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Time management and travel how to make the most of the journey

While travelling is part and parcel of your huge adventure, the long hours and constant switching between different modes of transportation can be extremely tiring and often, quite boring. The hours can seem like days and you may find it difficult to keep yourself entertained for the duration of the trip.

Don’t let the dread of boredom prevent you from making the decision to go travelling. It’s all about finding little ways to make the most of your travelling time in order to pass away the hours.

In this blog post, we’re going to look at some of the best ways to make the most of your time spent travelling.

Gambling

Most airports and venues now have free Wi-Fi, so if you are carrying a mobile device, you could spend a couple of hours gambling on your favourite sports. Studies have shown that this is a great way to cut down your stress levels and help you relax.

When people play for huge cash prizes, they experience a boost in happiness, which is the perfect way to get in the holiday spirit. Although this game requires little skill and is often down to luck, it would be best to read up more about how to bet on basketball before you sign up.

Listen to a podcast

During travelling, you’ll get pleasure doing something you would never have the time to do back home. Gaze out of the window, put in your earphones and unwind by listening to a podcast. If you’re interested in a particular topic, you may like to carry out a search online to discover whether you can find any recent interesting debates.

Get some sleep

Your travel time will feel significantly shorter if you take the time to catch up on sleep. This is even more important if you’re going to struggle with the time difference once you arrive at your destination and jet-lagged in the coming days. Don’t forget to bring a pair of sunglasses to reduce light exposure for the duration of your journey, as there’s a high likelihood you’ll spend the majority of the time travelling during daylight hours.

Plan your holiday

If you haven’t had much time back home, now would be the best time to start making plans for your holiday . If you have internet access, carry out some research on the local activities and eateries and make a note in your journal. Doing so will save a great deal of stress once you arrive, as you’ll know exactly where you’re going and what to do next. You could even go as far as creating a day-by-day itinerary to avoid wasting any time from the moment you touch down to the moment you catch your taxi back to the airport.

Adult colouring books

An adult colouring book is an ideal activity to keep you occupied during travelling. Studies have shown that it’s a therapeutic pastime to help you relax, free your mind of worries and simply concentrate on what’s in front of you. As you colour in the sections, your brain gets into a meditative state, which achieves a sense of mindfulness .

Time management and travel how to make the most of the journey

I have a colleague who runs a wildly popular blog, teaches online classes, and somehow manages to travel for about three months out of every year. That’s right, friends, three months. Clearly, this woman has access to some closely guarded secret to super-efficient time-management, right?

I pressed her for details.

“Honestly, I just force myself to work long hours for a couple of weeks at a stretch. I pull a bunch of 14-hour days and pound out a ton of content so I can relax later!”

This system is ideal for her since she’s unmarried, has no kids, and is a total nomad at heart. Plus her business structure is ideal for pre-population and setting everything to autopilot.

I, on the other hand, couldn’t possibly structure my working life like that. Just one 14-hour work day and my life begins to unravel! Talking to her was a fantastic reminder that time-management is deeply personal, and what works for one person might be a disaster for another.

Which is why it’s essential to understand your time-management personality.

New here? I also have the following posts to help women entrepreneurs outsource their business tasks like a boss:

And of course, you should definitely take my free quiz to find out the #1 task that you need to outsource to not only free up your time – but to give you the space to focus on revenue-generating tasks in your business.

Types of Time-management Personalities

There are as many ways to manage your time as there are stars in the sky, but most of us have one of five core time-management personalities:

The Deadline Devotee: You procrastinate until the very last minute, then race to the finish line. The work is still fantastic, but the journey isn’t terribly efficient.

The Daily Grinder: You put in the same number of working hours Monday through Friday, regardless of how much work needs doing. This means you end up chained to your desk on days when you could be out and about.

The List-maker: Every task, project, and goal is popped onto lists and into spreadsheets. This helps you feel organized, but can also lead to overwhelm.

The Marathon Fan: Like my powerhouse colleague, you like to work in long, intense bursts. You’re generally happy, but when emergencies pop up they can throw you for a loop.

The Improviser: Your time-management style is, “I’ll just deal with things as they come!” A fabulous strategy for entrepreneurs with amazing working teams, but harder for solopreneurs.

Which personality sounds most like you?
Are you happy with how you’re managing your time and workload?

If you feel like you could stand to tweak your methodologies, ponder these tips:

Time-management tip #1: Consider your daily schedule

Understanding the flow of your work and life schedule is essential to creating a time-management system that truly supports you. So give this some thought:

Do you have long, unbroken work hours?
Or are you always jumping from task to task?
Is each day totally different, or do you have some built-in routine?

Effective time-management means making your work days as predictable as possible AND having failsafes in place so you can cope when unpredictable things happen.

You will need structures and tools that help you achieve both.

Time-management tip #2: Experiment with tools

Once you’ve figured out your typical workflow, investigate and tinker with some of the most popular time-management tools and methodologies.

Read the descriptions and reviews carefully so you find a tool that actually matches your needs. Most will help you chart and track work tasks, which is key to the routine-building component of time-management, but if you need more help with unexpected work be sure to pick a tool that includes reminders and communication tools.

Here are a few to consider:

Monday : A robust online tool with a visual timeline and team communication capabilities. (Great for both The Improviser and The List Maker)

Toggl : This site is more of a time-tracker, so ideal for folks who juggle many projects at a time and need to see where hours are being spent. (Awesome for The Daily Grinder)

Getting Things Done : This five-step process was developed by productivity expert David Allen. His site has great guiding materials to get you started. (Honestly fab for all personalities!)

Pomodoro : A technique that focuses on bursts of productivity, usually 25 minutes spent working followed by a short break. (Super for The Marathon Fan)

Rescue Time : This online program sends you weekly reports so you can understand where you’re spending too much (or not enough) time. (Will help Deadline Devotees and List Makers)

Invest some time in experimentation to see which one feels natural to you!

Time-management tip #3: Use what works

Just because all your friends are wild about Toggl doesn’t mean you absolutely must use it yourself. Again, time-management is deeply personal, and the best tools are the ones you will actually use. If that means old-fashioned pen-and-paper, go for it! If you want to chart everything out in Google Calendar, do it!

No matter how sleek and impressive the system is, if it doesn’t compliment your specific personality, you just won’t use it.

Want to know my biggest time-management hack?

Delegation! Hand off the work to trusted team members, and discover just how productive you can really be. If you’re not sure how to get started, be sure to check out the VA Training Templates Library . Inside, you’ll find dozens of step-by-step project plans you can hand off to your VA today.

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Hey gorgeous! I’m Melissa. I’m an entrepreneur, mom to two teens and a dog, and married to the love of my life.

I help women entrepreneurs learn how to outsource tasks and systems in their business to not only free up their time – but to give them the space to focus on revenue-generating tasks. I share outsourcing tips and ideas here on the blog, as well as how to hire a va and other team members.

Obsessed with: adventure, camping, books, and essential oils.

Time management and travel how to make the most of the journey

An effective journey management plan is a holistic look at roadway safety risks and how to manage them.

Screenshot via National Safety Council/YouTube.

Journey management is a planned and systematic process for reducing transportation-related risks in a company’s operations. In short, it is a key element of safety in the workplace — for fleets and other employers. Across all industries, crashes cost employers approximately $9.25 billion a year, according to the National Safety Council.

Moreover, research shows that human error is the definite cause of accidents 70% of the time, and the probable cause 93% of the time.

Therefore, every journey management plan should take into account that your drivers are your greatest safety feature. In short, a company’s drivers are its best defense in protecting the organization from risk and liability.

When developing a journey management plan keep in mind that the key objectives of the plan should be to eliminate unnecessary trips, reduce driving distances, and minimize the risks associated with necessary trips.

A solid journey management plan will focus on four key factors: the roadway, your drivers, the vehicle, and the environment. For example, you need to consider route planning in order to makes sure drivers avoid construction or closed roads. You need to consider the behaviors of your drivers, for example, if they are getting enough sleep before hitting the road. Then there are factors such as vehicle maintenance and weather conditions, which must also be considered when developing your plan.

Your plan should aim to mitigate the following hazards:

  • Driver inexperience
  • Distracted driving behavior
  • Poor road conditions
  • Driver fatigue
  • Wildlife on the roads
  • Adverse weather conditions
  • Malfunctioning vehicles
  • Unsecured projectiles
  • Risky behaviors of other drivers
  • Communication failure

For commercial fleets, the benefits a solid journey management plan and many, according to the national safety Council. These include:

  • Eliminating unnecessary trips to reduce crash risk
  • Minimize exposure to traffic hazards
  • Reduce fuel costs
  • Reduce wear and tear on fleet vehicles
  • Reduce liability
  • Increase fleet and driver efficiency

Time management and travel how to make the most of the journey

I have a colleague who runs a wildly popular blog, teaches online classes, and somehow manages to travel for about three months out of every year. That’s right, friends, three months. Clearly, this woman has access to some closely guarded secret to super-efficient time-management, right?

I pressed her for details.

“Honestly, I just force myself to work long hours for a couple of weeks at a stretch. I pull a bunch of 14-hour days and pound out a ton of content so I can relax later!”

This system is ideal for her since she’s unmarried, has no kids, and is a total nomad at heart. Plus her business structure is ideal for pre-population and setting everything to autopilot.

I, on the other hand, couldn’t possibly structure my working life like that. Just one 14-hour work day and my life begins to unravel! Talking to her was a fantastic reminder that time-management is deeply personal, and what works for one person might be a disaster for another.

Which is why it’s essential to understand your time-management personality.

Types of Time-management Personalities

There are as many ways to manage your time as there are stars in the sky, but most of us have one of five core time-management personalities:

The Deadline Devotee: You procrastinate until the very last minute, then race to the finish line. The work is still fantastic, but the journey isn’t terribly efficient.

The Daily Grinder: You put in the same number of working hours Monday through Friday, regardless of how much work needs doing. This means you end up chained to your desk on days when you could be out and about.

The List-maker: Every task, project, and goal is popped onto lists and into spreadsheets. This helps you feel organized, but can also lead to overwhelm.

The Marathon Fan: Like my powerhouse colleague, you like to work in long, intense bursts. You’re generally happy, but when emergencies pop up they can throw you for a loop.

The Improviser: Your time-management style is, “I’ll just deal with things as they come!” A fabulous strategy for entrepreneurs with amazing working teams, but harder for solopreneurs.

Which personality sounds most like you?
Are you happy with how you’re managing your time and workload?

If you feel like you could stand to tweak your methodologies, ponder these tips:

Time-management tip #1: Consider your daily schedule

Understanding the flow of your work and life schedule is essential to creating a time-management system that truly supports you. So give this some thought:

Do you have long, unbroken work hours?
Or are you always jumping from task to task?
Is each day totally different, or do you have some built-in routine?

Effective time-management means making your work days as predictable as possible AND having failsafes in place so you can cope when unpredictable things happen.

You will need structures and tools that help you achieve both.

Time-management tip #2: Experiment with tools

Once you’ve figured out your typical workflow, investigate and tinker with some of the most popular time-management tools and methodologies.

Read the descriptions and reviews carefully so you find a tool that actually matches your needs. Most will help you chart and track work tasks, which is key to the routine-building component of time-management, but if you need more help with unexpected work be sure to pick a tool that includes reminders and communication tools.

Here are a few to consider:

Monday: A robust online tool with a visual timeline and team communication capabilities. (Great for both The Improviser and The List Maker)

Toggl: This site is more of a time-tracker, so ideal for folks who juggle many projects at a time and need to see where hours are being spent. (Awesome for The Daily Grinder)

Getting Things Done: This five-step process was developed by productivity expert David Allen. His site has great guiding materials to get you started. (Honestly fab for all personalities!)

Pomodoro: A technique that focuses on bursts of productivity, usually 25 minutes spent working followed by a short break. (Super for The Marathon Fan)

Rescue Time: This online program sends you weekly reports so you can understand where you’re spending too much (or not enough) time. (Will help Deadline Devotees and List Makers)

Invest some time in experimentation to see which one feels natural to you!

Time-management tip #3: Use what works

Just because all your friends are wild about Toggl doesn’t mean you absolutely must use it yourself. Again, time-management is deeply personal, and the best tools are the ones you will actually use. If that means old-fashioned pen-and-paper, go for it! If you want to chart everything out in Google Calendar, do it!

No matter how sleek and impressive the system is, if it doesn’t compliment your specific personality, you just won’t use it.

Want to know my biggest time-management hack? Delegation! Hand off the work to trusted team members, and discover just how productive you can really be.

Time management and travel how to make the most of the journey

I have a colleague who runs a wildly popular blog, teaches online classes, and somehow manages to travel for about three months out of every year. That’s right, friends, three months. Clearly, this woman has access to some closely guarded secret to super-efficient time-management, right?

I pressed her for details.

“Honestly, I just force myself to work long hours for a couple of weeks at a stretch. I pull a bunch of 14-hour days and pound out a ton of content so I can relax later!”

This system is ideal for her since she’s unmarried, has no kids, and is a total nomad at heart. Plus her business structure is ideal for pre-population and setting everything to autopilot.

I, on the other hand, couldn’t possibly structure my working life like that. Just one 14-hour work day and my life begins to unravel! Talking to her was a fantastic reminder that time-management is deeply personal, and what works for one person might be a disaster for another.

Which is why it’s essential to understand your time-management personality.

Types of Time-management Personalities

There are as many ways to manage your time as there are stars in the sky, but most of us have one of five core time-management personalities:

The Deadline Devotee: You procrastinate until the very last minute, then race to the finish line. The work is still fantastic, but the journey isn’t terribly efficient.

The Daily Grinder: You put in the same number of working hours Monday through Friday, regardless of how much work needs doing. This means you end up chained to your desk on days when you could be out and about.

The List-maker: Every task, project, and goal is popped onto lists and into spreadsheets. This helps you feel organized, but can also lead to overwhelm.

The Marathon Fan: Like my powerhouse colleague, you like to work in long, intense bursts. You’re generally happy, but when emergencies pop up they can throw you for a loop.

The Improviser: Your time-management style is, “I’ll just deal with things as they come!” A fabulous strategy for entrepreneurs with amazing working teams, but harder for solopreneurs.

Which personality sounds most like you?
Are you happy with how you’re managing your time and workload?

If you feel like you could stand to tweak your methodologies, ponder these tips:

Time-management tip #1: Consider your daily schedule

Understanding the flow of your work and life schedule is essential to creating a time-management system that truly supports you. So give this some thought:

Do you have long, unbroken work hours?
Or are you always jumping from task to task?
Is each day totally different, or do you have some built-in routine?

Effective time-management means making your work days as predictable as possible AND having failsafes in place so you can cope when unpredictable things happen.

You will need structures and tools that help you achieve both.

Time-management tip #2: Experiment with tools

Once you’ve figured out your typical workflow, investigate and tinker with some of the most popular time-management tools and methodologies.

Read the descriptions and reviews carefully so you find a tool that actually matches your needs. Most will help you chart and track work tasks, which is key to the routine-building component of time-management, but if you need more help with unexpected work be sure to pick a tool that includes reminders and communication tools.

Here are a few to consider:

Monday: A robust online tool with a visual timeline and team communication capabilities. (Great for both The Improviser and The List Maker)

Toggl: This site is more of a time-tracker, so ideal for folks who juggle many projects at a time and need to see where hours are being spent. (Awesome for The Daily Grinder)

Getting Things Done: This five-step process was developed by productivity expert David Allen. His site has great guiding materials to get you started. (Honestly fab for all personalities!)

Pomodoro: A technique that focuses on bursts of productivity, usually 25 minutes spent working followed by a short break. (Super for The Marathon Fan)

Rescue Time: This online program sends you weekly reports so you can understand where you’re spending too much (or not enough) time. (Will help Deadline Devotees and List Makers)

Invest some time in experimentation to see which one feels natural to you!

Time-management tip #3: Use what works

Just because all your friends are wild about Toggl doesn’t mean you absolutely must use it yourself. Again, time-management is deeply personal, and the best tools are the ones you will actually use. If that means old-fashioned pen-and-paper, go for it! If you want to chart everything out in Google Calendar, do it!

No matter how sleek and impressive the system is, if it doesn’t compliment your specific personality, you just won’t use it.

Want to know my biggest time-management hack? Delegation! Hand off the work to trusted team members, and discover just how productive you can really be.

Author: Melissa Ingold

I help women entrepreneurs learn how to outsource tasks and systems in their business to not only free up their time – but to give them the space to focus on revenue-generating tasks. I share outsourcing tips and ideas here on the blog, as well as how to hire a… View full profile ›

Time management and travel how to make the most of the journeyWe, the citizens of the modern world, often lead very busy lives. There are so many things to do and so little time to do them in. We are bombarded with emails, messages, calls and media throughout the day, all of which take up large chunks of our time. Sometimes it’s hard to find time to eat and sleep, let alone to unwind and relax. But how do you find time without neglecting your job or your loved ones’ needs? Each of one is unique, with your own schedules, your own demands on time.

The good part is we’re here to help. If you’re an entrepreneur who’s always on the job, here’s an effective course to help you manage your time better, and if you’re a college student juggling classes along with a part time job, you can check out this effective time management course. Business leaders and management can use these tips to manage their time efficiently.

Gurus like Tim Ferris and Mark Hurst have some good advice on managing your time. After going through the works of these, and other, modern time-management gurus, we’ve gathered a few practical effective time management techniques for you. We hope this helps you find time to do what you love the most.

Learn to Prioritize

Make a mental to-do list and decide what really needs to be done. Paying your bills counts, for example. If you’re a small business owner and can’t delegate, find two or three important tasks that must be done first to grow your business. Prioritize the most important task first. The other tasks can wait for later.

If you follow a Monday to Friday schedule, you can schedule important tasks for the beginning of the week. If you have a presentation that is due on Friday, start preparing from Tuesday itself. This will allow you time to deal with the unexpected delays that always seem to crop up. It will also prevent you from spending extra time at your desk. Less iimportant administrative tasks should be left for the end of the week. Important tasks should be done as soon as possible. This is called “front-loading” your schedule.

Improve Your Productivity by Trying Something New

It doesn’t matter how much time you spend at your desk – only your productivity matters. If you’re spending 12 hours a day at your desk, day in and day out, and accomplishing very little, it’s time to change your work techniques. Don’t follow a model that is unproductive, even if everyone around you is doing it. Learn to strike out on your own. Figure out what works best for you, what gets your productive juices flowing, and stick to that.

Don’t Work When You are Unhappy

Interest in your work will go up and down all the time. What most people tend to forget is that they’re not machines that can work day in and day out. Your ability to do your work will change over time. It’s normal to get bored with what you’re doing and get interested in something else. It’s not productive to work when you don’t want to – you’ll end up staring for hours at the screen and will get little to nothing accomplished. Working when you’re unhappy is a waste of time.

You know yourself best – what you can do and can’t do. Learn to plan for your off days, and mould your work or career to take these fluctuations in its stride.

Don’t Define Work by the Hours You Put In

Like Tim Ferris preaches – work is not about the hours you put in. We’ve been brainwashed by a culture that sees long hours as a sign of hard-work and dedication. However, long-hours don’t make you productive. Define your work by the results you get in return for the time you invest. Learn to invest less time for the same, or greater, results. You don’t get a prize for working hard. Work smart instead.

The Right Time is Now

The time will never be right to leave your job, to ask for a raise or for more responsibility. There is no perfect moment for any of these things. By waiting, you’re wasting your time. Learn to make the hard choices and don’t procrastinate. Even if, at the end of the day, you don’t succeed, you can always try again the next day.

Don’t Be Afraid

The worst-case scenarios you’re thinking of will almost never happen. Uncertainty can be scary, but it shouldn’t be crippling and prevent you from doing what you want to do. You can plan for the uncertainties by forming a worst-case scenario and then making plans to avoid it. The more you make plans for it, the more you will realize that you’re worrying needlessly. Life is rarely as extreme as you think.

Do What You are Good At

There is no point in being an engineer if you’re a great singer. There’s no point struggling to cook three meals a day, if it takes you six hours to do it. You might as well outsource it, and do something you’re better at, or enjoy more. You might become an exceptional singer with a lot of practice, but no more than an average engineer – because you just don’t have the talent for it. Learn to develop your strengths, not hang around trying to fix all your weaknesses.

Like any other advice, this is useful, only if you make the effort to apply it in your everyday life. So, what are you waiting for? Time to step it up and make the most of your day. And while you’re at it, you may want to check out this short course to help boost your productivity!

Time management and travel how to make the most of the journey

Importance of Goal Setting As a Time Management Tool

Achieving effective time management is something that almost everyone strives for. But it can be much harder than it sounds. The frustration many people feel when they cannot accomplish what they want in a set amount of time can be overwhelming. However, learning a few simple tricks and sticking to what works for you can make all the difference in accomplishing your goals of time management.

Think Smart to Succeed

In the November 30, 2001, issue of Fort Worth Business Press, Irwin Pollock states that “If you want the highest return on your investment (your time), make sure you’re only doing those things that will help you achieve your goals (in the least amount of time).” Simply put, thinking smart and fast helps you achieve as much as possible in your allotted amount of time. To do this, an individual can implement a few simple tricks that can help the process along.

Make a List

One of the most important aspects of time management is to make a list of what needs to be done during the day. This should be the very first thing that a person does in the morning. However, some people make lists both in the morning and the afternoon (before leaving the office). That way, they are always on track and know what they need to do. As each goal is achieved, they can mark it off the list. By having one’s goals already written down, there is no need to waste precious time thinking about what needs to get done.

Use a Schedule

Time management and travel how to make the most of the journey

Many people rely on their schedules to get them through their days. The October 30, 2008, edition of Healthcare Risk Management reports that “one of the most beneficial things you can do is block your time off of your schedule.” Today’s schedules exist on cell phones, BlackBerries and other computerized environments. These schedules tell people where and when they need to be somewhere. Schedules can help keep you on track but if you solely use electronic devices to keep you on schedule, you can become dependent on the device. If the device fails and you have not kept a backup copy of the schedule, it could wreak havoc in your life. Remember to always back up your schedule to another computer or simply keep a handwritten copy of it for safe keeping.

Eliminating Distractions

One of the biggest ways to lose time is to get distracted. Many things can cause distractions such as telephones or questions from co-workers. Knowing what your individual distraction is can help you eliminate it. For example, if the distraction is phone calls, let the call go to voice mail. If you are distracted by interruptions from other staff members, you may need to keep your door closed. Staying on track and eliminating distractions that cause you to get off schedule can be challenging at times, but if you can keep distractions to a minimum, then you will be more likely to accomplish your long-term goals.

Set a Time Limit

Finally, setting a time limit for each activity during the day can be a useful. The October 30, 2008, edition of Healthcare Risk Management reports that “allotting a specific amount of time will enable you to concentrate on just the matter at hand without concerning yourself with the clock or other things around you.” Setting a time limit for each activity forces you to move on when the time is up. Using the time limit rule makes it possible to stay on track and not keep any other appointments waiting.

Final Thoughts

Strategically using some simple tools can make all the difference when trying to stay on track and managing your time effectively. Time management is something that is different for everyone and it must be learned. You have to work at time management for it to be effective. Keeping yourself on track helps reduce your overall stress during the day. At the end of the day, when you’ve achieved your goals, it can be a very gratifying feeling.

Kristie Jernigan is a health writer with over 17 years of experience as a medical social worker. She has worked mainly with the elderly population and with children. She holds a Bachelor of Science in psychology and early childhood from East Tennessee State University and a Master of Science in health care administration and gerontology from the University of Phoenix.

Power up and be more productive

Time management and travel how to make the most of the journey

The Balance / Theresa Chiechi

Do you feel the need to be more organized and/or more productive? Do you spend your day in a frenzy of activity and then wonder why you haven’t accomplished much? Then these time management tips are for you — they’ll help you increase your productivity and stay cool and collected.

1. Realize That Time Management Is a Myth

This is the first thing you have to understand about time management, that no matter how organized we are, there are always only 24 hours in a day. Time doesn’t change. All we can actually manage is ourselves and what we do with the time that we have. Appreciate this. Internalize it. And move on as soon as possible to the next tip.

2. Find out Where You’re Wasting Time

Many of us are prey to time-wasters that steal time we could be using much more productively. What are your time bandits? Do you spend too much time Internet surfing, reading email, Facebook posting, texting, or making personal calls?

In a survey by salary.com, 89 percent of respondents admitted to wasting time every day at work:

  • 31 percent waste roughly 30 minutes daily
  • 31 percent waste roughly one hour daily
  • 16 percent waste roughly two hours daily
  • 6 percent waste roughly three hours daily
  • 2 percent waste roughly four hours daily
  • 2 percent waste five or more hours daily

Are you a time-waster? Tracking daily activities helps to form an accurate picture of how much time you spend on various activities, which is the first step to effective time management.

3. Create Time Management Goals

Remember, the focus of time management is actually changing your behaviors, not changing time. A good place to start is by eliminating your personal time-wasters. For one week, for example, set a goal that you’re not going to take personal phone calls or respond to non-work related text messages while you’re working.

4. Implement a Time Management Plan

Think of this as an extension of the third time management tip. The objective is to change your behaviors over time to achieve whatever general goal you’ve set for yourself, such as increasing your productivity or decreasing your stress. So you need to not only set your specific goals but track them over time to see whether or not you’re accomplishing them.

5. Use Time Management Tools

Whether it’s a planner, a software program, or a phone app, the first step to physically managing your time is to know where it’s going now and planning how you’re going to spend your time in the future. A software program such as Outlook, for instance, lets you schedule events easily and can be set to remind you of events in advance, making your time management easier.

6. Prioritize Ruthlessly

You should start each day with a session prioritizing the tasks for that day and setting your performance benchmark. If you have 20 tasks for a given day, how many of them do you truly need to accomplish?

7. Learn to Delegate And/Or Outsource

Delegation is one of the hardest things to learn how to do for many business owners, but no matter how small your business is, there’s no need for you to be a one-person show — you need to let other people carry some of the load. Delegation shares the tasks you’d be better off leaving to someone else, so you can make the most of the time that you have.

8. Establish Routines and Stick to Them as Much as Possible

While crises will arise, you’ll be much more productive if you can follow routines most of the time. For most people, creating and following a routine lets them get right down to the tasks of the day rather than frittering away time getting started.

9. Get in the Habit of Setting Time Limits for Tasks

For instance, reading and answering email can consume your whole day if you let it. Instead, set a limit of one hour a day for this task and stick to it. (The easiest way to do this is to assign a solid block of time to this task rather than answering email on demand.)

10. Be Sure Your Systems Are Organized

Are you wasting a lot of time looking for files on your computer? Take the time to organize a file management system. Is your filing system slowing you down? Redo it, so it’s organized to the point that you can quickly lay your hands on what you need.

11. Don’t Waste Time Waiting

From client meetings to dentist appointments, it’s impossible to avoid waiting for someone or something. But you don’t need to just sit there and twiddle your thumbs. Technology makes it easy to work wherever you are; your tablet or smartphone will help you stay connected. You can be reading a report, checking a spreadsheet, or planning your next marketing campaign.

A Bonus Tip: Your Time Belongs to You

And here’s the most important time management tip of all. You can be in control and accomplish what you want to accomplish — once you’ve come to grips with the time management myth and taken control of your time.

It is rightly said “Time and Tide wait for none”. An individual should understand the value of time for him to succeed in all aspects of life. People who waste time are the ones who fail to create an identity of their own.

What is Time Management ?

  • Time Management refers to managing time effectively so that the right time is allocated to the right activity.
  • Effective time management allows individuals to assign specific time slots to activities as per their importance.
  • Time Management refers to making the best use of time as time is always limited.

Ask yourself which activity is more important and how much time should be allocated to the same? Know which work should be done earlier and which can be done a little later.

Time Management plays a very important role not only in organizations but also in our personal lives.

Time Management includes:

  1. Effective Planning
  2. Setting goals and objectives
  3. Setting deadlines
  4. Delegation of responsibilities
  5. Prioritizing activities as per their importance
  6. Spending the right time on the right activity

    Effective Planning

    Plan your day well in advance. Prepare a To Do List or a “TASK PLAN”. Jot down the important activities that need to be done in a single day against the time that should be allocated to each activity. High Priority work should come on top followed by those which do not need much of your importance at the moment. Complete pending tasks one by one. Do not begin fresh work unless you have finished your previous task. Tick the ones you have already completed. Ensure you finish the tasks within the stipulated time frame.

    Setting Goals and Objectives

    Working without goals and targets in an organization would be similar to a situation where the captain of the ship loses his way in the sea. Yes, you would be lost. Set targets for yourself and make sure they are realistic ones and achievable.

    Setting Deadlines

    Set deadlines for yourself and strive hard to complete tasks ahead of the deadlines. Do not wait for your superiors to ask you everytime. Learn to take ownership of work. One person who can best set the deadlines is you yourself. Ask yourself how much time needs to be devoted to a particular task and for how many days. Use a planner to mark the important dates against the set deadlines.

    Delegation of Responsibilities

    Learn to say “NO” at workplace. Don’t do everything on your own. There are other people as well. One should not accept something which he knows is difficult for him. The roles and responsibilities must be delegated as per interest and specialization of employees for them to finish tasks within deadlines. A person who does not have knowledge about something needs more time than someone who knows the work well.

    Prioritizing Tasks

    Prioritize the tasks as per their importance and urgency. Know the difference between important and urgent work. Identify which tasks should be done within a day, which all should be done within a month and so on. Tasks which are most important should be done earlier.

    Spending the right time on right activity

    Develop the habit of doing the right thing at the right time. Work done at the wrong time is not of much use. Don’t waste a complete day on something which can be done in an hour or so. Also keep some time separate for your personal calls or checking updates on Facebook or Twitter. After all human being is not a machine.

    For Effective Time Management one needs to be:

    Organized – Avoid keeping stacks of file and heaps of paper at your workstation. Throw what all you don’t need. Put important documents in folders. Keep the files in their respective drawers with labels on top of each file. It saves time which goes on unnecessary searching.

    Don’t misuse time – Do not kill time by loitering or gossiping around. Concentrate on your work and finish assignments on time. Remember your organization is not paying you for playing games on computer or peeping into other’s cubicles. First complete your work and then do whatever you feel like doing. Don’t wait till the last moment.

    Be Focussed – One needs to be focused for effective time management.

    Develop the habit of using planners, organizers, table top calendars for better time management. Set reminders on phones or your personal computers.