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How to share your nest thermostat with other users

У каждой структуры в учетной записи Nest есть один «владелец». Семейная учетная запись может иметь разных владельцев для разных структур. Владельцы имеют полный контроль над всеми устройствами, настройками, подписками и соединениями Works with Nest в структуре.

Владельцы могут приглашать других людей разделить контроль над продуктами Nest у себя дома. Каждый человек, имеющий доступ, имеет отдельную учетную запись Nest и может управлять устройствами Nest в доме владельца. Они могут делать практически все, что может и хозяин.

Владельцы и люди, имеющие доступ, могут использовать ваш продукт Works with Nest и взаимодействовать с ним, но их опыт отличается:

  • Владельцы и люди с общим доступом можно установить, удалить, настройку и управление Nest продуктов через приложение Nest
  • Только владельцы могут устанавливать или удалять продукты Works with Nest для принадлежащих им структур.
  • Люди с общим доступом могут использовать продукты Works with Nest, подключенные к структуре владельца, если владелец сначала настроит соединение Works with Nest на своем устройстве.
  • Если человек с общим доступом попытается установить соединение Works with Nest с домом владельца Nest, он не сможет управлять устройствами через ваше приложение или службу.
    • В этом случае авторизация пользователя может показаться на работу, но человек с общим доступом не получит управление устройством через который работает с гнездом подключения (работы с гнездом продукта не будет функционировать , как и ожидалось)

    Except as otherwise noted, the content of this page is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License, and code samples are licensed under the Apache 2.0 License. For details, see the Google Developers Site Policies. Java is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates.

    Google Nest thermostats look similar, and share similar software, but there are some important differences that you’ll need to know for troubleshooting, installation and more. You can look at the display, the base, or in the Nest app to find out which Nest thermostat you have.

    Nest Thermostat E

    Nest Learning Thermostat

    3rd gen

    Nest Learning Thermostat

    2nd gen

    Nest Learning Thermostat

    1st gen

    Differences in the ring and display

    Nest Thermostat E

    Nest Learning Thermostat

    3rd gen

    Nest Learning Thermostat

    2nd gen

    Nest Learning Thermostat

    1st gen

    3.25 in (8.26 cm) illuminated screen diameter

    1.8 in (4.57 cm) illuminated screen diameter

    1.8 in(4.57 cm) illuminated screen diameter

    Stainless steel ring: also comes in different colors (Refer to the colors below).

    The Nest Thermostat can be in different colors. If you have a thermostat that looks like one of these, you have a Nest Thermostat.

    The 3rd gen Nest Learning Thermostat’s stainless steel ring can also be in different colors. If you have a thermostat ring that looks like one of these, you have a 3rd gen Nest Learning Thermostat.

    Copper

    White

    Black

    Differences in the thermostat base

    If looking at the display isn’t enough to tell you which thermostat you have, you can also pull off the display and look at the base. You should be able to tell right away. Refer to the table below for key differences between the different Nest thermostat bases.

    Nest Thermostat Nest Thermostat E
    Six wire connectors Six wire connectors
    Blue bubble level on top Blue bubble level on top
    Screw holes at the top and bottom Screw holes at the top and bottom
    Rectangular display connectors on the left and right sides Oval display connector at bottom
    Oval wire hole Circular wire hole
    Color of base will match color of display

    Nest Learning
    Thermostat

    3rd gen

    Nest Learning
    Thermostat

    2nd gen

    Nest Learning
    Thermostat

    1st gen

    Differences in the Home app

    To view your thermostat’s controls and settings, open the Home app touch and hold your thermostat’s tile at the top right, tap Settings .

    For the Nest Thermostat, all available controls and settings are in the Home app. So you can do things like change the temperature schedule and use a temperature preset .

    For all other thermostats, settings and controls will vary depending on the model you have and the software it runs. You can at least use basic controls for temperature (like changing the target temperature) and mode (Heat, Cool, Heat • Cool, and Off) in the Home app. To change other settings, you may have to use the Nest app or the thermostat display.

    Nest Thermostat Nest Thermostat E and Nest Learning Thermostat

    To change more settings for the Nest Thermostat E and Nest Learning Thermostat, use the Nest app or the thermostat display.

    Differences in the Nest app

    Note: The Nest app is only compatible with the Nest Thermostat E and Nest Learning Thermostat. To view the Nest Thermostat, use the Home app.

    The app colors and design will reflect which thermostat you have. If you have a Nest Learning Thermostat, the app background will be orange or blue to match your thermostat’s screen. If you have a Nest Thermostat E, the app background will be mostly white and shades of gray.

    Nest Thermostat E Nest Learning Thermostat

    You can also find out which model of thermostat you have by going to its technical info.

    In the Home app

    1. Touch and hold your device’s tile.
    2. At the top right, tap Settings .
    3. Device information.
    4. Under “Technical information,” the model name of your thermostat will appear.

    In the Nest app

    1. Select your thermostat on the app home screen.
    2. Tap Settings .
    3. Select Technical info.
    4. Refer to the numbers next to the “Display model” of your thermostat. The first digit of the number tells you what thermostat you have:
      • 1.xx is a 1st gen Nest Learning Thermostat
      • 2.xx is a 2nd gen Nest Learning Thermostat
      • 3.xx is a 3rd gen Nest Learning Thermostat
      • 4.xx is a Nest Thermostat E

    For example, the display model in the pictured example is 2.12, so it’s a 2nd generation Nest Learning Thermostat.

    Different thermostat model parts are not interchangeable

    • As long as the thermostat base is from the same model, generation, and country/region as the thermostat display, you can swap bases and displays.
    • The displays and bases of various thermostat models are not interchangeable, even though they may look similar.
    • WARNING: If you attempt to connect parts from different thermostat models, it may damage your thermostat as well as your system.
    • The display connector on the thermostat base is different for all 3 generations of the Nest Learning Thermostat. In addition, the connectors for the system wires are different between thermostat models.

    High voltage and low voltage parts are incompatible

    Some countries (such as the UK, France, and The Netherlands) use high voltage wiring for thermostats while others (such as the US and Canada) use low voltage wiring. High voltage and low voltage thermostat parts are not compatible with each other, and should not be used together.

    WARNING: Any attempt to connect low and high voltage thermostat parts may damage them as well as your system. Do not mix and match these bases and displays, even if the thermostats are the same model and generation.

    You can tell which type of base you have by looking at the wire connectors:

    Craig Lloyd
    How to share your nest thermostat with other usersCraig Lloyd
    Writer

    Craig Lloyd is a smarthome expert with nearly ten years of professional writing experience. His work has been published by iFixit, Lifehacker, Digital Trends, Slashgear, and GottaBeMobile. Read more.

    How to share your nest thermostat with other users

    If you have multiple people in your house, and want them all to have access to the Nest Thermostat from their phones, here’s how to share access to the device with other users.

    Granted, you may not want your kids to have access to your Nest Thermostat, but sharing access with your significant other can be convenient if either one of you wants to adjust the thermostat from your phone, then leave the unit itself locked so that the kids can’t mess with it.

    Furthermore, it’s actually really easy to share access to the Nest Thermostat with someone else, and even if they don’t have a Nest account of their own, it doesn’t take long to create one and get up and running.

    To share your Nest Thermostat with another user, start by opening up the Nest app and tapping on the settings gear icon in the top-right corner of the screen.

    How to share your nest thermostat with other users

    How to share your nest thermostat with other users

    Tap on “Add a family member” on the next screen.

    How to share your nest thermostat with other users

    You’ll have two options to choose from: “From contacts” or “Enter email address”.

    How to share your nest thermostat with other users

    The first option is great if you already have that person as a contact on your phone (which you likely do). However, their email address will need to be in the contact card, since the app will send them an email invitation. If you select “Enter email address”, you’ll simply just need to enter in their name and email address, and then tap “Send invitation” at the bottom.

    How to share your nest thermostat with other users

    You’ll then be sent back to the “Family” screen, where that user will show up in the list as “Invited”.

    How to share your nest thermostat with other users

    They’ll receive an email to accept the invitation and create a Nest account if they don’t already have one.

    How to share your nest thermostat with other users

    When they finish signing up, “Invited” will disappear in your list of approved users and they’ll now be able to control the Nest Thermostat from their phone as well.

    How to share your nest thermostat with other users

    Whenever you want, you can tap on their name and hit “Remove access” to remove them as a shared user of your Nest Thermostat.

    How to share your nest thermostat with other users

    Of course, you could just have multiple users sign into your existing Nest account, that way you don’t have to deal with inviting them and having to create more accounts. But with the Family feature, it’s a lot easier to remove access for users in the future, and you can see who exactly changed the thermostat in the usage history if you ever want to know who’s to blame for the frigid house.

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    How to share your nest thermostat with other users Craig Lloyd
    Craig Lloyd is a smarthome expert with nearly ten years of professional writing experience. His work has been published by iFixit, Lifehacker, Digital Trends, Slashgear, and GottaBeMobile.
    Read Full Bio »

    Learn the basics of how to use your Google Nest thermostat, change settings, set temperature schedules, save energy, control it with your phone, and more.

    If you don’t find what you’re looking for here, use the search bar above, or go to the Nest thermostat support page for more help.

    Nest Thermostat

    Download documents for your thermostat

    Nest thermostats include a few printed materials in the box to familiarize you with the product and installation, but you should follow the installation instructions in the Home app which will also provide you with the right wiring diagram for your system.

    Each thermostat has different guides you can download.

    Note: These guides should open directly in your browser. If you’re having trouble viewing them, you may need to download and install a PDF reader such as Adobe Acrobat Reader.

    Install your thermostat

    The app will guide you through thermostat installation and setup step-by-step. It will also give you a custom wiring diagram that you’ll need for installation.

    To get a preview of what you’ll need for installation, read our installation article or watch the Nest Thermostat installation video.

    Control your thermostat

    Nest Thermostats don’t have a touch screen. Use the touch bar on the right side to control your thermostat. Swipe up to raise the temperature, swipe down to lower it, and tap to confirm. The display will show you how many minutes until your desired temperature is reached.

    • Tap the touch bar to bring up the menu.
    • Swipe up or down to select an option.
    • Tap the touch bar again to confirm your selection.

    Here are the most important articles to familiarize yourself and get you comfortable with using your thermostat:

    Save energy with your thermostat

    There are a few ways you may be able to save energy with your thermostat like setting Eco temperatures when no one’s home, reviewing your Home Report to monitor your energy use, or joining an energy saving program.

    Temperature schedules

    When you set up your Nest Thermostat, it has a default schedule for your Comfort, Eco, and Sleep temperatures that you can further customize. You access schedules through device settings for the Home app.

    How your thermostat works

    Your Nest Thermostat has many settings to help you feel comfortable in your home. Hold temperature can maintain the current temperature or any of your presets. You can also set temperatures with a swipe of your thermostat’s touch bar. Learn more about how to control your thermostat.

    Common troubleshooting issues after set up

    These articles cover the most common issues you may encounter after setting up your Nest thermostat. This is not an extensive list so if you don’t find what you’re looking for below, there are other troubleshooting articles that you can find using the search bar above.

    If you moved into a home with a Nest thermostat already installed

    If you moved into a home that already has a Nest thermostat installed, follow these steps to remove the previous owner’s settings.

    1. Have the previous owner remove the thermostat from their account if possible. If this isn’t possible, reset the thermostat to factory defaults. You may also need to do an account reset on your thermostat before you can pair it to yourself.
    2. Set up the thermostat and add it to your account.

    Nest Thermostat E and Nest Learning Thermostat

    Download documents for your thermostat

    Nest thermostats include a few printed materials in the box to familiarize you with the product and installation, but you should follow the installation instructions in the Nest app which will also provide you with the right wiring diagram for your system.

    Each thermostat has different guides you can download.

    Note: These guides should open directly in your browser. If you’re having trouble viewing them, you may need to download and install a PDF reader such as Adobe Acrobat Reader.

    Install your thermostat

    The Nest app will guide you through thermostat installation and setup step-by-step. It will also give you a custom wiring diagram that you’ll need for installation.

    To get a preview of what you’ll need for installation, read our installation article or watch an installation video. Select your thermostat below:

    Control your thermostat

    Nest thermostats don’t have a touch screen. Use it just
    like a normal thermostat, turn the ring up when you want it a little warmer, and turn it down when you want it a little cooler.

    • Press your thermostat ring towards the wall to see more options.
    • Turn the ring to select an option.
    • Press the ring again to confirm your selection.

    Here are the most important articles to familiarize yourself and get you comfortable with using your thermostat:

    Save energy with your thermostat

    There are a few ways to save energy with your thermostat like setting Eco Temperatures when no one’s home, reviewing your Home Report to monitor your energy use, or joining an energy saving program.

    Temperature schedules

    Your Nest thermostat starts learning on day one, so it’s up to you to teach it good habits to help save energy. You can set your own heating or cooling schedules or have your thermostat Auto-Schedule for you.

    How your thermostat works

    Your Nest thermostat has a few different features that can keep you feeling comfortable. For instance, Early-On pre-heats or cools to reach your scheduled temperature on time. You can also set Safety Temperatures, which prevents your home from going above or below certain temperatures, and learn about the other ways your thermostat works.

    Common troubleshooting issues after set up

    These articles cover the most common issues you may encounter after setting up your Nest thermostat. This is not an extensive list so if you don’t find what you’re looking for below, there are other troubleshooting articles that you can find using the search bar above.

    If you moved into a home with a Nest thermostat already installed

    If you moved into a home that already has a Nest thermostat installed, follow these steps to remove the previous owner’s settings.

    How to share your nest thermostat with other users

    Meet the Nest Thermostat.
    Fine-tune your comfort.

    Save at home and
    away.

    It can turn down when you leave so you save energy.

    Control from
    anywhere.

    Change the temp wherever you are with the Google Home app.1

    Designed to install
    yourself.

    Installation usually takes 30 minutes or less.

    Monitors your
    system.

    Get alerts and reminders about your heating and cooling system.2

    Save at home and away.

    Nest Thermostats can save an average of 10% to 12% on heating bills and 15% on cooling bills.3

    How to share your nest thermostat with other users

    Schedule.

    With Quick Schedule, you can easily program the Nest Thermostat in the app, and then adjust anytime you want.

    How to share your nest thermostat with other users

    Conserve.

    It can turn itself down when you leave the house, so you don’t waste energy on an empty home.

    How to share your nest thermostat with other users

    Discover.

    Savings Finder looks for more ways to save, and suggests tweaks to your schedule in the app.

    Tech Specs

    Diameter: 3.3 in (84 mm)

    Depth: 1.07 in (27.25 mm)

    Weight: 4.9 oz (139 g)

    2.4-inch QVGA IPS liquid crystal display (240 x 320 pixels) with digital brightness enhancement film and mirrored glass lens

    Primary power

    From HVAC system wires

    Battery backup

    2 AAA 1.5V alkaline batteries

    Power consumption

    Less than 1 kWh/month

    The Nest Thermostat works with most 24V heating and cooling systems, including furnaces, air conditioners, boilers, and heat pumps with either forced air or radiant delivery.

    It works with conventional systems that have one stage of heating and cooling and a second stage of either heating or cooling.

    It works with heat pumps that have one stage of heating and cooling and either aux or emergency heat.

    Works with multi-zone systems (one thermostat required per zone).

    Works with Hey Google and Alexa.

    Voice control requires a compatible device.

    Covers cosmetic wall imperfections that may be left behind when an old thermostat is removed (optional).

    Steel plate

    Required if your thermostat is installed on an electrical box.

    1-year standard warranty

    Post-consumer recycled materials

    All plastic components are made with 49% post-consumer recycled materials.

    I recently added an outdoor nest cam to my account. I would like to give my parents access to the camera so they can check in on things, view the video history, etc. I do not want to give them access to all the cameras on my account. Currently, the only method nest provides to accomplish this is to share a link to a private live stream with a password or a public live stream. This method is flawed for several reasons. First, i have not been able to get the private live stream video to load on either the PC version of Chrome or Safari on iOS. All i get is "No compatible source was found for this media" (this is a subject for another post altogether). Second, even if the link did work, its a royal pain to always have the link handy, as well as the password. Third, even if the private stream worked and you always had the link/password, having to view the live stream from a web browser blows. I want my parents to be able to download the nest app, create their own account, and let me share access to a particular camera with that account. Why is the sharing feature so limited in options? What reason is there for disallowing another nest user to view a camera that I have and pay a subscription for?

    The same applies for thermostats, especially in a business environment. I share an office with someone (who also owns the building). He installed a nest thermostat here that is linked to his nest account. He also has a home thermostat and camera(s) at his home. He wants to share access to the thermostat here at the office with me so it appears on my nest account, but of course does not want to give me access to his cameras at his house. I do not believe there is any way to do that? I am not sure though, as I have not researched it as much as i have sharing cameras. But i do remember when i first installed the nest thermostat at my house, i had to download the nest app on my wife's phone and login under my account so she could have access to it. This is stupid, why cant she have her own account and i share the thermostats and cameras with her?

    Google has announced several new features for its Nest thermostats centered around helping the smart home become a bigger partner in the battle against climate change. These features are wrapped up in a new service called Nest Renew.

    The service will use intelligent automation to allow the thermostats to communicate with energy providers and make it easier for Nest users to know when there is cleaner and / or cheaper energy on their local power grid. The device will then automatically adjust to use that energy at optimal times without you having to do a thing.

    Nest Renew is the “First program of its kind,” said Google CEO Sundar Pichai, and it is entirely opt-in. It includes six main features:

    • Energy Shift — automatic shifting of heating and cooling to times when energy is cheaper and / or cleaner
    • Online dashboard — a rundown of how clean the energy a home is using is, based on time of day, so people can adjust when they use non-connected devices to take advantage of clean energy
    • Monthly Impact Reports — these track the impact using clean energy is having
    • Energy Impact Program — an option to gamify your eco-friendly choices. Users collect Nest’s green leaves to earn a vote in how Nest directs funds to clean energy nonprofits
    • Clean Energy Match — the ability to match estimated fossil fuel electricity use at home with renewable energy credits (RECs) from US solar and wind plants
    • Schedule Tuneups — a new version of the existing Seasonal Savings feature that makes small adjustments to your HVAC schedule based on the time of year to optimize energy use

    Nest’s existing demand-side response program, Rush Hour Rewards, which is an energy-saving program where the utility company can remotely adjust a household’s thermostat to relieve pressure on the grid, will continue as a separate service. People can choose to run both services on their thermostat simultaneously, with the Rush Hour program taking priority.

    Nest Renew will work on Nest’s newest thermostats, which are the third-generation Nest Learning Thermostat, the Nest Thermostat E, and the Nest Thermostat. Visual indicators on the thermostat, emails, and activity summaries will tell Nest users when the various functions are active.

    There are two levels to Nest Renew: Renew Basic, which is free and will be available across the continental US, and Renew Premium, which costs $10 a month and is limited to select markets at launch (Google didn’t say which). The premium tier adds two features for $10 a month; the Clean Energy Match, which is a way to match the fossil fuel energy used with renewable energy certificates that come from solar and wind plants in the US, and the option to pay utility bills through Nest Renew.

    The main feature of Nest Renew is Energy Shift, and this is available in both the paid and free plans. This will automatically shift heating and cooling energy use to times when energy is cleaner and / or cheaper. Ben Brown, director of Product Management at Nest, explained that it will use small shifts — such as pre-cooling a house five or 10 minutes before the wind starts dying down or new demand spikes causing new energy plants to come online. “It will be just small coordinations based upon the needs of the grid that don’t sacrifice comfort at all,” he said. Nest customers will be able to manually adjust their thermostats if at any given moment they decide they’d rather be more comfortable than more green.

    Depending on where you live and who your energy provider is, the power coming to your home could be generated by fossil fuels during one part of the day and wind or solar at another. Google says Energy Shift uses intelligent automation to make adjustments based on forecasts of the type of power on the grid. It then adapts energy use to prioritize clean energy. The company partnered with the non-profit WattTime, which has developed algorithms to determine the marginal emissions rates of the grid in real time.

    Energy Shift can also adjust around any “time-of-use” charges your energy provider might have. Time-of-use charges are when you are charged more for using electricity at, say, 7PM — when everyone is home cooking dinner and watching Netflix — than you would be if you did those activities at, say, 2AM. Time-of-use charging is prevalent in Europe and the UK but not so common in the US — yet. But it is coming. Energy providers see it as a way to incentivize people to use energy when there is less demand, helping them better balance demand on the grid.

    Nest says Energy Shift is a way its customers can navigate this change. “Certain regions are making it mandatory to move over to time-of-use plans — California and Michigan, for example,” said Brown. “Nest Renew will empower customers to manage their consumption against these time-of-use plans to make sure they can minimize their energy bills.”

    Nest Renew works with a near real-time dashboard to help users see the type of energy on their local grid at certain times of day, allowing them to adjust their use in response. Image: Google

    Time-of-use rates can be tricky to navigate. Running your HVAC system, for example, isn’t as easy to time as, say, running the dishwasher — which is something you can put off. Having a smart thermostat manage those calculations could make it easier.

    Nest says it’s hoping to roll out Nest Renew to more household devices in the future, tying in with its smart displays and Google Home ecosystem. “We want to look at opportunities to empower other devices to coordinate with the needs of the grid; a good example would be electric vehicles,” said Brown.

    RMI, a nonprofit working to accelerate the country’s transition to clean energy, analyzed the Nest Renew program and concluded that products like this could reduce around 50 million metric tons of CO2 per year if 10 million households participate. That’s approximately 7 percent of the gap between today’s level of household emissions and the US’s current target, which aims to cut emissions in half by 2030. With close to 123 million households in the US, the impact smart, connected homes could have on the climate change challenge will be even greater if even more people participate.

    Nest Renew will start in an invitation-only preview in the coming weeks. Sign up at nestrenew.google.com to join the list.

    Correction, October 6th, 11:35 am: An earlier version of this article said that Monthly Impact Reports provided a rundown of how clean the energy a home is using is. After publication, a Nest spokesperson reached out to clarify that the Monthly Impact Reports track the impact of the service and a different feature, the online dashboard, is how users can see when clean energy is powering their homes.

    How to share your nest thermostat with other users

    With the advent of smart homes, every homeowner is trying to create a seamless home experience with the curation of smart products. One such product is the Nest Thermostat that will adapt to the different seasons and temperature need of the users.

    So, the thermostats will help with cooling and heating. On the other hand, some Nest Thermostat users are struggling with Nest Thermostat no cooling issue and we have outlined the troubleshooting methods for you!

    NEST Thermostat Not Cooling

    1) Installation of Wires

    Smart products are nothing if the wiring is not right. So, if the Nest Thermostat is not cooling your space, there are higher chances that wires are not properly installed. First of all, you need to switch off the system power through the switch or fuse to make sure you and the thermostat remain safe. Then, take off the display and look for the wire connections.

    Keep in mind that all the connections must be in a downward position. We suggest that you re-insert the wires because it promises proper pressing of the button. In some cases, you might need to straighten out and strip the wire ends to ensure proper installation and insertion of the wires. So, always check the wires!

    2) Maintenance

    To be honest, sometimes all your Nest Thermostat needs is maintenance to start working again. Sure, the screen reflects blue color but the cooling is nowhere to be felt. Well, the first step is to switch off the thermostat through a fuse or switch and wait for five minutes. When you switch on the fuse box or switch, there are chances that the thermostat will start cooling again.

    On the other hand, we suggest that you remove the Nest thermostat and install the old thermostat (we know you didn’t throw it out). This will tell you if there is a fault with the home system or thermostat itself. In case the old thermostat works, there might be something wrong with the wiring system. In this case, you should opt for the C-wire network.

    In case even the old thermostat doesn’t work, there are higher chances that the system is not working properly and needs maintenance. For maintenance purposes, you need to call the local technicians and have them look at the issue.

    3) Compatibility

    If you used the incompatible system for installation and setup of Nest Thermostat, there are higher chances that there will be unreliable cooling. To be honest, you should use the 24V system for reliable cooling through the thermostat. On the other hand, if you have the C-wire system, you can jump to the next step.

    4) C-Wire System

    In case you want to check the C-wire system, you need to take off the display of the Nest Thermostat. Also, check if there is some wire in the C connection. If there is a wire present, take out the wire and try to plug it again after some time and make sure the connection is tight and secure. You can also try replacing the wire with a new one to ensure there is no fraying or damaging that’s causing cooling issues.

    How to share your nest thermostat with other users

    Several Google Nest Thermostat units are experiencing a strange “W5 error” that leaves device owners disconnected from their Wi-Fi networks.

    Without an internet connection, the Nest Thermostat and basically every other smart home gadget becomes useless. And this is exactly what owners of the device are going through right now.

    To recall, multiple Nest Thermostat users started reporting back in late 2019 that they were experiencing a “W5 error” that left the devices unable to connect to any Wi-Fi network.

    How to share your nest thermostat with other users(Source)

    At first, it only seemed like a small group of users were affected. But then reports started bulging, prompting Google into action.

    The search giant had the following statement to say regarding the matter:

    A very small number of Nest thermostat users are experiencing a known issue with the Wi-Fi chip that causes remote connectivity issues. This does not affect the thermostat’s ability to control the customer’s heating and cooling system in the home, but does impact the user’s ability to manage the thermostat remotely.

    If a user sees this error and it can’t be resolved through troubleshooting, they are prompted to contact customer support for assistance and will be issued a replacement device.

    The statement above was made to Android Police back in July 2020. But looking at the same thread that first reported the issue in the support forums, many are still experiencing this issue to date.

    In fact, the said forum thread is currently trending, with plenty of other affected users flooding support guys with queries of how to address the Wi-Fi issues they are experiencing.

    There are also plenty of new threads that have been started in the Nest forums with respect to this matter, some of which we’ve shared below for reference.

    How to share your nest thermostat with other users

    (Source)

    My Nest thermostat disconnected from wifi yesterday, and won’t find any networks at all. I’ve reset the device, my router, tried entering the SSID manually, it won’t see my phone’s hotspot from a foot away. The thermostat still works fine as far as I can tell, it just can’t see any networks. It’s either fine for a couple months.
    Source

    Well, in case you missed the memo, the “W5 error” is hardware related. Thus, Google will replace your Nest Thermostat unit as soon as you can prove that it’s indeed affected by the W5 error.

    Sure, the memo about replacing affected units was made close to a year ago, but recent reports can confirm that Google is still replacing Nest Thermostat units suffering from the “W5 error.”

    How to share your nest thermostat with other users

    (Source)

    Problem started a little over 2 weeks ago and battery is fine. Followed all the troubleshooting steps before posting on the board. @ Roxelle G., I have a replacement thermostat on the way due to W5 error. Did this via phone since the message board did not solve/answer my problem quickly.
    Source

    As you can see from the comments above, Google is still sending out replacement units to affected Nest Thermostat owners, so don’t be left out.

    We would also like to know if you recently received a replacement unit for your faulty Nest Thermostat — or at least your experience with Google support — via the comments section below.

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