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How to stop strava from making your home address public

Harry Guinness
How to stop strava from making your home address publicHarry Guinness
Writer

Harry Guinness is a photography expert and writer with nearly a decade of experience. His work has been published in newspapers like The New York Times and on a variety of other websites, from Lifehacker to Popular Science and Medium’s OneZero. Read more.

How to stop strava from making your home address public

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Strava is the biggest name in running and bike-ride tracking. However, it occasionally gets in trouble for revealing secret U.S. military bases or enabling doxing. If you use it, you might be wondering who exactly can see your tracked activities. Well, the answer is pretty much everyone.

Everyone (By Default)

Strava’s handling of privacy issues is a major cause for concern. The worst issue is its default settings. If you join Strava and don’t lock down your account immediately, your tracked activities are visible to anyone with an internet connection. They even show up in Google searches.

How to stop strava from making your home address public

Strava started telling me about the activities of the friends of some of my friends.

Here are some of the ways people might stumble across (or deliberately track down) your ride info:

  • They follow you on Strava and you share it with them.
  • You post your activity from Strava to another social media site and they click through.
  • Their run or ride overlapped with yours by 30 percent, so Strava assumes you did it together.
  • You passed each other, and they use the Flyby feature.
  • You made it onto a segment leaderboard and they tapped through.
  • You made it onto a daily, age or weight category, or other leaderboard, and they tapped through.
  • They did a segment at a similar pace as you, so you show up in the same place on a leaderboard.
  • Strava sends them a push notification and suggests they check you out.

And those were just the instances we could remember. By default, your activities on Strava are truly public, which you likely find terrifying.

What You Can Do About It

Maybe you’re okay with everyone being able to see your runs and rides. Strava is a social network, so the fact that everyone can see these things by default is very much a feature, not a bug. If you want to hold a spot on a segment leaderboard (and get the bragging rights that come with it), then that activity needs to be public.

If, however, you’re a bit uncomfortable, you might want to follow the instructions in the sections below.

Lock Down Your Profile and Hide Your Home

The last thing you want is the entire internet to know where you live. First, check out our guide on preventing Strava from revealing your information. You can change the settings so that all your activities will only be visible to you or your followers. You can also create Privacy Zones that hide the exact location of your home and/or workplace.

Make Activities Public on an Individual Basis

All of your activities don’t have to have the same privacy settings on Strava. If you run a blazing fast 5K and want to feature on a segment leaderboard, just make that run private.

To do so, find that activity on Strava, and then click the Pencil icon.

How to stop strava from making your home address public

Under “Privacy Controls,” change “Who Can See” to “Everyone.”

How to stop strava from making your home address public

Now, this activity will be public while everything else remains private. If you’ve set a Privacy Zone around your home, people won’t be able to see where you live or triangulate things from multiple activities based on information from one specific run.

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How to stop strava from making your home address public Harry Guinness
Harry Guinness is a photography expert and writer with nearly a decade of experience. His work has been published in newspapers like The New York Times and on a variety of other websites, from Lifehacker to Popular Science and Medium’s OneZero.
Read Full Bio »

You can always set the Privacy Controls on Strava to see the activity only to you. As long as you did not set any privacy controls, your daily activities are public. Anybody can see your riding activities and the map you ride. When you walk or ride on the same street every day, they can see your start and endpoint, and anybody can guess your home or office location.

You can hide your start or endpoint of the activity on Strava, and this is a good practice to hide your home location from the public or even from your followers. Let’s check here.

Hide Starting & Ending Location on Strava

  1. Login to your Strava account on PC.
  2. Head to Strava Privacy Settingswww.strava.com/settings/privacy
  3. Select Privacy Controls.
  4. Scroll down until you see Your Privacy Zones
  5. Enter your Home or Office address
  6. Select the location Radius.
  7. Click on the Create Privacy Zone button

You can create multiple privacy zones by giving the location address here, and give the radius to define the area you want to hide. This is the right choice if you are walking or riding from your home to the office. You can give both office and home address and set the radius to hide.

How to stop strava from making your home address public

You will be able to see the hidden part on your profile. But the starting and ending position (if you set both) will be hidden from the public and the followers.

Additional Strava Privacy Controls

There are a few more options to set your privacy on Strava. You can limit to show your activities only to your followers instead of making them public.

You can set your profile details, activities, and group activists can set to view only for your followers or for you. You can set these based on your privacy requirement. By default, these activities are viewable to Anyone.

Even though you set all your activities to publish, it’s a good practice to hide your home location and the ride ending location from the public. Hope this guide will help you.

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Harry Guinness
How to stop strava from making your home address publicHarry Guinness
Writer

Harry Guinness is a photography expert and writer with nearly a decade of experience. His work has been published in newspapers like The New York Times and on a variety of other websites, from Lifehacker to Popular Science and Medium’s OneZero. Read more.

How to stop strava from making your home address public

Nutthanun Gunthasen/Shutterstock.com

Strava, like all social media apps, can reveal a huge amount of information about you. Even if you stop random strangers from stumbling across your home address, you might sometimes need to actively stop a specific person from seeing what you’re up to. Here’s how to block someone else on Strava.

By default, anyone on the internet can see your activities and, potentially, work out where you live. Be sure to look through your Strava account privacy settings, too.

What Does Blocking Do on Strava?

Blocking someone on Strava:

  • Removes them from your followers and you from theirs.
  • Stops them from following you again or viewing your activities in detail.
  • Hides your profile details except for your profile picture, bio, total activity count for the last month, that week’s activity statistics, and how many followers you have. It’s what someone who doesn’t follow you sees when they view your profile, but it’s not quite everything.

Somewhat surprisingly, if you have a publicly viewable activity, like say a top 10 position in a segment leaderboard, they’ll be able to see the summary of it there, but they won’t be able to click through for a more detailed view.

Blocking someone won’t send them a notification, but they’ll know something’s changed if they try to view your profile.

How to stop strava from making your home address public

How to Block Someone in the Mobile App

Head to the person you want to block’s profile page on Strava and tap the three little dots in the top right corner.

Tap “Block this Athlete,” then “Block Athlete” to block them.

How to stop strava from making your home address public

How to Block Someone on the Strava Website

Open Strava in your browser and navigate to the person you want to block’s athlete page. Click the “Settings” icon (the gear icon) and then “Block Athlete.”

Finally, click “Block Athlete” again to block them.

How to stop strava from making your home address public

The Strava account you block won’t be able to follow you or view information about your activities, follow you, or appear in your activity feeds anymore.

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How to stop strava from making your home address public Harry Guinness
Harry Guinness is a photography expert and writer with nearly a decade of experience. His work has been published in newspapers like The New York Times and on a variety of other websites, from Lifehacker to Popular Science and Medium’s OneZero.
Read Full Bio »

[German]Incorrect settings can cause the popular Strava running and cycling app (and service) to make the user’s information available to third parties nearby. For privacy reasons you should take a closer look at this and check your settings.

A strange experience with Strava

Andrew Seward, Experian’s Head of Product Development, has been posting the whole thing on Twitter these days and Bleeping Computer has picked it up.

Out running this morning on a new route and a lady runs past me. Despite only passing, when I get home @Strava automatically tags her in my run. If I click on her face it shows her full name, picture and a map of her running route (which effectively shows where she lives)

(Strava data leak)

During a morning run, he had his data recorded using the Strava app. During the run he noticed a woman running past him. When he arrived at home and analyzed the data of the Strava app, he was astonished. The Strava app had apparently recorded data about the woman, and when he selected the jogger’s face in Strava, her full name, picture and a map of her run (which effectively shows where she lives) were displayed.

Andrew Seward was surprised because he had not followed the lady for a long time and she had not made her data public on Strava. This prompted him to post the whole thing on Twitter. Because such a ffeature, which a Strava user doesn’t know about, invites abuse (like stalking).

Confusing default privacy settings to blame

After his tweet, another pointed out that a separate privacy setting with somewhat odd wording was responsible for this. Here is the text of his tweet.

UPDATE: @ntzm_ points out this is a separate privacy setting from when you change who can see your activities – all settings default to ‘Everyone’ but this feature will only be disabled if you turn off ‘Flyby’

In the settings, the privacy preferences for all options are set to ‘Everyone’, i.e. third parties can view activities. In order to prevent Strava data from being copied into the profiles of third parties as they pass by, the Flyby option, which shares activities with everyone nearby, must be disabled (see also the explanation on Bleeping Computer).

These are probably extremely clumsy settings that Strava prescribes, coupled with confusing explanations of the options that lead to this problem. Only when the Flyby option is deactivated can the sharing of activities with others in the vicinity be prevented. The case shows once again that you should not actually use all this stuff without a prior safety analysis.

Additional note: The whole thing doesn’t seem to be really new, by the way. Already in June 2020 How-To Geek had published the article How to Stop Strava From Making Your Home Address Public, which addressed exactly this issue. But probably nobody was interested at that time.

In the meantime Strava has learned from the incident and sends his users a link with the information how to change the attitude. This is not the first case, by the way, where risks became obvious when using Strava. In 2018 there was a case, where the shared tracks of US military personnel could be viewed on the Strava site.

Sharing your running and cycling routes is the whole point of using Strava—you can see whether you’re the fastest in your neighborhood at climbing that big hill, or take on a friend’s favorite running route to see how you compare. But this weekend, analyst Nathan Ruser pointed out that the app’s heatmap of popular routes reveals, oops, data about military bases and the people who are stationed there .

This isn’t just the military’s problem. Many of us don’t want randos browsing our running routes, especially when they’re close to home. Quartz reporter Rosie Spinks wrote last year of the difficulty she had locking down her Strava account . She thought her settings would hide her activity from strangers while allowing her to share with her friends, but Strava has several then-hidden privacy settings that meant she was still findable through various app features.

Strava wrote this blog post after she contacted them, which runs down all the ways to protect your privacy in the app. (We’ve contacted Strava to ask if this information is still current and complete. We’re still waiting on a response, but the app seems to behave as described.)

Strava’s Privacy Settings Get Pretty Granular, But There Are Tradeoffs

The bottom line seems to be that you have to tweak a bunch of settings to get any privacy, and some of them require tradeoffs where you can’t use some of the app’s functions, like seeing where you stand compared to the fastest people to run a certain segment. When you sign up for Strava through the iPhone app, you aren’t shown any privacy-related settings. You just create an account, grant location access (without which it can’t track you at all), and then it prompts you to start a run or ride.

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If you want to find the privacy settings, you’ll have to go into either the Profile or More screen, then Settings, and then Privacy. There, you’ll find five different switches that each allow you to make certain types of things private. One, “Private by Default,” requires you to opt into sharing each run, rather than the other way around. Another, “Enhanced Privacy,” only allows people you follow to see your photos, your last name, and the activities listed on your profile. But as Spinks found out, your name will still show up in other parts of the app. She has an updated guide to Strava’s privacy settings here .

Hiding Your House

Strava’s first recommendation for privacy is to create “ privacy zones ” around your home, workplace, or anywhere you don’t want people snooping. (I also learned today that mountain bikers use privacy zones to hide their activity on illegal trails .) But these zones are a clumsy tool that don’t really make your whereabouts all that secret.

First, you have to go through the Strava website to set up a privacy zone, but you can reach that through a link from the app if you know where to find it. (It’s at the bottom of the privacy settings screen.) Then, you have to enter an address, and choose how big the zone should be. Your options range from a 200 meter radius up to one kilometer, which is 0.62 miles.

Those distances might be handy if you live in a densely populated area, but if you’re on a country road, there might only be a handful of houses within your privacy zone. Strava hides the portion of a run or ride that starts or ends in a privacy zone, but that means that your profile can end up with a bunch of short activities circling a two-kilometer dead zone. For example, see if you can guess where I set the center of my privacy zone here:

If you need an extra clue, Strava also shares photos I took at any point on the run, including the sign for the North Park Boat House, which is the spot I set as the center of my dead zone. A stranger could also do some simple math from just one of those routes to figure out how far down the road your house must be. This one looks like (and is) an out-and-back course, with mileage clearly listed:

Privacy zones are not, it turns out, all that private.

The most private solution, as you may have guessed, is not to use the app at all—or to keep every single run and ride private, making it useless as a social app. Other running apps don’t have the same system of public leaderboards, but allow other types of sharing, including posting a map of your run to Facebook. That may seem more straightforward, until you start to wonder if you really trust all of your 300 Facebook friends with your house’s location data. Your only option appears to be overthinking your privacy in one way or another, so, good luck with that.

Can you block followers on Strava? Are they notified if you remove them? Can you track an athlete without them knowing? How do you get new followers on Strava? This page will answer all these questions and more.

How to stop strava from making your home address public

I use Strava constantly. Not in an obsessive way, I’m not interested in KOMs, more tracking distance, time over that distance and measuring improvement and decline in my fitness. Millions of others also use Strava, which often prompts questions about the app. This page is going to answer a few of the more common ones I see.

How to stop strava from making your home address public

Can you block followers on Strava?

You can block followers in Strava. This isn’t Facebook though so you should rarely ever have to do this. You would be much better off unfollowing them. I’ll show you both.

To block a follower on Strava, do this:

    .
  1. Select your profile image on the top right and select My Profile.
  2. Select Following from the center tab.
  3. Select the follower open their profile page.
  4. Select the gear icon under their name.
  5. Select Block Athlete.

I think it easier to just unfollow them but it’s up to you. The main downside here is that they can follow you again at any time.

To unfollow someone on Strava, do this:

    .
  1. Select your profile image on the top right and select My Profile.
  2. Select Following from the center tab.
  3. Hover over the Following button by the person’s name.
  4. Select Unfollow when highlighted.

When you hover over the Following button, it changes to orange and Unfollow. Select the button at that time and you will unfollow that person.

Are they notified if I remove them?

If you decide to unfollow instead of block, are they notified of this? No. There are no notifications sent if you have been unfollowed by someone. Strava uses the same methodology as social networks. Nobody wants to hear bad news so negative notifications like this are suppressed and not sent to users.

How to stop strava from making your home address public

Can I track a Strava athlete without them knowing?

You can check on a Strava user without following them. All you need to do is search for their name and look at their profile. Depending on their settings, you will be able to see their rides, trophies, clubs and more. There is nothing to tell them you visited their profile as far as I can tell.

If the athlete has set their Strava account to private, you won’t get to see anything except their name. Private accounts only share data with followers.

How do I get new followers on Strava?

Strava isn’t Facebook. More followers doesn’t mean more success or more miles. It’s not even counted as a measure of success on the platform. Your mileage and PRs are the metrics that count here. However, kudos is a useful thing to have and that is given by followers, so if you’re the type that needs external validation, kudos might prove useful.

Here are some ways to gather followers on Strava.

Use the app a lot

This is the most obvious one. If you want people to follow you on Strava, give them something to follow. Frequent activities, lots of variations, special events and more will all see you gain followers and get kudos.

Make your account public

Another obvious one for Strava, keep your account public. Having a private account is all very well but it won’t get you followers unless you invite them. If you’re collecting kudos, you need a public account. People need to see you in search or in activities and be able to follow you.

Be imaginative with your descriptions

Rather than just calling it ‘Morning Ride’, be a little more descriptive or imaginative. Something like ‘Every hill in town and then some’ or ‘Highway to Hell and Back’ is going to gather a lot more attention than something mundane.

The same for if you participate in events. Name them well, ‘Boston Half Marathon’, ‘Hell of the North’, Mudfest 2019’ and so on. This will also gain attention as they are events that will be recognized and will have mass participation.

Give kudos

You have to give to receive. If you want kudos, give kudos. This is a great way to acquire new followers especially after an event. If you’re running or riding with hundreds of others, handing out a bunch of kudos will have people following you in no time. Be generous and be consistent. Credit where it’s due and all that.

Do you have any questions about Strava? Want to know anything in particular? Tell us below if you do!

How to stop strava from making your home address public

There are a lot of perks to using social apps to track your workout activity. Of course, the perk of cheers coming from friends and sharing tips and tricks for how you’re getting up and around town.

Even better, research shows that those who use exercise apps are more likely to exercise during their free time than those who do not use exercise apps. And if you’re one of Stava’s reported more than 50 million users, you’ve got a lot of routes to check out.

But did you know that you can create a custom route to follow on your next workout? Here, we break down everything you need to know to create a Strava route.

Plotting your route

First things first, you’ll have to be a Strava subscriber to create and utilize the route mapping feature, and the most important thing about creating a successful route in the Strava app is that you want to do it within Strava. While you can use a third-party option and import the data, it can be pretty tough to make it all work.

Note: you’ll be able to create a route both in-app on your mobile device, and via Strava’s online platform. Our tip is to do it at a computer if you have the opportunity.

If you’re using Strava’s desktop website, log in and hover over ‘Explore’ in the top menu, then click ‘Create a route’. In the mobile app, tap the ‘Explore’ icon at the bottom, tap ‘Explore routes’ and then select ‘Draw your own route’.

You have a few options from the get-go, including running or cycling, miles versus kilometers, whether you’d like to follow the most popular or direct route, what types of surfaces you prefer (dirt versus paved) and if you’d like to maximize or minimize. After you make those critical decisions, the rest is pretty simple. Simply select a starting point, and then continue to tap along — creating waypoints on your desired route.

As you proceed, you’ll notice a few things. Firstly, there’s a tally of data along the bottom of your screen that gives key metrics you’ll want to be in the loop about, including distance, elevation gain and loss, and estimated moving time (according to Strava, this estimated moving time is calculated by your four-week average speed or pace). This way, if you’re plotting seems to get too challenging or perhaps too lengthy, you can circle back and easily tweak your route.

Once you’ve finished your route design, you’ll name your course, add a description including details or notes about your upcoming workout, and select whether you’d like to make this route public or private. This is when the real fun begins.

Using your route

The execution of Strava maps is really in which device you use to access them. If you export your routes to something like a Garmin or Wahoo, then you’ll get turn-by-turn navigation which is clutch, especially when you don’t know exactly where you’re going and you’re not local to home.

However, if you simply press ‘Use route’ on Strava, it will not offer vocal cues to help direct you where you’re going, and rather – just show a breadcrumb trail on a map as you’ve created.

Great for referencing? Sure, but it seems preferable if apps don’t just let you design something, but also have a lot of user-friendly aspects to put it into practice.

Still, as a perk to a paid Strava subscription, in addition to a slew of other goodies, like custom heart rate zones, in-depth race analysis, cumulative stats, and personal heatmaps, it’s not so bad.

Strava is testing a new feature to some 50% of their user base that allows people to mute an activity of their feed when publishing. The idea being that many of us might have more trivial workouts or even commutes that we want on Strava for historical/challenge/segments sake, but don’t really want to clutter our friends’ (or club’s) feeds with them.

A good example with commuting would be someone that might want to accumulate progress towards a segment’s Local Legend status or challenges, which only happens when their activity is public. However, they don’t really feel like publishing their twice-daily rides to work to everyone else’s feed is that interesting. Which, without any creative titles/photos/etc, can be basically akin to publishing that you ate oatmeal every single morning and afternoon on your Facebook feed, though I suppose people do that too.

Another simple example would be separated cool-down rides on Peloton, especially for folks that have all new workouts be automatically set as public. These 5-10 minute rides are usually the type of thing I delete from my Strava profile, and don’t bother to publish/set public.

In any event – the new option is available to both paid and free Strava users, though only 50% of the population has access to it. And ironically, it’s actually not enabled on my account, but is on my wife’s account, as well as a few friends’ accounts. You’ll see the new toggle at the bottom of the activity page:

How to stop strava from making your home address public How to stop strava from making your home address public

This then skips publishing it to people’s home feeds or club feeds. It will still appear on your profile though, and still counts towards goals and competitions, as well as your 12-week progress chart. It’ll still count towards segments too.

Now of course, as a result, it’s likely you won’t get many kudos, since it won’t show up in other’s feeds – thus someone would have to actually go to your profile to find it (or, have it show up as a group activity). As a reminder, the ‘Feed’ is the thing that you see on the ‘Home’ tab (at left below), where yours and other workouts show up, versus your ‘profile’ (at right below) is where people can see your specific public details:

How to stop strava from making your home address public How to stop strava from making your home address public

Now you can change the setting of this toggle after the fact. For example, if you forget to toggle it initially you can always do it later and it takes immediate effect (I’ve tried it in both directions).

There’s not much more for me to say on this topic, it’s a very simple – and much-appreciated feature. I can’t wait until it’s actually available on my account. As a point of reference, here’s what my Strava profile actually looks like right now – with approximately zero of those activities or workouts toggled to public. Some simply because some of them are throw-away tests that I’d never make public anyway, but many because they’re shorter workouts that I don’t want to clutter people’s feeds with. This option solves that perfectly for those that are at least worthy of including in a public profile.

How to stop strava from making your home address public

(As usual, all my activities are private by default in Strava, and then I manually toggle to public those that I want, when I get around to it.)

Of course, there’s still two variants of this option that people have long asked for:

A) Category mute defaults (own activities): In other words, as an example, mute all ‘Commutes’ from me to others
B) Category mute defaults (other people’s activities): Such as muting all people’s commutes, or all peoples ‘Virtual Rides’.

I think the first one (own-activity category mute defaults) is a very logical progression of this feature. Especially around commutes. Whereas I think that other-people broad category mutes sorta defeats the purpose of what Strava is: A social network for athletes. I know that it does annoy some people to have to scroll an extra half a swipe past a Zwift or Peloton workout, but I mean…that’s kinda the point of a social network, right? To see what other people are up to. After all, you followed them. If that person is a serial empty-activity poster, then simply muting that particular individual is probably the better bet.

In any case, I’m looking forward to getting the new option – and plan to start using it once available. Though, in asking Strava, they did say that the 50% population user test is set to run for about 4 weeks before they decide whether to go forward with it or not. While I appreciate the concept of testing here, I’d argue that when you roll out a feature to 50% of the user base (some 45 million users out of 90 million users), that there’s probably a no-take-backs clause that Strava might need to better understand.

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It's essential for Strava to be accurate!

Tags: bicycle, bicycles, can-someone-pause-my-strava, cycles, cycling

If I Collapse Pause My Strava T-Shirt

If It Is Not On Strava It Never Happened

Tags: barefoot-running, barbell, beast-mode, half-marathon, inspiring

If It Is Not On Strava It Never Happened T-Shirt

If i collapse please pause my watch, funny running tshirt gift, running , jogging gift, marathon , Short-Sleeve Unisex