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How to turn a raspbery pi into a plex server

Here’s how to install Plex server on a Raspberry Pi, configure it, and start streaming movies, TV shows, music, and more.

Want to stream videos hosted on a Raspberry Pi to difference devices around your home? Several options are available (including Kodi) but for the best results, a dedicated Plex installation is recommended. In fact, Raspberry Pi is one of the best devices to use as a Plex media server.

Here’s how to install Plex server on a Raspberry Pi, configure it, and start streaming your favorite movies, TV shows, music, family photos, and other media files.

What Is Plex?

If you’re not aware, Plex is an application that lets you stream your media anywhere, on almost any device. Installed standalone, it can be used to play video, music, and image files stored on a local (or network) drive.

Meanwhile, if it is installed as a server, a secondary device can then access the same content remotely, just as long as the Plex app is installed. The app adapts to changing scenarios; it too can act as a server, or it can be your Plex client.

Our guide to Plex demonstrates just how awesome it is. It’s worth noting quickly that Plex in its server form has been available for the Raspberry Pi since 2017. Prior to that, the Pi was only suitable for running Plex client apps.

What You’ll Need for a Raspberry Pi Plex Server

To install Plex server on your Raspberry Pi, you will need:

  • Raspberry Pi 3 or later
  • microSD card (8GB or more)
  • External HDD or USB flash drive with media files
  • USB keyboard and mouse

Naturally, you’ll also need a TV, with a competent sound system attached. You may use these optional extras:

  • Ethernet cable for more reliable router connection
  • Wireless/Bluetooth keyboard and mouse

While it is possible to set up a Raspberry Pi via an SSH connection, you’ll need a device for directly controlling Plex once it’s up and running.

Step 1: Install and Update Raspbian

You probably have Raspbian running on your Raspberry Pi already. Other versions of Linux for the Raspberry Pi should work, but this guide is produced using a fresh install of Raspbian Stretch.

Need help installing an operating system on your Raspberry Pi? Beginners should probably start with NOOBS, but if you’re computer savvy, the standard Raspberry Pi installation guide should see you through.

Once installed, boot up your Pi, and in the Terminal enter:

This will ensure that your version of Raspbian is fully up to date.

Step 2: Install dev2day and Download Plex

To install Plex, you’ll need to add a new repository. You’ll also need a GPG key to download it. We’ll deal with that first:

Next, edit the package list from the terminal using the echo and tee commands:

Repeat the package update:

Plex is now ready to install. Use

Follow the on-screen prompt to complete the download and installation. A few minutes later, the Plex server should be installed on your Raspberry Pi.

Step 3: Configure Permissions and IP Address

So, you have the Plex server installed, but it’s not yet ready to run. First, you need to change the default username for the software; after this, you’ll need to specify a static IP.

Open the plexmediaserver.prev file in the nano text editor to edit it.

Scan through to find the line that reads:

Edit the line so that it instead reads:

You should only change the username to “pi” if that is the username you’re using to log into your Raspberry Pi. Of course, you should have changed this by now. If you’re using a different username, substitute this for “plex” instead. (Read our important security tips for Raspberry Pi.)

Press Ctrl + X to exit, confirming your change, then restart the server:

To ensure that the Plex server is always accessible from your other devices, it’s worth setting a static IP address. Begin by finding the current address:

Next, open the cmdline.txt file and add a new line at the bottom.

The new line should read:

Save and exit with Ctrl + X. Finish by restarting the Raspberry Pi:

Step 4: Add Media Files to Your Plex Server

When the computer has rebooted, you’ll be ready to start adding files to the server library.

These should already exist on the HDD (or your storage device of choice), but will need adding into Plex. Next, open a browser on your Raspberry Pi and enter the IP address of the Plex server, followed by :32400/web/. It should look something like.

. without the square brackets.

The Plex web interface will open, so sign in (or create a new account) and read overview. Close this view, and the give your Plex server a name. Wait as this is detected, then click Add Library, and choose the library type. This will depend on the content you plan to add. Plex is capable of checking the internet for the correct movie and album art, so it’s important to get this right.

In the Add folders view, use the Browse for media folder button and search for the directory on the HDD. Repeat this as often as necessary until all of the media you want Plex to serve has been added into the library.

You should also check the Advanced tab to ensure the default display options for the folder are to your liking. Here you can select the online database for listings and artwork, as well as how to display collections of media, such as TV show seasons. The Advanced tab will display different options based on the type of content you’re adding.

Step 5: Connect With Client Devices and Enjoy!

Ready to enjoy your videos via Plex? First and foremost, you can just start watching on your TV. But if you want to take your videos with you around your property, you’ll need a Plex mobile app.

Available from Google Play for Android and the App Store for iOS, if you sign into the app with the same credentials you used on the server, the devices will link up. From there, you’ll be able to browse Plex for what you want to watch, hit play, and enjoy!

Interestingly, these apps have a built-in remote control, for use when enjoying media on Plex via your TV. This is an option you could use in place of the mouse and keyboard.

Meanwhile, as well as enjoying your own media files, check out the numerous unofficial channels that are available for Plex.

Charging your smartphone overnight can damage the battery and shorten its lifespan. Here’s everything you need to know.

How to turn a raspbery pi into a plex server

Deputy Editor for Security, Linux, DIY, Programming, and Tech Explained, and Really Useful Podcast producer, with extensive experience in desktop and software support. A contributor to Linux Format magazine, Christian is a Raspberry Pi tinkerer, Lego lover and retro gaming fan.

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How to turn a raspbery pi into a plex server

Now that Ubuntu Desktop is available for Raspberry Pi 4, users no longer need to fiddle with terminal commands to enjoy Plex Media Server on Raspberry Pi. In this article, we will set up Ubuntu Desktop and turn our Raspberry Pi into a streaming media server. We have chosen Plex Media Server since it is available in the Ubuntu Appliance portfolio. Check out our recent article on the Ubuntu Appliance portfolio for Raspberry Pi here.

What is Plex Media Server?

Plex Media Server turns your computer into a server for your content (music, photos, and videos) enabling access to your content anywhere in the world. Your content is streamed to your authenticated Plex app including Smart TVs, Chromecast, Roku, Amazon FireTV, and even Alexa and Google Home. A basic account on Plex is free and premium features are available via Plex Pass. Plex also offers ad supported movies and TV on their streaming platform. Users can share their libraries with friends and family and/or even watch content together.

This article provides step-by-step instructions to:

1. Install Ubuntu Desktop on Raspberry Pi.

2. Load your media on your Raspberry Pi.

3. Set up your Raspberry Pi as a Plex Media Server.

What You’ll Need for this Project

    or higher installed on a computer running Windows, osX, Linux
  • 32 GB (or larger) microSD card (see best Raspberry Pi microSD cards)
  • Power supply/Keyboard/Mouse/Monitor/HDMI Cable (for your Raspberry Pi)
  • Your media stored on a USB drive.

Before You Begin

  • Organize your media collection, name the files and group music in folders by artist. Movies should be named by movie title. More info on organizing your media collection from Plex. Organize your music, photos, and videos into respectively named folders. You can organize your music with the hierarchy, Music > Artist > Album, Videos by title, and Photos > Year > Month.
  • Copy your media (photos, music, videos) onto a USB drive. There are of course other ways to transfer your media, but we have found the USB drive method to be the easiest.
  • Please note that your Raspberry Pi must be powered ON and connected to the internet for your Plex Media Server to work. After you have completed the steps in this tutorial, you’ll access your content from this device via the Plex app. The Plex app is available for iPhone, Android, SmartTVs, Roku, Chromecast, AppleTV, and more. Review the Plex website for the most updated list of devices.

Part 1: Basic Ubuntu Desktop Install

In this section, we will install Ubuntu desktop on our Raspberry Pi.

1. Insert the microSD card into the corresponding slot on your computer. The next steps in this project will erase all data on your microSD card.

2. Launch Raspberry Pi Imager app on your computer.

3. Click on CHOOSE OS under the Operating System heading.

4. Click the arrow > for Ubuntu.

5. Select Ubuntu Desktop.

6. Click CHOOSE SD CARD and select the microSD card you inserted in step 1.

7. Click WRITE. It will take at least 10 minutes to write and verify that Ubuntu has been written to your microSD card.

8. When the task is finished, remove your microSD card from your computer and insert into your Raspberry Pi.

9. Connect your USB drive, monitor, keyboard and mouse to your Raspberry Pi. Boot your Pi. The first time Ubuntu Desktop loads, it will take about 5 minutes.

10. Follow the setup wizard to configure your Raspberry Pi.

Part 2: Install Plex Media Server and Transfer Your Media

1. Using the Ubuntu Appliance library click on Plex Media Server. This will appear at the end of the setup wizard.

2. Click the Install button for Plex Media Server.

3. Wait for the install to finish, this should take around 10 minutes.

4. Open the file manager and navigate to your USB drive. Copy the videos from your USB drive to the system default Videos folder on your Raspberry Pi. Repeat the same steps for your photos and music.

5. Open the Plex Media Server by clicking on the grid of nine dots in the bottom left of the screen.

6. Plex will open a window on your default browser. Create an account on Plex.

7. Follow the Plex setup wizard. Type in the name for your Plex server, the default is your computer name. Click “Allow me to access my media outside my home” if you wish to access your media from outside of your network.

8. To tell Plex where to find our media, movies for example, select Movies, then Next.

9. Click Browse For Media Folder

10. Navigate to /home/yourname/Videos and click ADD. “Yourname” is the name of the user which was created during the Ubuntu setup wizard.

11. Click Add Library.

12. Click the Add Library button.

13. Repeat the process for Music, Photos and any additional media you would like to access from your Plex Media Server.

14. Click Next and you will be prompted to Claim your server. Click Claim It Now.

Part 3: Stream Your Media Content

1. From your desktop/laptop computer, go to https://www.plex.tv/. Login and click the Launch button in the top right corner.

2. Navigate to your content and test out your new media server. If you don’t immediately see your content, it will take a few minutes to Scan your Library files for the first time.

3. There is a Plex app for many devices enabling you to enjoy your media from your laptops, cell phone and smart TV. View the full list here.

4. You can listen to the music on your Plex Media Server from Amazon Alexa by enabling the Plex Skill on Alexa. Say, “Alexa, ask Plex to play music.

I love the Plex Media server. I’ve posted about it several times. I’ve also posted about the Raspberry Pi, and how I’m dieing to work a project with it. Well, here’s one great project that combines Plex and the Raspberry Pi- this article is all about how to make your Raspberry Pi a dedicated Plex Media server. If I didn’t have a TCL Roku TV that has the Plex app available to download from the Roku store, this would be a great way for me to get Plex on my TV.

To install Plex server on your Raspberry Pi, you will need:

  • Raspberry Pi 3 or later
  • microSD card (8GB or more)
  • External HDD or USB flash drive with media files
  • USB keyboard and mouse

Naturally, you’ll also need a TV, with a competent sound system attached. You may use these optional extras:

  • Ethernet cable for more reliable router connection
  • Wireless/Bluetooth keyboard and mouse

Step 1: Install and Update Raspbian

You probably have Raspbian running on your Raspberry Pi already. Other versions of Linux for the Raspberry Pi should work, but this guide is produced using a fresh install of Raspbian Stretch.

Need help installing an operating system on your Raspberry Pi? Beginners should probably start with NOOBS, but if you’re computer savvy, the standard Raspberry Pi installation guide should see you through.

Once installed, boot up your Pi, and in the Terminal enter:

This will ensure that your version of Raspbian is fully up to date.

Step 2: Install dev2day and Download Plex

To install Plex, you’ll need to add a new repository. You’ll also need a GPG key to download it. We’ll deal with that first:

Next, edit the package list from the terminal using the echo and tee commands:

Repeat the package update:

Plex is now ready to install. Use

Follow the on-screen prompt to complete the download and installation. A few minutes later, the Plex server should be installed on your Raspberry Pi.

Step 3: Configure Permissions and IP Address

So, you have the Plex server installed, but it’s not yet ready to run. First, you need to change the default username for the software; after this, you’ll need to specify a static IP.

Open the plexmediaserver.prev file in the nano text editor to edit it.

Scan through to find the line that reads:

Edit the line so that it instead reads:

You should only change the username to “pi” if that is the username you’re using to log into your Raspberry Pi. Of course, you should have changed this by now. If you’re using a different username, substitute this for “plex” instead. (Read our important security tips for Raspberry Pi.)

Press Ctrl + X to exit, confirming your change, then restart the server:

To ensure that the Plex server is always accessible from your other devices, it’s worth setting a static IP address. Begin by finding the current address:

Next, open the cmdline.txt file and add a new line at the bottom.

The new line should read:

Save and exit with Ctrl + X. Finish by restarting the Raspberry Pi:

Step 4: Add Media Files to Your Plex Server

When the computer has rebooted, you’ll be ready to start adding files to the server library.

These should already exist on the HDD (or your storage device of choice), but will need adding into Plex. Next, open a browser on your Raspberry Pi and enter the IP address of the Plex server, followed by :32400/web/. It should look something like…

…without the square brackets.

The Plex web interface will open, so sign in (or create a new account) and read overview. Close this view, and the give your Plex server a name. Wait as this is detected, then click Add Library, and choose the library type. This will depend on the content you plan to add. Plex is capable of checking the internet for the correct movie and album art, so it’s important to get this right.

In the Add folders view, use the Browse for media folder button and search for the directory on the HDD. Repeat this as often as necessary until all of the media you want Plex to serve has been added into the library.

You should also check the Advanced tab to ensure the default display options for the folder are to your liking. Here you can select the online database for listings and artwork, as well as how to display collections of media, such as TV show seasons. The Advanced tab will display different options based on the type of content you’re adding.

Step 5: Connect With Client Devices and Enjoy!

Ready to enjoy your videos via Plex? First and foremost, you can just start watching on your TV. But if you want to take your videos with you around your property, you’ll need a Plex mobile app.

Available from Google Play for Android and the App Store for iOS, if you sign into the app with the same credentials you used on the server, the devices will link up. From there, you’ll be able to browse Plex for what you want to watch, hit play, and enjoy!

Interestingly, these apps have a built-in remote control, for use when enjoying media on Plex via your TV. This is an option you could use in place of the mouse and keyboard.

Meanwhile, as well as enjoying your own media files, check out the numerous unofficial channels that are available for Plex.

Raspberry Pi's are wonderfully capable machines. You can use them to play games, make a furry assistant, or even build your own smart mirror. But today we're looking for something a little more relaxed.

In fact, we want to kick back on the couch for this one. In this guide, we'll be setting up our very own Plex media server. Your Plex setup will let you to stream video, audio, photos, and more from your Raspberry Pi!

Howchoo is reader-supported. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn a small affiliate commission at no cost to you.

Install and update Raspberry Pi OS

In order to set up our media server, we'll need the latest version of Raspberry Pi OS (formerly Raspbian) installed. Visit our guide here on how to update Raspberry Pi OS.

Install the HTTPS transport package

We'll need to install the HTTPS transport package for our media server to work. This can be done via command line terminal. For more information on how to log in using a terminal, visit our guide on how to access a Raspberry Pi using SSH.

Once you've logged into your Raspberry Pi, it's time to initiate the package install. Run the following command to start the process.

Add the dev2day repository

The program we're using to create our media server is called Plex. You can learn more about Plex on the official Plex website. To get our hands on it, we'll need to download the dev2day repository. First up, we'll need to get a key. Run the following command to set it up.

Once you have the key, run the following command to add the repository to the list of package sources.

Install the Plex server

Now it's time for the meat of our media server sandwich—the Plex server files. To install this component, run the following command.

Set the Plex server permissions

In order to use our media server, we need to adjust the permission settings. To do this, we need to modify a line of text from a specific file. Run the following command to open the file.

Your screen will fill with several lines of text. Scroll through them until you find the following line.

Replace the word "plex" with "pi". The full string will look like this.

Press Ctrl + X to close the file. You will be prompted to save the changes, to do so press Y followed by Enter.

Restart the media server using the following command.

Define a static IP address

To help us reach our new media server, we'll be defining a static IP address. To find your current IP address, run the following command.

To set this IP address as static, add it to the cmdline.txt file. To open this file, run the following command.

At the bottom of this file, add an extra line of text for the IP address. It should look like the following, where x.x.x.x represents your desired static IP address.

Use Ctrl+X to close the file. You will need to press Y to save the changes and Enter to return to the terminal screen.

Restart your Raspberry Pi.

Connect media files to the Raspberry Pi

First, attach your files to the Raspberry Pi. This can be accomplished using things like thumb drives, hard drives, or SD cards.

Once your media is accessible, open a browser window. Enter the static IP address from before. Include the suffix :32400/web/ . It should look like the following string:

Plex will guide you through setting up for the first time. You'll notice the option to add a library. This tells the Raspberry Pi where our media files are located. Follow the prompts to add your media library.

Test the media server

Let's test out our new setup. Your media server should be accessible using Plex from any device on the same network. Just open Plex and look for your Raspberry Pi server in the list.

How to turn a raspbery pi into a plex server

The Raspberry Pi is a very capable little device that can do all sorts of things. One cool thing is being able to turn it into a Raspberry Pi Plex Media Server. Plex is a media player that organizes all of your TV Shows, Movies, Music, and Pictures. The Plex server will allow you to transmit all of your media to a client, which can be pretty much any device (eg. PS4, Xbox, Smart TV, Tablet, Phone, etc). You don’t even necessarily need to be connected to your home network to access your media, you can be anywhere in the world.

The Raspberry Pi is a very ideal way to host a Plex Media Server. Not only is it an inexpensive Linux computer (about $35) but it has very low power consumption. A typical laptop uses 60 watts per hour, the Raspberry Pi uses 1.4 watts per hour. A media server is meant to be on most of the time, so minimizing power consumption is important.

How to turn a raspbery pi into a plex server

The Ideal Setup

Which model of the Raspberry Pi should I use?

A Raspberry Pi 3 or 2 will work best. I do not recommend using the original Raspberry Pi since the components are outdated and the server may run sluggishly.

Caveats: Running a Plex server on a Raspberry Pi limits your streaming to 1080p. You will not be able to stream 4K movies due to the Raspberry Pi’s limited power. If this is an issue I would suggest looking into the more powerful ASUS Tinker Board.

Where to store your media files?

The best place to store your media files would be a Network Attached Storage (NAS). This could be in the form of a traditional NAS like “WD My Cloud” or similar, or simply an external HDD connected via the USB port of your router.

Though less ideal/convenient, you could also place your files on your Raspberry Pi’s micro SD card or connect an external HDD to your Raspberry Pi. These are less ideal than a NAS because video files are large, and large micro SD cards are expensive. Although Pi Ethernet speeds are limited to 100Mbps, and USB 2.0 transfer speeds are higher, the convenience of a NAS outweighs this for me.

Update: You can check out Jeff Geerling’s post for information and benchmarks on adding a Gigabit adapter to your Pi to increase Ethernet speeds.

Requirements

      for Raspberry Pi OS
      (recommended)

    Instructions

    1. Install Raspbian OS

    First, you must install the Raspbian OS on your Raspberry Pi. Check out the official guide here.

    2. Install the Raspberry Pi Plex Server

    We will need to make sure that our Raspberry Pi software is up to date before we proceed to install Plex. Log into your Raspberry Pi, open up a terminal window and type the following commands:

    How to turn a raspbery pi into a plex server

    Plex Media Servers are great for storing and accessing all your movies, tv shows, and other media. Unfortunately, Plex Server hardware can be expensive, electricity intensive, or both. To reduce both bills, use a Raspberry Pi for a Plex Server.

    What You Need to Know

    Running a Raspberry Pi as a Plex Server does come with several benefits. It won’t take up as much room as a server or a full-size PC. It also will use less electricity, even when idle all day. Best of all, it costs less than most other hardware capable of working as a server.

    There are some downsides to be aware of, though. The Raspberry Pi 3 has an ARM processor that just doesn’t have the power to support transcoding. So when you are setting up your videos, you are going to want to choose MKV as your video format. That will usually bypass the need for transcoding. (Just about every Plex player supports MKV without transcoding on the fly, but a few smart TVs might have problems.)

    Even then, while you’ll be able to watch standard Blu-ray quality locally, you probably won’t be able to view these videos remotely. And 4K Videos are likely not going to play well either. Also, keep in mind that this is not officially supported, and you’ll need to update the server software manually.

    But once you account for those potential pitfalls, the Raspberry Pi does make a competent Plex Media Server.

    Getting Started

    Compared to using a dedicated full PC or an NVIDIA Shield as a Plex Server, the costs to get started with a Raspberry Pi are relatively low. You’ll need:

    Optionally you might want to consider a case and a heat sink for the Raspberry Pi. You’ll need a monitor, keyboard, and mouse to get everything in place, but after that, you can run the Pi headless.

    To start with, you will want to set your Raspberry Pi up following the standard steps. The easiest thing to do is get a copy of NOOBS to install the latest version of Raspbian.

    Once you have Raspbian installed, you’ll do nearly everything else in the terminal. You don’t need to be familiar with terminal, though; you can copy and paste the commands below.

    Configuring The Software

    How to turn a raspbery pi into a plex server

    The first thing to do is ensure the Raspberry Pi is fully up to date. So run the following commands:

    And provide the root password when prompted. Alternatively, you can use SU and skip all the sudo entries.

    After all your updates are finished, you’ll need to install the “apt-transport-https” package. This allows Plex Server from an HTTPS source. Run this command:

    The next step is to add the crypto key for the dev2day website (the source of this software):

    How to turn a raspbery pi into a plex server

    Run the following command to add the dev2day repository to the package source list:

    How to turn a raspbery pi into a plex server

    Now you’ve added the dev2day repository, it’s time to update the package list:

    Now, you’re ready to install Plex Media Server. Just type the following command and hit Enter:

    After the Plex Server software finishes installing, there are just a few more details to take care of.

    Final Details

    To avoid any permissions issue, it’s best to make Plex run under the Pi user. Type the following command and hit Enter:

    You should see a line that says:

    Change the word “plex” to “pi” and then use Ctrl+X to close the file. Choose to save and overwrite the file.

    How to turn a raspbery pi into a plex server

    For reliable remote access, you’ll want a static IP. Once the Raspberry Pi has rebooted, open the terminal and run this command:

    That’s the current IP address, write that down or type it into a text editor.

    Now open the cmdline.txt file with the following command:

    At the bottom of the file, type in the following:

    How to turn a raspbery pi into a plex server

    Using the IP you wrote down previously. Then use Ctrl+X to close the file and save it.

    Now reboot your Raspberry Pi with the following command:

    And your Raspberry Pi is now a functioning Plex Server. You’re ready to head to plext.tv/web on any browser to detect and associate the Plex Server to your account. Then you’ll need to configure your Raspberry Pi to recognize an external drive, rip your DVDs, or Blu-Rays, and then name your media files per the Plex guidelines.

    Once you have everything in place, you’ll have access to your media collection on just about any device, from your phone to your game console. It’s a great Plex Server option that won’t break the bank.

    RasPlex is a lightweight operating system that, once installed on the Raspberry Pi, allows users to access their Plex movies and TV shows, music, and more. Best of all, it is free of charge and is very easy to set up. In this guide, we’ll show you how to get it working.

    Before we begin

    Running RasPlex on a Raspberry Pi demands a fast SD card. If you plan to run this operating system on your device, you must have a fast enough SD card that can handle it.

    Don’t have a good SD card to handle the demanding performance of RasPlex? Here are two great SD cards to consider.

    Downloading RasPlex

    RasPlex is an operating system for Raspberry Pi Model B, Zero, and 3. There’s not yet a release for the Pi 4, unfortunately. If you’re using one of the supported devices for RaspPlex, follow the step-by-step instructions below to get your hands on it.

    Step 1: Head over to the RasPlex website, and locate the “Get RasPlex” button. Click on it to head over to the downloads page.

    How to turn a raspbery pi into a plex server

    Step 2: On the downloads page for RasPlex, some icons represent the three big operating systems (Mac, Windows, and Linux). These images link to easy to use installers. Ignore them, as we will not be covering them in this guide. Instead, move down to “Get Rasplex Installers” and click on the “legacy download instructions link.”

    Step 3: After selecting the “legacy download instructions link,” you will be taken to a new page called “Manual Installation Instructions.” Locate “Mac OSX/Linux” on the page, and click on “Grab your desired image (img.gz) file from github” to go to the RasPlex GitHub.

    Step 4: On the RasPlex GitHub release page, download one of the following links.

    For RPi 1, download: RasPlex-1.8.0.148-573b6d73-RPi.arm.img.gz

    For RPi 2/3, download: RasPlex-1.8.0.148-573b6d73-RPi2.arm.img.gz

    For Zero, read the release notes to find out which one to grab.

    When the release of RasPlex is downloaded to your computer, move on to the next step of the guide.

    Installing RasPlex to your SD card

    To use RasPlex on the Raspberry Pi, you must install it on the SD card. To do that, you’ll need to get your hands on Etcher, an easy to use SD card/USB flashing tool. To download Etcher, head over to the official website, and click on the download button. Then, follow the installation instructions to get it working on your OS. Once Etcher is working, follow the step-by-step instructions below to flash RasPlex to your Pi’s SD card.

    How to turn a raspbery pi into a plex server

    Step 1: Launch the Etcher program on your PC and allow it to start up for the first time.

    Step 2: Plug in the SD card into your computer by inserting it into the SD card slot, or by putting it into an SD card reader in the USB port.

    Step 3: Locate the “Select Image” button and click on it with the mouse. You’ll then see an open-file dialog box pop-up on the screen. Use this open-file dialog to locate the downloaded RasPlex file from earlier.

    Step 4: Find the “Select Drive” button and click on it. Then, select the SD card you plan to flash RasPlex onto in the UI.

    Step 5: Find the “Flash!” button, and click it to start the SD card flashing process. Keep in mind that this process may take some time!

    When the flashing process is complete, move on to the configuration process for RasPlex.

    Configuring RasPlex

    Configuring RasPlex is the last step in the installation process. To start the config process, put the SD card into your Raspberry Pi, plug in an HDMI cable to the TV, and power it on. Then, follow the step-by-step instructions below.

    Step 1: On the “Welcome” screen for RasPlex, find the “Next” button, and click it to begin the setup process for your new installation.

    How to turn a raspbery pi into a plex server

    Step 2: After passing the “Welcome” screen in the RasPlex config tool, you will be on the “Networking” page. Locate your WiFi network and connect to it so that RasPlex has access to the internet, as well as your local LAN, where the Plex server is hosted.

    How to turn a raspbery pi into a plex server

    Don’t want to use WiFi for RasPlex? Plug in an Ethernet cable into the back of the Pi to get instant network access.

    Step 3: Following the “Networking” page is the “Sharing and Remote Access” page. Here you’ll be able to enable SSH and Samba for RasPlex. Turn both options off, unless you know what they do, as they are not required to enjoy Plex.

    How to turn a raspbery pi into a plex server

    Step 4: With “Sharing and Remote Access” out of the way, it is time to calibrate your screen. Click the “Do Calibrate” button to begin the calibration. Or, click ‘Next’ to skip it if you do not want to calibrate.

    How to turn a raspbery pi into a plex server

    Step 5: Once the screen calibration is taken care of, you will be brought to the “Plex Login” screen. On your smartphone, tablet, or computer, go to https://plex.tv/pin and enter the code on the screen.

    How to turn a raspbery pi into a plex server

    When you’ve successfully entered the pin on the screen, RasPlex will log into your Plex account and give you access to your Plex server! Enjoy!

    Turn your Raspberry Pi into a home media server through the use of Plex. Learn how to set up and install it.

    • Post author

    In this article we’re going to install Plex on Raspberry Pi. By doing this you’ll be able to turn your Pi into a media server. This will allow you to stream all the content that you have stored on a hard drive to any device you own. You’ll be able to access your Plex Server both locally and remotely. This means you can stream your home library while across the globe!

    What is Plex

    Plex is a piece of software that is installable on a Linux devices, such as a Raspberry Pi, or Windows computers. You can take media that you have downloaded or stored on the device or a connected drive and then stream it to your other devices. This includes media such as movies, TV shows, music, pictures, and videos. Plex is available to stream content on iPhone, Android, Windows, Linux, and Roku devices.

    Why Install Plex on Raspberry Pi?

    Well, if you already own or have copies of media, or acquire them by “other means,” Plex is great because it’s 100% free! There is no subscription fee, and no one is harnessing your data and selling it to other companies. Plus, I mean, now you have a convenient client to watch all the “Linux ISOs” that you’ve downloaded.

    So, you think Plex is something you’re interested in and you want to install it? Perfect, that’s the whole point of this article! Let’s get right into it.

    What You’ll Need to Get Started

    • Raspberry Pi (4 recommended)
    • Ethernet Cable or Wi-Fi Compatible Pi/Dongle
    • (optional) Thermal Raspberry Pi Case
    • (optional) USB Keyboard
    • (optional) USB Mouse
    • (optionalish) External Hard Drive or USB Drive

    Everything you need

    • Raspberry Pi 4GB
    • On/Off Switch
    • Power Supply
    • Aluminum Heatsinks

    How to Install Plex to Your Raspberry Pi

    1. Update and Upgrade Your Pi

    The first step is to make sure that all the packages on your Raspberry Pi are up to do date. To do this, use the commands below.

    2. Allow Retrieving Packages Over HTTPS

    Next, we’re going to want to install a package that will allow us to retrieve packages over the HTTPS protocol. This is required because it is what Plex uses.

    3. Add the Plex Repository GPG Key

    After we’ve allowed receiving packages over HTTPS we’ll want to add the Plex Repository GPG Key. This will ensure that when we attempt to download Plex in the next step, it is indeed a legitimate file signed by the same key.

    4. Add the Plex Repository

    The second to last step to installing Plex on your system is to add the Plex repository to your system. This will add Plex’s information to your apt/sources.list.d file so we can install it and update it.

    5. Update Your Pi Again

    Now that we’ve added Plex to the apt/sources.list.d file, we’ll want to update our system again to pull Plex’s information.

    6. Install Plex

    Our Pi is now ready for Plex, let’s get it installed.

    How to Assign a Static IP Address to Your Raspberry Pi

    At this point, Plex is technically installed. You may want to configure a static IP address on your Raspberry Pi to make sure your router doesn’t assign it a new address. If your router were to assign your Pi a new address, you would have to manually find out what it is in order to re-connect to the server.

    1. Get Your Current IP Address

    Use the below command to get your Pi’s current IP address. Save your IP address somehow. You can write it down, take a picture, or copy it to your clipboard.

    2. Get Your Router’s IP Address

    Next, you’ll want to grab your router’s IP address, just like the previous step, you’ll want to make a note of it somehow.

    The numbers after “default via” is your routers IP address.

    3. Edit dhcpcd conf File

    Now we’ll want to edit the dhcpcd conf file using the following command to do so.

    Then we’ll want to add the following information to the bottom of the file. In this example, my Pi’s IP address is 192.168.1.7 and my router’s IP address is 192.168.1.1

    interface eth0 is if you’re using Ethernet. If you’re using Wi-Fi do interface wlan0.

    In this example static_domain_servers is using Cloudflares DNS servers, in my experience they have been the fastest. If you would prefer to use google you can do static domain_name_servers = 8.8.8.8 8.8.4.4.

    4. Reboot Your Pi to Make Sure Everything is Working

    You’ll now want to reboot the Pi and test it to ensure that you didn’t break your Internet.

    Once the Pi comes back online, use the below command to check for an active internet connection.

    If you receive data back, everything is working. If you get a “response timed out” error, you did something wrong and need to go back and carefully re-read each step.

    Accessing the Plex Web Interface

    Now that Plex has been installed and we’ve set up a static IP address, we’ll want to access the Plex Web Interface to configure it and add media.

    To do this go to Your_Pi_IP:32400/web in a web browser. My Pi’s ip is 192.168.1.7 so I would do 192.168.1.7:32400/web.

    At this point you are connected to Plex’s Web Interface. When you first go to the address it should make you run through some easy to follow instructions for adding your media to Plex. If you’re planning to stream remotely, create a plex.tv account.

    You can install Plex on Windows and Mac for streaming in higher quality than Chrome supports or you can download the Plex app on iPhone and Android. You can also install Plex on other devices such as Chromecasts, Rokus, and quite a bit more, check the Plex download page to see if your device supports it.

    What to do if You Have Questions or Issues?

    If you come across any errors or issues that you can’t resolve, reach out to us. You can either leave a comment below, or Contact us.

    My brother recently decided to go through all of our DVDs and CDs and get the whole digital library going on an external hard drive. We had the hard drive plugged into the TV, but the TV interface sucks and I can't access it on my PS4 or PC. I can plug it into the router, and then I can at least access it on my PC, but for some reason the TV barely reads any files off of it.

    Enter Plex it would seem. Long story short, can we use a Raspberry Pi for the server? I mean, I've seen "tutorials" around online so I know I can but I want to know if it's just an awful idea altogether or something. I've got the only PC in the house and I don't want it constantly running because I'm not into that sort of thing.

    I don't know how Plex works, if I have all the meta-data n such for all the movies (like I currently do) and switch it to the Raspberry does all that stay there, or is it going to take weeks for the raspberry to get all that information again? How viable is it to use a Raspberry as a server? I don't know if it matters, but any amount of video streaming would be just over the local home network, I doubt there's going to be any Internet streaming. or does Plex always use Internet? Would it be better to run the external hard drive straight through the Raspberry, or through the router? Does it make a difference?

    I found an old Reddit post talking about using the Raspberry, and it seemed like it should be enough to at least play the videos. I suppose for ease's sake I'm asking because we already have a Raspberry Pi 3, pretty sure it's the B+.