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How to poach fish in milk

How to Poach Fish in Milk

I make no apologies for this simple recipe. This is food the way my mother made it to feed a huge, hungry family.

To me, this is as comforting as it gets. It is a culinary heirloom that I hope my children and their children cook long after I am gone.

Ready

  • Boneless white fish fillets, whatever is chunky, flaky and fresh
  • Milk
  • Parsley
  • Some things of your choice to flavour the poaching liquor (I might use a bay leaf, half an onion, sliced, a few peppercorns)
  • Butter
  • A big pan with a lid
  • A sieve
  1. Pour a pint or so of milk (enough for your fish to be half covered but not submerged) into your pan and add a bayleaf, some peppercorns, some onion… whatever you fancy. Bring it to the boil and reduce to a very low simmer.
  2. Season the fish with salt and lay gently in the milk.
  3. Cover and poach for maybe five minutes or until the fish flakes easily. Spoon some of the milk liquor over the fish to finish off the cooking if it needs it. Don’t you dare over-cook it though.
  4. Remove the fish and place on a big heap of mash potatoes.
  5. Meanwhile, pass the liquor through a sieve into a pan, reduce a bit and add chopped parsley and as much butter as your arteries can bear.
  6. Taste, season if necessary and pour over the fish and make sure plenty of sauce is floating around the plate.
  7. Serve with peas.
  8. Eat with a spoon.

What you should know

Looking for more fish recipes?

It’s hard to find knowledgeable people on this topic, but you sound like you know what you’re talking about! Thanks

I tried this recipe with flounder. It had been frozen, but tasted as fresh as mothers milk. Thanks for a great recipe.

I’ve heard that milk helps restore frozen fish to freshness. This recipe proves it true. Thanks. This was delish poached fish!

I frequently thaw frozen fish in milk. I can’t guarantee that it works but I can say it has done no harm.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

You’ve most likely been poaching your fish in wine, butter, or oil. And these liquids work just fine. But milk? Senior food editor Andy Baraghani says that milk opens up a whole new world of flavor when poaching fish. Think intensely herbaceous, creamy, chowder-like flavor. Yeah, sounds pretty great. Here’s what you need to know.

Photograph: Ditte Isager

Because of its high fat content, whole milk is better than water or wine at absorbing flavor. It readily draws in the essence of the herbs, garlic, or any other aromatics you might throw into it, taking on the qualities more quickly and intensely.

There is nothing more heartbreaking than a beautiful piece of fish that crumbles into oblivion when you pick it up (and maybe the time your eighth grade girlfriend broke up with you while getting soft serve at Lucy’s Custard). Poach sturdier fish like salmon, halibut, or tuna, instead of a super thin flaky fish like skate, flounder, or branzino. Keep. It. Together.

We suggest whole milk, but you don’t always play by the rules, right? You like to start at 10 and turn things up to 11. We get that. Baraghani said that he uses half and half for an even fattier, more absorbent, more flavorful piece of fish. Half and half is the step to take once you’ve reached the summit of Mt. Dairy, planted your flag, and looked out upon the vast sea of fish, waiting to be poached.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Poaching cod is one of the best ways to show off the flaky flesh of this much-loved fish; the gentle cooking technique helps to keep the flesh moist and succulent while also retaining as many of the fish’s nutrients as possible.

The method below calls for the cod to be poached in milk, but you could easily use any other liquid (fish stock or coconut milk are fantastic alternatives). You can also infuse the poaching liquid with herbs and spices, which will flavour the fish even further.

Ingredients

Ingredients

  • 500ml of whole milk
  • 1 pinch of salt
  • 2 cod fillets, each weighing 150g

Poached cod: method

Poached cod: tips

To tell whether the cod is cooked, run a skewer through the thickest part of the fish – there should be no resistance.

The milk can be used as the base of a delicious, creamy sauce.

Poached cod: variations and recipe ideas

How to Poach Fish in Milk

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Pascal Aussignac coats pieces of cod in salt then places them in the fridge for 30 minutes before poaching. This firms up the flesh of the fish, making it less likely to fall apart while poaching. If salting, make sure that you wash the seasoning off the fish thoroughly before poaching.

The milk can be substituted for fish stock, coconut milk, tomato broth or a white wine sauce, as mentioned above – tailor the poaching liquid to the dish you’re planning to make.

To poach fish

Poaching is fast, easy and no fuss, and if you want to serve a sauce with the fish then using the poaching liquid introduces the flavour of the fish itself. Rolled fish fillets, such as plaice or sole, can be poached in white wine or cider, which will make a lovely sauce. Trout can be poached in a pan of water to which a glass of dry white wine or cider has been added, along with a few sprigs of fresh herbs, a couple of bay leaves, slices of lemon, thin onion slices and a few black peppercorns. Don’t bother with fish kettles, which take up far too much storage space; large, whole fish are better oven-baked in foil. The timings that follow are guidelines only, so just remember that thicker pieces of fish will need the longer times, thinner pieces the shorter.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

The operative word here is gentle – the liquid should barely simmer, in order not to overcook or break up the fish. Rolled fillets of sole and plaice will take 4-5 minutes, and the cooking liquid – dry white wine or cider – can be used to make a sauce. White or smoked fish fillets and fish steaks weighing 6-7 oz (175-200 g) will take 6-8 minutes, depending on their thickness. Whole trout weighing 10-12 oz (275-350 g) each will take 8-10 minutes – less for small fish. Use enough liquid to half cover the fish and make sure the pan has a well-fitting lid.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Poached smoked haddock, topped with a couple of fresh, lightly poached eggs and served with some brown bread and butter, is one of the quickest and best comfort meals I know. The liquid from white fish poached in a mixture of half milk and half water can be used for a parsley sauce, and the cooking liquid from smoked fish fillets poached in the same way can be used to make a basic white sauce to which chopped hard-boiled eggs and chives can be added. Either sauce can be finished off beautifully with a tablespoon of cream or crème fraîche.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

To steam fish

Like poaching, steaming is a great cooking method for calorie counters. No fat is needed, so if you’re cutting the fat in your diet, steaming fish is definitely for you. You can use either a traditional fan or bamboo steamer. I think steaming – as oriental cooks have discovered – is particularly good for rolled fillets of plaice, sole or trout, as they retain their shape perfectly and remain beautifully moist. Add about 2 inches (5 cm) of boiling water to the saucepan, then fit the steamer over, making sure it doesn’t come into contact with the water, and cover with a tight-fitting lid.

Steaming guidelines are:

* Whole Dover sole, lemon sole or plaice weighing 10-12 oz (275-350 g) will take 7-8 minutes
* Rolled fillets of the above will take 7-8 minutes
* Rolled fillets of trout will take 7-8 minutes
* White or smoked fish, steaks and fillets weighing 6-7 oz (175-200 g) will take 8-10 minutes.

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Recipe sent in by Angela

We’ve used haddock in this classic recipe, but any other fish, such as cod, would taste great, too.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

  • Prep Time 15 minutes
  • Cook Time 30 minutes
  • Serves 4
  • Difficulty Level Easy

Preparation

  • Total Time 45 minutes
  • Preparation Time 15 minutes
  • Cooking Time 30 minutes
  • 4 smoked haddock fillets (undyed)
  • 400ml milk
  • 1 tsp black pepper, ground
  • 500g potatoes
  • 500g butternut squash
  • 4 mini corn on the cobs
  1. Lay the haddock fillets flat in a large frying pan or skillet
  2. Pour in enough milk to cover the bottom of the pan and go about half way up the fish, then grind black pepper on top to taste
  3. Cover the pan, then bring the milk to the boil
  4. Turn down quickly to simmer for about 15 minutes or until the fish is cooked
  5. Boil the potatoes (or bake if you prefer) and steam mini corns and the squash (cut into cubes) till soft
  6. Once it’s all ready, serve up with a little of the milk that the fish was cooked in poured on the side for the potatoes to be mashed into

You will need

Frying pan – We highly recommend using a skillet, like this best-selling one that’s made from durable cast iron. It’s available at Amazon for £32.50.

Variations

  • If you don’t want to use smoked haddock, you can use any other fish – salmon, plaice, sole, trout etc
  • Any leftover fish will taste great in a fish pie!

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Reviews

Charlotte H(918)

Poaching fish takes no time at all and it is such a healthy way to cook .

Helen H

Can also do this in the microwave – takes 4-5 mins to cook.

Guest

I make fish like this loads for my kids – I just get fish mixes from the supermarket. Even easier in summer when I just boil little potatoes, and steam some random veg on top of potatoes towards the end, so no messing about with loads of pans. I throw a bit of cream in the fish at the end too and tell them I’ve made them fish pie. Really easy and healthy!

Perfectly Poached Fish should be unbelievably tender and melt in your mouth. With this easy technique, you can make sure that every time you poach fish it turns out perfect.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Poached fish is far too underrated, in my opinion.

I know it’s not necessarily the fanciest, most complicated, or the prettiest way to cook fish. The thing is, when it’s done right, it’s amazing. Perfectly poached fish is tender and almost melts on your tongue. Because you’re not smothering it in sauce, the delicate flavor of the fish really shines. It’s a beautiful thing.

The problem is that when most people poach fish they boil it until it turns tough and rubbery. Sound familiar? It doesn’t have to be that way.

I’ve poached fish many times and every time I use this fail-proof technique. Cook it this way and I promise you will fall in love with poached fish.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

The trick to perfectly poached fish is to cook it gently and over low heat. Don’t bring your pot to a boil, or even a simmer for that matter. Lower the heat.

Fish is perfectly cooked when it reaches an internal temperature of 140 degrees. If you don’t already own one, I highly recommend picking up an instant-read thermometer the next time you’re at a kitchen store. If you’re cooking fish in the oven or on the stovetop, you can use it to make sure you’re not overcooking it.

When you’re poaching fish, you want the temperature of the water to remain at 140 degrees Fahrenheit. If you are familiar with sous vide cooking then this concept will ring a bell. Basically, if the water temperature never rises above (or much above) 140 degrees, then the fish will never overcook. Even if you leave the fish in the pan a little longer than necessary, the fish will remain perfectly cooked.

So how do you tell if the water is the perfect temperature?

An instant-read thermometer is your best bet here. Simply hold the end in the water until you get a reading then adjust your stove’s element until the water stays at 140 degrees.

And if you don’t have an instant-read thermometer?

The water in the pot will start moving around, and you’ll see steam rising from the pot. You might notice 2 or 3 small bubbles rising, but no more than that. If the water is simmering, it is too hot.

You’ll also be able to dip your finger into the water very briefly without burning it. (I tested this one out for you guys, but please, be careful and use common sense.)

How long do you cook the fish?

That depends on the size of the piece of fish you’re cooking. The fish you see in the photos took 10 minutes, but if your fish is thicker, it will take longer. Remember that it won’t overcook if the water temperature stays at 140 degrees, so this is one time you can err on the side of caution and not worry about overcooking your fish.

What kinds of fish are best for poaching?

I prefer meatier fish like salmon or steelhead trout. Halibut and arctic char are great poached, too. I tend to steer away from poaching thin fish, like snapper or tilapia, as I find they’re too delicate and can fall apart. That’s only a personal preference though and not a hard and fast rule.

Try topping your perfectly poached fish with a squeeze of charred lemon juice, some fresh dill or a little lemony hollandaise.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

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How to Poach Fish in Milk

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Poaching is a very common method for cooking smoked or unsmoked haddock as it is gentle and unobtrusive. Once cooked, the haddock can be skinned and flaked and used in a variety of dishes from fish pie to kedgeree.

Ingredients

  • 750ml of milk
  • 1 pinch of salt
  • 500g of haddock fillet

Method

Poaching is a gentle method so it is necessary to keep the temperature of the milk below boiling. If the temperature is too high it will result in dry, overcooked fish.

To check that the fish is cooked, insert a skewer into the thickest part of the fish – it should go through with no resistance.

The leftover milk can be used for a fish pie, soup or sauce.

Variations

Poaching haddock in milk adds a sweetness to the flavour of the fish; you can enhance this flavour by adding aromatics such as black pepper, thyme, garlic and onion.

For a more exotic flavour, try adding chilli and ginger or even a spoon of curry powder.

Serving suggestions

Shay Cooper uses poached haddock in his delicious Kedgeree recipe and Mark Dodson poaches his haddock in cream for his smoked haddock risotto with grain mustard sauce.

less than 30 mins

less than 30 mins

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 4 fresh cod fillets, weighing about 180g/6¼oz each
  • salt
  • freshly ground pepper
  • 1 lemon, zest only
  • 1 dried chilli
  • 1 garlic clove, finely sliced
  • 125ml/4¼fl oz dry white wine
  • 500ml/18fl oz skimmed milk
  • 2 tbsp mascarpone cheese
  • 4 tbsp chopped basil

To serve

  • creamy mash

Method

Warm the oil in a pan large enough to accommodate the fish fillets in a single layer.

Season the fillets with salt and pepper and place in the pan.

Seal on both sides over a low heat, without colouring the flesh.

Add the zest, chilli and garlic, and fry gently to allow the flavours to develop, about 1-2 minutes.

Add the wine and milk, increase the heat and bring to the boil. Reduce to a very gentle simmer and cover, with the lid gaping slightly.

Poach the fillets until just cooked through, 4-8 minutes, depending on their thickness. When done, the flesh will flake when pressed gently. The sauce will appear slightly curdled.

Remove from the heat and transfer the fish to warm serving plates. Gently pull off the skin. 8. Add the mascarpone to the pan and stir into the sauce.

Taste for seasoning and add the basil at the last minute.

Serve the cod with creamy mash and plenty of sauce spooned over the top.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

To poach is the same as to gently simmer in liquid and therefore when you poach fish, whether it is in the form of cutlets, fillets, steaks or even whole, this signifies that you are cooking the fish in a gently rolling liquid of some kind.

Poaching is an easy and hassle-free method of preparing fish and can be carried out in a number of ways.

You must never allow the fish to cook in boiling water, as this will break the fish into pieces and destroy the structure.

Due to the fact that the fish is being cooked in a liquid, poaching is an excellent method for leaner, less oily types of fish, as moisture is retained during the cooking process giving the fish a succulent flavour and texture.

When poaching fish, it is necessary to keep the fish covered in liquid at all times throughout the cooking period.

Try to always use good quality water and not tap water, unless it is clean enough to drink. Use bottled or filtered water or water from a spring.

Poaching fish in the oven

Small whole fish or fish fillets, cutlets and steaks can be poached in the oven. For this you will need to arrange the fish in a buttered flameproof and ovenproof rectangular dish.

Add liquid according to the recipe and pour to around two-thirds of the height of the fish. Then add any other ingredients to flavour such as vegetables or herbs.

Lay a lightly buttered piece of greaseproof paper on top of the fish. This will help retain the moisture in the fish and prevent the paper from sticking to it.

Place the dish on to the stove first of all and heat until the liquid starts to boil. Then transfer the dish to a preheated oven at a temperature of 350°F (180°C) and poach in the oven until the flesh of the fish becomes slightly translucent and cooked.

Poaching fish on the stove

Similarly, all types of fish can be poached on the stove, although larger sized fish will need to be cooked in a bigger cooking vessel. Ideally, a fish kettle should be used. This is a rectangular container, with or without a lid, and a perforated rack inside, making the removal of the fish easy. If you do not have a kettle, you could use a wire rack placed inside a deep tin or a muslin hammock inside a casserole dish instead.

Firstly, prepare the liquid that you are going to poach the fish in the pan.

If you are poaching fillets, steaks or cutlets in a court bouillon, it is best to prepare the liquid and allow it simmer for 10 – 15 minutes before adding the fish.

To keep the shape, the pieces of fish can be wrapped in cling film for the cooking process. The shape is retained without compromising the method or end result or quality of the fish in any way, although the cling film must be removed before eating.

For a larger piece or whole fish, it can be placed on the rack of a kettle or inside a hammock made of muslin and then lowered into the simmering liquid. If the court bouillon or liquid does not cover the fish, add more liquid or water.

Cover the kettle or casserole dish with the lid and bring back to the boil. At this point, reduce the heat and gently simmer until the fish is just cooked. This should take around 15 – 20 minutes for large fish.

Remove the fish and drain and then transfer to a serving dish to cool. When the fish has cooled slightly, carefully peel off the skin from the body.

Some poached fish such as salmon, may be eaten hot or cold served with a mayonnaise type dip or sauce.

Poaching liquid

Court bouillon

Poaching cooking times

Cooking times when poaching fish vary depending on the size and thickness of the fish.

Generally, rolled fish fillets need 5 minutes cooking time, fillets or steaks 6 – 8 minutes, a small whole trout or salmon weighing 10 oz (285 g) 8 – 10 minutes and larger fish weighing several pounds will require around 15 – 20 minutes.

Yes – we love haddock for breakfast. While salmon has become a favourite instagrammable brunch of food bloggers, haddock is just as tasty and beneficial to your health. In Joel’s house, there was only one way to have it and that’s poached in a pan of milk. For Garry, poached haddock plays a big part in his fitness regime, starting his day with a meal that’s filling and full of nutritional goodness.

But why should we eat haddock for breakfast?

As with most fish, haddock is a great source of top-quality protein, which means it can help you to feel fuller for longer. Have a portion of smoked haddock on toast with scrambled eggs, and your appetite could be curbed until lunchtime. It’s also significantly low in fat compared to other red and processed meats you might eat for breakfast, like sausages and bacon.

Haddock is in season most of the year, but it thrives throughout the colder months. It’s a cold-water fish and the cooler temperatures make its flesh firmer, giving a great texture and flavour.

Why poach haddock?

Haddock is loved for its flaky texture, which is only enhanced when gently poached. Milk brings out the natural sweetness of the meat, and you can add herbs like thyme, parsley, and black pepper for additional flavour.

Poaching fish takes literally minutes – we’d suggest around 10 minutes depending on the size and thickness of the portion. So, you can easily fit into your busy morning routine.

How to poach your haddock

If you don’t have a Joel to cook it at home, this is how to poach your smoked haddock in milk.

The simple method calls for submerging fish in barely simmering liquid and letting it gently cook while soaking up all kinds of flavor.

How to Poach Delicious Fish Every Time

Start with the right liquid.

Broth-based poaching is refreshing and relatively low-calorie, while oil- or butter-based poaching makes for unbelievably tender fillets. Other staples like coconut milk or wine make great poaching liquids, too. (Note: Each of the recipes below uses a different poaching liquid.)

Build flavor with aromatic vegetables, herbs, and spices.

Sauté aromatic vegetables in the pan before adding the liquid to add depth. Add herbs, spices, and condiments like soy sauce and vinegar to your poaching liquid for a bigger boost in flavor.

Poaching isn’t the same as boiling.

Be sure not to let the liquid boil, as this will make your fish tough. You want to heat your poaching liquid to a slight simmer. Make sure you have enough liquid in your pan to fully cover the fish.

Pair these five poaching liquids and herbs with your favorite type of fish (it’s barramundi, right?). Each will yield enough liquid to poach four 4- to 6-ounce fillets in a 12-inch pot or saucepan.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Poaching in fat makes for tender, fall-apart fish. Olive oil is a great option, and pairing it with fresh flavors like fennel and citrus cuts the richness of the dish.

Try It at Home: Heat 3 cups olive oil over medium heat, then add 1 small bulb sliced fennel, 6 cloves crushed garlic, a ½ bay leaf, and 2 strips of orange zest. Add seasoned fish fillets, cover, and cook for 5 minutes. Remove the pot from heat and let it sit, covered, for 10 minutes, to cook fish through.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

A butter poach is as decadent as it sounds. It’s also a great way to make lean white fish more tender. Wine, garlic, and thyme deepen the flavor but are subtle enough not to distract from the buttery taste.

Try It at Home: Heat 14 tablespoons butter, ¼ cup white wine, 1 clove smashed garlic, and 1 sprig thyme in a large saucepan over medium-low heat. When the liquid is nearly simmering, add seasoned fish fillets and cook until opaque, 10 to 15 minutes.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Court bouillon is a quick-cooked broth that gets its flavor from wine and aromatics. It’s the perfect way to add lots of flavor without a ton of calories and works equally well with lean or fatty cuts of fish.

Try It at Home: In a large pot, combine 5 cups water and 1 cup dry white wine. Add 2 chopped celery stalks, 1 chopped leek, 1 small chopped onion, 1 crushed lemongrass stalk, 1 bay leaf, 6 black peppercorns, and 3 parsley stems. Simmer 15 minutes, then strain. Return strained liquid to pot or saucepan, add seasoned fish fillets, and simmer for 7-10 minutes.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Coconut Milk, Onion, Garlic, Ginger, Curry Paste & Lime

An Asian-inspired poach is a surefire way to get out of a fish-cooking rut. Coconut milk has a strong flavor, so it’s complemented by other strong flavors like ginger and curry paste. Finish the dish with a squeeze of lime juice to liven things up.

Try It at Home: Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large saucepan. Sauté 1 small minced onion, 3 cloves minced garlic, and 1 teaspoon grated ginger until fragrant. Add 3 tablespoons red curry paste and stir. Add 1 13.5-ounce can coconut milk, the juice and zest of 1 lime, 1 tablespoon fish sauce (optional), and 1 tablespoon sambal chili sauce (optional). Simmer for 15 minutes. Reduce heat to low and add seasoned fish fillets. Poach for 7-10 minutes.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

For a light dinner that’s more than a salad, try poaching a piece of white fish in a leek and ginger infused broth.

Try It at Home: Thinly slice 3 leeks, then rinse with water until no dirt remains. In a large saucepan, simmer 2 cups chicken broth, leeks, 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice, 4 teaspoons grated lemon zest, and 1 teaspoon grated ginger. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a low simmer. Add seasoned fish fillets, cover saucepan with lid, and poach for 10 minutes.

Once you’ve had a few goes at poaching fish, you can start to build your own poaching liquids with whatever ingredients you love or happen to have on-hand. You can also cook vegetables in potatoes in the same liquid to round out the meal—just add them a few minutes before the fish, since they take longer to cook.

Have bought some frozen cod fillets – I’m sure that ages ago I bought some and could poach them from frozen in milk, but the packet says I can only microwave them or oven bake them. So can I poach them from frozen or not?

yes. If you can oven bake them from frozen I don’t see why you can’t poach them in milk – I do it in oven anyway.

Or ar you talking on hob?

Ignore the packet!
You can do anything with them, but do expect a lot of liquid after cooking.

Those boil in the bag frozen fillets in butter sauce aren’t baked or microwaved. Stupid manufacturers.

I was planning on poaching them in milk on the hob with bay leaf and peppercorns.

That’ll be fine, go for it.

I would go with goober and think fine as long as properly cooked – but probably use a bit less milk than usual as will release a lot of liquid.

(ponders as to whether I’m weird for poaching everything in oven)

Don’t think you are weird Armadillo, sometimes it makes more sense if oven is already on.
I sometimes do fish wrapped in foil on top tier of steamer if I have steamer out.

How do you poach them in the oven Amadillo?

put them in oven dish cover with milk and add the bay leaf and peppercorns. Cover with foil and stick in for 20mins or so at 180 (or 200 in my crappy oven).

I do it that way cos if I’m cooking other stuff in oven is easier to whack it all in.

I didn’t realise you could poach on hob till after I left home. I find the trays a better size for fillets than my pans.

cool – you’re right about the pan size – I just had to try and chop a frozen fillet in half to fit the pan!

I poach my fish in oven too – I do it in wrapped in foil parcel. It shouldn’t need much liquid in it.
BTW I do recycle the foil not put it in landfill, although goodness knows what happens to the stuff after I’m taken it to recycle centre.

strictly speaking it would be better if you could leave the fish in a cover dish in the fridge for a few hours before cooking. i know theres a lot of cooking from frozen going on, but it’s not the best practice!

(from the british frozen food federation)

Could you put sliced potato on top of the fish & milk, would the potato cook at the same time thus giving you a pie-ish thing?

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While fish has a reputation for being finicky—falling apart or drying out all too easily—with a little loving care, you can cook it to flaky, tender perfection. If you want a totally fool-proof method, cooking en papillote (in parchment or foil packets) is a great choice. But you could go one better and poach your fish in oil, for the most succulent piece of tuna, salmon, halibut, or cod you’ve ever had.

It’s basically confit for fish instead of duck, and it’s almost impossible to overcook it using this method, plus you can change up the flavorings any way you like. Despite what you might think, the fish doesn’t come out sodden with grease, just lightly slicked—even more lightly if you blot the surface gently with a towel before serving—and rich and silky straight on through. True, you miss out on crisp-seared skin, but you can always add a crunchy element to the plate for contrast. (That crunchy element could even be the skin itself, if you trim it off first and turn into pescatarian bacon of sorts…)

Here’s what to do:

1. Select your fish. Oil poaching works particularly well for firm, meaty fish like tuna, salmon, swordfish, halibut, and mahi mahi. However, you can try it with any other type, from tilapia to flounder, and even shrimp or scallops. For fish fillets, you can leave the skin on (it’ll slip right off later), but for shrimp, peel and devein them before poaching. You can let the fish sit out at room temperature for 15 to 30 minutes beforehand for faster cooking, but it’s not necessary either.

2. Select your oil. You don’t want to use the most expensive, super-premium olive oil you can find for this, but you also don’t want it to be bottom-shelf stuff. Choose an oil that tastes good on its own that’s also in a price range you’re comfortable with, or go for a more neutral type, like canola, avocado, or grapeseed oil.

3. Select your aromatics and seasonings. Garlic, lemon, and fresh or dried herbs like thyme and dill are classic flavors, but you can choose other combinations if you like—think ginger and sesame, fennel and saffron, or red pepper flakes and orange zest, all of which will infuse the oil and flavor the fish. Or, you can keep it simpler with just salt and pepper, and then dress the fish with a more complex sauce when it’s done.

4. Place the fish and aromatics in a baking dish. Spread your fish in a single layer in a relatively deep vessel that will hold them snugly; what kind you use depends on how much fish you’re cooking, and what form it’s in (for instance, an 8-inch square pan might suffice for cooking two tuna steaks, but you’ll need a casserole dish for a whole side of salmon). In addition to being large enough to hold all your fish, it should be at least one or two inches deeper than your fish is thick, because you’ll need to cover it completely with the oil. Try to use a dish that’s not too wide for the same reason, so you don’t have to use extra oil to fill that empty space (or fill it up with other, cheaper ingredients, like halved lemons, before adding the oil to reduce the total volume you’ll need). Tuck your flavorings like citrus slices and herb sprigs evenly in among the fillets or steaks and sprinkle a little salt and freshly cracked black pepper over all of that (plus any dry spices you may be using), then rub gently into the surface of the fish for good measure.

5. Pour over enough oil to cover it. You just want to submerge it so no part of the fish is peeking above the surface, but you don’t need to cover it by too much (about 1/8 to 1/4 of an inch should do). However, depending on the size of your pan and pieces of fish, this could take two or more cups total, which is why you probably don’t want to use a $40 bottle of olive oil here…

6. Place it in a 275 degree oven until it’s done. Depending on the thickness of your fish, this could take anywhere from 15 minutes to about an hour (or more); just check it now and again, and if any spots are no longer covered by oil when you do peek, baste them with a few spoonfuls from the surrounding pool (if you pour more oil in, it will lower the temperature and increase the cooking time). You’re looking for the flesh to be mostly opaque and fairly firm to know it’s done, but for fish like tuna and salmon in particular, if you prefer a rosier center, you can pull it out before it’s totally cooked through. However, if you do want it all the way done, it should still come out perfectly moist thanks to the oil bath.

Then what do you do with it?

Aside from serving the oil-poached fish right on a plate with some rice or grains, cooked vegetables, and perhaps a sauce (like chermoula, chimichurri, romesco, cilantro-lime sauce, or herbed yogurt sauce) or chunkier relish (like tomatillo salsa or tomato jam), you can use it to make the best tuna salad of your life; break it up and gently mix it into pasta; turn it into salmon or tuna rillettes for a fancy appetizer or snack; or serve it as part of a composed salad (like Tuna Niçoise).

Variations: You can adapt the method to the stovetop for smaller pieces of fish or shrimp and scallops. Many recipes will have you heat the oil to a specific temperature before adding the seafood, but it’ll work fine if you just combine everything in a deep pot or Dutch oven and place it over low heat until it warms up. Ideally, the oil will feel warm to the touch without being hot enough to burn you, but if you’d rather not stick your finger into cooking oil, just keep an eye on it and never let it get above a very gentle simmer, if even that. Depending on your fish (and your stove), it can take anywhere from 5 to 30 or more minutes; trust your eyes and sense of touch to know when it’s done. Whether you’re cooking in the oven or on the stove, instead of using oil, you can also poach fish in butter.

Notes: Don’t discard the oil! Or at least not all of it. You can drizzle a bit over the fish and any vegetables you’re serving with it as an ultra simple pan sauce, or use it for dipping crusty bread on the side; even incorporate it into a dressing if you’re serving the fish on or accompanied by a green salad.

If you’re still startled by the notion of cooking seafood submerged in fat, you can try this passive poaching method using water, wine, or broth instead. But for those times you’re after a truly luxurious bite, try the oil poaching method and say goodbye to all thoughts of dry, disappointing fish.

Header image courtesy of Coley Cooks.

Out of all of the “odd couple” food pairings you could imagine, this has got to be one of the outright weirdest.

Sorry, what?! I didn’t sign up for being grossed out today, but according to Andy Baraghani of Bon Appétit, cooking fish in milk is the ticket to creamy, delicious flesh—and not some kind of sick joke on your taste buds.

There is method to the madness. When cooking fish in milk, the key is to poach the fish. Because milk contains fat (unlike water or broth), it absorbs the flavors added to the fish better—herbs, garlic, or anything else you may dream up.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Just be sure to use the right kind of fish: think of sturdy varieties like cod, salmon, or tuna. Flakier, more delicate fish like branzino will fall apart faster than your attempts to fit in with the cool crowd. (They know you’re trying too hard, man. Just be yourself.)

While whole milk is recommended, Baraghani says that you can use half and half for an even creamier, fatty consistency—and who says no to more flavorful fat, am I right?

And for those of you that are still on the fence about combining fish and milk together in a dish, just think about the amazing soup-from-the-gods known as clam chowder. I could probably drink that stuff on a daily basis. if it weren’t 90% cream and 100% terrible for me. but that’s neither here nor there.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

The full article is on Bon Appétit—complete with a tasty-looking recipe for poached cod that I’m probably going to devour in the near future.

Going to give this crazy twist on poaching a try? Let us know in the comments how it turns out (or if you think the idea of fish and milk together is just too gross to attempt).

More Fine Fish Hacks:

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Cover photo via Smabs Sputzer/Flickr

Delicious and easy – a fish pie anyone can make. You’ll learn how to poach fish and make a white sauce too

Nutrition and extra info

Nutrition: per serving

Ingredients

One of the most widely used ingredients, milk is often referred to as a ‘complete’ food…

Onion

Onions are endlessly versatile and an essential ingredient in countless recipes. Native to Asia…

Clove

A clove is the dry, unopened flower bud of the tropical myrtle tree family used to flavour a…

The ultimate convenience food, eggs are powerhouses of nutrition packed with protein and a…

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Parsley

One of the most ubiquitous herbs in British cookery, parsley is also popular in European and…

Butter

Butter is a dairy product made from separating whole milk or cream into fat and…

Nutmeg

One of the most useful of spices for both sweet and savoury …

Potato

The world’s favourite root vegetable, the potato comes in innumerable varieties. A member of…

Cheddar

Once cheddar was ‘Cheddar’, a large, hard-pressed barrel of cheese made by a particular…

Method

Poach 400g skinless white fish fillets and 400g skinless smoked haddock fillets. Put the fish in the frying pan and pour over 500ml of the full-fat milk. Quarter 1 small onion and stud each quarter with a clove, then add to the milk, with 2 bay leaves. Bring the milk just to the boil – you will see a few small bubbles. Reduce the heat and simmer for 8 mins. Lift the fish onto a plate and strain the milk into a jug to cool. Flake the fish into large pieces in the baking dish.

Hard-boil 4 eggs. Bring a small pan of water to a gentle boil, then carefully lower the eggs in with a slotted spoon. Bring the water back to a gentle boil, with just a couple of bubbles rising to the surface. Set the timer for 8 mins, cook, then drain and cool in a bowl of cold water. Peel, slice into quarters and arrange on top of the fish, then scatter over the chopped leaves of a small bunch of parsley.

Make the sauce. Melt 50g butter in a pan, stir in 50g plain flour and cook for 1 min over moderate heat. Take off the heat, pour in a little of the cold poaching milk, then stir until blended. Continue to add the milk gradually, mixing well until you have a smooth sauce. Return to the heat, bring to the boil and cook for 5 mins, stirring continually, until it coats the back of a spoon. Remove from the heat, season with salt, pepper and a pinch of freshly grated nutmeg, then pour over the fish.

Assemble and bake. Heat oven to 200C/fan 180C/gas 6. Boil 1kg floury potatoes, cut into even-sized chunks, for 20 mins. Drain, season and mash with the remaining 50g butter and 100ml full-fat milk. Use to top the pie, starting at the edge of the dish and working your way in – push the mash right to the edges to seal. Fluff the top with a fork, sprinkle over 50g grated cheddar, then bake for 30 mins. Make up to a day ahead, chill, then bake for 40 mins.

How to Poach Fish

Poaching refers to the technique of cooking food slowly and gently in a simmering, but not boiling, liquid. The poaching liquid may be flavored or seasoned. This flavor will then transfer to the fish. Here’s how to poach fish steaks:

    Rinse fish steaks and pat dry with paper towels.

Place fish in saucepan just the size to hold them. Add enough poaching liquid to barely cover fish.

How to Poach Fish in Milk
Add enough liquid to just barely cover the fish.

Bring liquid to a simmer over medium heat. (Do not boil. This will cause fish to break apart.) Adjust heat, if necessary, to keep liquid at a simmer.

Simmer 10 minutes or until center is opaque and fish flakes easily when tested with fork.

Remove fish with slotted spatula.

Remove skin and bones from fish with paring knife.

How to Poach Fish in Milk
Before serving, remove the skin and bones.

Cooking fish in parchment is a great way to keep moisture in. Find out more in the next section.

Want more information? Try these:

  • Cooking: Learn the ins and outs of some basic cooking techniques in this helpful article.
  • Cooking Seafood: Get your feet wet by exploring the best ways to prepare seafood.
  • Fish Recipes: Reel in dozens of amazing fish recipes from this article.
  • Shellfish: From shrimp and lobster to clams, mussels, and more, you’ll find valuable information on shellfish at HowStuffWorks.

Poaching is a gentle and moist way of cooking fish while maintaining its flavours and structure. There are many recipes that include use of milk and stocks.

16 Recipes

Ingredients

  • Cheese (1)
  • Dairy (2)
  • Egg (1)
  • Fish (16)
  • Fruit (3)
  • Herbs and Spices (6)

Meals

  • Dinner (11)
  • Dip (1)
  • Entrée (1)
  • Gourmet (1)
  • Main (12)
  • Salad (1)

Total Time

Global Cuisine

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Wine Poached Salmon

Fresh and tender salmon steaks are plunged into a boiling hot stock made of onions, carrots, celery and dry white wine. The salmon absorbs the flavour.

Recipe by: GINGER P

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Simple Poached Salmon with Yoghurt Sauce

Salmon is so delicate and tasty it needs an elegant presentation like this where it is served with a simple yoghurt dill sauce. Serve with steamed asparagus.

Recipe by: Karena

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Orange and Lemon Grass Poached Salmon

This is a light, delicate dish with subtle lemon and orange flavours. Nice for a dinner party! An easy entertaining meal that will delight your guests!

Recipe by: Chef Dave

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Salmon Poached in Dill

It doesn’t get simpler than this! Poach your salmon fillets in hot chicken stock with dill for flavour and you’ll come back for more.

Recipe by: Rachel Nohe

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Poached Tuna and Kumquats

The sweet-sour kumquats form a lovely contrast with tuna steaks in this aromatic dish. Serve with couscous.

Recipe by: MOTTS

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Poached Salmon and Capers

Often called “Salmon Piccata”, this seafood main is fresh salmon stakes poached in lemon juice and chicken stock then served topped with a buttery caper sauce.

Recipe by: Christine L.

Fish Poached in Tamarind and Lemongrass

Snapper is cooked in a fragrant Asian-style stock. If you don’t have any tamarind you can substitute distilled malt vinegar, as the tamarind juice lends a sour flavour.

Recipe by: Kim Abdullah

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Poached Salmon Dip

Salmon is a very versatile fish. Here it is poached and mixed with cream cheese, lemon and Tabasco to make a delicious dip.

Recipe by: CHRISTINEPAAVOLA

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Easy Poached Salmon

Microwaves are very good at poaching fish, as this recipe will show. You can prepare this wonderfully savoury salmon dinner in 6 minutes! Serve with rice or pasta.

Recipe by: Saori

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Salmon Poached in Wine

This dish is a simple, moist and delicious way to prepare fresh salmon fillets. Serve with mashed potato and a salad.

Jackson-ctid

Well-Known Member

MadchesterCity

Well-Known Member

mammutly

Well-Known Member

Poaching sea bass should be illegal. What a waste.

Blitz ginger, corriander and wild garlic leaves ( loads out at the moment) and parsley with soy sauce, sesame oil and a little red chillie. You want to make a pesto like paste.

Spread this over your fish and leave in fridge for an hour.

butter some foil and parcel the fish in it. Put in hot oven for 15 – 20 mins.

Ducado

Well-Known Member

Poaching sea bass should be illegal. What a waste.

Blitz ginger, corriander and wild garlic leaves ( loads out at the moment) and parsley with soy sauce, sesame oil and a little red chillie. You want to make a pesto like paste.

Spread this over your fish and leave in fridge for an hour.

butter some foil and parcel the fish in it. Put in hot oven for 15 – 20 mins.

pauldominic

Well-Known Member

Gotta say I agree – staple diet in Wilmslow was chips and fish fingers with tomato sauce.

Also chicken wings, with lemon juice, flaked almonds and rice.

The funniest thing about tonight is that the train stopped in Wilmslow in ’69.

— Mon May 23, 2011 10:34 pm —

Poaching sea bass should be illegal. What a waste.

Blitz ginger, corriander and wild garlic leaves ( loads out at the moment) and parsley with soy sauce, sesame oil and a little red chillie. You want to make a pesto like paste.

Spread this over your fish and leave in fridge for an hour.

butter some foil and parcel the fish in it. Put in hot oven for 15 – 20 mins.

Oooohhh that sounds horrible.

What a waste of a fantastic fish

— Mon May 23, 2011 10:45 pm —

Poaching sea bass should be illegal. What a waste.

Blitz ginger, corriander and wild garlic leaves ( loads out at the moment) and parsley with soy sauce, sesame oil and a little red chillie. You want to make a pesto like paste.

Spread this over your fish and leave in fridge for an hour.

butter some foil and parcel the fish in it. Put in hot oven for 15 – 20 mins.

How about this one site /recipe: –

Google is your friend with fish like these.

cockneycarparkm32

Well-Known Member

Poaching sea bass should be illegal. What a waste.

Blitz ginger, corriander and wild garlic leaves ( loads out at the moment) and parsley with soy sauce, sesame oil and a little red chillie. You want to make a pesto like paste.

Spread this over your fish and leave in fridge for an hour.

butter some foil and parcel the fish in it. Put in hot oven for 15 – 20 mins.

Bert Trautmann’s Parachute

Well-Known Member

Or more importantly how long for?

Sea Bass to be exact

Bluebee2

Well-Known Member

I certainly wouldn’t poach Sea Bass. Unless it’s filetted I’d do it in a foil parcel, with Lemon and black pepper or pan fry the fillets.

mammutly

Well-Known Member

Sea bass is a fish that you can do loads with and it does best with sweetish, spicy flavours.

The farmed specimens are generally very poor compared to line caught wild bass. The non line caught wild bass is probably excellent, but its a completely unsustainable fishery so it shouldn’t be on anyones menu.

A decent sized wild sea bass is an absolute gem of a fish. I’ve only ever caught one – a lovely 5 pounder from a perfect early morning sea. I’ll be trying hard again this year.

DrBlueBob

Well-Known Member

Or more importantly how long for?

Sea Bass to be exact

I know I’m after the event here but poaching sea bass in milk seems to be a waste as it will mask the delicate flavours, (Ducado & Mammutly I agree with you).

Now you’ve mastered the technique of this I’d recommend launching yourself into a fish pie, (metaphorically of course). Smoked (undyed) haddock, cod/pollock or some other sustainable white fish. Loads of easy recipes, (Google is your friend) but trust your instincts and like as not you won’t be disappointed.

healthy family recipes

No-fuss velvety and luscious poached fish for dinner.
How to Poach Fish in Milk

Poaching is underrated, IMHO. Especially with delicate fish fillets.

Poaching with coconut milk – plus aromatics of your choice for flavor – produces fish fillets that are buttery, fragrant and delicious. And so good for you.

This is the simplest way to cook fish – you just pour hot coconut milk into your slow cooker with whatever aromatics you like. I went with Mediterranean flavors like capers, parsley, lemon and garlic. You could add some peppers for a little heat if you like. Then you cook for about an hour on high – cooking the fish very gently. The slow cooker is the perfect kitchen tool for cooking fish very gently.

Most poached fish recipes call for salmon – perhaps because of the high fat content in salmon that withstands poaching while staying moist. But since the oil in coconut milk provides fat, the fish absorbs it and becomes rich and buttery in texture. I used Chilean Sea Bass, but you could choose any mild white fish, such as cod, tilapia, even halibut – they all will be will be very tender and have a beautiful flavor. There is something about slow cooking that infuses wonderful flavor into your fish.

Try poaching fish and even those family members who used to turn up their noses at fish will become fish fans!

COCONUT MILK POACHED FISH FILLETS

4 white fish fillets, about 6 ounces each
Several cans of coconut milk (regular and not light), to cover the fish fillets while poaching
Aromatics of choice, such as garlic, shallots, parsley, ginger, lemon, capers, etc.
1/2 teaspoon of salt for every can of coconut milk

Place fish fillets in slow cooker, skin side down. Add all aromatics to slow cooker, distributing evenly around and on top of fish.

Heat coconut milk to a simmer in the microwave or on stovetop. Pour into slow cooker.

Cover and cook for about 60 minutes on high, until fish is opaque.

Garnish with aromatics as desired. I always use extra lemon for serving.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

How to Poach Fish in Milk | Tesco Food

Matt Tebbutt gives us his top tips for poaching fish. Here he’s using milk infused with onion, mace, parsley and black peppercorns, which is perfect for making .

How to Poach Fish in Milk

How to Poach Fish in Milk

2016-08-27 Tess Cooks 4u

Today I will show you how to poach fish/ a cod loin in milk. The fish is tender, flaky and flavorful. Poaching fish is an easy and healthy way to prepare fish. Spices .

How to Poach Fish in Milk

How to Poach Smoked Fish in Milk | Waitrose

Leyli from the Waitrose Cookery School shows you an easy way to poach smoked fish in milk. Twitter | http://www.twitter.com/waitrose Facebook .

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How to Poach and Flavour Salmon – Gordon Ramsay

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From Christmas with Gordon (2010). Poached salmon is perfect is Gordon’s festive Nicoise salad, for parties, lunches or any occasion where you fancy .

How to Poach Fish in Milk

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There are many reasons to poach in milk. Milk’s lactic acid tenderizes meat (making cheaper, more flavorful meats like pork shoulder a breeze to cook), and .

Poaching Fish

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Viking Range provides instructions on how to poach fish. Patrick apprenticed and worked in numerous hotels and restaurants near his hometown Lyon, the .

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Shallow Poaching

2014-04-23 Arcane Chest

Shallow Poaching is a popular method of cooking that is usually used with tender fish and poultry breasts. The food is placed on a bed of aromatic ingredients, .

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Coconut Milk Poached Cod with Spinach – Треска РІ РєРѕРєРѕСЃРѕРІРѕРј молоке

Coconut Milk Poached Cod with Spinach. RECIPE HERE: http://bit.ly/2sfYLCT Support me on Patreon: http://bit.ly/2nCJDhj Get MY FREE E-BOOK .

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Fresh Poached Cod with Buttered Veg | Bart’s Fish Tales

2015-01-25 Jamie Oliver

Our very own resident fish expert Bart Van Olphen has travelled the world to bring you the freshest fish recipes. Here he stops off in Reykjavik, Iceland in time for .

How to Poach Fish in Milk

How to Poach Fish in Olive Oil

Merrill Stubbs shows us how to poach fish in olive oil. Your new favorite party dish — or weeknight dinner, for that matter — is just a half hour away. Get the recipe .

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How to Poach Fish

2014-04-03 Blaine Porter Videos

A quick cooking video on one way to poach fish.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

How to Poach Fish in Milk | A classic breakfast | Fish for Thought

How to Poach fish in milk perfectly every time, the easy way. In this latest series we will be showing you how to master all the main techniques for cooking fish .

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Poach fish in milk for tender, flavorful results

2017-09-05 How To Make

Poach fish in milk for tender, flavorful results Milk is great for taming fishy odors while cooking, but it’s also a fantastic poaching liquid for sturdy fish like halibut, .

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Poached Cod with Leek and Parsnip Potato Salad

2014-03-08 WISN 12 News

Prepared by Executive Chef Justin Johnson.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Cooking Fish. Poaching smoked fish in milk. Schmoking!.mpg

Cold smoked whiting fillets poached with milk, bay, parsley, juniper berries, butter, salt and pepper. Quick, easy and tasty.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

How to Poach Fish | Potluck Video

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Poaching Fish Poaching fish can seem like more trouble than its worth, but as Ben Pollinger shows us it is actually easier than it looks. He shows how to poach .

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Chef Tutorial: Poaching Salmon

For information about our culinary and pastry school visit: http://www.escoffier.edu/ Follow along and learn how to make a simple yet delicious poached salmon.

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Poached Halibut – Poaching is such a simple way to cook fish and keep it moist and tender.

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Poached Halibut Poaching is such a simple way to cook fish and keep it moist and tender. It’s important to keep the skin on the fish during poaching to keep it .

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Lawrence Keogh Poached Smoked Haddock saturdaykitchenrecipsearch.co.uk

http://www.saturdaykitchenrecipesearch.co.uk Lawrence Keogh Poached Smoked Haddock saturdaykitchenrecipsearch.co.uk.

How Do I Poach Fish In Milk?

2017-08-22 Kacey Kacey

Add the fish and poach it. Poached cod is simple and easy to prepare tribunedigital poached fish with parsley sauce in milk. Bring to a boil and let simmer five .

Milk-poached Halibut with Asparagus and Morel Mushrooms
How to Poach Fish in Milk

Ingredients (serves 8):

Recipe created by chef Mark Franz of Faralllon restaurant in San Francisco

8 (8 ounce) Halibut Fillets
1 1/2 teaspoons sea salt
3/4 teaspoon plus scant 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 teaspoons vegetable oil
1/2 cup whole milk
1/2 cup heavy cream
4 tablespoons (1/4 cup) white wine, preferably white Burgundy
24 thick asparagus spears, peeled and trimmed
2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil
4 ounces fresh morels,* trimmed, washed well, patted dry, and halved or quartered if large
1/4 cup sherry vinegar
2 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves, chopped
2 tablespoons unsalted butter

*If fresh morels are unavailable, fresh chanterelles make a good substitute.

Preheat oven to 400°F.

Pat halibut dry and sprinkle with 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon pepper. In large, heavy skillet over moderately high heat, heat vegetable oil until hot but not smoking. Add fish, milk, cream, and wine. Bring to light simmer, cover, and place in oven until just cooked through, 7 to 10 minutes. Remove halibut from liquid, cover, and keep warm. Reserve poaching liquid.

While halibut is in the oven, cook asparagus in 8-quart pot boiling salted water until tender, about 3 minutes. Using slotted spoon or tongs, remove asparagus from water and transfer to large bowl. Drizzle with 2 tablespoons olive oil, sprinkle with 3/4 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper, and toss gently to coat. Cover and keep warm.

In heavy 10-inch skillet, heat remaining 2 teaspoons olive oil until hot but not smoking. Add morels and sauté 5 to 6 minutes. Remove from heat and add sherry vinegar and thyme, stirring to scrape up any morels that might stick to bottom of skillet. Sprinkle with remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt and remaining 1/8 tablespoon pepper.

Place poaching liquid over high heat and simmer until reduced by half. Remove from heat and stir in butter.

Divide asparagus between 8 plates. Peel skin off halibut and place 1 filet on top of asparagus on each plate. Divide morels among plates. Spoon sauce over fish and serve immediately.

While halibut is in the oven, cook asparagus in 8-quart pot boiling salted water until tender, about 3 minutes. Using slotted spoon or tongs, remove asparagus from water and transfer to large bowl. Drizzle with 2 tablespoons olive oil, sprinkle with 3/4 teaspoon salt and 1/2 teaspoon pepper, and toss gently to coat. Cover and keep warm.

In heavy 10-inch skillet, heat remaining 2 teaspoons olive oil until hot but not smoking. Add morels and sauté 5 to 6 minutes. Remove from heat and add sherry vinegar and thyme, stirring to scrape up any morels that might stick to bottom of skillet. Sprinkle with remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt and remaining 1/8 tablespoon pepper.

Place poaching liquid over high heat and simmer until reduced by half. Remove from heat and stir in butter.

Divide asparagus between 8 plates. Peel skin off halibut and place 1 filet on top of asparagus on each plate. Divide morels among plates. Spoon sauce over fish and serve immediately.

Entrees don’t get much healthier than poached salmon. This fish provides essential vitamins and minerals, lots of protein, and beneficial unsaturated fats with minimal saturated fat, cholesterol and calories. Poaching on the stovetop is a health-conscious way to prepare the food, as it doesn’t add calories from cooking fat. Poaching is also quick and simple, and results in a meal with natural flavors that aren’t overshadowed by cooking fats, caramelization or heavy-handed seasonings.

Thaw frozen salmon before poaching it so it cooks quickly and evenly.

Pat the salmon fillets or steaks dry with paper towels, then season the fish with salt and pepper to taste.

Place a skillet that will snugly fit the salmon pieces over medium-high heat on the stove. Pour in about 1/4 to 1 cup of red or white wine, depending on how strong a wine flavor you want to impart. Add enough water to bring the total liquid to about 2 cups.

Add a few squeezes of fresh citrus juice or a bit of citrus zest, along with herbs, such as rosemary, dill, thyme, fennel, tarragon, basil or marjoram. If you’d like, add aromatics like chopped celery and carrots; chopped onion, shallot or garlic; and leeks or scallions. Bring the liquid to a boil, then reduce the heat to low so the liquid just barely simmers. Place the cover on the skillet and simmer for about five minutes.

Place the salmon in the pan in a single layer. If you have fillets with skin, place them skin-side down. Recover the pan and poach fillets for about 3 1/2 minutes or steaks for about 4 1/2 minutes.

Turn the cuts of salmon carefully with a broad spatula. Poach the salmon for another three minutes or so as needed to bring it to 145 degrees Fahrenheit at the middle of the thickest part on an instant-read thermometer. When it’s done, its flesh flakes easily and is entirely opaque.

Eric Mohrman is a food and drink, travel, and lifestyle writer living with his family in Orlando, Florida. He has professional experience to complement his love of cooking and eating, having worked for 10 years both front- and back-of-house in casual and fine dining restaurants. He has written print and web pieces on food and drink topics for Orlando Style Magazine, CrushBrew Magazine, Agent Magazine, Dollar Stretcher Magazine, The 863 Magazine and other publications.

22 Answers

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Try sweating down a chopped onion, adding some garlic, pour in some milk, season with salt and ground pepper, add the fish and simmer for not more than ten minutes (depends on thickness of the fish). Garnish with chopped parsley.

This Site Might Help You.

anybody got any ideas how to poach fish? would probably be smoked haddock or cod fillet along those lines?

Your going to poach Smoked Haddock. it’s smoked.

The easiest way for a new poacher like YOU. Go buy some parchment paper. Tear off a big square. Place your fish on the paper and sprinkle it with seasoning and a splash of lemon juice, white wine and / or butter. Fold the paper over and crimp the ends so that it’s air tight.

Place on a baking sheet and slide it in the oven at 375 degrees. Cooking time will vary with the thickness of your fish, but 20 – 30 minute will do it. Fish should plump up and be moist and flakey.

Poaching fish is more of a technique but a good way to emphasize the taste of fish.

This is a quick but gently way of cooking the fish in a flavorful liquid to keep the fish’s natural flavor.

The term poaching is used most often for fish cooked in a simmering liquid where the liquid is intended to be discarded. Braising or stewing is often used when the liquid is to be served with the fish.

The water used when poaching fish should be “high quality”. If you don’t drink your tap water, then don’t use it for this recipe. Use water that you would be willing to drink (and, hopefully, prefer the taste of) for this recipe because those off flavors will present themselves in the final dish if you use funny tasting water. Also, you will not beboiling the fish – you should cook it in near boiling temperature water. Boiling will cause unnecessary violent currents through the cooking liquid which will end up tearing apart the fish into little pieces instead of gently cooking them through. The poaching liquid can be used repeatedly for multiple batches of fish or other foods you may want to poach in a flavorful liquid – just bring it back to a boil between uses. (Use the poaching liquid all in one session and then discard. please don’t keep a pot of poaching liquid sitting on your stove waiting for the next poached fish meal.)

Prepare the poaching liquid by filling a saute pan with enough water to measure a depth of about one inch (2.5 cm). Throw in a couple cloves of garlic, about 30 to 40 whole peppercorns, 4 sprigs of parsley, 1/2 cup dry white wine, and a bay leaf. Covering the saucepan, allow the mixture to come to a full boil and turn the heat down to low. This will let flavors of the spices infuse into the liquid, this should be for about twenty minutes.

Bring the poaching liquid back up to a full rolling boil, then turn the heat back to the lowest setting. When the boil settles down, place the fillets into the liquid with a thin, flat, slotted spatula and cover for approx five minutes. (Thicker than 1 cm may need an additional minute or two.)

Remove the filets from the liquid and serve.

lthough poaching is a cooking method that has been in use worldwide for centuries, it’s often overlooked in today’s American kitchen. At its core, poaching is simply cooking foods submerged in liquid that is kept at a constant simmer. Here are a few simple tips and tricks to encourage you to give poaching a try.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

It’s Not Just for Eggs!

While poached eggs are certainly delicious, they’re not the only proteins that work well with this method. Poultry, such as chicken, capon, poussin and even duck, is excellent poached. The delicate flesh absorbs the aromatics you season the liquid with. Lean beef cuts are also suitable for poaching, like filet. What poaching does not do is tenderize so stay away from tough or fibrous cuts, such as shoulder, brisket or stew meat. Lamb can be absolutely delicious when poached as well. There are many recipes for poaching leg of lamb but other cuts such as chops or tenderloin are suitable too.

Not much in the way of equipment is needed for poaching. Use a stockpot or Dutch oven or straight-sided sauce pan large enough to hold your meat completely submerged in cooking liquid. Kitchen twine is needed if you’re cooking whole birds, as they should be trussed when poaching. An insta-read thermometer is also important as you want to cook the meat through without over cooking it.

One of the great advantages of poaching is its simplicity. The one key to successful and flavorful poached meat is the poaching liquid. One of the most common poaching liquids is traditional court-bouillon, which is a broth made by cooking mirepoix, a clove-studded onion and bouquet garni with water and wine or lemon juice. Any flavorful meat stock or bone broth works beautifully, as does wine. Poaching in fat puts you directly on the path to succulent meat. Try olive oil poaching for red meat. Experiment with coconut milk or butter poaching for poultry, fish and seafood. Whichever cooking liquid you choose just make sure it’s generously seasoned. Aromatics such as garlic, onion, herbs and spices add flavor as does vinegar, citrus, wine or liquor.

For moist and juicy results, poach meats at a low temperature. A good rule of thumb to keep in mind is: start whole birds and larger cuts of meat in cold liquid and smaller pieces or delicate cuts in liquid that’s up to poaching temperature. All meats should cook in liquid close to the boiling point, which will kill any surface bacteria, for at least one minute then reduce the heat to barely a simmer to finish cooking through.

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How to Poach Fish in Milk

By Teresa Cutter

Healthy Recipes

Special Diets

Healthy Baking

How to Poach Fish in Milk

How to Poach Fish in Milk

What’s great about it

Poaching is one of the easiest and best ways to cook salmon. I love it because it’s such a clean and unadulterated way of cooking and eating. The integrity of the fish is not lost if poached correctly and you end up with the most delicious piece of tender fish that tastes great simply seasoned with a little lemon and a little cold pressed olive oil dressing.

Method

STEP 1 – Prepare your Salmon Fillet

I like them pin boned and you can choose to leave the skin on or off.

180 g (6 1/2 oz) is a good size per portion – if you’re hungry grab 2 portions.

STEP 2 – Choose your poaching liquid

I love it simple and clean so water or a court-bouillon (2 carrot, 1 onion, 1 bay leaf, splash of white wine + a few peppercorns + water) is my first choice if you’re not eating the broth afterward.

You can also use a good home-made vegetable or chicken stock.

STEP 3 – Choose your aromatics

If using water I love some citrus flavours such as lemon and lime. Add some thyme, fennel or parsley and that’s pretty much it.

If using stocks you can add more robust flavours. Give it an Asian touch by using aromatics like lemongrass, ginger, kaffir lime.

Another great combo is star anis, tamari soy sauce and a splash of mirin.

STEP 4 – Heat the poaching liquid and aromatics for 5 minutes only if poaching fillets.

So that the flavours infuse a little and penetrate into the liquid.

If using whole fish or a whole side of salmon, the water needs to be cold to start – but that’s another post.

STEP 5 – Add your salmon

The secret to a great poached anything is to keep the temperature just below boiling. Best temp is 95 C. just below boiling.

Make sure the salmon is immersed in the stock.

STEP 6 – Cook the salmon

For stove top – poach the salmon for 8 – 10 minutes depending on how you like it.

For oven poaching – preheat your oven 200 C. Poach for 15 minutes approx.

STEP 7 – Remove your salmon and serve.

I like it served very clean with a side of steamed greens such as asparagus or broccolini then topped with a little lemon + EVOO (extra virgin olive oil) dressing.

It’s also delicious, flaked and stirred through freshly cooked quinoa, baby spinach, peas and a little pesto.

You can cook up extra and serve cold the next day for lunch with leafy greens, hard boiled organic egg and French dressing.

Notes and Inspiration

This method of poaching fish is great with other cuts of fresh fish fillets such as ocean trout, Blue eye cod, snapper, ling, trout etc..

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How to Poach Fish in Milk

By Teresa Cutter

Healthy Recipes

Special Diets

Healthy Baking

How to Poach Fish in Milk

How to Poach Fish in Milk

What’s great about it

Poaching is one of the easiest and best ways to cook salmon. I love it because it’s such a clean and unadulterated way of cooking and eating. The integrity of the fish is not lost if poached correctly and you end up with the most delicious piece of tender fish that tastes great simply seasoned with a little lemon and a little cold pressed olive oil dressing.

Method

STEP 1 – Prepare your Salmon Fillet

I like them pin boned and you can choose to leave the skin on or off.

180 g (6 1/2 oz) is a good size per portion – if you’re hungry grab 2 portions.

STEP 2 – Choose your poaching liquid

I love it simple and clean so water or a court-bouillon (2 carrot, 1 onion, 1 bay leaf, splash of white wine + a few peppercorns + water) is my first choice if you’re not eating the broth afterward.

You can also use a good home-made vegetable or chicken stock.

STEP 3 – Choose your aromatics

If using water I love some citrus flavours such as lemon and lime. Add some thyme, fennel or parsley and that’s pretty much it.

If using stocks you can add more robust flavours. Give it an Asian touch by using aromatics like lemongrass, ginger, kaffir lime.

Another great combo is star anis, tamari soy sauce and a splash of mirin.

STEP 4 – Heat the poaching liquid and aromatics for 5 minutes only if poaching fillets.

So that the flavours infuse a little and penetrate into the liquid.

If using whole fish or a whole side of salmon, the water needs to be cold to start – but that’s another post.

STEP 5 – Add your salmon

The secret to a great poached anything is to keep the temperature just below boiling. Best temp is 95 C. just below boiling.

Make sure the salmon is immersed in the stock.

STEP 6 – Cook the salmon

For stove top – poach the salmon for 8 – 10 minutes depending on how you like it.

For oven poaching – preheat your oven 200 C. Poach for 15 minutes approx.

STEP 7 – Remove your salmon and serve.

I like it served very clean with a side of steamed greens such as asparagus or broccolini then topped with a little lemon + EVOO (extra virgin olive oil) dressing.

It’s also delicious, flaked and stirred through freshly cooked quinoa, baby spinach, peas and a little pesto.

You can cook up extra and serve cold the next day for lunch with leafy greens, hard boiled organic egg and French dressing.

Notes and Inspiration

This method of poaching fish is great with other cuts of fresh fish fillets such as ocean trout, Blue eye cod, snapper, ling, trout etc..

Recipe by: Chef John

Ingredients

  • Adjust
  • US
  • Metric
  • 2 (10 ounce) thick-cut ahi tuna steaks
  • 2 cloves garlic, bruised
  • 6 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1 pinch red pepper flakes, or to taste
  • 2 cups olive oil, or as needed
  • sea salt to taste
  • Add all ingredients to list
  • Add all ingredients to list

Directions

1 d 1 h 20 m

  1. Let tuna rest at room temperature for 10 to 15 minutes.
  2. Combine garlic, thyme, and red pepper flakes in a heavy skillet. Pour olive oil into skillet to reach a depth of 1 inch. Heat oil over medium heat until garlic and thyme begin to sizzle, 5 to 10 minutes.
  3. Place tuna gently in hot oil and reduce heat to low. Cook steaks in hot oil, spooning oil over the top of the steaks constantly, until fish is white and hot, 5 to 7 minutes. Remove from heat, transfer steaks to a baking dish, and pour hot oil and herbs over the fish. Cool fish and oil to room temperature.
  4. Wrap baking dish tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerate steaks for 24 hours. Remove fish from oil and sprinkle sea salt over the top.

Whip up this spicy tuna rice bowl in a flash for a delicious, easy meal.

Poaching fish in milk makes for a delicate and mild fish dish. It is simple to put together and so elegantly perfect.

How to Poach Fish in Milk Milk Poached Fish

4 servings
158 calories per serving

4 5 oz. tilapia filets
2 bay leaves
3 T fresh lemon juice
Chopped parsley
Salt and pepper to taste
Skim milk (enough to cover the fish)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Place fish in a shallow baking dish. Cover with milk. Season with salt and pepper and add the lemon and bay leaves. Cook fish 20-25 minutes or until done. Sprinkle with parsley and serve.

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What’s a foodie to do when she passes the 40 mark and her metabolism comes to a screeching halt? (hint. denial did not work !) So I’ve put together a collection of everyday meals that are simple to make, under 400 calories, yet so savory and delicious that you won’t miss your old favorites and standbys. I’ve tested and tweaked, tested and tweaked and the recipes yield satisfying and scrumptious home cooked foods, because regular ‘diet food’ just wasn’t going to cut it in this house !

If you are cooking for a family, stick to the 400 calories for yourself, but just give larger portion sizes to other family members. I double up dinner for my husband and it is more than enough. That way you are not spending too much time cooking multiple dishes. The family will love these meals !

I hope you enjoy 🙂

Aileen
How to Poach Fish in Milk

fresh bright flavors

How to Poach Fish in Milk

by formerchef on June 29, 2013

Summer has arrived with a bang, seemingly overnight. There are “excessive heat warnings” all over Southern California this weekend with temperatures expected in the 100-110 range. If you’re still willing to cook, I’ve got the perfect meal for a warm night or a Sunday brunch served al fresco. And if you’ve never poached fish before, it’s an easy method which every cook should have in their repertoire, so now is the time to learn!

Poaching fish and shellfish is one of the lightest, healthiest ways to cook seafood and it showcases the true flavor of the fish because the cooking method is gentle and lets the flavor of the fish shine. Traditionally, poaching is done in a court bouillon, a French culinary term which translates to “short boil”, and refers to a lightly flavored broth traditionally used to poach fish, shellfish and even vegetables. Court bouillon usually contains citrus and vegetables and is brought to a brief boil before being strained to use for cooking.

Some notes about poaching fish and shellfish:

  • If your salmon comes with the skin on, leave it on while poaching, the skin will help keep the fillet together while cooking and when removing it from the court bouillon. Once the fish is cooked the skin will easily peel off.
  • Take care not to overcook the salmon or it will become dry and lose flavor. If you see little globs of white coming out of the fish after you cook it, this is fish albumin (a protein similar to egg white) and while you’ll always see a little of it, a lot means the fish has reached over 140 degrees and the protein has started to coagulate. Don’t be afraid to leave the fish a little translucent (medium) and know that it will continue cooking for a minute or two after it comes out of the court bouillon.
  • Serve the salmon warm, right after poaching, or chilled. If you are going to chill it, make sure it is covered so that it doesn’t dry out in the refrigerator.
  • Poaching shellfish like shrimp is just as simple. If you have a wire mesh basket or a strainer which fits into a larger pot, use that to dunk the shrimp in the court bouillon. Take care not to over cook the shrimp; cook until just opaque and pink and then cool in the refrigerator on a sheet tray.

Right now is wild salmon season. If you can find it, buy it, especially salmon that’s been sustainably fished from Alaska or anywhere on the Northern Pacific coast. Look for indicators like “wild” and “troll caught”. King (the largest salmon with the highest fat content which means flavor), Sockeye (bright dark orange in color) and Coho (also known as Silver salmon) are all available now.

If you’re looking for ideas on what to serve with the salmon, how about some grilled asparagus or one of these salads?

“Until recently, turbot was a fish that few of us had seen. It is the second largest flat fish, only halibut being larger, and can reach a length of 3 feet. In the wild, it swims exclusively on the other side of the Atlantic where it rivals sole as the ultimate fish deluxe. What makes it so appealing is its firm white flesh that, when taken from a large wild turbot, can produce fillets over an inch thick. Turbot is never cheap.

Fortunately turbot is now farmed and is relatively easy to track down in the United States. It’s easily filleted—the technique is the same as for any flat fish—but it makes a dramatic sight when poached whole.

The problem with poaching flat fish, is the need for a poacher that fits the fish. There are such things—they’re called turbotières—but they can cost upwards of a thousand dollars since it seems they come only in copper. To get around this, I rigged up my own flat fish poacher by cutting a cake rack to the size of my largest roasting pan. I then strung string on the ends to act as handles.

When poaching any fish, it’s ideal to prepare a vegetable stock, called a court-bouillon, but given that this means chopping onions or leeks, carrots, and maybe fennel, in a pinch it’s ok to just use salted water flavored with a large bouquet garni containing plenty of thyme and parsley.

Bring the water or strained court-bouillon to the simmer in the roasting pan. Put the fish on the rack and slowly lower it into the simmering liquid. Control the temperature so that the fish is in liquid that’s barely moving. Poach for about 10 minutes per inch of thickness.

When the fish is ready, lift up the rack with the string handles and transfer it to a cutting board for filleting.”

A Quick Note: This recipe was a unique submission Jim created and shot especially for Browne Trading Co. from his home studio in Brooklyn, NY – literally days after Hurricane Sandy hit the area in November, 2012! Here he is using our Spanish turbot . This fish was a little under 4 pounds in weight, yielding a little under 2 pounds of fillet prepared, which serves 4-6 people. – Nick Branchina

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How to Poach Fish in Milk

With Cook’n, you can.



Serves: 2
Total Calories: 401

Ingredients

Directions:

1. Heat milk to boiling in 8-inch skillet over medium-high heat reduce heat so milk is simmering.

2. Break each egg into custard cup or saucer. Carefully slip egg into milk. Cook about 5 minutes or until whites and yolks are firm and not runny.

3. While eggs are cooking, lightly toast bread. Spread butter on toast break into bite-size pieces into individual bowls. Remove eggs from milk using slotted spoon and place on toast. Pour milk over toast to soften.

Carol N. Shares her Recipe
“To keep on keeping on, I had to act like a well person. Even when I didn’t feel like it, I got out of bed, showered, got dressed, and smiled. Eating soft foods, like these poached eggs, was a big comfort, and it helped when my mouth was so sore from chemo.”

FOOD for THOUGHT
An important source of calories and protein, eggs and egg yolks are great as sandwich spreads and in salads, dressings and casseroles.

NUTRITION FACTS: High in calcium, vitamin C and folic acid low fiber
1 Serving: Calories 425 (Calories from Fat 200) Fat 22g (Saturated 9g) Cholesterol 450mg Sodium 520mg Potassium 470mg Carbohydrate 35g (Dietary Fiber 1g) Protein 23g % DAILY VALUE: Vitamin A 22% Vitamin C 0% Calcium 32% Iron 16% Folic Acid 24% Magnesium 12% DIET EXCHANGES: 1 ½ Starch, 1 ½ High-Fat Meat, 1 Skim Milk, 1 ½ Fat

Helpful For These Side Effects: (n), (m)

From “Betty Crocker’s Living with Cancer Cookbook.” Text Copyright 2005 General Mills, Inc. Used with permission of the publisher, Wiley Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

I have two smallish fillets and want to poach them in milk. I’ve never done this before but have tried other types of fish poached this way. can any fish be poached in milk?? And how would you do it? Thank you!

6 Answers

Simmer softly until it is just about finished and remove from pan reserving the milk, thicken the milk and flake the fish and return to the pan to reheat. Check your seasonings, I just use salt, but a little lemon or lime juice is nice also.

Add some chopped parsley if you have some.

If you wish to serve the fillets whole, don’t flake but return to the pan intact.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Yes, you can do that but trout if poached, is better poached in just water with a knob of butter added.

I think that milk will spoil the flavour.

Trout fillets are better grilled with a basting of garlic butter.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Why use milk when wine is soooooo much better?

•6 tablespoons (3/4 stick) chilled butter

•1 very large leek (white and pale green parts only), thinly sliced

•1 carrot, peeled, cut into matchstick-size strips

•4 trout, boned, butterflied

•2 teaspoons minced fresh thyme

•2 bay leaves, broken in half

•1 cup Johannisberg Riesling

Preheat oven to 450°F. Melt 1 tablespoon butter in heavy large skillet over medium heat. Add sliced leek and carrot strips; sauté until crisp-tender, about 5 minutes. Open fish flat and arrange skin side down in large roasting pan. Sprinkle fish with salt and pepper and 1 1/2 teaspoons minced fresh thyme. Top with leek and carrot mixture and bay leaves. Dot with 2 tablespoons butter. Pour Riesling over fish.

Bake fish until just opaque in center, about 15 minutes. Transfer fish and vegetables to plates. Tent with foil to keep warm. Pour pan juices into heavy medium saucepan. Boil until reduced to 3/4 cup, about 6 minutes. Discard bay leaves. Add remaining 3 tablespoons butter and 1/2 teaspoon thyme and whisk just until butter is melted. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Pour sauce over fish and serve.

Poaching fish is a simple way to create tender, melt-in-your-mouth seafood that allows the delicate fish flavor we all love to really shine. “How do you poach fish?” is a question we get all the time. So, here are some tips for a fail-proof way to poach fish. Poaching is a simple technique to cook fish, keeping it moist, flavorful and light. How to Poach Fish Pat your fish dry. Be sure to properly pat your fish fillets dry before adding to your saucepan. Place fish in a large pot and add enough poaching liquid to the pan to cover the fish. Don’t boil. Perfectly poached fish requires gentle cooking over low heat. Don’t let your pot come to a boil, or even a simmer (a few bubbles are fine). Monitor the liquid temperature. It’s important for the temperature of the liquid to remain at 140 degrees Fahrenheit (the internal temperature of a perfectly cooked fish). If the temperature never rises above 140 degrees, then the fish will never overcook. It’s helpful to have an instant read thermometer handy. Cook the fish. The average cooking time for fish is 10 minutes, however that will depend on the size of the […]

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How to Poach Fish in Milk

A while back I discovered Jamie Oliver’s chicken baked in milk, and my entire world as it related to chicken was rocked forevermore. The tenderness! The flavor! The gorgeous, delicate sauce! I couldn’t believe it/stop talking about/stop dreaming about it. The only teeny tiny issue was that it takes a couple of hours to prep and make, which is totally doable on a lazy Sunday afternoon, but not so much on a busy weeknight. And so I started scheming about how to get some of the baked chicken wonderfulness, but in a quicker, weekday-friendly way. Please meet chicken poached in milk, your new weeknight chicken best friend.

The baked chicken calls for a whole chicken, and the key to this one is that you are using boneless chicken breasts, and you are simmering it on the stovetop instead of baking it in the oven. It still calls for the lemon that makes the Jamie Oliver version so wonderful, but it adds a little sour cream to the mix to help thicken up the milk gravy just a tad. And since I was going for weeknight simplicity, I decided to add in some veggies while I was at it, in the form of baby carrots and tender, sweet leeks. They all simmer up together in milk until the chicken and veggies are tender. Once everything is cooked, the chicken gets scooped out and shredded into bite sized pieces – shred it rather than cutting it, so that you have nice ragged edges to catch the sauce.

And speaking of the sauce, it gets made by whisking a little sour cream and mustard into the milk to give it a little extra flavor and substance. Once this is done, all you have to do is serve things up! I piled my chicken and veggies on to a plate of polenta and poured the sauce over everything, but you could serve it over rice, pasta, or just by its wonderful self.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

I had a bunch of cheery tarragon in my fridge, so I toped it off with a few sprigs of that. The whole thing took about 20 minutes, and was a nice speedy alternative to the glorious baked chicken. So the next time you gave a hankering for chicken comfort food extraordinaire but want it NOW, grab your carton of milk and give this a try!

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Chicken Poached In Milk

  • Author: Kate Jackson
  • Prep Time: 15 minutes
  • Cook Time: 15 minutes
  • Total Time: 30 minutes
  • Yield: 4 – 6 servings 1 x
  • Category: Dinner
  • Method: Stovetop
  • Cuisine: American

Ingredients

  • 1 pound boneless and skinless chicken breasts
  • Zest from one lemon
  • 2 cups baby carrots
  • 1 leek, rinsed and sliced
  • 3 cups whole milk
  • 1/2 cup sour cream at room temperature
  • 2 teaspoons mustard
  • Tarragon sprigs for garnish (optional)

Instructions

  1. Place chicken, carrots, leeks and lemon zest in a heavy deep skillet. Pour milk over the chicken. Bring to a simmer over medium heat. Cover and cook until the chicken is cooked through and the vegetables are crisp tender, about 10 minutes.
  2. Place a colander over a bowl and pour the chicken and veggies out into the colander, keeping the milk in the bowl.
  3. Quickly tear the chicken into bite sized pieces. Add back with the veggies.
  4. Whisk the sour cream and mustard into the milk. Taste and season with salt and pepper as needed.
  5. Ladle the chicken and veggies onto a bed of polenta or pasta or rice, or directly onto the plate. Drizzle the milk sauce on top and garnish with tarragon. Serve at once.

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How to Poach Fish in Milk

Hi there! I’m Kate, and I’m a recipe writer, food photographer and devoted bacon lover. I started Framed Cooks in 2009, and my mission is to create and share family-friendly recipes that make cooking both easy and fun…yes, I said FUN! My kitchen is my happy place, and I want yours to be that place too. And if you make this recipe, I would love you to tag @FramedCooks on Instagram so I can see the deliciousness!

Keyword Analysis

Keyword CPC PCC Volume Score Length of keyword
poaching fish in milk 1.29 0.8 7687 72 21
poaching 1.42 0.1 741 53 8
fish 0.55 0.1 4238 53 4
in 0.39 0.9 6266 31 2
milk 1.63 0.3 5308 89 4

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poaching fish in milk 0.08 0.3 2152 41
poaching fish in milk and butter 0.9 0.5 5402 14

Search Results related to poaching fish in milk on Search Engine

wikihow.com

Poaching is an easy way to quickly cook even the most delicate fish. Poaching the fish in milk adds a rich flavor and creates a creamy poaching liquid that you can spoon over the cooked fish. All you need is fish of your choice, whole milk, and a little salt. Then you can choose to poach the fish on the stove, in the oven, or even in the microwave.

netmums.com

Pour in enough milk to cover the bottom of the pan and go about half way up the fish, then grind black pepper on top to taste; . Poaching fish takes no time at all and it is such a healthy way to cook . on 12/5/15. Helen H. Can also do this in the microwave – takes 4-5 mins to cook.

bonappetit.com

Senior food editor Andy Baraghani says that milk opens up a whole new world of flavor when poaching fish. Think intensely herbaceous, creamy, chowder-like flavor. Think intensely herbaceous .

greatgrub.com

Season the fish with salt and lay gently in the milk. Cover and poach for maybe five minutes or until the fish flakes easily. Spoon some of the milk liquor over the fish to finish off the cooking if it needs it. Don’t you dare over-cook it though. Remove the fish and place on a big heap of mash potatoes.

deliaonline.com

To poach fish Poaching is fast, easy and no fuss, and if you want to serve a sauce with the fish then using the poaching liquid introduces the flavour of the fish itself. Rolled fish fillets, such as plaice or sole, can be poached in white wine or cider, which will make a lovely sauce. Trout can be poached in a pan of water to which a glass of dry white wine or cider has been added, along with .

theendlessmeal.com

Butter poaching lobster and fish in a beurre monte is also something very special. We cooked lobster on NYE this way and then had cod the next day and it was a fabulous way to prepare it. Kristen — February 12, 2015 @ 11:54 am Reply

tablespoon.com

Place fish in a large saucepan and add enough poaching liquid to the pan to cover the fish. You can also use a fish poacher fitted with a rack for holding fish instead of a saucepan or soup pot. Bring your poaching liquid to a simmer over medium heat, and cook the fish for 10 minutes or until the center of the fish seems opaque and it flakes .

food52.com

The poaching liquid may be reduced to create a sauce if desired: – For chicken, add thinly sliced mushrooms and simmer until tender and thickened. – For fish, reduce until thickened, then remove from the heat and stir in capers, lemon juice, and dill.

helpwithcooking.com

Fish is often poached in a court bouillon, although other forms of liquid are just as good. When poaching in the oven, milk is often used. Other poaching liquids are wine, soup, orange juice, fruit juice or cider and you can use the liquid as a basis for a sauce to serve the fish with once the fish has been cooked and removed.

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Post last edited May 13, 2020 | 19 Comments

SKIP TO RECIPE 12 mins Main Course

This recipe for poached salmon in curried coconut milk is ready in under ten minutes and flavoured with ginger, garlic, lemongrass and curry paste.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Get dinner on the table in just ten minutes. I’m not kidding! This recipe uses a flavourful curried coconut milk to gently poach salmon fillets for tender, flaky and perfectly cooked salmon every time.

Have you tried poaching before? Poaching is a moist heat cooking technique, where food is submerged and cooked in a liquid, that is at a lower temperature than a boil or simmer. It’s ideal for cooking more delicate ingredients, like salmon.

How to poach salmon

The key to poaching any ingredient is to make sure that your temperature doesn’t get too high–you don’t want the liquid to boil as this will overcook whatever you’re making.

I’ve found that many people overcook salmon, but when you’re poaching it, if you keep it to five to six minutes and remove the fillets immediately when they are done, your salmon will melt in your mouth.

They other most important element for poaching is to have a flavourful poaching liquid.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

For this poached salmon in curried coconut milk, I was inspired by Thai flavours like ginger, garlic and lemongrass to gently perfume the sweet coconut milk. The Thai red curry paste is where most of the flavour of this dish comes from, and it’s the perfect way to add a ton of flavour with really no effort.

I always have a jar of curry paste (green curry paste would also work in this recipe) in my fridge or pantry for quick weeknight meals like this.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

I’ve made this recipe almost every week for the month of January and everyone I’ve shared it with has loved it. I actually did a demonstration of this recipe on my Instagram stories last week and have saved it as a highlight, so be sure to check that out when you’re cooking this recipe! I’ll take you step by step through every piece.

It all starts with heating garlic and ginger in a saute pan, then a tablespoon of red curry paste gets added to the aromatics. I like to caramelize the curry paste a bit to get some extra flavour going.

Next comes the coconut milk and the lemongrass, and then the salmon gets cooked in this liquid for five to six minutes.

How to Poach Fish in Milk

Lemongrass is an aromatic herb that is commonly used in Asian and Indian cuisine. This poached salmon in curried coconut milk is definitely Thai-inspired, so that’s why I decided to add the delicate flavour of lemongrass to the poaching liquid.

How do you prepare lemongrass for poaching?

Lemongrass is a sturdy and woody herb which means you can’t just add it directly to the broth. The key is to cut trim off the silky tops and woody bases, and bruise the stalks to release their aromatic oils.

I use a rolling pin to smash the lemongrass before adding it to the curried coconut milk, and then remove the stalks when serving (or you can eat around them).

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How to Poach Fish in MilkHow about an easy recipe that tastes phenomenal, looks elegant and is relatively healthy? I’ve got a winner for you!

We have this dish at least twice a month.You can use any firm white fish that you like and can adjust the flavor of the poaching liquid to suit your taste. You can also make this on the stove top or in the oven, whichever works better at the time.

Poaching is when you cook something in a gently simmering liquid. It’s an especially successful method for cooking delicate food, such as fish, chicken, or eggs.

This dish is poached in evaporated milk flavored with white wine, onions, garlic, parsley, bay leaf and Old Bay seasoning. Using an aromatic poaching liquid gently cooks the fish and infuses it with flavor and moisture. Fish has a tendency to overcook, but this way, it’s pretty hard to mess it up. When the fish is cooked, you use the same poaching liquid to make a creamy, velvety sauce with fresh dill. Absolutely wonderful on so many levels! Easy, delicious, and beautiful too:).

Season the fish with salt and pepper. You can use any firm white fish – tilapia, haddock, snapper, grouper, etc. Layer the onions on the bottom of the skillet. Add the crushed garlic cloves, fresh parsley leaves, white wine, dry bay leaf and peppercorns. How to Poach Fish in MilkNestle the fish on top. How to Poach Fish in MilkPour the evaporated milk over the fish.How to Poach Fish in Milk

Why am I using evaporated milk?

Evaporated milk is a shelf stable, canned milk that has 60% of the water removed by cooking it down. That’s why it has a slightly sweet taste and has a darker color than regular milk. Evaporated milk is heavier than milk but has a lower fat content than heavy cream or half n half. It also doesn’t curdle when you cook it, so it’s perfect to use in this recipe. It also has a really silky texture which is great to make the velvety dill sauce.

It should cover the fish almost completely. It’s ok if the fish is peaking out a little bit, but the idea is for the fish to poach in this flavorful liquid. Sprinkle the Old Bay seasoning and add some salt and pepper to taste to the evaporated milk. How to Poach Fish in MilkBring it to a boil and reduce the heat to a simmer. Keep the skillet covered and cook on low heat until the fish is cooked through, about 10-15 minutes. If the poaching liquid doesn’t completely cover the fish, spoon some of it over the fish once in a while.How to Poach Fish in Milk

The best way to check for the doneness of fish is to poke it in the thickest part with a fork and gently twist. It should easily flake.

You can make this dish in the oven too. Isn’t that great? Arrange all the ingredients in a deep baking dish the same way you would in a skillet. Or place the fish on the bottom and everything else on top:). This recipe isn’t too particular. (By the way, if you’re using the oven, and the baking dish has more surface area than the skillet would, add more evaporated milk.)How to Poach Fish in MilkCover with aluminum foil and place in a preheated 400 degree oven. Bake for 20-30 minutes until the fish easily flakes with a fork but isn’t falling apart. It takes longer to cook in the oven because it takes more time for the liquid to come to a simmer. Be careful not to have the fish fall apart. Check it often after the liquid starts to simmer.

Many times I serve the fish just the way it is, with some mashed potatoes, rice or couscous. Use a slotted spoon to gently take out the fish and spoon some of the delicious liquid over it.

However, when I have an extra 5 minutes, I make this amazing, velvety dill sauce to accompany it. Fresh dill pairs so well with fish. I already have a great head start to a delicious, aromatic liquid that the fish was poaching in, so I use it to make the sauce.

Strain the liquid through a fine mesh sieve and set is aside. How to Poach Fish in MilkIn a skillet or small saucepan, melt butter and add the flour to it. Whisk the flour until it’s completely incorporated into the butter and starts to turn just a little bit golden. This helps to cook out the rawness of the flour. How to Poach Fish in MilkPour in a splash of white wine, whisking as you add it. Add the reserved poaching liquid. Cook for about 3 minutes, until the sauce thickens. How to Poach Fish in MilkAdd fresh minced dill and pour over the fish.How to Poach Fish in Milk

How to Poach Fish in Milk

My favorite way to serve this dinner is with Rice Pilaf and Garlicky Green Beans.