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How to pin folders websites settings notes and more to the start menu on windows 10

This post will show you how to pin favorite Windows 10 settings to Start Menu easily. Pinning in Windows 10 continues to become more and more popular with time. Pinning is a feature that can pin settings, apps, files, and programs to the Start Menu. Pinning to the Start Menu gives the ability to quickest and easiest way to access your favorite pages.

Here’s how you can pin the settings pages to the Start Menu in Windows 10. Let’s get started –

Pin Favorite Windows 10 Settings to Start Menu

  • In Windows 10 device, Select the Start button on the taskbar, and then select Settings. To quickly access the settings app, you can use the Windows key + I keyboard shortcut to open.
  • Once the Settings app window opens, locate your preferred settings app pages you want to pin ( For example – System, Personalization, Update & Security ) from the list to Start. Right-click on the Settings group and choose Pin to Start from the pop-up that appears.

Note – If the Pin to Start option is available, choose it. If you see an Unpin to Start option instead, the selected settings are already pinned.

Easily Pin Favorite Windows 10 Settings to Start Menu

  • Click Yes to add when a dialog window appears asking. Do you want to pin this tile to Start?

Easily Pin Favorite Windows 10 Settings to Start Menu

  • Similarly, you can navigate to a specific Windows Settings app pages. Right-click on the settings and select Pin to Start from the pop-up that appears. For example – Here, I selected under Settings >Devices, choose Bluetooth & other devices.

Easily Pin Favorite Windows 10 Settings to Start Menu

  • Click Yes to add when a dialog window appears asking. Do you want to pin this tile to Start?

Easily Pin Favorite Windows 10 Settings to Start Menu

Once that’s done, click on the Start button. The pinned settings will automatically appear as a tile on the Windows 10 Start menu. To unpin a setting, you can right-click on the setting, then select Unpin from Start.

Last Updated on February 26, 2020 by admin Leave a Comment

The Start menu in Windows 10 can be used not only to pin apps and programs but also to pin folders and websites. While pinning programs and folders are supported out of the box, pinning websites to the Start menu is not a straight-forward job, though.

Pinning a program or folder to the Start menu is relatively simple. You just need to right-click on the application or folder and then click the Pin to Start option to pin the selected folder or program to the right side of the Start menu in the form of a tile. But when you right-click on website shortcut on the desktop, Windows 10 doesn’t offer Pin to Start option in the context menu.

Pin a website to the Windows 10 Start menu using Chrome or Chromium-Edge

Step 1: Open the website that you want to pin to the Windows 10 Start menu.

Step 2: Click on the More options icon (three dots), click More tools, and then click Create shortcut option. If you are on Edge, you will see the Pin to the taskbar option instead of the Create shortcut option.

Step 3: Type a name for the website. Select Open in a window option. Click the Pin button to pin it to the taskbar.

Step 4: Open the Start menu. You will see the newly added website in the Recently added list. Right-click on the website shortcut and click the Pin to Start option to pin the website to the Start menu.

If you want, you may remove the website shortcut from the taskbar by right-clicking on it and then clicking Unpin from taskbar option.

Pin websites or webpages to Start menu in Windows 10

If you prefer pinning your favorite websites or webpages to Start menu for the quick access, you need to follow the given below workaround to pin webpages to Start menu in Windows 10.

Follow the given below directions without any deviations to pin a webpage or website to the Windows 10 Start menu.

To create a website shortcut on the desktop, launch the website or webpage that you want to pin to the Start menu in the Internet Explorer browser, right-click on the empty area on the webpage, click Create shortcut option and finally, click Yes button when you see the confirmation prompt.

If you want to create a website shortcut on desktop using Chrome or Firefox browser, please refer to how to create a website shortcut on the Windows 10 desktop guide.

Step 2: Once the website shortcut is on the desktop, simultaneously press Windows logo and R keys to open up the Run command box.

Step 3: In the Run command box, type Shell:Programs, and then press Enter key. This will open the Programs folder located under the Start menu.

Step 4: Now, copy and paste the newly created website shortcut in the Programs folder.

The website shortcut will now appear under the Start menu, but it will not appear on the right side of the Start menu. The shortcut will appear on the left side of the Start menu under All Apps.

Step 5: Open the Start menu, browse through the apps to find the newly added website.

Step 6: Finally, right-click on the website shortcut and then click the Pin to Start option to pin the website shortcut in the form of tile to the right side of the Start menu.

The website shortcut tile can now be moved anywhere on the right side of the Start menu.

To unpin the shortcut or tile from the Start menu, right-click on the tile and then click Unpin from Start option. That’s it!

Joel Cornell has spent twelve years writing professionally, working on everything from technical documentation at PBS to video game content for GameSkinny. Joel covers a bit of everything technology-related, including gaming and esports. He’s honed his skills by writing for other industries, including in architecture, green energy, and education. Read more.

Having quick access to frequently-used or hard to remember websites can save you time and frustration. Whether you use Chrome, Firefox, or Edge, you can add a shortcut to any site right to your Windows 10 taskbar or Start menu.

Google Chrome

Navigate to the website you want to pin. Click the three vertical dots in the top right of Chrome, hover your mouse over “More Tools,” and click “Create Shortcut.”

In the pop-up menu, change the name of the shortcut if desired, and click “Create.” This will automatically create an icon on your Windows desktop.

By default, Chrome will open the web page as a tab in a normal Chrome browser window. You can check the “Open as Window” option to have Chrome open the page in its own window with its own taskbar icon when you click the shortcut.

From your desktop, right-click on the shortcut, and either click “Pin to Start” or “Pin to Taskbar.” You can now delete the shortcut on your desktop.

If you set the website to open as a window, it will open immediately as its own window. You can then right-click its shortcut on your taskbar and select “Pin to Taskbar” without using the desktop shortcut.

Firefox

Create a shortcut to Firefox on your desktop. You can do this by typing “Firefox” into your Start menu, right-clicking on the icon, and clicking “Open File Location.”

In the new File Explorer window, right-click Firefox and click “Create Shortcut.” A prompt will appear, saying, “Windows can’t create a shortcut here. Do you want the shortcut to be placed on the desktop instead?” Click “Yes.”

Right-click the new Firefox icon on your desktop, and click “Properties.” In the “Target” field, insert the full URL of the website you want to pin after the quotation mark. Here’s an example of what the “Target” field should look like:

“C:\Program Files (x86)\Mozilla Firefox\firefox.exe” https://www.howtogeek.com

From your desktop, right-click on the shortcut, and either click “Pin to Start” or “Pin to Taskbar.” You can now delete the shortcut on your desktop.

The New Edge

Microsoft’s new Chromium-based Edge browser works similarly to Google Chrome. To pin any website to a taskbar, simply open the “Settings and More” menu (Alt+F, or click on the three horizontal dots in the top right of your browser). Hover your mouse over “More tools” and click “Pin to Taskbar.”

Additionally, the new Edge has a neat new feature called “Launch Taskbar Pinning Wizard,” which you can see right below “Pin to Taskbar.” Click this, and Edge will guide you through a short menu that lets you pin the most popular websites and Microsoft web apps to your taskbar.

Classic Edge

You can pin pages to the taskbar or Start menu in the original version of Microsoft Edge that came with Windows 10.

Navigate to the website you want to pin to your taskbar. Click the three vertical dots in the top right of Edge, and click “Pin This Page to the Taskbar.” You can now delete the shortcut on your desktop.

Navigate to the website you want to pin to the Start menu. Click the three vertical dots in the top right of Edge, hover your mouse over “More Tools,” and click “Pin This Page to Start.” You can now delete the shortcut on your desktop.

Windows 10 has a built-in feature that lets you pin websites from Edge to Start. The good news is you pin sites to the Start menu using Chrome, too.

One of the neat features in Windows 10 is the ability to pin links to websites to the Start menu from Microsoft Edge. This is something that the company built into its new operating system, unfortunately, Edge is still a work in progress. It’s fast with cool features, but until it gets extension support, a lot of us are still using Google Chrome.

The good news is you can still pin a site to Start or taskbar using Chrome. Here’s how it’s done.

For more on using the built-in feature, read our article on how to pin websites from Edge to the Start menu in Windows 10.

Pin Websites to Windows 10 Taskbar or Start from Chrome

Make sure you have the most updated version of Chrome. Launch it, and then head to the website you want to pin. Then click the Settings menu located at the upper-right corner of the browser and select More tools > Add to taskbar.

Give the shortcut a name and choose whether you want it to open it as a new window instead of a tab or not and click Add.

That won’t directly kick it to the taskbar, but open the Start menu and you’ll see it under Recently added. Right-click on it and then select to add it to Start or the Taskbar.

Another interesting thing to point out about this is that some sites are set up to give you a live tile and provide updated information. In the example below, ESPN and CNN provide a live tile that you can resize. Whether or not you get this feature is up to the site’s developer.

And then to make things more organized by creating live tile groups in the Start menu. That makes the Start menu feel alive and more responsive than the static menu in Windows 7.

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README.md

Start Menu Manager

Windows 10 App to improve you productivity with shortcuts. See the features below:

⭐ ⭐ ⭐ And if you like it . please star it! ⭐ ⭐ ⭐

Add Shorcuts to Start Menu

The app lets you add any kind of shortcut to the Start Menu:

  • Website Shorcuts
  • Software Shorcuts
  • File Shorcuts
  • Folder Shorcuts
  • Shorcuts to run Commands/Scripts
  • ‘Group’ Shortcuts which open multiple things at the same time

Add Shortcuts Anywhere

Once created, those shorcuts can be moved or added elsewhere. They can be pinned to the Start Menu, added to the Taskbar, added to your Desktop, or put anywhere you like.

Fixes Windows 10 Bugs

Windows 10 Search is buggy and inconsistent. Sometimes you might type in the exact name of an app, but get redirected to Bing search results inside a web brower.

Start Menu Manager fixes this. All shorctuts are treated like apps so they get priority in Windows 10 Search and appear at the top of the search results.

  • Clean modern Graphical Interface with light/dark themes.
  • Want an icon for your shortcut? The app can extract images from your favorite websites to use as shortcut icons.
  • Or provide custom icons as .ico files.
  • Shortcuts can be saved to JSON format so you can copy them between devices.
  • You can also generate the shortcuts from JSON using a terminal to avoid the GUI.
  • If you don’t like it, uninstallation removes all shortcuts and leaves no ‘junk’ behind.
  • No performance loss as no background processes are used. Apps will start with an almost unnoticable overhead.

Click for full size.

Requires Windows 10 with recent updates.

Disclaimer: The app needs to run with Administrator privileges, so it can access the directories to place the shortcuts. If you don’t have Administrator privileges, then it won’t work.

  1. Go to the GitHub Releases page.
  2. Scroll Down and download the .msi file in the ‘Assets’ section.
  3. Run the installer to install the software.

It should be intuitive from the app, but just in case .

  1. Open the ‘Start Menu Manager’ app through the Start Menu.
  2. Click the ‘Add Shortcut’ button to begin creating a shorcut.
  3. Change the ‘Shortcut Name’. This will be the name which appears in the Start Menu and Windows Search.
  4. Change the ‘Shortcut Type’ to the kind of shortcut you want to create. And fill in the details for that type. E.g. Set the ‘Website Url’ for Web shortcuts.
  5. Next to ‘Icon’ press ‘Select from Website’ to pick an icon from your favorite website.
  6. Create as many shortcuts as you want in the same way.
  7. Press ‘Generate’ to create the shortcuts. You’ll see them added to the start menu under ‘Recently Added’.

Optional:
8. In the Start Menu, right click on the shortcut to pin it, or add it to the Taskbar.
9. Naviagate to the Start Menu folder through the App Settings and copy the shortcut to wherever you want it.

Note: When generating the shorcuts, icons might not immediatley be displayed correctly in the Start Menu. This is a bug with Windows. One fix is to look in the ‘Display’ settings in the Windows 10 Settings App. Change the ‘Scale and Layout’ percentage, wait a few seconds, then change it back again.

Open the ‘Apps & Features’ page in the Windows 10 Settings app. Select ‘Start Menu Manager’ and select ‘Uninstall’. Everything is removed, including the shorctuts you created with the tool.

Building the App from Source

If you want to get your hands dirty you can build from the source code. Just clone the repository and open the solution ( .sln ) in Visual Studio 2019 or later.

The StartMenuManager.GUI project contains the main WPF application. StartMenuManager.Builder is a console app which creates the shorcuts a from JSON file. StartMenuManager.Runner is a console app used to run the Shortcuts when they are clicked. There are a few other class libraries, a project which acts as an uninstallation step, and an Wix installer project.

VS may prompt you to open as an administrator, since running the app requires those privileges.

Once built, the various console apps ( .exe files with .dll s) need to be put in the correct locations relative to each other. See the Program Files of an installed version of the app to see the correct setup.

This code is released under MIT license. This means you can use this for whatever you want. Modify, distribute, sell, fork, and use this as much as you like. Both for personal and commercial use. I hold no responsibility if anything goes wrong.

If you use this, you don’t need to refer to this repo, or give me any kind of credit but it would be appreciated. At least a ⭐ would be nice.

It took a lot of work to make this available for free. If you are feeling more generous, perhaps you could consider donating?

Pull Requests are welcome. But, note that by creating a pull request you are giving me permission to merge your code and release it under the MIT license mentioned above. At no point will you be able to withdraw merged code from the repository, or change the license under which it has been made available.

This wouldn’t have been possible without .

Material Design In Xaml – The WPF styles used in this app.

AvalonEdit – The code editor WPF control used for the JSON editing in the app.

AvalonEditHighlightingThemes – Implementation of Themes in AvalonEdit. Used for light/dark JSON editing themes.

FontAwesome.WPF – Only used for the loading spinner on the Icon Extractor page.

JsonSubTypes – JSON SubType implementation for Json.NET.

Wix Toolset – Used to create the .msi installer.

. and obvious credit to Microsoft for C#, WPF, .NET, and the best OS in existence 🙂

About

App to add websites/software/files/folders/scripts to the Windows 10 Start Menu and Taskbar, and priority shortcuts to Windows 10 Search.

Microsoft continues to move more into Settings on Windows 10. If an item is buried deep you can pin it to Start for easier access.

Windows 10 is full of features, and one of them is the ability to pin specific settings to the Start menu. This comes in handy if you frequently use an item buried deep in Settings and you want easier access to it. You can also pin an item from the classic Control Panel to Start as well. Here’s how to do it.

Pin Specific Settings to Windows 10 Start Menu

While you’re getting acclimated to Windows 10 and tweaking it, you’ll find yourself in Settings a lot, especially as Microsoft moves more and more classic Control Panel settings there.

To get started, click the Start button and click on Settings from the left column. Or, for keyboard warriors, hit the Windows key + I to open Settings directly.

From the Home page of Settings, you can right-click any sections and select Pin to Start.

You can dig deeper into Settings and pin categories to the Start menu, too. For example, here I am pinning the Storage section in Settings > System > Storage.

Before a section from the Settings app is pinned to Start, you will have to verify you want to pin it. Click Yes.

Note: The classic Control Panel that you may be used to from older versions of Windows is still available for now. You can access it by typing: control panel into the Search box or create a shortcut to it. And you can pin frequently used items from there, too. Use the same method — right-click > Pin to Start.

In the example below, I pinned System, Storage, and Focus Assist from Settings. I also pinned Programs and Features and Security and Maintenance from the classic Control Panel.

Pinning items that are buried deep in Settings or even the Control Panel to the Start menu makes them easier to access.

For more, check out the archive of Windows 10 articles we’ve built up over the years. Or, for more discussions, check out the free Windows 10 Forums.

Microsoft has just released the Windows 11 Insider Preview Build 22509 on its dev channel. And it has got quite a lot of interesting features and upgrades. One such feature that caught our eye is the option to get more Pins in Windows 11 Start Menu.

  • Requirements
  • How to Add More Apps and Folder Shortucts in Windows 11 Start Menu
  • What is the More recommendations option under Start Layout settings?

Requirements

You will need the latest Windows 11 Insider Preview Build 22509, released on December 1, 2021, to access this feature.

The good news though is that this feature should be soon available on other builds too, including beta, release candidate, and finally, stable builds, over the course of time.

How to Add More Apps and Folder Shortucts in Windows 11 Start Menu

Press the Windows key on your keyboard or click on the Windows icon on your taskbar to open the Start Menu.

Now right-click anywhere inside the start menu and then click Start settings.

On the Personalization settings window and under the Layout section, click More pins to increase the space available for pinned items

Now again press the Windows Key or click on the Windows icon to open the start menu. You will notice that the start menu now has one extra row where you can Pin your favourite apps.

And that’s it. That is how you can get more pins in Windows 11 Start Menu.

What is the More recommendations option under Start Layout settings?

Well, if you happen to want more space for recommendations and fewer pins then you can select the More recommendations option in the Start Layout settings.

Go back to the Personalization settings window as given above and then under the Layout section, click More recommendations.

And now when you go back to the start menu you will notice that there is more space for recommended stuff and 2 fewer rows for pinned apps.

We hope you found this guide useful. Leave a comment below to let us know what you think about this new feature from Microsoft.

One of my favorite features in Windows 11 is the folders we can enable on the Start Menu. They are discrete and easy to access. Unfortunately, the Start Menu folders are not enabled by default which I would very much approve if they were! These are the folders we are talking about.

They can manually be turned on in Settings > Personalization > Start > Folders as shown below.

We can however enable them using CSP in Windows 11 but there is no way of doing it using Group Policy or registry settings. More information on the CSP can be found here: Policy CSP – Start – Windows Client Management | Microsoft Docs
What we can do is use the MDM WMI Bridge provider to set these settings using PowerShell.
Note: as the MDM WMI Bridge is used the script must be run in System Context. If you want to test it out use PSEXEC for example.
MVP Peter van der Woude has created a great PowerShell script template which can be found here:
Windows 10 MDM Bridge WMI Provider: Settings template – All about Microsoft Endpoint Manager (petervanderwoude.nl) Great work and a real timesaver.

I use the script during OSD to enable the Start Menu folders. They are turned on by the script but the end-user can not turn it off it the like that is the downside. However it does not take up any estate that can be used for anything else so I think it is fine. If the end-user tries to change the values they are greyed out as shown below.

Task Sequence step

I run the script during OSD in my Windows 11 branding group as shown below the script accepts variables for each setting that should be enabled.
The following variables can be used:
-Documents
-Download
-FileExplorer
-HomeGroup
-Music
-Network
-PersonalFolder
-Pictures
-Settings
-Videos
Here is sample screenshot of the step I use in my Task Sequence:

The script is written by my great co-worker Sassan Fanai!
It can also be downloaded from GitHub: MEMCM-OSD-Scripts/Windows11 at master · Ccmexec/MEMCM-OSD-Scripts · GitHub
It can also be used to set the values to Disabled and Not configured.

Windows 11 has a brand-new taskbar, made from scratch, along with a brand-new start menu. The new start menu gets rid of tiles in favor of simple app icons. But just like the taskbar, the new start menu has a few missing features. Some of these can be easily enabled again from the settings.

In this post, we’ll show you how to add Windows 11 start menu folders, just like you could on Windows 10.

Windows 11 Start Menu Folders

To be clear, we’re not talking about the ability to create pinned app folders in the start menu. That’s still something that is missing from this new start menu. But you can add start menu folders in Windows 11 start menu. This includes your personal folder, documents folder, music folder, downloads folder, etc. Other than that you can also add shortcuts to Settings, Network, and the File Explorer.

The screenshots below might better help you understand.

Add Windows 11 Start Menu Folders

When the first Insider Preview of Windows 11 was released, this feature was not available. Fortunately, Microsoft added it in later updates. So now, you simply have to enable Windows 11 start menu folders in the Settings.

  1. Press Windows + I on the keyboard to open the Windows 11 Settings app.
  2. From the left column, navigate to Personalization.
  3. Under the Personalization menu, select Start on the right.
  4. Here you’ll see some toggles to enable/disable certain start menu features, as well as another section labelled Folders.
  5. Click on Folders.
  6. On the next page, simply turn on the toggle next to any folders or shortcuts that you want to see on the Windows 11 Start Menu.

Start Menu folders on Windows 11 can be quite handy, as they have been on previous versions of Windows. They provide a quick way to access your files without having to pin them to your Start menu or Taskbar. The new Windows 11 Start Menu already has less real estate for pinned apps compared to Windows 10. So, Start Menu folders in Windows 11 are even more important now. If you are looking to customize normal folders on Windows, you can now change folder color and icon too.

September 27, 2013

Windows 8 utilizes a new Start menu, but without options to remove it. Fortunately, however, you can personalize it via customization options. This tutorial describes how to change the background ‘pin’ items and otherwise organize and customize the look of the Windows 8 Start menu. Users can customize by addition or removal of unwanted tiles/applications, grouping or naming the applications, and also by adding shortcuts and website bookmarks to the Start menu. Follow this tutorial to learn how to customize your Start menu.

1. Changing Start Menu background and color.

To change the background color, press win+c or move your mouse to the right upper/lower corner of the screen, once the charm opens, click on ‘Settings’.

Choose ‘Change PC settings’. If you are using a tablet, swipe your finger from the right side of your device screen – this will open charm.

Once you enter the PC settings, choose ‘Personalize’ and then click on ‘Start screen’. Start screen settings will appear, and here you can choose your preferred background image and color.

2. Pinning items to the Start Menu.

Press alt+d to enter the desktop. Try adding some folders and website bookmarks to the Start menu. To ‘pin’ a shortcut or folder, simply click the right mouse button over it and choose ‘Pin to Start’.

In order to ‘pin’ a website, go to Internet Explorer, click the settings icon on the right side of the screen, and choose ‘Add site to Start Menu’. Note that this function is available on Internet Explorer only.

A window appears, and here you enter the required website URL. After entering the URL, click ‘Add’. The website bookmark will immediately be added to your Start menu.

3. Grouping the applications in the menu.

To group applications, drag the shortcuts or tiles from one group to another. To name the groups, click Ctrl and scroll the mouse wheel down – the groups will minimize. Next, right click on the required group and a menu on the bottom of the screen will appear. Click ‘Name group’ and enter the required name. Grouping and naming applications is a great way to design a quick and well-ordered Start menu.

4. Enabling/disabling Start Menu live tiles.

To enable/disable live tiles such as weather, messages, etc., simply right click on the tile and choose ‘Turn live tile on/off’.

5. Resizing Start Menu tiles.

Right click on the tile and choose Larger/Smaller from the the menu on the bottom of the screen.

Here is a video showing the above Windows 8 Start Menu customization possibilities:

Fix Pin to Start Menu Option is Missing in Windows 10: In Windows 10 when a user right-clicks on files or folders, the context menu which comes up contains an option “Pin to Start Menu” which pins that program or file to the Start Menu so that it is easily accessible by the user. Similarly when a file, folder or a program is already pinned to Start Menu the above context menu which comes up by right-clicking shows an option “Unpin from Start Menu” which remove the said program or file from the Start Menu.

Now imagine Pin to Start Menu and Unpin from Start Menu options are missing from your context menu, what would you do? Well for starters you wouldn’t be able to pin or unpin files, folders or programs from the Windows 10 Start Menu. In short, you won’t be able to customize your Start Menu which is an annoying issue for Windows 10 users.

Well, the main cause of this program seems to be corrupted registry entries or some 3rd party program have managed to change the value of NoChangeStartMenu and LockedStartLayout registry entries. The above settings can also be changed via Group Policy Editor, so you have to verify from where the settings have been changed. So without wasting any time let’s see how to actually Fix Pin to Start Menu Option is Missing issue in Windows 10 with the below-listed steps.

Pin to Start Menu Option is Missing in Windows 10 [SOLVED]

Make sure to create a restore point just in case something goes wrong.

Method 1: Registry Fix

1.Press Windows Key + R then type notepad and hit Enter.

2.Copy the following text and paste it in the notepad file:

3.Now click File > Save as from the notepad menu.

4.Select “All Files” from the Save as type dropdown.

5.Name the file as Pin_to_start_fix.reg (The extension .reg is very important) and save the file to your desired location.

6.Double-click on this file and click Yes to continue.

7.Reboot your PC to save changes.

This should Fix Pin to Start Menu Option is Missing in Windows 10 but if it didn’t then continue to the next method.

Method 2: Change the Settings from gpedit.msc

Note: This method won’t work for Windows Home edition users.

1.Press Windows Key + R then type gpedit.msc and hit Enter to open Group Policy Editor.

2.Navigate to the following setting by double clicking on each of them:

User Configuration > Administrative Templates > Start Menu and Taskbar

3.Find Remove pinned programs list from the Start Menu and Remove pinned programs from the Taskbar in the settings list.

4.Double-click on each of them and make sure both settings are set to Not configured.

5.If you have changed the above setting to Not configured then click Apply followed by OK.

6.Again find the Prevent users from customizing their Start screen and Start Layout settings.

7.Double-click on each of them and make sure they are set to Disabled.

8.Click Apply followed by OK.

9.Reboot your PC to save changes.

Method 3: Delete Files and Folder in AutomaticDestinations

1.Press Windows Key + R then type the following and hit Enter:

%appdata%\Microsoft\Windows\Recent\AutomaticDestinations

Note: You could also browse to the above location like this, just make sure you have enabled show hidden files and folders:

2.Delete all the content of the folder AutomaticDestinations.

2.Reboot your PC and see if the issue Pin to Start Menu Option is Missing is resolved or not.

Method 4: Run SFC and CHKDSK

1.Press Windows Key + X then click on Command Prompt(Admin).

2.Now type the following in the cmd and hit enter:

3.Again open Command Prompt with admin privileges and type the following command and hit Enter:

chkdsk C: /f /r /x

Note: In the above command C: is the drive on which we want to run check disk, /f stands for a flag which chkdsk the permission to fix any errors associated with the drive, /r let chkdsk search for bad sectors and perform recovery and /x instructs the check disk to dismount the drive before beginning the process.

4.It will ask to schedule the scan in the next system reboot, type Y and hit enter.

5.Wait for the above process to finish and then Restart your PC to save changes.

Method 5: Run DISM Tool

1.Press Windows Key + X then select Command Prompt (Admin).

2.Try these command sin sequence:

Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /StartComponentCleanup
Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth

3.If the above command doesn’t work then try on the below:

Dism /Image:C:\offline /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth /Source:c:\test\mount\windows
Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth /Source:c:\test\mount\windows /LimitAccess

Note: Replace the C:\RepairSource\Windows with the location of your repair source (Windows Installation or Recovery Disc).

4.Reboot your PC to save changes and see if you are able to Fix Pin to Start Menu Option is Missing in Windows 10 or not.

Method 6: Run CCleaner and Malwarebytes

2.Run Malwarebytes and let it scan your system for harmful files.

3.If malware is found it will automatically remove them.

4.Now run CCleaner and in the “Cleaner” section, under the Windows tab, we suggest checking the following selections to be cleaned:

5.Once you’ve made certain the proper points are checked, simply click Run Cleaner, and let CCleaner run its course.

6.To clean your system further select the Registry tab and ensure the following are checked:

7.Select Scan for Issue and allow CCleaner to scan, then click Fix Selected Issues.

8.When CCleaner asks “Do you want backup changes to the registry?” select Yes.

9.Once your backup has completed, select Fix All Selected Issues.

10.Restart your PC.

Recommended for you:

That’s it you have successfully Fix Pin to Start Menu Option is Missing in Windows 10 but if you still have any questions regarding this guide then feel free to ask them in the comment’s section.

Aditya Farrad

Aditya is a self-motivated information technology professional and has been a technology writer for the last 7 years. He covers Internet services, mobile, Windows, software, and How-to guides.

I can pin some programs to taskbar on Win7 using PowerShell.

How do I modify the above code to pin a program to the Start menu?

5 Answers 5

You can now choose to sort by Trending, which boosts votes that have happened recently, helping to surface more up-to-date answers.

Trending is based off of the highest score sort and falls back to it if no posts are trending.

Use the code below

Note: the change is in the fourth line.

If you want to add an action like Pin to Modern UI interface (Windows 8), at $verbs, add 51201

The main problem with most of the solution is that they enumerate the verbs on a file, search for the string to perform the action (“Pin to Startmenu” etc.) and then execute it. This does not work if you need to support 30+ languages in your company, except you use external function to search for the localized command (see answer from shtako-verflow).

The answer from Steven Penny is the first that is language neutral and does not need any external code. It uses the verbs stored in the registry HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\CLSID\ <90AA3A4E-1CBA-4233-B8BB-535773D48449>and HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\CLSID\

Based on this, here’s the code we are now using:

Steven Penny’s second answer above worked well for me. Here are a couple more tidbits.

It’s doing COM through PowerShell, so you can do the same thing with pretty much any COM client. For example, here’s an AutoHotkey version.

VBScript or InnoSetup would look almost the same except for the function used to create the object.

Screen reader content

This article is for people with visual impairments who use a screen reader program with Office products and is part of the Office Accessibility content set. For more general help, see Microsoft Support home.

Use your keyboard and a screen reader to explore and navigate the Start menu in Windows 11. We have tested this article with Narrator, JAWS, and NVDA, but the instructions might work with other screen readers as long as they follow common accessibility standards and techniques.

To navigate the options in the Start menu’s grid view, use the arrow keys.

To control which app icons appear on the Taskbar and which icons appear in the Taskbar corner overflow, in Windows 11, press the Windows logo key +I. You hear “Settings window, search box, find a setting.” Press the Down arrow key until you hear “Personalization,” and then press Enter. Use the Tab key and Down and Up arrow keys to navigate the subcategories and when you hear “Taskbar,” press Enter. Press the Tab key until you hear “Taskbar corner overflow,” and then press Enter. To select which apps should show icons in the Taskbar corner overflow instead of on the Taskbar, press Spacebar to toggle the button.

In this topic

Navigate to the Search bar

To find an app or to perform an action quickly, use the Search bar available on the Start menu.

Press the Windows logo key to open the Start menu. You hear: “Search box, edit.”

Type the search words for the action you want to perform. The list of search results is updated as you type. The search results are automatically categorized, for example, into apps, documents, and web results.

Use the Down and Up arrow keys to browse through the search results.

When you’ve found the result you want, press Enter to select it and to perform the action.

Navigate to Pinned and All apps

For quick access, some of the frequently used apps are pinned to the Start menu.

Press the Windows logo key to open the Start menu. You hear: “Search box, edit.”

If you want to browse the list of pinned apps, press the Tab key until you hear “Pinned,” followed by the name of the first pinned app. Then use the arrow keys to navigate the apps, and press Enter to open the selected app.

Tip: To go directly to the first app beginning with a specific letter in the pinned apps, press that letter key.

If you want to browse to all apps installed on your computer, press the Tab key until you hear: “All apps.” To open the All apps list, press Enter. Then use the Down and Up arrow keys to navigate the apps, and press Enter to open the selected app.

Navigate to Recommended files

In addition to the list of all apps, the Start menu has a section that is labeled as Recommended. It helps you to quickly access your recently opened files, documents, and installed apps.

Press the Windows logo key to open the Start menu. You hear: “Search box, edit.”

To browse the list of recommended files or apps, press the Tab key until you hear “Recommended,” followed by the name of the first recommended file or app. Then use the arrow keys to navigate the files or apps, and press Enter to open the selected file or app.

If you want to view more recommended files and apps, press the Tab key until you hear: “More.” To open the More list, press Enter. Then use the Down and Up arrow keys to navigate the files or apps, and press Enter to open the selected file or app.

Navigate other Start menu items

The Start menu also provides quick access to the user profile, power options, documents, and many more. In Windows 11, the Start menu is centered on the taskbar and the exact selection of what appears on the Start menu depends on how you rearrange your icons, pin apps, manage your folders, improve app and file recommendations, and more.

Press the Windows logo key to open the Start menu. You hear: “Search box, edit.”

If you want to navigate to the user account menu, press the Tab key until you hear “User account,” followed by the name of the current user. To open the menu, press Enter. Use the Down and Up arrow keys to browse through the sign out, switch user, and lock options, and press Enter to select. To close the user account menu without making a selection, press Esc. The focus returns to the search box.

If you want to navigate to the Power menu, press the Tab key until you hear “User account,” and then press the Right arrow key. You hear “Power.” To open the menu, press Enter. Use the Down and Up arrow keys to browse the Power menu options, and press Enter to select. To close the menu without making a selection, press Esc. The focus returns to the Power menu.

See also

Use your keyboard and a screen reader to explore and navigate the Start menu in Windows 10. We have tested this article with Narrator, JAWS, and NVDA, but the instructions might work with other screen readers as long as they follow common accessibility standards and techniques.

This post shows students and new users steps to group apps into folders on the Start menu in Windows 11. The Start menu in Windows 11 has three sections: Pinned, All apps and Recommended – which contains list of recently used or opened apps.

The Start menu also has shortcuts to settings, files and other apps. By default, there are some apps that are pinned to the Pinned section. These includes Edge, Mail, Microsoft Store and few other Windows apps.

Starting with Windows 11 build 22557, one can now organize pinned apps on the Start menu and group them into folders, similarly to your mobile devices. You can add/remove apps from group in folders, rearrange them within folders, and delete an entire folder if you wish.

At this moment, this feature only available to computer enrolled in Microsoft Insider Preview program, in the BETA channel. For all other computers, they must wait until it is released to machines.

How to group apps in folder on the start menu in Windows 11

As mentioned above, one can now organize pinned apps on the Start menu and group them into folders, similarly to your mobile devices with Windows 11 build 22557.

If your computer is enrolled in Microsoft Insider Preview program, you should be able to update and start using apps grouping on the Start menu.

When you group apps in folders, they should look similar to the screen below.

So, to group apps in folders, simply select a pinned app and drag it next to another pinned apps you want to the same folder.

Once the apps are together, a grouping folder will automatically be created. When groups are created, you can rearrange them by selecting the folder and moving it to where you want on the Start menu, remove apps from groups and more.

That should do it!

Conclusion:

This post showed you how to group apps in folders on the Start menu in Windows 11. If you find any error above or have something to add, please use the comment form below.

Published by Richard

In my spare time, I research topics that are interesting and worthwhile for users and students who want to try something new. I, too, am a student and my focus here is to help other students and new users get started with managing Ubuntu Linux, Windows, Content Management Systems (CMS) and others.

I try to do my best explaining the topics and detailing the instructions so that anyone can understand. These tutorials may not work in all situations and for all users. However, if you run into trouble, please ask your questions below and I or someone from the community may help you resolve. Thanks for reading and hope you come back.

In the Active Directory domain, you can centrally manage and customize Start Menu and Taskbar Layout on Windows 10 users’ computers using Group Policy. This allows you to assign the same settings for icons and pinned app shortcuts in the Start Menu and Taskbar pane for users of various departments. You can set the custom layout for different user groups and make sure that all workstations are configured in the same way.

  • How to Export and Import Start Menu Layout in Windows 10 With PowerShell?
  • Deploying Windows 10 Start Menu Layout using GPO
  • Using Partial Lockdown to Lock Certain Items in Start Menu
  • How to Manage Pinned Taskbar Items Using GPO?

How to Export and Import Start Menu Layout in Windows 10 With PowerShell?

The easiest way to get Start Menu Layout template on Windows 10 (Windows Server 2016) is to manually customize desktop appearance and elements on a reference user profile. Create shortcuts (tiles) for the necessary applications, pin and group them, delete unnecessary elements. Then you can export the current Start Menu layout to an XML file.

You can export the current Start Menu settings using PowerShell cmdlet Export-StartLayout:

Export-StartLayout –path c:\ps\StartLayoutW10.xml

Later you can manually import this Start Menu layout on another Windows 10 computer using the Import-StartLayout cmdlet as follows:

Import-StartLayout –LayoutPath c:\ps\StartLayoutW10.xml –MountPath c:\

The main drawback of the Import-StartLayout cmdlet is that it doesn’t import the Start layout to the current user profile, but to the default user profile (the file Layoutmodification.xml appears in C:\Users\Default\AppData\Local\Microsoft\Windows\Shell\ directory). This XML Start Screen layout will only apply to the new user profiles when they log in for the first time.

Deploying Windows 10 Start Menu Layout using GPO

To deploy your Windows 10 Start Menu layout on domain computers using Group Policy (GPO), you need to copy your layout XML file to the NETLOGON directory on the domain controller. Then run Group Policy Management Console (GPMC.msc) and create a new policy or edit the existing one and link it to the users OU.

In the Group Policy Management Editor, find the policy with the name Start Layout in the section User Configuration -> Policies -> Administrative Templates -> Start Menu and Taskbar. You can also assign the Start Menu layout to the computer objects. In this case you need to configure the same policy in the Computer Configuration section.

Open the policy, enable it and in Start Layout File field specify the UNC path to the XML file containing Windows 10 Start Menu layout settings (for example, \\woshub.com\netlogon\StartLayoutW10.xml).

If you want to apply the Start Layout policy only to specific user groups or computers, you can use Security Filtering or WMI GPO filters.

Using Partial Lockdown to Lock Certain Items in Start Menu

Partial Lockdown mode, that appeared in Windows 10 1511, allows you to specify groups of Start Menu tiles that users cannot change. Those you can allow the user to change any shortcuts, icons and tiles except for a certain group of corporate app shortcuts.

To set the locked Start Layout groups, you need to manually edit the XML layout file using any text editor (it is convenient to use Notepad ++ to edit the XML file).

Open your file StartLayoutW10.xml and find the following section in it: . To lock the specific shortcut group, you need to change the attribute of this section to

Save the changes to the XML file and deploy it on users’ computers using GPO. Thus, only groups of tiles (shortcuts) specified in the XML file will be locked. All other groups, their contents, and element settings can be changed by users.

Partial Lockdown works both in Windows 10 Enterprise and Pro (starting from 1703 build).

Windows 10 has a small bug when the assigned Internet Explorer shortcut doesn’t appear after applying the XML layout file via GPO. To solve the problem, you need to edit the XML file and change the line for the IE shortcut as follows:

And then through the GPO you need to copy the shortcut file “Internet Explorer.lnk” to the %ALLUSERSPROFILE%\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu\Programs\.

How to Manage Pinned Taskbar Items Using GPO?

Starting from Windows 10 1607, you can manage pinned shortcuts in the taskbar via the same XML file with the Start Menu layout. To add your own pinned shortcuts to the XML layout, which is distributed through the GPO, edit the XML file. After the tag, add the following code:

In this example, we will add two pinned shortcuts to the taskbar: File Explorer and Internet Explorer. After applying the policy on the user’s computer, two pinned shortcuts will appear in the Windows 10 taskbar.

In older Windows builds (pre 1607), pinned app shortcuts in the taskbar are configured differently. Let’s try to figure out how.

The list of pinned taskbar shortcuts in Windows 10 is stored in the user profile folder %APPDATA%\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Quick Launch\User Pinned\TaskBar.

And the settings of the pinned apps are stored encoded in the following registry key HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Taskband.

To distribute these Taskbar settings to domain computers, you need to export the contents of this registry key on a reference computer to a REG file:

reg export HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\Taskband c:\script\PinnedItem.reg

Copy this REG file and the directory containing icons (%APPDATA%\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Quick Launch\User Pinned\TaskBar) to a shared network folder (for example, you can use NETLOGON). In the Domain Group Policy Editor (User Configuration -> Policies -> Windows Settings -> Scripts (Logon/Logoff) -> Logon), add a logon script (deploy_taskbar.bat) with the following code:

@echo off
set Logfile=%AppData%\pinned.log
if not exist “%Logfile% (
IF EXIST “%APPDATA%\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Quick Launch\User Pinned\TaskBar” GOTO NOTASKDIR
del “%APPDATA%\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Quick Launch\User Pinned\TaskBar\*” /S /Q
:NOTASKDIR
xcopy /E /Y “\\woshub.com\netlogon\PinnedItem ” “%APPDATA%\Microsoft\Internet Explorer\Quick Launch\User Pinned”
regedit.exe /s “\\woshub.com\netlogon\PinnedItem.reg ”
echo PinnedItemImported on %date% at %time% >> %LogFile%
taskkill /IM explorer.exe /f
start explorer.exe
)

A user at logon will see the corporate set of pinned app icons in the Windows 10 Taskbar.

In Windows 10, Microsoft lets you pin Settings, Settings groups, and even individual settings to Start. But you can also create a shortcut to Settings on the taskbar and, with a little know-how, create shortcuts for individual settings on the desktop too. Here’s how.

Pin settings to Start

Windows 10 natively supports the ability to pin Settings, Settings groups, individual settings to Start. To pin Settings to Start, just right-click (or, with a touch screen, tap and hold on) it and then select Pin to Start from the pop-up menu that appears.

To pin a Settings group to Start, open Settings (WINKEY + I) and then right-click (or, with a touch screen, tap and hold on) the Settings group and choose Pin to Start from the pop-up menu that appears. (It’s the only choice.)

Here, you can see three Settings groups—System, Personalization, and Update & Security—in Start.

If you navigate into any Settings group in Settings, you can likewise pin any individual setting to Start. Just right-click (or, with a touch screen, tap and hold on) it in the list and, again, choose Pin to Start.

Here, you can see three individual settings—Display, Battery Saver, and Default Apps—pinned to Start.

Place shortcuts to settings on the taskbar

The taskbar is a bit trickier. You can create a shortcut to Settings itself to the taskbar easily enough, and it works exactly as does pinning Settings to Start: just right-click (or, with a touch screen, tap and hold on) it and then select Pin to Taskbar from the pop-up menu that appears.

Place shortcuts to settings on the desktop

If you open Settings (WINKEY + I), however, you’ll notice that you cannot pin Settings groups or individual settings to the taskbar as you can with Start. This is a curious omission, but enterprising tech enthusiasts have discovered the internal identifiers for some Settings groups many individual settings, and you can use this information to create shortcuts to them the desktop.

Here are the known settings identifiers:

Account Info: ms-settings:privacy-accountinfo
Airplane Mode: ms-settings:network-airplanemode
Backgrounds: ms-settings:personalization-background
Battery Saver: ms-settings:batterysaver
Bluetooth: ms-settings:bluetooth
Calendar: ms-settings:privacy-calendar
Camera: ms-settings:privacy-webcam
Cellular: ms-settings:network-cellular
Closed Captioning: ms-settings:easeofaccess-closedcaptioning
Colors: ms-settings:personalization-colors
Connected Devices: ms-settings:connecteddevices
Contacts: ms-settings:privacy-contacts
Data Usage: ms-settings:datausage
Date and Time: ms-settings:dateandtime
Dial-Up: ms-settings:network-dialup
DirectAccess: ms-settings:network-directaccess
Display: ms-settings:display
Display: ms-settings:screenrotation
Ethernet: ms-settings:network-ethernet
Family & Other Users: ms-settings:otherusers
Feedback: ms-settings:privacy-feedback
For Developers: ms-settings:developers
High Contrast: ms-settings:easeofaccess-highcontrast
Keyboard: ms-settings:easeofaccess-keyboard
Location: ms-settings:privacy-location
Lock screen: ms-settings:lockscreen
Magnifier: ms-settings:easeofaccess-magnifier
Manage Wi-Fi Settings: ms-settings:network-wifisettings
Messaging: ms-settings:privacy-messaging
Microphone: ms-settings:privacy-microphone
Mobile Hotspot: ms-settings:network-mobilehotspot
Motion: ms-settings:privacy-motion
Mouse & Touchpad: ms-settings:mousetouchpad
Mouse: ms-settings:easeofaccess-mouse
Narrator: ms-settings:easeofaccess-narrator
Notifications & Actions: ms-settings:notifications
Offline maps: ms-settings:maps
Optional Features: ms-settings:optionalfeatures
Other Devices: ms-settings:privacy-customdevices
Other options (Ease of Access): ms-settings:easeofaccess-otheroptions
Personalization: ms-settings:personalization
Power & Sleep: ms-settings:powersleep
Privacy: ms-settings:privacy
Proximity: ms-settings:proximity
Proxy: ms-settings:network-proxy
Radios: ms-settings:privacy-radios
Region & Language: ms-settings:regionlanguage
Sign-In Options: ms-settings:signinoptions
Speech, Inking, & Typing: ms-settings:privacy-speechtyping
Speech: ms-settings:speech
Start: ms-settings:personalization-start
Storage Sense: ms-settings:storagesense
Tablet Mode: ms-settings:tabletmode
Themes: ms-settings:themes
Typing: ms-settings:typing
VPN: ms-settings:network-vpn
Wi-Fi: ms-settings:network-wifi
Windows Update: ms-settings:windowsupdate
Work Access: ms-settings:workplace

With this information, you can create a shortcut to an individual setting like so:

Right-click on the desktop and chose New and then Shortcut from the pop-up menu that appears. This triggers the Create Shortcut wizard.

In the location text box, paste the identifier for the shortcut you wish to use. For example, if you would like a shortcut to Personalization, use the following:

When you tap Next, you are prompted to name the shortcut. Use something logical (Personalization in this case), and then tap Finish. A blank shortcut is created.

It’s plain-looking, but it works. If you would prefer something a little more customized, you can of course change the icon image to something a bit more interesting. To do so, right-click on the shortcut, choose Properties from the pop-up menu that appears, and then click Change Icon in the resulting window. In the Change Icon window, select an icon for your shortcut. (The new Settings icon is at the far right.)

Much better. But hopefully, Microsoft expands the Settings pinning abilities to the taskbar in the future.