of your vehicle. Put the heaviest objects in the middle area and pad the objects with blankets. Blankets as padding in the front area can absorb the kinetic energy when braking heavily. Last but not least: luggage should be secured in the box. All done!

Bonus level – the bike rack

For the sporty holidaymaker: if you want to be on the go on your holiday and want your bike with you, you have several options for transporting it safely. Read more here about whether a roof or rear rack would work better for you.

Roof rack

A big advantage of the roof rack: not only do you have a clear view while driving, but access to the boot also remains free. Important when mounting the roof rack: align it centrally on the vehicle so that the load can act on the vehicle column. Make sure not to exceed the maximum roof load.

The roof rack works best with lighter-weight bicycles. In any event hough, teamwork is the key to a relaxed start to your holiday, especially for heavy bicycles. Let someone help you mount your bike to protect your paintwork – and your mood.

Rear carrier

A stable rear carrier ensures the safe transport of a maximum of three bicycles – even heavier ones, like e-bikes or pedelecs. Thanks to the integrated folding function, many rear carrier systems even provide comfortable access to the luggage compartment. In some cases, the rear rack and roof box can be easily combined without obstructing the view. Here, too, the maximum load of both the carrier and the trailer coupling must not be exceeded. The bicycles should not project more than 40 centimetres beyond the tailgate. However, the maximum permissible width varies from country to country. In some countries, the bicycle rack must also be specially signposted. You should therefore find out ahead of time which regulations apply for your journey.

No matter what bicycle-rack manufacturer you choose: small attachments such as air pumps, batteries and bicycle locks belong in the vehicle interior. Adjust your driving, because the changed centre of gravity and the changed aerodynamics have an effect on the cornering and braking behaviour. Drive as defensively as possible and pay attention to low-hanging branches, underpasses, tunnels and bridges. You should also observe the speed limits specified for loads. Otherwise, you could be fined.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

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Opening a bottle of fine wine or spirits sourced on holiday evokes memories of your travels that can transcend enjoyment of the wine itself.

As such, I scarcely return home from overseas travel without a few bottles of some unique and special drops.

Most often that’s Pinot Noir – I’ve recently brought back some fine examples from Martinborough, in New Zealand’s north island, and the Willamette Valley in Oregon, USA – although on a recent trip to New York I couldn’t resist a bottle of the exceptional Willett Family Estate Straight Rye Whiskey from Kentucky.

The challenge, then, is bringing this precious cargo home.

I learnt very early that a bottle stashed in a suitcase will not always withstand the rigours of baggage handling, and a red wine breakage has deep ramifications for your luggage and personal effects.

These days I always travel with a few special carrier bags to ensure the wines’ safe passage home to Australia.

These are essentially tough plastic pockets lined with protective matrial that can be sealed once the bottle is inserted.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

I’ve never experienced a breakage when travelling with wine this way. But in the unlikely event one was to occur, the seal should ensure that the liquid stays within the pocket, avoiding spoilage of the contents of your suitcase.

Two such products worth looking at are the WineSkin (from www.wineskin.com.au) and the Wine Travel Bag (www.winetravelbag.com).

At around $5 each, the bubble-wrapped WineSkin has a dual-strip sealing system which the creators boast to be leak-proof.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

However, the adhesive seal makes each WineSkin a single-use solution. It’s possible to re-use them but you do so at your own risk (and that of the clothes packed in you luggage). WineSkin has released a re-usable version at around $8 each, although it’s currently not available in Australia.

By comparison, the imaginatively-named Wine Travel Bag ($19.95 for two) has zip lock seals so they can be used again and again.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

If you want something even more robust and sophisticated that will really show how serious you are about wine, consider investing in a VinGardValise suitcase (www.flywithwine.com). It comes in either Petite ($US249) or Grande ($US299) versions, accommodating up to eight or 12 bottles respectively.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

The foam cavities are designed to hold 750ml bottles of any shape.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Mix and match inserts allow the traveller to customise the case so that it can accommodate, for example, six bottles of wine together with clothes and other items.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

You even have the option of a special insert to carry two wine glasses should you decide to lighten the load during your trip.

Be mindful that while a VinGardValise can carry at least eight bottles, Australian Customs allows only the equivalent of three bottles (2.25 litres) to be brought into the country duty free.

Take heed of this limit, as it can certainly be enforced – although my experience indicates a fair bit of leeway where wine is concerned.

That’s on two provisos; that the wine is not worth an inordinate sum of money, and that you do the right thing and declare it. Limits are much more strictly enforced with higher-strength spirits.

James Atkinson

James is a journalist whose career took a turn for the better when he began specialising in what he enjoys most: Travel, food and drink. Whether at home in Sydney or on the road, he’s especially diligent at roadtesting bars and restaurants and hunting down some special bottles to bring home.

FLIGHTS at this time of year often see Britons jetting off on holiday to guaranteed snow or winter sun. Those in search of warmer climes may head to such destinations as South Africa, Dubai or the Maldives. However, there’s one thing you should never pack if you’re going to the latter.

Flights to any destination involve travellers packing their bags and heading to the airport. However, not all destinations are equal when it comes to what you can and can’t bring into the country. It’s important to know about any local laws that might render certain items illegal and follow travel advice.

Related articles

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

READ MORE

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

The Maldives is one such country with very strict rules on what globetrotters can bring with them.

Luggage should be packed with care as holidaymakers do not want to end up in trouble just as their holidays are beginning.

Taking alcohol into the Maldives is illegal and anything on you will be confiscated.

Although it might be tempting to make the most of duty free offers at the airport, it’s key to hold off until your return journey.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Flights: The Maldives is one such country with very strict rules on what globetrotters can bring (Image: Getty Images)

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Flights: Taking alcohol into the Maldives is illegal and anything on you will be confiscated (Image: Getty Images)

Rich Quelch, Global Head of Marketing, Lifestyle Packaging explained the rules to Express.co.uk.

“While you can drink alcohol in resorts, if you’re jetting off to the Maldives for a relaxing break, don’t be tempted by the offers in duty-free,” Quelch said.

“Customs officials will confiscate any bottles when you land as it’s illegal to import alcoholic drinks.”

Quelch added: “In many countries with large Muslim populations, like UAE, Saudi Arabia and even The Maldives, alcohol is sold under strict regulations or even banned.

Related articles

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

“If there are exceptions for non-residents, they’re likely to only apply in permitted restaurants, hotels and nightclubs.”

It’s also forbidden to take any alcohol away from resorts, too.

Alcohol isn’t the only thing travellers are banned from bringing in.

The following are banned in the Maldives: explosives, weapons, firearms, ammunition, pornographic material, materials deemed contrary to Islam including ‘idols for worship’ and bibles, pork and pork products, and alcohol.

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Flights: Luggage should be packed with care as holidaymakers do not want to end up in trouble (Image: Getty Images)

READ MORE

How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

The UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) details the local laws and customs to be aware of.

“Local laws reflect the fact that the Maldives is an Islamic country. Violations of local laws may lead to a prison sentence.

“Public observance of any religion other than Islam is prohibited.

“You should respect local traditions, customs, laws and religions at all times and be aware of your actions to ensure that they don’t offend, especially during the holy month.” of Ramadan or if you intend to visit religious area.”

The Maldives also has a very strict stance on drugs. “Maldives has very strong anti-drugs laws,” explains the FCO.

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How to Pack Alcohol in Your Luggage

Flights: “Local laws reflect the fact that Maldives is an Islamic country,” said the FCO (Image: Getty Images)

“Importing or possessing drugs can carry severe penalties, including life imprisonment.”

Nudism and topless sunbathing is also banned, even on resort islands.

Same-sex relations are illegal and convicted offenders could face lengthy prison sentences and fines.

Accoridng to the FCO: “Most visits to Maldives are trouble free.

“The most common problems faced by visiting British nationals are lost and stolen passports, and swimming and diving related accidents.”