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Why netflix asks “are you still watching” (and how to stop it)

Why netflix asks “are you still watching” (and how to stop it)

Melinda Sue Gordon / Knight Takes King Prod.

We’ve all been there: We’re four episodes into whatever our latest Netflix binge is (for me, it’s The X-Files). We’re cruising, each episode automatically giving way to the next, when suddenly the dreaded question is asked: Are you still watching? The assumption, of course, that Netflix is making, is that with so much autoplay and so little human interaction, there may be a chance that you’ve fallen asleep or perhaps hit the “chill” segment of Netflix and Chill. But you know you’re alone. And you know that Netflix believes you’ve left the room for an outside “life” and accidentally just left a cat your cat to silently watch Scully and Mulder’s sexual tension. Well, that’s called Netflix-Shaming, and we don’t have to take it anymore.

Why netflix asks “are you still watching” (and how to stop it)

The Best Way to Netflix This Weekend

Apparently, there’s a Chrome browser extension called FlixAssist that automatically clicks the “Continue” button so you don’t have to participate in your bullying. It’s a huge fuck-you to Netflix, as if to say, Not only have I not gotten up off the couch in hours, I shan’t even lift a finger to continue my binge. There are a ton of perks here. First, you don’t have to be compliant to Netflix-Shaming. Second, your greasy snack fingers don’t have to touch any appliance, be it remote or keyboard. And third, there’s the silent pride of having beat the system. Sure, Netflix can’t hear you, but it does feel good to cackle at the TV. Happy binging.

If you are an avid Netflix user, you might have noticed the controversial, ‘Are you Still Watching’ Prompt. This usually pops up, when Netflix suspects the user has stopped watching the show. Usually, this helps Netflix to save your data and also their bandwidth, but if you are binge-watching, having such pop-ups in the middle is just annoying. Anyhow, while you can’t disable it from Netflix settings, you can use a third-party chrome extension on your Desktop. Here’s how.

How to Disable Netflix’s “Are You Still Watching?” Prompt on Desktop

If you are using Chrome or any Chromium-based browsers like edge which supports Chrome extensions, you can use this Chrome extension “Never Ending Netflix” or “Netflix Pause Removal“.

Netflix Pause Removal is made to only remove this still watching prompt whereas Never Ending Netflix also provides the option to skip title sequences, ending credits, Auto Play Promoted Videos, etc. If you are looking for a non-distractive binge-watching experience, I highly recommend you to use Never Ending Netflix.

Why netflix asks “are you still watching” (and how to stop it)

Anyhow Never Ending Netflix add-on isn’t available on the Firefox extension store, so you can use the Netflix Pause Removal add-on.

Disable “Are You Still Watching?” Prompt on TV and Mobile

Unlike on the desktop, there’s no option to stop this prompt on the TV and Mobile. Anyhow you can either engage with the app with things changing volume, skipping the title sequences or just manually starting the next episode by stoping the autoplay feature.

You can disable the autoplay feature for each profile by selecting the profile > account > playback settings and turn off “Autoplay next episode in a series on all devices” and click save. That’s it, now all you need to do click on the next episode button.

Wrapping Up

Though the prompt is annoying, Netflix’s reasoning is to save the people’s data and claims that they are saving an average of 2 billion GB of data every week around the world. This feature also helps Netflix to save their bandwidth, therefore much faster streaming for people who are watching. So do you think this app is useful or is this just an annoying interruption? Do let me know in the comments below.

Why netflix asks “are you still watching” (and how to stop it)

The pleasure of a good Netflix-marathoning sesh can only be interrupted by one thing — and no, it’s not your butt falling asleep. If you thought it was impossible to figure out how to get Netflix to stop asking if you’re “still watching,” now there is a super quick fix, reports The Next Web . Say “goodbye” to that little message that pops up every few hours to remind you that you are quickly running out of episodes of your favorite series. The Flix Assist Google Chrome extension is the answer to your marathoning prayers — and it’s just in time for Season 2 of Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt!

While Netflix knows that episode marathoning is an emerging trend, and can tell when exactly you get hooked on a show, they have yet to make a “marathon feature” part of their system. A survey Netflix conducted in 2013 found that 73 percent of people considered watching long stretches of television positive, and 61 percent do it regularly (though more recent surveys the numbers have grown).

If you’re among those happy people, you can download the free Flix Assist, and it will automatically click the “continue watching” button for you, hands free! It is true that clicking a button only takes a few seconds and is just a minor inconvenience, but there is no reason to continue to subject yourself to it. Why risk having an existential moment every few hours? This isn’t Hamlet — you shouldn’t have to constantly ponder, “To watch another episode, or not to watch another episode” every hour or so. (Not to spoil the play, but we all know you’re going to anyway.)

Mentalfloss also recommends getting the most out of your streaming service by downloading the Super Browse for Netflix. If you hover over the “super browse” tab, it will reveal a drop down list of extended categories and genres, like magic. This will make it even easier to find exactly what you want to watch! So next time you hunker down with your laptop and some snackz, these Chrome extensions should give you the best uninterrupted viewing experience!

Images: Bloomberg/Bloomberg/Getty Images; Giphy

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I bought a Roku TV. However, we sleep with the tv on. The Roku and all apps beg the question “ Are you still watching? ” after 4 hours. When it shuts off.. I wake up. How do I disable this feature?

Youtube seems to be the only app that doesn’t do this. I’m wanting to stream ATTNow, Prime, or Netflix. Please help.

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Roku Tv.
The Roku and all apps beg the question “ Are you still watching? ” after 4 hours.
How do I disable this feature?

Settings > Network > Bandwidth saver
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You will see a prompt after 4 hours of continuous playback without any user activity. It will ask you to confirm that you are still watching. If no confirmation is received, the channel will exit to the Roku Home screen.

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Great question! I, too, would like a solution to this issue.

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This was a feature that was just added because of so many people complaining about excessive bandwidth usage because the stream didn’t auto-stop. It was mostly because people would turn their TV off with the Roku still playing, mistakenly thinking the playback stops if the TV is off. That only happens with a Roku TV, not any players (nor any other brand for that matter).

It would be nice to be able to disable it, and perhaps they can add such a switch in the future. For now, there’s no way to disable it.

EDIT: I was incorrect that it cannot be disabled. See the accepted answer for more detail.

I mean, it was quite rude let’s be real

Netflix might finally let us watch our favourite shows all day in peace, as it has been announced it is trialing a feature which allows you to turn off the “are you still watching” pop-up message.

The notification comes up when you’ve been watching a number of episodes back-to-back and the site assumes you may have left them playing or fallen asleep, so prompts you to confirm that you are still there before playing any more.

However it has recently been turned into a bit of meme, with users saying it is an “anxiety inducing” feature and shames people who are doing nothing but binge watching TV all day – which is very, very fair.

Why netflix asks “are you still watching” (and how to stop it)

For a long time, people have begged for Netflix to give us a way to disable the notification, and it looks like someone has finally listened. Soon, there may be a way in your settings for you to switch off the message on your account.

Why, for the love of god why, can you not disable the “are you still watching” thing on Netflix?

A spokesperson for Netflix confirmed to The Verge that the new feature is still in a trial mode and is being rolled out among a few selected users. It has not yet been confirmed if it will become worldwide for everyone.

Netflix: Are you still watching?
Me: Yes. Until there’s a vaccine.

netflix: are you still watching

me: what is your problem

Some people who have been the lucky ones and found themselves on the receiving end of the new feature have shared that a new message has been popping up which lets you select “Ask Again Later”, ‘Play Without Asking Again’ and “I’m Done” instead. Others say you can opt to turn off the messages all together.

So finally, Netflix might get off our backs for once.

For all the latest Netflix news, drops and memes like The Holy Church of Netflix on Facebook.

NETFLIX often asks “Are you still watching?” if it suspects you have fallen asleep in front of the TV. So can you deactivate this annoying Netflix prompt?

Into the Night: Netflix release trailer for thriller series

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When Netflix suspects users may no longer be watching, the streaming site asks “Are you still watching?” This prompt blocks playback until Netflix users confirm they really are binge-watching Breaking Bad.

Trending

This controversial prompt is considered helpful by some as it prevents an entire season playing while you slumber in front of your laptop.

But on numerous other occasions, the Netflix prompt can be an annoyance.

Although some users believe the prompt benefits the service’s customers, others suspect it actually helps Netflix save bandwidth.

This is because the questions can prevent playback until customers hit the continue button.

Why netflix asks “are you still watching” (and how to stop it)

Netflix: The service often asks “Are you still watching?” if it suspects you have fallen asleep (Image: Getty)

Why netflix asks “are you still watching” (and how to stop it)

Netflix: This prompt blocks playback until Netflix users confirm they really are binge-watching Breaking Bad (Image: Getty)

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Why netflix asks “are you still watching” (and how to stop it)

Can you deactivate Netflix “Are you still watching?”

Netflix does not offer any options to disable the “Are you still watching?” prompts in the service’s settings.

It is, however, still possible to bypass them using browser extensions.

This works only if you use a web browser like Chrome or Firefox to watch Netflix.

Those who use an unsupported web browser, a smart TV, or streaming device, are out of luck at the moment.

Why netflix asks “are you still watching” (and how to stop it)

Netflix: Many people are watching far more TV (Image: Getty)

Netflix Pause Removal for Mozilla Firefox and Google Chrome handles Netflix’s continue playing prompts.

This Netflix extension requires permission to access data on netflix.com but there no other permissions besides that.

Simply install the Netflix extension and proceed from there.

Fortunately, there exists a simple application for those who do not want to have to click the “Continue Watching” button in Netflix.

Why netflix asks “are you still watching” (and how to stop it)

We’re all familiar with binge-watching shows on Netflix, only to be rudely interrupted by the prompt that asks . “Are you still watching?”

Of course, we’re still watching. We’re always watching, Netflix.

But now, thanks to a web extension seen by The Next Web, you can binge-watch season after season without needing to move a muscle to click Continue Watching.

Why netflix asks “are you still watching” (and how to stop it)

The dreaded “Continue Watching” button.

Flix Assist is a Google Chrome-exclusive web extension that clicks Netflix’s Continue Watching button for you, even before you even see it, allowing you to watch Netflix unimpeded.

Not only that, Flix Assist removes the 30-second countdown timer between episodes so you don’t even have to wait for the next episode to start playing. Pair it with some other Netflix extensions and tricks and you’ll be watching your favorite shows like a pro.

To download the extension, click here.

Flix Assist creator Josh Kirk told Mashable in an email that he will likely expand on the Chrome extension and develop a version for Firefox.

If you want to stop the extension temporarily, you can right-click the Flix Assist icon in Chrome, hit Manage Extensions and uncheck the box next to Enabled. You can turn it back on the same way.

And now you won’t have to feel like these people.

PublishedВ 12:15 ,В 15 October 2020 BST
| Last updatedВ 12:15 ,В 15 October 2020 BST

It’s a miserable night and you’re glued to the sofa, mid-binge watch, when that fatal Netflix message pops up, asking: ‘Are you still watching?’

We’ve all been there – and nothing crushes the mood of a marathon telly sesh harder than those four little words.

The question appears when viewers have watched three back-to-back episodes, on the off-chance they may have fallen asleep while watching, but has been widely memed for triggering feelings of guilt and shame.

Netflix explains that the feature is in place so that “you don’t lose your place or consume unnecessary internet data if you’re not actually watching”, but right now, the only way to disable it is to turn off the autoplay function altogether.

Netflix adding a “Play Without Asking Again” button is def one of the top 3 things to happen in 2020. pic.twitter.com/6C4N6izp4h
– Kaitlin Cubria (@KCubes) September 28, 2020

they added a “play without asking again” button to the “are you still watching?” on netflix. absolutely revolutionary.
– will (@WT_Buck) September 23, 2020

Did y’all know Netflix listened to us?? They added a “Play without asking again” option when they ask if you’re still watching a show
– Katie Cooks (@JustlOVEKATE) September 23, 2020

Some viewers may be pleased to hear it’s now emerged that the streamer is testing a feature which will allow users to switch off the divisive pop-up.

A spokesperson for Netflix told The Verge that the function is “still in testing mode”, so it’s unclear whether it will be rolled out worldwide.

Nevertheless, news of the feature has spread to Twitter and TikTok. Some users in the US have had the feature appear on their Netflix accounts and shared the updated options available.

With the new feature in place, viewers can reportedly choose between three options, which are ‘Ask Again Later’, ‘Play Without Asking Again’ and ‘I’m Done’, when the message first pops up.

The notification has been criticised for triggering feels of guilt and shame

“They added a “play without asking again” button to the ‘are you still watching?’ on netflix. absolutely revolutionary,” tweeted one user.

“Did y’all know Netflix listened to us?? They added a “Play without asking again” option when they ask if you’re still watching a show,” commented another.

For anyone who gets the urge to yell “hell yes I’m still watching, Netflix” before grumpily retrieving the remote, this could be a game-changer.

For some reason I cannot fathom, Netflix will pause halfway through the fourth episode of whatever you are binge-watching to ask if you are still watching. So, if you are Casting from a computer or tablet to your TV, you have to stop what else you are doing and go back to the Cast screen and press play.

What is the point of it? Why should Netflix care if I’ve gone out and left it on? I don’t understand why they would deliberately do something that annoys people.

Does anyone know?

Comments

Never seen that using the Netflix app. on my Amazon FTV box or Humax DSAT receiver. Is it a setting somewhere, perhaps, or a limitation imposed via your broadband provider?

For some reason I cannot fathom, Netflix will pause halfway through the fourth episode of whatever you are binge-watching to ask if you are still watching. So, if you are Casting from a computer or tablet to your TV, you have to stop what else you are doing and go back to the Cast screen and press play.

What is the point of it? Why should Netflix care if I’ve gone out and left it on? I don’t understand why they would deliberately do something that annoys people.

Does anyone know?

I get the prompt on the app on my TV I don’t think i get it on my Roku, so some front-ends are different

Because of people who fall asleep watching the series and so don’t wake up the next day with no idea as to where they fell asleep during the show. At least with a 4 episode prompt you have some idea as to where you started missing episodes

Plus streaming a whole boxset while you’re asleep might have an impact on your data usage so maybe that’s another reason. Though I switched onto one of many many Netflix Clients the other day to see if was quite happily playing the preview to one of the shows. No idea how long that had been running